History Main / TranslationWithAnAgenda

6th Jun '17 7:52:08 AM KaputExaltation
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* The ever so infamous homophobic Leviticus verse actually uses a term more accurately applied to underage [male?] prostitutes than "man".
** A lesser known verse, 1 Corinthians 6:9, rattles off various lifestyles that will never get into heaven. One such lifestyle is translated by the King James Version as "[those] that defile themselves with mankind", the American Standard Version as "abusers of themselves with men", and the English Standard Version as... "men who practice homosexuality".



* A New Testament example is the common practice of translating the Greek word "doulos" as "servant" when it meant "slave". The New Testament has a lot of casual and uncritical references to slaves, but slavery is nowadays considered abhorrent. [[ValuesDissonance At the time it was fairly matter-of-fact]], but one of Christianity's main selling points was its insistence that slaves were as equal as anyone else in the eyes of God, and (in the context of their status, anyway) should be treated as such.

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* A New Testament example is the common practice of translating the Greek word "doulos" as "servant" when it meant "slave". The New Testament has a lot of casual and uncritical references to slaves, but slavery is nowadays considered abhorrent. [[ValuesDissonance At the time it was fairly matter-of-fact]], but one of Christianity's main selling points was its insistence that slaves were as equal as anyone else in the eyes of God, and (in the context of their status, anyway) should be treated as such.simply matter-of-fact]].



* The ending salutation in Romans 16 references Junia, a female deacon or church leader. Nearly all English Bibles (exceptions to this include the New King James Version and more scholarly ones, like NRSV) render this name as "Junias" in an attempt to make it masculine and disguise the fact that many early church leaders were women.
** It's a more complicated story than that, to the point that [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junia Junia]] gets quite an extensive entry on TheOtherWiki. While there's a good argument that gender bias played a part in the translation of the verse, it's also quite possible it could have been a mistake due to the confusing nature of indicating gender in ancient Greek writing. It's worth noting that the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holman_Christian_Standard_Bible HCSB]] translation uses Junia but adds [[FootnoteFever a footnote]] at the bottom that says "Or Junias, a man's name."
* The Semitic god Baal is repeatedly named in the Bible in the context of his worshipers being idolaters [[note]]he was a deity in the originally polytheistic Semitic pantheon alongside YHWH who fell out of favour once the Israelites adopted monotheism in the 9th Century BC[[/note]], but the word "baal" literally means "lord" or "owner" in various Semitic and Arabic languages (including Early Hebrew), and so appears as a common syllable in the names of characters and places. At some point, a translator, possibly attempting to brush Baal worship completely out of Hebrew history, changed all instances of ''baal'' to ''bosheth'' ("shame") in order to write out the name of Baal, including in names where the word was literally intended as "Lord" in unambiguous reference to YHWH -- so Saul's son Eshbaal ("great is the lord") became Ishbosheth ("[[UnfortunateNames great is the shame]]"), Jonathan's son Meribaal ("from the mouth of the lord") became Mephibosheth ("from the mouth of shame"), etc. This carries through to most Bibles and Scriptures with the exception of scholarly works.
* 1 Samuel 41 writes that David and Jonathan kissed and wept when they had to say goodbye to one another. Leaving aside the [[InternetBackdraft scholarly debate]] of whether or not David and Jonathan were lovers, a kiss on the mouth would not have been an unusual gesture between two [[HeterosexualLifePartners friends]] in a tender moment in that place and time period, and so most translations leave it in. However, many conservative modern translations are [[ButNotTooGay so scared of any male-on-male action]] that they specify that the two friends kissed each other's cheeks (although nothing about that is said in the original Hebrew), or even (in the case of the ultra-insecure Living Bible) turn it into "and they sadly shook hands".
* Ecclesiastes 11:2 is usually translated along the lines of "Give a portion to seven, or even to eight, for you know not what disaster may happen on earth" (ESV), one of many times the Bible urges those with wealth to spend it supporting the community. The NIV translates it as "Invest in seven ventures, yes, in eight; you do not know what disaster may come upon the land" and continues the verse by urging people to diversify a stock portfolio. It goes without saying that the particular economic system being justified there did not exist at the pre-feudal time Ecclesiastes was written, and would, in fact, have been considered sinful under Old Testament money handling laws. The NIV is an American translation from the Cold War era, so imagining King Solomon as a wise investor rather than as a wise man of generosity had a political motivation.

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* The ending salutation in Romans 16 references Junia, a female deacon or church leader. Nearly all English Bibles (exceptions to this include the New King James Version and more scholarly ones, like NRSV) render this name as "Junias" in an attempt to make it masculine and disguise the fact that many some early church leaders were women.
** It's a more complicated story than that, to the point that [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junia Junia]] gets quite an extensive entry on TheOtherWiki. While there's a good argument that gender bias played a part in the translation of the verse, it's also quite possible it could have been a mistake due to the confusing nature of indicating gender in ancient Greek writing. It's worth noting that the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holman_Christian_Standard_Bible HCSB]] translation uses Junia but adds [[FootnoteFever a footnote]] at the bottom that says "Or Junias, a man's name."
* The Semitic god Baal is repeatedly named in the Bible in the context of his worshipers being idolaters [[note]]he was a deity in the originally polytheistic Semitic pantheon alongside YHWH who fell out of favour once the Israelites adopted monotheism in the 9th Century BC[[/note]], but the word "baal" literally means "lord" "lord", "master" or "owner" "[[PropertyOfLove Husband]]" in various Semitic and Arabic languages (including Early Hebrew), and so appears as Hebrew). Often misinterpreted to be a common syllable god in the names semetic pantheon, it's actually a euphemism for deification of characters and places.the current king. At some point, a translator, possibly attempting to brush Baal worship completely out of Hebrew history, changed all instances of ''baal'' to ''bosheth'' ("shame") in order to write out the name of Baal, including in names where the word was literally intended as "Lord" in unambiguous reference to YHWH -- so Saul's son Eshbaal ("great is the lord") became Ishbosheth ("[[UnfortunateNames great is the shame]]"), Jonathan's son Meribaal ("from the mouth of the lord") became Mephibosheth ("from the mouth of shame"), etc. This carries through to most Bibles and Scriptures with the exception of scholarly works.
* 1 Samuel 41 writes that David and Jonathan kissed and wept when they had to say goodbye to one another. Leaving aside the [[InternetBackdraft scholarly debate]] of whether or not David and Jonathan were lovers, a [[MistakenForGay A kiss on the mouth would not have been an unusual gesture gesture]] between two [[HeterosexualLifePartners friends]] in a tender moment in that place and time period, and so most translations leave it in. However, many conservative modern translations are [[ButNotTooGay so scared of any male-on-male action]] action that they specify that the two friends kissed each other's cheeks (although nothing about that is said in the original Hebrew), or even (in the case of the ultra-insecure Living Bible) turn it into "and they sadly shook hands".
* Ecclesiastes 11:2 is usually translated along the lines of "Give a portion to seven, or even to eight, for you know not what disaster may happen on earth" (ESV), one of many times the Bible urges those with wealth to spend it supporting the community. The NIV translates it as "Invest in seven ventures, yes, in eight; you do not know what disaster may come upon the land" and continues the verse by urging people to diversify a stock portfolio. It goes without saying that the particular economic system being justified there did not exist at the pre-feudal time Ecclesiastes was written, and would, in fact, have been considered sinful under Old Testament money handling laws. The NIV is an American translation from the Cold War era, so imagining King Solomon as a wise investor rather than as a wise man of generosity had a political motivation.
5th May '17 5:00:36 PM Lirodon
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* The Dutch Christian-run broadcasting group Evangelische Omroep (EO) was the subject of controversy after it edited the Creator/DavidAttenborough series ''The Life of Mammals'' to remove content that was not in line with their creationist viewpoints. Attenborough was not happy about it.
1st May '17 10:34:12 AM Jeduthun
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* Creator/CSLewis's ''Miracles'' was translated into Japanese by a [[UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} Baptist]] translator who {{Bowdlerized}} a few passages to make it seem as though Lewis was TheTeetotaler and a non-smoker. Lewis suspected that the changes were made on doctrinal grounds that he didn't agree with-- in person, Lewis was an Anglican who was an avid beer drinker and pipe smoker.
18th Apr '17 10:52:29 PM justanid
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[[folder:Live-Action -- TV]]

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* The Semitic god Baal is repeatedly named in the Bible in the context of his worshipers being idolaters [[note]]he was a deity in the originally polytheistic Semitic pantheon alongside YHWH who fell out of favour once the Israelites adopted monotheism in the 9th Century BC[[/note]], but the word 'baal' literally means 'lord' or 'owner' in various Semitic and Arabic languages (including Early Hebrew), and so appears as a common syllable in the names of characters and places. At some point, a translator, possibly attempting to brush Baal worship completely out of Hebrew history, changed all instances of ''baal'' to ''bosheth'' ("shame") in order to write out the name of Baal, including in names where the word was literally intended as 'Lord' in unambiguous reference to YWH - so Saul's son Eshbaal ("The Lord is great") became Ishbosheth ("[[UnfortunateNames shame is great]]"), Jonathan's son Meribaal ("from the mouth of God") became Mephibosheth ("from the mouth of shame"), etc. This carries through to most Bibles and Scriptures with the exception of scholarly works.

to:

* The Semitic god Baal is repeatedly named in the Bible in the context of his worshipers being idolaters [[note]]he was a deity in the originally polytheistic Semitic pantheon alongside YHWH who fell out of favour once the Israelites adopted monotheism in the 9th Century BC[[/note]], but the word 'baal' "baal" literally means 'lord' "lord" or 'owner' "owner" in various Semitic and Arabic languages (including Early Hebrew), and so appears as a common syllable in the names of characters and places. At some point, a translator, possibly attempting to brush Baal worship completely out of Hebrew history, changed all instances of ''baal'' to ''bosheth'' ("shame") in order to write out the name of Baal, including in names where the word was literally intended as 'Lord' "Lord" in unambiguous reference to YWH - YHWH -- so Saul's son Eshbaal ("The Lord ("great is great") the lord") became Ishbosheth ("[[UnfortunateNames shame great is great]]"), the shame]]"), Jonathan's son Meribaal ("from the mouth of God") the lord") became Mephibosheth ("from the mouth of shame"), etc. This carries through to most Bibles and Scriptures with the exception of scholarly works.
18th Apr '17 8:00:58 PM justanid
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!!Examples:



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** The magazine ran a series of NewspaperComic strips which had been (allegedly) adapted by the Soviet Union, re-translated into English, which had the various characters bemoaning their fates or otherwise delivering very unsubtle stabs at the American Way. For example, in a ''{{Peanuts}}'' Halloween strip which showed the kids going Trick or Treating, the speeches were changed to the kids having to go begging door to door to get something to eat and being so embarrassed by having to do so that they dress in costumes so nobody will see their shame.
** There was a MadLookAt strip where a man was speaking at a political rally with someone translating into Sign Language. Everyone in the room gets offended. The last panel is the interpretor being paid by the man's opponent.

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** The magazine ran a series of NewspaperComic strips which had been (allegedly) adapted by the Soviet Union, re-translated into English, which had the various characters bemoaning their fates or otherwise delivering very unsubtle stabs at the American Way. For example, in a ''{{Peanuts}}'' ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' Halloween strip which showed the kids going Trick or Treating, the speeches were changed to the kids having to go begging door to door to get something to eat and being so embarrassed by having to do so that they dress in costumes so nobody will see their shame.
** There was a MadLookAt "Mad Look At" strip where a man was speaking at a political rally with someone translating into Sign Language. Everyone in the room gets offended. The last panel is the interpretor being paid by the man's opponent.

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* The final ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic'' webisode showed an alternate ending to ''Film/PearlHarbor'' for the Japanese market.
* In the WesternAnimation version of [[WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfSamAndMaxFreelancePolice Sam & Max]], a yeti/abominable snowman they are with creates a lynch mob out of a remote village by altering what the duo asked him to say to sound like threats.



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* The final ''WesternAnimation/TheCritic'' webisode showed an alternate ending to ''Film/PearlHarbor'' for the Japanese market.
* In ''WesternAnimation/TheAdventuresOfSamAndMaxFreelancePolice'', a yeti[=/=]abominable snowman they are with creates a lynch mob out of a remote village by altering what the duo asked him to say to sound like threats.
[[/folder]]


!! Other Examples
[[folder:Anime
and Manga]]




[[AC:Comics]]
* [[http://www.bleedingcool.com/forums/showthread.php?35676-Now-It\-s-Time-For-The-Brazilian-Batman-Potty-Mouth This]] case is a textbook one. "Nasty", a general insult, was translated as a specific political slur regarding people of a certain Brazilian political party. Since the editor of this comic is linked to a magazine well-known in Brazil for utterly hating said political party, and since it would take specific effort to make such a "mistake" (as "nasty" is a fairly simple word that can be translated more easily into several others), it became clear that this was a Translation With An Agenda.

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* [[http://www.bleedingcool.com/forums/showthread.php?35676-Now-It\-s-Time-For-The-Brazilian-Batman-Potty-Mouth This]] case ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' comic is a textbook one. "Nasty", a general insult, was translated as a specific political slur regarding people of a certain Brazilian political party. Since the editor of this comic is linked to a magazine well-known in Brazil for utterly hating said political party, and since it would take specific effort to make such a "mistake" (as "nasty" is a fairly simple word that can be translated more easily into several others), it became clear that this was a Translation With An Agenda.




[[AC:Film]]
* Many Chinese films will have lines altered when exported to the US to remove any pro-Chinese political messages. With some films, this not only means taking out overt references, but anything that can be construed as even vaguely political. Suffice to say, has become a BerserkButton for fans.
* UsefulNotes/TheFrancoRegime had a board of censors to make sure Spaniards weren't exposed to foreign filth and dangerous political ideas. This extended to movie dubbing, and some efforts of the censors are still legendary in Spain, the most egregious one being turning the protagonists of the adulterous affair in ''Film/{{Mogambo}}'' to an innocent-looking brother and sister, making their visually hinted relationship [[IncestIsRelative incestuous]] instead in a spectacular backfire. Another straightforwardly political one was omitting Rick's past as a fighter for the Spanish Republic in ''Film/{{Casablanca}}''.
* While not as exaggerated as the Spaniard ones, Mexican-Spanish dubs did this sometimes. As a rule of thumb, any reference towards Americans going against Mexicans will be invariably changed, for [[UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar obvious reasons]].
* Michael Wood's ''In Search of Alexander'' documentary, following in the footsteps of Alexander the Great, gets a subtle one in thanks to a pointed translation of his Greek guide Arrian. When Wood reaches what he believes to be the site of the famous Battle of Gaugamela in Iraq, he gets out his copy of Arrian and describes Alexander's preparations for war - most prominently offering up prayers to the gods Phobos and Deimos for their aid the next day. Traditionally Phobos and Deimos are translated as something like "fear" and panic" or "terror" and "disarray", but here, in the middle of Iraq, not long after the end of the second Gulf War, Wood chooses to translate them as "shock and awe"...
* The Italian dub of ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' has replaced the humour with near-incomprensible political jokes.

[[AC:Literature]]

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\n[[AC:Film]]\n* Many Chinese films will have lines altered when exported to the US to remove any pro-Chinese political messages. With some films, this not only means taking out overt references, but anything that can be construed as even vaguely political. Suffice to say, has become a BerserkButton for fans.\n* UsefulNotes/TheFrancoRegime had a board of censors to make sure Spaniards weren't exposed to foreign filth and dangerous political ideas. This extended to movie dubbing, and some efforts of the censors are still legendary in Spain, the most egregious one being turning the protagonists of the adulterous affair in ''Film/{{Mogambo}}'' to an innocent-looking brother and sister, making their visually hinted relationship [[IncestIsRelative incestuous]] instead in a spectacular backfire. Another straightforwardly political one was omitting Rick's past as a fighter for the Spanish Republic in ''Film/{{Casablanca}}''.\n* While not as exaggerated as the Spaniard ones, Mexican-Spanish dubs did this sometimes. As a rule of thumb, any reference towards Americans going against Mexicans will be invariably changed, for [[UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar obvious reasons]].\n* Michael Wood's ''In Search of Alexander'' documentary, following in the footsteps of Alexander the Great, gets a subtle one in thanks to a pointed translation of his Greek guide Arrian. When Wood reaches what he believes to be the site of the famous Battle of Gaugamela in Iraq, he gets out his copy of Arrian and describes Alexander's preparations for war - most prominently offering up prayers to the gods Phobos and Deimos for their aid the next day. Traditionally Phobos and Deimos are translated as something like "fear" and panic" or "terror" and "disarray", but here, in the middle of Iraq, not long after the end of the second Gulf War, Wood chooses to translate them as "shock and awe"...\n* The Italian dub of ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' has replaced the humour with near-incomprensible political jokes.\n\n[[AC:Literature]][[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]




[[AC:Let's Play]]
* In his LetsPlay of ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'' after having railed against Yoshio Sakomoto for ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' in earlier videos of the LP, LetsPlay/{{Slowbeef}} translated [[EasterEgg his producers log]] as thus:
-->''"Hello, this is Yoshio Sakomoto! Itís not easy writing stories for Metroid considering my functional illiteracy. Honestly, I donít really like Samus, and I donít want you to like her either. I hate her and feel threatened by her. I will ruin this franchise. Iím just coming out and telling you. Fuck Metroid and fuck you."''

[[AC: Video Games]]
* A Russian hacked FanTranslation of ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoLibertyCityStories'' cut missions [[{{Bowdlerise}} for being too violent]] and translates dialogue as nonsensical AuthorTract segments about the author's [[http://gtaforums.com/topic/680404-gta-lcs-is-censored-in-russia/ extreme-right, straight-edge, anti-videogame political views]]. Dageron, the translator, is regarded in the Russian gaming community as a notorious kook who ruins games, which is annoying as Russian gaming stores regularly sell his versions.

[[AC:Real Life]]
* When coming up with an Inuktitut word for "uranium", a translator who obviously had some personal views regarding nuclear energy rendered it as "rock that kills", and that term was used for some time before it was realized what had been done.
* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, the original German is a bit more ambiguous. You can interpret it as ''either'' "Germany above all (to me)" i.e. Germany should come as the first priority to its people ''or'' "Germany above all else" (i.e. Germany is the best thing in the world and everything/one else should bow down to it). Hofman von Fallersleben, the author of the lyrics, almost certainly intended the former meaning, as he was an advocate for uniting all the petty feudal states into one Germany, but both the Nazis and Antinazi propaganda during the war naturally chose to interpret it in the latter sense, which means that particular line has become DeaderThanDisco - even some Germans don't know about the ambiguity in the text.



[[folder:Real-Life Translations of The Bible]]

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[[folder:Real-Life [[folder:Literature -- Translations of The Bible]]





Added DiffLines:


[[folder:Live Action -- Films]]
* Many Chinese films will have lines altered when exported to the US to remove any pro-Chinese political messages. With some films, this not only means taking out overt references, but anything that can be construed as even vaguely political. Suffice to say, has become a BerserkButton for fans.
* UsefulNotes/TheFrancoRegime had a board of censors to make sure Spaniards weren't exposed to foreign filth and dangerous political ideas. This extended to movie dubbing, and some efforts of the censors are still legendary in Spain, the most egregious one being turning the protagonists of the adulterous affair in ''Film/{{Mogambo}}'' to an innocent-looking brother and sister, making their visually hinted relationship [[IncestIsRelative incestuous]] instead in a spectacular backfire. Another straightforwardly political one was omitting Rick's past as a fighter for the Spanish Republic in ''Film/{{Casablanca}}''.
* While not as exaggerated as the Spaniard ones, Mexican-Spanish dubs did this sometimes. As a rule of thumb, any reference towards Americans going against Mexicans will be invariably changed, for [[UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar obvious reasons]].
* Michael Wood's ''In Search of Alexander'' documentary, following in the footsteps of Alexander the Great, gets a subtle one in thanks to a pointed translation of his Greek guide Arrian. When Wood reaches what he believes to be the site of the famous Battle of Gaugamela in Iraq, he gets out his copy of Arrian and describes Alexander's preparations for war - most prominently offering up prayers to the gods Phobos and Deimos for their aid the next day. Traditionally Phobos and Deimos are translated as something like "fear" and panic" or "terror" and "disarray", but here, in the middle of Iraq, not long after the end of the second Gulf War, Wood chooses to translate them as "shock and awe"...
* The Italian dub of ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' has replaced the humour with near-incomprensible political jokes.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
* A Russian hacked FanTranslation of ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoLibertyCityStories'' cut missions [[{{Bowdlerise}} for being too violent]] and translates dialogue as nonsensical AuthorTract segments about the author's [[http://gtaforums.com/topic/680404-gta-lcs-is-censored-in-russia/ extreme-right, straight-edge, anti-videogame political views]]. Dageron, the translator, is regarded in the Russian gaming community as a notorious kook who ruins games, which is annoying as Russian gaming stores regularly sell his versions.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Originals]]
* In his LetsPlay of ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'' after having railed against Yoshio Sakomoto for ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'' in earlier videos of the LP, LetsPlay/{{Slowbeef}} translated [[EasterEgg his producers log]] as thus:
-->''"Hello, this is Yoshio Sakomoto! Itís not easy writing stories for Metroid considering my functional illiteracy. Honestly, I donít really like Samus, and I donít want you to like her either. I hate her and feel threatened by her. I will ruin this franchise. Iím just coming out and telling you. Fuck Metroid and fuck you."''
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
* When coming up with an [[UsefulNotes/{{Canada}} Inuktitut]] word for "uranium", a translator who obviously had some personal views regarding nuclear energy rendered it as "rock that kills", and that term was used for some time before it was realized what had been done.
* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany "Das Deutschlandlied" begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others [=/=] above all others in the world!"; however, the original German is a bit more ambiguous. You can interpret it as ''either'' "Germany above all (to me)" i.e. Germany should come as the first priority to its people ''or'' "Germany above all else" (i.e. Germany is the best thing in the world and everything[=/=]one else should bow down to it). Hofman von Fallersleben, the author of the lyrics, almost certainly intended the former meaning, as he was an advocate for uniting all the petty feudal states into one Germany, but both the Nazis and Antinazi propaganda during the war naturally chose to interpret it in the latter sense, which means that particular line has become DeaderThanDisco - even some Germans don't know about the ambiguity in the text.
[[/folder]]
12th Apr '17 11:17:40 AM Jhonny
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* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, the original German is a bit more ambiguous. You can interpret it as ''either'' "Germany above all (to me)" i.e. Germany should come as the first priority to its people ''or'' "Germany above all others" (i.e. Germany is the best thing in the world and everything/one else should bow down to it). Hofman von Fallersleben, the author of the lyrics, almost certainly intended the former meaning, as he was an advocate for uniting all the petty feudal states into one Germany, but both the Nazis and Antinazi propaganda during the war naturally chose to interpret it in the latter sense, which means that particular line has become DeaderThanDisco - even some Germans don't know about the ambiguity in the text.

to:

* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, the original German is a bit more ambiguous. You can interpret it as ''either'' "Germany above all (to me)" i.e. Germany should come as the first priority to its people ''or'' "Germany above all others" else" (i.e. Germany is the best thing in the world and everything/one else should bow down to it). Hofman von Fallersleben, the author of the lyrics, almost certainly intended the former meaning, as he was an advocate for uniting all the petty feudal states into one Germany, but both the Nazis and Antinazi propaganda during the war naturally chose to interpret it in the latter sense, which means that particular line has become DeaderThanDisco - even some Germans don't know about the ambiguity in the text.



* The KJV also explicitly translated a mythological animal's Hebrew name to "unicorn" in the context of a lion and a "unicorn" together symbolising a people specially cherished by God and destined for great things. Unicorns were not known in ancient Israel, so artistic licence applied here. Guess whose national insignia is a lion and a unicorn... and the KJV was an English translation.

to:

* The KJV also explicitly translated a mythological animal's Hebrew name to "unicorn" in the context of a lion and a "unicorn" together symbolising symbolizing a people specially cherished by God and destined for great things. Unicorns were not known in ancient Israel, so artistic licence license applied here. Guess whose national insignia is a lion and a unicorn... and the KJV was an English translation.



** Though it is worth mentioning that a bit of royal ExecutiveMeddling regarding the rules for translators (reproduced [[http://www.kjvonly.org/other/kj_instructs.htm here]]) insisted on keeping in the "old ecclesiastical words", presumably to not rock the boat of the status quo too much. So for example we have "charity" for "love", "church" instead of congregation/gathering/assembly, "bishop" (when the Greek word is literally translated "overseer"), "baptize" (the Greek word meaning to immerse, which might upset those in favour of sprinkling) etc.

to:

** Though it is worth mentioning that a bit of royal ExecutiveMeddling regarding the rules for translators (reproduced [[http://www.kjvonly.org/other/kj_instructs.htm here]]) insisted on keeping in the "old ecclesiastical words", presumably to not rock the boat of the status quo too much. So for example we have "charity" for "love", "church" instead of congregation/gathering/assembly, "bishop" (when the Greek word is literally translated "overseer"), "baptize" (the Greek word meaning to immerse, which might upset those in favour favor of sprinkling) etc.



* The Semitic god Baal is repeatedly named in the Bible in the context of his worshippers being idolators [[note]]he was a deity in the originally polytheistic Semetic pantheon alongside YHWH who fell out of favour once the Israelites adopted monotheism in the 9th Century BC[[/note]], but the word 'baal' literally means 'lord' or 'owner' in various Semitic and Arabic languages (including Early Hebrew), and so appears as a common syllable in the names of characters and places. At some point, a translator, possibly attempting to brush Baal worship completely out of Hebrew history, changed all instances of ''baal'' to ''bosheth'' ("shame") in order to write out the name of Baal, including in names where the word was literally intended as 'Lord' in unambiguous reference to YWH - so Saul's son Eshbaal ("The Lord is great") became Ishbosheth ("[[UnfortunateNames shame is great]]"), Jonathan's son Meribaal ("from the mouth of God") became Mephibosheth ("from the mouth of shame"), etc. This carries through to most Bibles and Scriptures with the exception of scholarly works.

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* The Semitic god Baal is repeatedly named in the Bible in the context of his worshippers worshipers being idolators idolaters [[note]]he was a deity in the originally polytheistic Semetic Semitic pantheon alongside YHWH who fell out of favour once the Israelites adopted monotheism in the 9th Century BC[[/note]], but the word 'baal' literally means 'lord' or 'owner' in various Semitic and Arabic languages (including Early Hebrew), and so appears as a common syllable in the names of characters and places. At some point, a translator, possibly attempting to brush Baal worship completely out of Hebrew history, changed all instances of ''baal'' to ''bosheth'' ("shame") in order to write out the name of Baal, including in names where the word was literally intended as 'Lord' in unambiguous reference to YWH - so Saul's son Eshbaal ("The Lord is great") became Ishbosheth ("[[UnfortunateNames shame is great]]"), Jonathan's son Meribaal ("from the mouth of God") became Mephibosheth ("from the mouth of shame"), etc. This carries through to most Bibles and Scriptures with the exception of scholarly works.



* Song of Songs has a controversy over a line from the Beloved that would be literally translated from Hebrew as "I am black and beautiful". Many translations change it to something along the lines of "although I am black, I am beautiful". The context of the scene is that the Beloved is tanned dark because her brothers have forced her to work in the sun all day, thus changing her to be against Hebrew beauty standards, making this change a little less offensive; but the Hebrew had her instisting her black skin was a part of her beauty, while many translations made in times of racism and colourism had her claim her beauty ''despite'' her dark skin.

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* Song of Songs has a controversy over a line from the Beloved that would be literally translated from Hebrew as "I am black and beautiful". Many translations change it to something along the lines of "although I am black, I am beautiful". The context of the scene is that the Beloved is tanned dark because her brothers have forced her to work in the sun all day, thus changing her to be against Hebrew beauty standards, making this change a little less offensive; but the Hebrew had her instisting insisting her black skin was a part of her beauty, while many translations made in times of racism and colourism colorism had her claim her beauty ''despite'' her dark skin.
12th Apr '17 11:12:12 AM Jhonny
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* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, in German grammar, there is a subtly different meaning. "Über alles" implies "above all others [to me]"; if the song was claiming Germany was objectively the best, it would have said "über ''allen''" instead. However, for propaganda purposes, the Allies chose the former translation during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.

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* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, in the original German grammar, there is a subtly different meaning. "Über alles" implies "above bit more ambiguous. You can interpret it as ''either'' "Germany above all others [to me]"; if the song was claiming (to me)" i.e. Germany should come as the first priority to its people ''or'' "Germany above all others" (i.e. Germany is the best thing in the world and everything/one else should bow down to it). Hofman von Fallersleben, the author of the lyrics, almost certainly intended the former meaning, as he was objectively an advocate for uniting all the best, it would have said "über ''allen''" instead. However, for petty feudal states into one Germany, but both the Nazis and Antinazi propaganda purposes, the Allies chose the former translation during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.the war naturally chose to interpret it in the latter sense, which means that particular line has become DeaderThanDisco - even some Germans don't know about the ambiguity in the text.
12th Apr '17 12:23:15 AM hppavilion1
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* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, in German grammar, there is a subtly different meaning. "Über alles" implies "above all others [to me]"; if the song was claiming Germany was objectively the best, it would have said "über ''allen''" instead. However, for propaganda purposes, the Allies chose the former translation during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.



* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, in German grammar, there is a subtly different meaning. "Über alles" implies "above all others [to me]"; if the song was claiming Germany was objectively the best, it would have said "über ''allen''" instead. However, for propaganda purposes, the Allies chose the former translation during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.

to:

* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, in German grammar, there is a subtly different meaning. "Über alles" implies "above all others [to me]"; if the song was claiming Germany was objectively the best, it would have said "über ''allen''" instead. However, for propaganda purposes, the Allies chose the former translation during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
12th Apr '17 12:20:19 AM hppavilion1
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to:

* The infamous national anthem of UsefulNotes/NaziGermany- Das Deutschlandlied- begins with the lines "Deutschland, Deutschland, über alles / über alles in der Welt". This is usually translated as something along the lines of "Germany, Germany above all others / above all others in the world!"; however, in German grammar, there is a subtly different meaning. "Über alles" implies "above all others [to me]"; if the song was claiming Germany was objectively the best, it would have said "über ''allen''" instead. However, for propaganda purposes, the Allies chose the former translation during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
10th Mar '17 9:29:28 AM Jaro7788
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* Pawel Leczycki - a 17th century Polish Bernadine monk - was the translator of Giovanni Botero's travelogue ''Relazioni universali''. Apart from fixing some of Botero's errors in the sections relating to Poland, Leczycki also seemingly added some content reflecting his biases--e.g. in a listing of Greater Poland's major cities he added a bunch of cities which happened to house Bernardine convents, and in the section on Russia he put in [[TakeThat a bunch of mean jabs]] at the country.

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* Pawel Leczycki Paweł Łęczycki - a 17th century Polish Bernadine monk - was the translator of Giovanni Botero's travelogue ''Relazioni universali''. Apart from fixing some of Botero's errors in the sections relating to Poland, Leczycki Łęczycki also seemingly added some content reflecting his biases--e.g. in a listing of Greater Poland's major cities he added a bunch of cities which happened to house Bernardine convents, and in the section on Russia he put in [[TakeThat a bunch of mean jabs]] at the country.
* The Polish translation of Tony Judt's opus magnum ''Postwar'' was released in Poland with an entire section filled with the publisher's comments on particular excerpts and although the text proper remained faithful to the original, quite a few notes and observations made in said comments may appear somewhat unnecessary if not downright political in their nature. Aside from correcting genuine historical mistakes, obviously most of them relating to Polish history, the publisher does shove their two cents into, for instance, some of Judt's less than enthusiastic remarks on Pope John Paul II, calling those "controversial at best".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TranslationWithAnAgenda