History Main / TranslationStyleChoices

20th May '17 1:33:41 PM nombretomado
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* ''VagrantStory'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' and the PSP version of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' (the original PSX version was an {{Engrish}} wonderland).

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* ''VagrantStory'', ''VideoGame/VagrantStory'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' and the PSP version of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'' (the original PSX version was an {{Engrish}} wonderland).
3rd May '17 11:05:16 AM Dere
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'''3'''. Formal equivalence: Some productions, however, decide they're going the direct route. The story is getting straight-up translated, ValuesDissonance be damned, and no pesky [[FirstNameBasis honorific changes]], [[KansaiRegionalAccent dialect jokes]], or [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseCulture cultural variations]] are going to get in the way. This is the most ''literal'' of the methods, typically translating only dialogue and [[TooLongDidntDub leaving anything that doesn't directly translate fully intact]]. The downside to this is that a lot of the necessary elements for full understanding don't make the journey overseas with the dialogue; as a result, J. Random Viewer (lacking proper context) is left scratching his head, as some lines will [[DubInducedPlotHole sound strange]] or seem to come out of nowhere. In the worst cases, some figures of speech may be translated literally, instead of going with an equivalent from the vernacular language or simply translating the meaning. Despite this method catering to them, the hardcore purists will probably hate it, too; they'll just use it as another example of "[[SubbingVersusDubbing how dubbing is the devil's work]]", for instance.

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'''3'''. Formal equivalence: Some productions, however, decide they're going the direct route. The story is getting straight-up translated, ValuesDissonance be damned, and no pesky [[FirstNameBasis honorific changes]], [[KansaiRegionalAccent dialect jokes]], or [[UsefulNotes/JapaneseCulture cultural variations]] are going to get in the way. This is the most ''literal'' of the methods, typically translating only dialogue and [[TooLongDidntDub leaving anything that doesn't directly translate fully intact]]. The downside to this is that a lot of the necessary elements for full understanding don't make the journey overseas with the dialogue; as a result, J. Random Viewer (lacking proper context) is left scratching his head, as some lines will [[DubInducedPlotHole sound strange]] or seem to come out of nowhere. In the worst cases, some figures of speech may be translated literally, instead of going with an equivalent from the vernacular language or simply translating the meaning. Despite this method catering to them, the hardcore purists will probably hate it, too; they'll just use it as another example of "[[SubbingVersusDubbing how dubbing is the devil's work]]", for instance.
meaning.
3rd May '17 11:03:46 AM Dere
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'''2'''. {{Woolseyism}}: Named on [=TVTropes=] after Ted Woolsey, who was known for his more pragmatic translations of games. This approach is formally referred to as ''dynamic equivalence''; the general idea is that the translation should give the foreign audience the same experience as the original, even if some details have to be altered and some aspects that would [[ValuesDissonance cause]] [[UnfortunateImplications controversy]] or fail to translate sensibly just have to be left out. The general guideline when using this method is that the work needs to be self-contained; if the script contains references or connotations that wouldn't be obvious to the target audience, those elements should probably be left out or changed. It's probably the best tool for a ''localization'': the purists get their original storyline intact (more or less), but you don't need an introductory lesson in a foreign language and culture to understand what's going on. Of course, the ''hardcore'' purists will still hate it. But when you get right down to it, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks the hardcore purists hate everything]] -- they should probably stick to the original language of the production in question.

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'''2'''. {{Woolseyism}}: Named on [=TVTropes=] after Ted Woolsey, who was known for his more pragmatic translations of games. This approach is formally referred to as ''dynamic equivalence''; the general idea is that the translation should give the foreign audience the same experience as the original, even if some details have to be altered and some aspects that would [[ValuesDissonance cause]] [[UnfortunateImplications controversy]] or fail to translate sensibly just have to be left out. The general guideline when using this method is that the work needs to be self-contained; if the script contains references or connotations that wouldn't be obvious to the target audience, those elements should probably be left out or changed. It's probably the best tool for a ''localization'': the purists get their original storyline intact (more or less), but you don't need an introductory lesson in a foreign language and culture to understand what's going on. Of course, the ''hardcore'' purists will still hate it. But when you get right down to it, [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks the hardcore purists hate everything]] -- they should probably stick to the original language of the production in question.
it.
30th Nov '16 6:42:50 AM ashlay
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** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' is forced to continue keeping the Japanese food and place names, as this time around the game takes place in the real world city of UsefulNotes/{{Tokyo}}, rather than a fictional Japanese city.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' is forced to continue keeping the Japanese food and place names, as this time around the game takes place in the real world city of UsefulNotes/{{Tokyo}}, rather than a fictional Japanese city.town.
30th Nov '16 6:42:28 AM ashlay
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Added DiffLines:

** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' is forced to continue keeping the Japanese food and place names, as this time around the game takes place in the real world city of UsefulNotes/{{Tokyo}}, rather than a fictional Japanese city.
21st Oct '16 3:52:19 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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'''4'''. BlindIdiotTranslation: What happens when the people responsible for the translation [[TheyJustDidntCare just don't care]]. Grammar rules will be violated and homonyms may have the wrong meaning translated. Fortunately, the vast, vast majority of serious commercial releases rarely fall into this category, but there are a depressing number of 1980s video games that were translated in this manner. And let's not even [[TranslationTrainWreck get started on]] [[BlindIdiotTranslation bootlegs]]...

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'''4'''. BlindIdiotTranslation: What happens when the people responsible for the translation [[TheyJustDidntCare just don't care]]. Grammar rules will be violated and homonyms may have the wrong meaning translated. Fortunately, the vast, vast majority of serious commercial releases rarely fall into this category, but there are a depressing number of 1980s video games that were translated in this manner. And let's not even [[TranslationTrainWreck get started on]] [[BlindIdiotTranslation bootlegs]]...
3rd Oct '16 9:22:29 AM ShivaIndis
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* Most games translated by Working Designs, particularly the ''{{Lunar}}'' series.

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* Most games translated by Working Designs, particularly the ''{{Lunar}}'' ''Franchise/{{Lunar}}'' series.
16th Jul '16 4:29:35 PM Doug86
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* The fansubbers of Æsir prefer to do this, particularly seen with their translation of ''Series/KamenRiderGaim''. They changed Armored Rider Gridon's name to Ornac in order to communicate the idea that it was supposed to be an AtrociousAlias, saying that the original intent was ruined by English-speaking fans who had declared Gridon an AwesomeMcCoolname because they didn't know that it was just an anagram of "donguri", the Japanese word for acorn. For the same reason, they changed the name of Gridon's [[DropTheHammer hammer]], the Donkachi ("kachi" being the onomatopoeia for a heavy impact), to Ornac Donker.
** However, this did come back to bite them in one example. The series' {{Transformation Trinket}}s are called Sengoku Drivers, taking the name of the Warring States Period of Japanese history (a major theme of the show) and replacing the kanji for "states" with "extreme". Æsir tried to retain this by renaming the belts "Wärring Driver", figuring that the use of a HeavyMetalUmlaut was a reasonable way to depict the "extreme" concept. Unfortunately, several episodes into the show we learn that the belts are named after their inventor, Ryoma Sengoku; Æsir simply shrugged, said "We've made our bed, so now we'll lay in it", and translated his name as "Ryoma Wärring".

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* The fansubbers of Æsir [=Æ=]sir prefer to do this, particularly seen with their translation of ''Series/KamenRiderGaim''. They changed Armored Rider Gridon's name to Ornac in order to communicate the idea that it was supposed to be an AtrociousAlias, saying that the original intent was ruined by English-speaking fans who had declared Gridon an AwesomeMcCoolname because they didn't know that it was just an anagram of "donguri", the Japanese word for acorn. For the same reason, they changed the name of Gridon's [[DropTheHammer hammer]], the Donkachi ("kachi" being the onomatopoeia for a heavy impact), to Ornac Donker.
** However, this did come back to bite them in one example. The series' {{Transformation Trinket}}s are called Sengoku Drivers, taking the name of the Warring States Period of Japanese history (a major theme of the show) and replacing the kanji for "states" with "extreme". Æsir [=Æ=]sir tried to retain this by renaming the belts "Wärring Driver", figuring that the use of a HeavyMetalUmlaut was a reasonable way to depict the "extreme" concept. Unfortunately, several episodes into the show we learn that the belts are named after their inventor, Ryoma Sengoku; Æsir [=Æ=]sir simply shrugged, said "We've made our bed, so now we'll lay in it", and translated his name as "Ryoma Wärring".
24th Jun '16 8:57:10 PM nombretomado
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* Just about any anime dubbed by [[FourKidsEntertainment 4Kids Entertainment]]. This still leaves out stuff like ''FunkyCops'' and the more recent ''VideoGame/DinosaurKing'', both which are perfectly faithful to the original.

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* Just about any anime dubbed by [[FourKidsEntertainment 4Kids Entertainment]].Creator/FourKidsEntertainment. This still leaves out stuff like ''FunkyCops'' and the more recent ''VideoGame/DinosaurKing'', both which are perfectly faithful to the original.
21st Jan '16 9:34:30 AM Willbyr
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* The Finnish translation of the ''GingaNagareboshiGin'' manga uses footnotes for the translations of the different [[SpecialAttack Battougas]]. They are seldom used otherwise.

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* The Finnish translation of the ''GingaNagareboshiGin'' ''Manga/GingaNagareboshiGin'' manga uses footnotes for the translations of the different [[SpecialAttack Battougas]]. They are seldom used otherwise.



* Creator/{{AnimEigo}} was well-known for this, and actually had paper liner notes in the days before [=DVDs=], but has also adapted references at times. Their release of ''Manga/YoureUnderArrest'' managed to do both simultaneously.

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* Creator/{{AnimEigo}} Creator/AnimEigo was well-known for this, and actually had paper liner notes in the days before [=DVDs=], but has also adapted references at times. Their release of ''Manga/YoureUnderArrest'' managed to do both simultaneously.
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