History Main / TransSexual

14th Nov '17 11:41:47 PM Solle
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* '''{{Drag Queen}}s and Drag Kings''' are theatrical performers who dress as a specific sex. Drag being an exquisitely camp job, drag performers (whether cis or trans) will gleefully ham it up in their stage persona. Although many drag performers are on the trans spectrum, they often appear as CampGay men and {{Butch Lesbian}}s who are gender-bending purely to entertain, which can contribute to [[TransEqualsGay the mistaken notion that a trans person is "super" gay]]. The history of drag is deeply interlinked with the trans community, and was the sole outlet for many trans people in less friendly times. Some drag acts incorporate caricatures, abstract interpretations of gender roles or exaggerated stereotypes, whereas others simply look good. Drag personas can be fictional characters, but they can also be serious expressions of the performer's gender. Note that anyone of any sex and gender can do drag -- so AFAB people playing female caricatures and AMAB people playing male caricatures are also part of this community.

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* '''{{Drag Queen}}s and Drag Kings''' are theatrical performers who dress as a specific sex. Drag being an exquisitely camp job, drag performers (whether cis or trans) will gleefully ham it up in their stage persona. onstage. Although many drag performers are on the trans spectrum, they often appear as CampGay men and {{Butch Lesbian}}s who are gender-bending purely gender-bend specifically to entertain, which can contribute to [[TransEqualsGay the mistaken notion that a all trans person is "super" gay]].people are "just super gay"]]. The history of drag is deeply interlinked with the trans community, and was the sole outlet for many trans people in less friendly times. Some drag acts incorporate performers act out caricatures, abstract interpretations of gender roles or exaggerated stereotypes, whereas others simply look good. Drag personas can be fictional characters, but they characters or can also be serious expressions of the performer's gender. gender, or a combination of both. Note that anyone of any sex and gender can do drag -- so AFAB people playing female caricatures in lady drag and AMAB people playing male caricatures in guy drag are also part of this community.
14th Nov '17 3:35:17 PM rjd1922
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* '''Transitioning''' is when a trans person changes their looks and/or social roles to match their gender. This can consist of picking a new wardrobe, changing names and pronouns, or choosing hormones and surgical options. The term "sex change" is an old-fashioned and overly simplistic description of many different surgical procedures, and the term has been replaced with "gender confirmation surgery."

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* '''Transitioning''' is when a trans person changes their looks and/or social roles to match their gender. This can consist of picking a new wardrobe, changing names and pronouns, or choosing hormones and surgical options. The term "sex change" is an old-fashioned and overly simplistic description of many different surgical procedures, and the term has been replaced with "gender confirmation confirmation/reassignment surgery."
14th Nov '17 11:21:20 AM Solle
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* '''{{Drag Queen}}s and Drag Kings''' are theatrical performers who dress as a specific sex. Drag being an exquisitely camp job, drag performers (whether cis or trans) will gleefully ham it up in their stage persona. Although many drag performers are on the trans spectrum, they often appear as CampGay men and {{Butch Lesbian}}s who are gender-bending purely to entertain, which can contribute to [[TransEqualsGay the mistaken notion that a trans person is "super" gay]]. The history of drag is deeply interlinked with the trans community, and was the sole outlet for many trans people in less friendly times. Some drag acts incorporate caricatures, abstract interpretations of gender roles or exaggerated stereotypes, whereas others simply look good. Drag acts can be theatrical characters, or serious expressions of the performer's gender. Note that anyone of any sex and gender can do drag -- so AFAB people playing female caricatures and AMAB people playing male caricatures are also part of this community.

to:

* '''{{Drag Queen}}s and Drag Kings''' are theatrical performers who dress as a specific sex. Drag being an exquisitely camp job, drag performers (whether cis or trans) will gleefully ham it up in their stage persona. Although many drag performers are on the trans spectrum, they often appear as CampGay men and {{Butch Lesbian}}s who are gender-bending purely to entertain, which can contribute to [[TransEqualsGay the mistaken notion that a trans person is "super" gay]]. The history of drag is deeply interlinked with the trans community, and was the sole outlet for many trans people in less friendly times. Some drag acts incorporate caricatures, abstract interpretations of gender roles or exaggerated stereotypes, whereas others simply look good. Drag acts personas can be theatrical fictional characters, or but they can also be serious expressions of the performer's gender. Note that anyone of any sex and gender can do drag -- so AFAB people playing female caricatures and AMAB people playing male caricatures are also part of this community.
14th Nov '17 11:18:55 AM Solle
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* '''{{Drag Queen}}s and Drag Kings''' are performers who dress as caricatures of a specific sex. Although many drag performers are on the trans spectrum, they often appear as CampGay men and {{Butch Lesbian}}s who are gender-bending purely to entertain, which can contribute to [[TransEqualsGay the mistaken notion that a trans person is "super" gay]]. Drag being an exquisitly camp job, all drag performers, whether cis or trans, will gleefully ham it up in their stage persona. The history of drag is deeply interlinked with the trans community, and was the sole outlet for many trans people in less friendly times. Note that anyone of any sex and gender can do drag -- so AFAB people playing female caricatures and AMAB people playing male caricatures are also part of this community.

to:

* '''{{Drag Queen}}s and Drag Kings''' are theatrical performers who dress as caricatures of a specific sex.sex. Drag being an exquisitely camp job, drag performers (whether cis or trans) will gleefully ham it up in their stage persona. Although many drag performers are on the trans spectrum, they often appear as CampGay men and {{Butch Lesbian}}s who are gender-bending purely to entertain, which can contribute to [[TransEqualsGay the mistaken notion that a trans person is "super" gay]]. Drag being an exquisitly camp job, all drag performers, whether cis or trans, will gleefully ham it up in their stage persona. The history of drag is deeply interlinked with the trans community, and was the sole outlet for many trans people in less friendly times. Some drag acts incorporate caricatures, abstract interpretations of gender roles or exaggerated stereotypes, whereas others simply look good. Drag acts can be theatrical characters, or serious expressions of the performer's gender. Note that anyone of any sex and gender can do drag -- so AFAB people playing female caricatures and AMAB people playing male caricatures are also part of this community.
14th Nov '17 7:58:26 AM Solle
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* '''Cisgender''' or just '''cis''' is the opposite of transgender, the majority: someone whose gender identity matches the one they were assigned at birth. "Cis" is a Latin prefix that is the opposite of "trans," meaning "not across," as in chemistry or "cisatlantic/transatlantic." "Non-trans" is also used, but just saying "normal" or "real" or just "man"/"woman" as opposed to "trans man"/"trans woman" is [[UnfortunateImplications basically saying that trans people aren't ''really'' their gender.]] Cis is also sometimes [[FunWithAcronyms jokingly de-abbreviated as "comfortable in skin"]] (although many trans people are comfortable with their bodies and identities, suffering only from the stigma).
* '''Trans''' is used as an umbrella term for all non-cis people, and is a shortened form for "transgender", which is used for same.
* '''Gender''' is someone's innate mental blueprint of how male and how female they are. Gender is on a massive gradient with many different points. It can fluctuate over time for some people, but on the whole it seems to be immune to outside influence. Gender ''roles'', on the other hand, are a changeable social construct, and include things like "girls like pink" or "the word for men is he."
* '''Sex''' are the male and female bits of someone's body that can be seen, either with the naked eye or using scientific equipment. The word encompasses things like genitals, chromosomes, hormones and hair growth. Like gender, sex is on a gradient with many points in between male and female. Unlike gender, sex can nowadays be changed by medical science, which many trans people are happy to do. The term "biological" sex is often used to describe someone's sex as assigned at birth, but it's quickly falling out of favour as it implies people's gender being somehow less biological than the rest of them.

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* '''Trans''' is used as an umbrella term for all non-cis people, and is short for "transgender".
* '''Cisgender''' or just '''cis''' is the opposite of transgender, the majority: transgender. A cis person is someone whose gender identity matches the one they were assigned at birth. "Cis" is a Latin prefix that is the opposite of "trans," meaning "not across," as used in chemistry or "cisatlantic/transatlantic." "Non-trans" Non-trans is also used, but just saying used. Saying "normal" or "real" or just "man"/"woman" as opposed to "trans man"/"trans woman" instead of cis is [[UnfortunateImplications basically saying implies that trans people aren't ''really'' their gender.]] gender]], so don't do that thing. Cis is also sometimes [[FunWithAcronyms jokingly de-abbreviated as "comfortable in skin"]] (although many trans people are comfortable with their bodies and identities, suffering only from the stigma).
* '''Trans''' is used as an umbrella term for all non-cis people, and is a shortened form for "transgender", which is used for same.
* '''Gender''' is someone's innate mental blueprint of how male and how female they are. Gender is on a massive gradient with many different points. It can fluctuate over time for some people, but on the whole it seems to be immune to outside influence. Gender ''roles'', on the other hand, are a changeable social construct, and include things like "girls like pink" or "the English word for men is he."
* '''Sex''' are the male and female bits of someone's body that can be seen, either with the naked eye or using scientific equipment. The word encompasses things like genitals, chromosomes, hormones and hair growth. Like gender, sex is on a gradient with many points in between male and female. Unlike gender, sex can nowadays be changed by medical science, which many trans people are happy to do. The term "biological" sex is often used to describe someone's sex as assigned sexual characteristics at birth, but it's quickly falling out of favour as it implies people's gender being somehow less biological than the rest of them.



* '''Dysphoria''' means discomfort that often happens when someone's gender, sex and social roles are mismatched. Not all trans people experience dysphoria, although some people define dysphoria simply as the mismatch itself (leading to many, '' many'' internet arguments over semantics). The opposite is gender euphoria, which is the happy feeling when someone's gender, sex and social roles finally match up.
* '''[[QueerAsTropes Homosexuality]]''' means being sexually attracted to the same sex and/or gender. Trans people can have any sexual orientation, and are not just gay people "UpToEleven." The "T" is in "LGBT" because transphobia and homophobia have similar motives -- both defy the main idea of what a man or woman "is" or "should be." Although some uninformed people see all relationships that trans people engage in as homosexual relationships, it's up to trans individuals and their partners to pick their own orientation labels.
* '''Non-binary''' and related words describe genders that aren't strictly male or female. Non-binary is a relatively new umbrella term and includes many points on the gender spectrum. Synonyms include genderqueer, gender variant, third gender and androgynous, all of which have their own connotations and cultural histories. People whose gender varies over time may choose the word genderfluid, and people who don't experience any gender may call themselves agender. Different cultures have tons of different words. There are many points on the cis-to-trans scale, and it's important to keep in mind that distress over one's body is never a prerequisite.

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* '''Dysphoria''' '''Gender dysphoria''' means discomfort that often happens can arise when someone's gender, sex and social roles are mismatched. The word dysphoria means "bad feeling." Not all trans people experience dysphoria, although some people define dysphoria simply as the mismatch itself (leading to many, '' many'' internet arguments over semantics). The opposite is gender euphoria, which is the happy feeling when someone's gender, sex and social roles finally match up.
* '''[[QueerAsTropes Homosexuality]]''' means being sexually attracted to the same sex and/or gender. Trans people can have any sexual orientation, and are not just gay people "UpToEleven." The "T" is in "LGBT" because transphobia and homophobia have similar motives -- both defy target the main idea of what a man or woman "is" or "should be." Although some uninformed people see all relationships that trans people engage in as homosexual relationships, it's up to trans individuals and their partners to pick their own orientation labels.
* '''Non-binary''' and related words describe genders that aren't strictly male or female. Non-binary The knowledge of gender as a gradient appears throughout world history -- non-binary is a relatively new recent Western umbrella term for this knowledge and includes many points on the gender spectrum. Synonyms include genderqueer, gender variant, third gender and androgynous, all of which have their own connotations and cultural histories. People whose gender varies over time may choose the word genderfluid, and people who don't experience any gender may call themselves agender. Different cultures have tons of different words. There are many points on the cis-to-trans scale, and it's important to keep in mind that distress over one's body is never a prerequisite.
14th Nov '17 2:32:52 AM Solle
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* '''Sex''' are the bits of someone's body that can be seen, either with the naked eye or using scientific equipment. The word encompasses things like genitals, chromosomes, hormones and hair growth. Like gender, sex is on a gradient with many points in between male and female. Unlike gender, sex can nowadays be changed by medical science, which many trans people are happy to do. The term "biological" sex is often used to describe someone's sex as assigned at birth, but it's quickly falling out of favour as it implies people's gender being somehow less biological than the rest of them.

to:

* '''Sex''' are the male and female bits of someone's body that can be seen, either with the naked eye or using scientific equipment. The word encompasses things like genitals, chromosomes, hormones and hair growth. Like gender, sex is on a gradient with many points in between male and female. Unlike gender, sex can nowadays be changed by medical science, which many trans people are happy to do. The term "biological" sex is often used to describe someone's sex as assigned at birth, but it's quickly falling out of favour as it implies people's gender being somehow less biological than the rest of them.



* '''[[http://www.isna.org/faq/what_is_intersex "Intersex"]]''' refers to atypical prenatal development of genitals, hormones and chromosomes, and is approximately as common as having red hair. (People with intersex conditions are sometimes called "{{Hermaphrodite}}") depending on culture, though this has fallen out of favour in English.) Like all people, intersex people can have male, female or non-binary genders, and may identify as transgender if their gender doesn't match their bodies or their assigned social roles. Some intersex conditions have a high correlation with gender dysphoria. The exact link between intersex conditions and being trans is currently being scientifically explored.

to:

* '''[[http://www.isna.org/faq/what_is_intersex "Intersex"]]''' refers to atypical prenatal development of genitals, hormones and and/or chromosomes, and is approximately as common as having red hair. (People with intersex conditions are sometimes called "{{Hermaphrodite}}") "{{Hermaphrodite}}" depending on culture, though this has fallen out of favour in English.) Like all people, intersex people can have male, female or non-binary genders, and may identify as transgender if their gender doesn't match their bodies or their assigned social roles. Some intersex conditions have a high correlation with gender dysphoria. The exact link between intersex conditions and being trans is currently being scientifically explored.
14th Nov '17 2:21:54 AM Solle
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Despite the trope name, it is very important to note that the currently preferred term is '''transgender''', not '''transsexual'''. The language around trans discourse changes very rapidly, due to being de-medicalised and re-written by trans people themselves instead of by outside onlookers. The demarcation between gender, sex, gender expression and orientation is also subject to constant historical and cultural shifts in perspective -- the realisation that these are different things with only some overlapping points is slowly seeping into in Western consciousness. This should be kept in mind with context to older media and stories from foreign cultures. As a matter of fact, there is still a lot that isn't understood, and because research on the subject is always yielding new discoveries in relatively quick succession, in addition to shifting societal norms and growing understanding that even biology isn't as cut-and-dry as it once was thought to be. It's best to keep an open mind as previously rigidly held, commonplace ideas are challenged.

to:

Despite the trope name, it is very important to note that the currently preferred term is '''transgender''', not '''transsexual'''. The language around trans discourse changes very rapidly, due to being de-medicalised and re-written by trans people themselves instead of by outside onlookers. The demarcation between gender, sex, gender expression and orientation is also subject to constant historical and cultural shifts in perspective -- the realisation that these are different things with only some overlapping points is slowly seeping into in Western consciousness.our modern narratives. This should be kept in mind with context to older media and stories from foreign cultures. As a matter of fact, there is still a lot that isn't understood, and because research on the subject is always yielding new discoveries in relatively quick succession, in addition to shifting societal norms and growing understanding that even biology isn't as cut-and-dry as it once was thought to be. It's best to keep an open mind as previously rigidly held, commonplace ideas are challenged.
14th Nov '17 2:20:50 AM Solle
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Despite the trope name, it is very important to note that the currently preferred term is '''transgender''', not '''transsexual'''. The language around trans discourse changes very rapidly, due to being de-medicalised and re-written by trans people themselves instead of by outside onlookers. The demarcation between being trans, being gender non-conforming and experiencing same-sex attraction is also subject to historical and cultural shifts in perspective. This should be kept in mind with context to older media and stories from foreign cultures. As a matter of fact, there is still a lot that isn't understood, and because research on the subject is always yielding new discoveries in relatively quick succession, in addition to shifting societal norms and growing understanding that even biology isn't as cut-and-dry as it once was thought to be. It's best to keep an open mind as previously rigidly held, commonplace ideas are challenged.

to:

Despite the trope name, it is very important to note that the currently preferred term is '''transgender''', not '''transsexual'''. The language around trans discourse changes very rapidly, due to being de-medicalised and re-written by trans people themselves instead of by outside onlookers. The demarcation between being trans, being gender, sex, gender non-conforming expression and experiencing same-sex attraction orientation is also subject to constant historical and cultural shifts in perspective.perspective -- the realisation that these are different things with only some overlapping points is slowly seeping into in Western consciousness. This should be kept in mind with context to older media and stories from foreign cultures. As a matter of fact, there is still a lot that isn't understood, and because research on the subject is always yielding new discoveries in relatively quick succession, in addition to shifting societal norms and growing understanding that even biology isn't as cut-and-dry as it once was thought to be. It's best to keep an open mind as previously rigidly held, commonplace ideas are challenged.
14th Nov '17 2:12:26 AM Solle
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* '''[[http://www.isna.org/faq/what_is_intersex "Intersex"]]''' refers to atypical prenatal development of genitals, hormones and chromosomes, and is approximately as common as having red hair. (People with intersex conditions are sometimes called "{{Hermaphrodite}}") depending on culture, though this has fallen out of favour in English) Like all people, intersex people can have male, female or non-binary genders, and may identify as transgender if their gender doesn't match their bodies or their assigned social roles. The exact link between intersex conditions and being trans is currently being scientifically explored.

to:

* '''[[http://www.isna.org/faq/what_is_intersex "Intersex"]]''' refers to atypical prenatal development of genitals, hormones and chromosomes, and is approximately as common as having red hair. (People with intersex conditions are sometimes called "{{Hermaphrodite}}") depending on culture, though this has fallen out of favour in English) English.) Like all people, intersex people can have male, female or non-binary genders, and may identify as transgender if their gender doesn't match their bodies or their assigned social roles.roles. Some intersex conditions have a high correlation with gender dysphoria. The exact link between intersex conditions and being trans is currently being scientifically explored.
14th Nov '17 2:11:48 AM Solle
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* '''[[http://www.isna.org/faq/what_is_intersex "Intersex"]]''' refers to atypical development of genitals relative to chromosomes, and is more common than you'd think. (People with intersex conditions are sometimes called "{{Hermaphrodite}}") depending on culture, though this has fallen out of favour in English) Like all people, intersex people can have male, female or non-binary genders, and may identify as transgender if their gender doesn't match their bodies or their assigned social roles.

to:

* '''[[http://www.isna.org/faq/what_is_intersex "Intersex"]]''' refers to atypical prenatal development of genitals relative to genitals, hormones and chromosomes, and is more approximately as common than you'd think.as having red hair. (People with intersex conditions are sometimes called "{{Hermaphrodite}}") depending on culture, though this has fallen out of favour in English) Like all people, intersex people can have male, female or non-binary genders, and may identify as transgender if their gender doesn't match their bodies or their assigned social roles. The exact link between intersex conditions and being trans is currently being scientifically explored.
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