History Main / TorosYFlamenco

12th Jun '17 5:29:02 PM Naram-Sin
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* In the ''Franchise/GrandTheftAuto'' [[FollowTheLeader knock-off]] ''Wheelman'', set in Barcelona and starring Creator/VinDiesel, Vin's contact in the "Catalan underworld" is a skilled thief moonlighting as a Flamenco dancer for no seeming reason than the fact that she's Spanish. She looks very much like a sexy [[PhenotypeStereotype Gypsy woman stereotype]], which would at least add some verosimilitude here, but it is never clear if this was the developers' intention or they were just going for a SpicyLatina instead. There is also Flamenco-inspired music, a couple of missions in the bullring ''La Monumental'' (although it's closed down for reform in the game), and Vin drives a tanker truck brand "Toro de Lidia" at one point.
23rd May '17 2:44:21 AM Naram-Sin
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* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': In "Peter's Got Woods," Peter makes Brian go to a PTA-meeting in his place and Brian's surprised to see Quagmire at the meeting, despite being single and (presumably) not having children--but Quagmire points out to Brian that he's had sex with women all over the world, and that he very well could have kids in their twenties. Soon enough, the show cuts to "Madrid, Spain," represented by a Spanish colonial villa in what appears to be a desert, where a woman (speaking in an [[ShownTheirWork surprisingly good Spaniard accent]]) berates a man who looks like Quagmire (but with a ponytail and a {{Film/Cantinflas}} [[{{Spexico}} 'stache]]) for coming in late. Before leaving again, the man goes on a much-less-well-accented rant ending with "I'm going to see a bullfight!"

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* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': In "Peter's Got Woods," Peter makes Brian go to a PTA-meeting in his place and Brian's Brian is surprised to see Quagmire at the meeting, despite being single and (presumably) not having children--but no children. Quagmire points out to Brian replies that he's he has had sex with women all over the world, and that he very well could have kids in their twenties. Soon enough, the show cuts to "Madrid, Spain," represented by a Spanish colonial villa in what appears to be a desert, where a woman (speaking in an [[ShownTheirWork surprisingly good Spaniard accent]]) berates a man who looks like Quagmire (but with a ponytail and a {{Film/Cantinflas}} [[{{Spexico}} 'stache]]) for coming in late. Before leaving again, the man goes on a much-less-well-accented rant ending with "I'm going to see a bullfight!"
6th May '17 6:48:07 PM Dravencour
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* ''Film/CitySlickers'' opens during the annual Running of the Bulls in Pamplona, Spain, which the protagonists get caught up in.
24th Apr '17 12:20:44 PM Sukeban
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Meanwhile, the [[RegionalRiff music department]] will invariably and uniformingly consist of Flamenco, or something aiming to sound like Flamenco, with Spanish guitar, castanets, tap-dancing and "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cante_jondo deep song]]". In RealLife, this music style originated in Andalusia and the city of Seville in particular. Elsewhere in Spain, it is practically a niche genre associated with Gypsies[[note]]Almost half of Spain's Gypsies live in Andalusia[[/note]] and Andalusian immigrants and their descendants.

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Meanwhile, the [[RegionalRiff music department]] will invariably and uniformingly consist of Flamenco, or something aiming to sound like Flamenco, with Spanish guitar, castanets, tap-dancing and "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cante_jondo deep song]]". In RealLife, this music style originated in Andalusia and the city of Seville in particular. Elsewhere in Spain, it is practically a niche genre associated with Gypsies[[note]]Almost [[{{UsefulNotes/Romani}} Roma people]][[note]]Almost half of Spain's Gypsies Roma live in Andalusia[[/note]] and Andalusian immigrants and their descendants.
5th Apr '17 11:07:48 AM StFan
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* ''Tom Clancy's Op-Center: Balance of Power'' (which wasn't really written by Creator/TomClancy but by a ghost writer like the rest of the series) should be considered one of the most blatant examples of CriticalResearchFailure, as the EthnicScrappy Spaniards are constantly characterized with the worst stereotypes [[SouthOfTheBorder about Mexico]][[note]]A gringo's idea of Mexico anyway[[/note]], and the whole "ethnic tension" that serves as motif of the book is said to rely on ''racial'' grounds with no linguistic or cultural differences whatsoever. The book goes as far as to claim that you can tell a Castilian apart of a Catalan because of his ''darker face''. Special nod goes to [[SmallReferencePools Luis]] [[{{Series/Zorro}} García]] [[{{Franchise/Zorro}} de la Vega]], the '[[InterpolSpecialAgent Interpol chief]]' in Madrid:

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* ''Tom Clancy's Op-Center: Balance of Power'' (which wasn't really written by Creator/TomClancy but by a ghost writer like the rest of the series) should be considered one of the most blatant examples of CriticalResearchFailure, as the EthnicScrappy Spaniards are constantly characterized with the worst stereotypes [[SouthOfTheBorder about Mexico]][[note]]A gringo's idea of Mexico anyway[[/note]], and the whole "ethnic tension" that serves as motif of the book is said to rely on ''racial'' grounds with no linguistic or cultural differences whatsoever. The book goes as far as to claim that you can tell a Castilian apart of a Catalan because of his ''darker face''. Special nod goes to [[SmallReferencePools Luis]] [[{{Series/Zorro}} [[Series/{{Zorro}} García]] [[{{Franchise/Zorro}} [[Franchise/{{Zorro}} de la Vega]], the '[[InterpolSpecialAgent "[[InterpolSpecialAgent Interpol chief]]' chief]]" in Madrid:



* Literature/{{Discworld}}

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* Literature/{{Discworld}}''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':



* Creator/SidneySheldon's ''The Sands of Time'' grabs this trope hard in the first line of the prologue and doesn't let it go until the end of the epilogue, 400 pages later. Colorfully-costumed gypsies traveling in wooden wagons are a common sight in 1970s Segovia[[note]]We only have a couple mentions that Franco died the year before as hints of this; otherwise, the prologue and epilogue push the idea that the book is set in the modern day (1988 at the time it was released), and the description of the country is consistently between Hemingway's ''For whom the bell tolls'' and Mérimée's ''Carmen.''[[/note]], everyone is a fan of El Cid, the only source of entertainment is bullfighting-related,[[note]]With special mention to the version of [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans Pamplona's Running]] that opens the book, [[WritersHaveNoSenseOfScale where the bulls knock down statues and chunks of buildings.]][[/note]] the only dance is flamenco, the only meals are chorizo, gazpacho and paella, and the only thing resembling political activism is done by the Catholic Church (which is portrayed as the mortal enemy of the [[UsefulNotes/TheFrancoRegime Francoist dictatorship]] and [[ArtisticLicenseHistory every Spanish government of the past 300 years]] ''except'' for the [[CriticalResearchFailure Second Republic]]). The main plot follows four [[AuthorAppeal sexually repressed]] HollywoodNuns [[NunTooHoly as they ride shotgun]] with a group of [[WillTheyOrWontThey alluring]] LovableRogue [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters ETA terrorists]] while they travel through the Guadarrama mountains killing fascists and being cheered on by the people, {{Zorro}}-style.

to:

* Creator/SidneySheldon's ''The Sands of Time'' grabs this trope hard in the first line of the prologue and doesn't let it go until the end of the epilogue, 400 pages later. Colorfully-costumed gypsies traveling in wooden wagons are a common sight in 1970s Segovia[[note]]We only have a couple mentions that Franco died the year before as hints of this; otherwise, the prologue and epilogue push the idea that the book is set in the modern day (1988 at the time it was released), and the description of the country is consistently between Hemingway's ''For whom the bell tolls'' and Mérimée's ''Carmen.''[[/note]], everyone is a fan of El Cid, the only source of entertainment is bullfighting-related,[[note]]With special mention to the version of [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans Pamplona's Running]] that opens the book, [[WritersHaveNoSenseOfScale where the bulls knock down statues and chunks of buildings.]][[/note]] the only dance is flamenco, the only meals are chorizo, gazpacho and paella, and the only thing resembling political activism is done by the Catholic Church (which is portrayed as the mortal enemy of the [[UsefulNotes/TheFrancoRegime Francoist dictatorship]] and [[ArtisticLicenseHistory every Spanish government of the past 300 years]] ''except'' for the [[CriticalResearchFailure Second Republic]]). The main plot follows four [[AuthorAppeal sexually repressed]] HollywoodNuns [[NunTooHoly as they ride shotgun]] with a group of [[WillTheyOrWontThey alluring]] LovableRogue [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters ETA terrorists]] while they travel through the Guadarrama mountains killing fascists and being cheered on by the people, {{Zorro}}-style.Franchise/{{Zorro}}-style.



* There are three things you can expect any Spanish euro store to have (even moreso if frequented by tourists): a stuffed bull, a ''sevillana'' dancer doll, and a [[{{Spexico}} Mexican hat]]. There is at least some justification to that, as those Mexican ''sombreros'' '''are''' descendants of the broad-brimmed hats worn in Andalusia, but they look nothing like their ancestors.[[note]]Most common of these, ''sombrero cordobés'', is actually the hat that {{Franchise/Zorro}} traditionally wore a medium sized hat with the flat circular brim and the low cylindrical crown. The Mexican hat, with its tall conical crown and enormous upturned brim probably descended from another variant, ''sombrero de catite''.[[/note]]
* It should be noted here that the usual depiction of the Spanish countryside as the classical depictions of southwestern North America, with a similar climate (and dotted with towns of whitewashed buildings), has its exceptions not only on its mountainous regions but also mainly in the form of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Spain northermost Spain]], whose considerably wetter and milder climate gives it lush landscapes similar to those of Great Britain or Ireland.
** In Galicia and Asturias, the similarity with the British Isles even exists at a geological level. As a result, the traditional architecture there is also dominated by grey stone walls and black shale roofs, not at all white lime and red tiles.

to:

* There are three things you can expect any Spanish euro store to have (even moreso if frequented by tourists): a stuffed bull, a ''sevillana'' dancer doll, and a [[{{Spexico}} Mexican hat]]. There is at least some justification to that, as those Mexican ''sombreros'' '''are''' descendants of the broad-brimmed hats worn in Andalusia, but they look nothing like their ancestors.[[note]]Most common of these, ''sombrero cordobés'', is actually the hat that {{Franchise/Zorro}} Franchise/{{Zorro}} traditionally wore -- a medium sized medium-sized hat with the flat circular brim and the low cylindrical crown. The Mexican hat, with its tall conical crown and enormous upturned brim probably descended from another variant, ''sombrero de catite''.[[/note]]
* It should be noted here that the usual depiction of the Spanish countryside as the classical depictions of southwestern North America, with a similar climate (and dotted with towns of whitewashed buildings), has its exceptions not only on its mountainous regions but also mainly in the form of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Spain northermost Spain]], whose considerably wetter and milder climate gives it lush landscapes similar to those of Great Britain or Ireland.
**
Ireland. In Galicia and Asturias, the similarity with the British Isles even exists at a geological level. As a result, the traditional architecture there is also dominated by grey stone walls and black shale roofs, not at all white lime and red tiles.
29th Mar '17 8:39:41 AM Naram-Sin
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* Parodied in the classic Spanish film ''¡Bienvenido, Mr. Marshall!'', in which the people of a small Castilian village decide to give themselves an Andalusian makeover in order to impress the Americans in charge of distributing Marshall Plan funds.

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* Parodied in the classic Spanish film ''¡Bienvenido, ''[[Film/WelcomeMrMarshall Welcome Mr. Marshall!'', Marshall]]!'', in which the people of a small Castilian village decide to give themselves an Andalusian makeover in order to impress the Americans in charge of distributing Marshall Plan funds.
11th Mar '17 9:25:18 AM TMNTFanGirl
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* ''WesternAnimation/SylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'' has one episode where Granny and her pets go to Pamplona and Sylvester has to constantly run away from bulls. Bonus points for getting the festival's name right.
* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': In "Peter's Got Woods", Peter sends Brian to a PTA meeting in his place and he is surprised to find Quagmire there because he is single. Quagmire says that he has slept with so many women over the years that he wouldn't be surprised if he had a 20-year old son somewhere. Soon enough, the show cuts to "Madrid, Spain", represented by a Spanish colonial villa in what appears to be a desert, where a woman (speaking in an [[ShownTheirWork unexpectedly good Spaniard accent]]) berates an adult son that looks [[UncannyFamilyResemblance just like Quagmire]] with a ponytail and a {{Film/Cantinflas}} [[{{Spexico}} 'stache]] for coming in late. Before leaving again, the son goes on a much-less-well accented rant ending with "I'm going to see a bullfight!".

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/SylvesterAndTweetyMysteries'' has one episode where Granny and her pets go to Pamplona and Sylvester has to constantly run away from bulls. Bonus points for also getting the festival's name right.
* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': In "Peter's Got Woods", Woods," Peter sends makes Brian go to a PTA meeting PTA-meeting in his place and he is Brian's surprised to find see Quagmire there because he is single. at the meeting, despite being single and (presumably) not having children--but Quagmire says points out to Brian that he has slept he's had sex with so many women all over the years world, and that he wouldn't be surprised if he had a 20-year old son somewhere. very well could have kids in their twenties. Soon enough, the show cuts to "Madrid, Spain", Spain," represented by a Spanish colonial villa in what appears to be a desert, where a woman (speaking in an [[ShownTheirWork unexpectedly surprisingly good Spaniard accent]]) berates an adult son that a man who looks [[UncannyFamilyResemblance just like Quagmire]] Quagmire (but with a ponytail and a {{Film/Cantinflas}} [[{{Spexico}} 'stache]] 'stache]]) for coming in late. Before leaving again, the son man goes on a much-less-well accented much-less-well-accented rant ending with "I'm going to see a bullfight!".bullfight!"
2nd Mar '17 4:56:53 AM Naram-Sin
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* The episode "El Toro Bravo" of ''Series/CriminalMindsBeyondBorders'', starting with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the title itself]]. Two killers involved in the bullfighting business see themselves as a master and apprentice matador when they "bullfight" foreign tourists who disrespect the bulls or the festival itself during [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans the Running of the Bulls of Pamplona]]. And the police can't catch the killers sooner because everyone in Spain is a sucker to the Catholic Church and [[AristocratsAreEvil old names]], even after they have [[ImpoverishedPatrician fallen in disgrace]] [[IdiotPlot in the most nonsensical way possible]]. Throw in some [[SymbologyResearchFailure bizarre references]] to ''Literature/DonQuixote'' and Basque nationalism, techno-Flamenco in the beginning and bullfighting-inspired music at the end, and more Spanish flags and 1950s Bull Run posters than you can hang on ''Series/Westworld'''s [[{{Spexico}} Mexican village set]], and you have your Spanish episode.

to:

* The episode "El Toro Bravo" of ''Series/CriminalMindsBeyondBorders'', starting with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the title itself]]. Two killers involved in the bullfighting business see themselves as a master and apprentice matador when they "bullfight" foreign tourists who disrespect the bulls or the festival itself during [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans the Running of the Bulls of Pamplona]]. And the police can't catch the killers sooner because everyone in Spain is a sucker to the Catholic Church and [[AristocratsAreEvil old names]], even after they have [[ImpoverishedPatrician fallen in disgrace]] [[IdiotPlot in the most nonsensical way possible]]. Throw in some [[SymbologyResearchFailure bizarre references]] to ''Literature/DonQuixote'' and Basque nationalism, techno-Flamenco in the beginning and bullfighting-inspired music at the end, and more Spanish flags and 1950s Bull Run posters than you can hang on ''Series/Westworld'''s ''{{Series/Westworld}}'''s [[{{Spexico}} Mexican village set]], and you have your Spanish episode.
2nd Mar '17 4:51:16 AM Naram-Sin
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* The episode "El Toro Bravo" of ''Series/CriminalMindsBeyondBorders'', starting with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the title itself]]. Two killers involved in the bullfighting business see themselves as a master and apprentice matador when they "bullfight" foreign tourists who disrespect the bulls or the festival itself during [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans the Running of the Bulls of Pamplona]]. And the police can't catch the killers sooner because everyone in Spain is a sucker to the Catholic Church and [[AristocratsAreEvil old names]], even after they have [[ImpoverishedPatrician fallen in disgrace]]. Throw in some [[SymbologyResearchFailure bizarre references]] to ''Literature/DonQuixote'' and Basque nationalism, a bit of techno-Flamenco in the beginning and bullfighting-inspired music at the end and you have your Spanish episode.

to:

* The episode "El Toro Bravo" of ''Series/CriminalMindsBeyondBorders'', starting with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the title itself]]. Two killers involved in the bullfighting business see themselves as a master and apprentice matador when they "bullfight" foreign tourists who disrespect the bulls or the festival itself during [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans the Running of the Bulls of Pamplona]]. And the police can't catch the killers sooner because everyone in Spain is a sucker to the Catholic Church and [[AristocratsAreEvil old names]], even after they have [[ImpoverishedPatrician fallen in disgrace]]. disgrace]] [[IdiotPlot in the most nonsensical way possible]]. Throw in some [[SymbologyResearchFailure bizarre references]] to ''Literature/DonQuixote'' and Basque nationalism, a bit of techno-Flamenco in the beginning and bullfighting-inspired music at the end end, and more Spanish flags and 1950s Bull Run posters than you can hang on ''Series/Westworld'''s [[{{Spexico}} Mexican village set]], and you have your Spanish episode.



* ''Series/EmptyNest'': In "Harry's Excellent Adventure", Harry travels with his brother to Pamplona for the Running of the Bulls. They hang in a very narrow and typically Mediterranean whitewashed alley, [[{{Spexico}} drinking tequila]], until the bull herd suddenly runs on them unnanounced and they have to flee. On the wall behind there is a poster announcing a corrida with Gitanillo de Triana and Manolete, two bullfighters that died on the arena in 1931 and 1947, respectively.

to:

* ''Series/EmptyNest'': In "Harry's Excellent Adventure", Harry travels with his brother to Pamplona for the Running of the Bulls. They hang in a very narrow and typically Mediterranean whitewashed alley, [[{{Spexico}} drinking tequila]], until the bull herd suddenly runs on them unnanounced and they have to flee. On the wall behind there is a poster announcing a corrida with Gitanillo de Triana and Manolete, two bullfighters that who died on the arena in 1931 and 1947, respectively.
2nd Mar '17 4:38:05 AM Naram-Sin
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* Creator/SidneySheldon's ''The Sands of Time'' grabs this trope hard in the first line of the prologue and doesn't let it go until the end of the epilogue, 400 pages later. Colorfully-costumed gypsies traveling in wooden wagons are a common sight in 1970s Segovia[[note]]We only have a couple mentions that Franco died the year before as hints of this; otherwise, the prologue and epilogue push the idea that the book is set in the modern day (1988 at the time it was released), and the description of the country is consistently between Hemingway's ''For whom the bell tolls'' and Mérimée's ''Carmen.''[[/note]], everyone is a fan of El Cid, the only source of entertainment is bullfighting-related,[[note]]a special mention is deserved by the version of [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans Pamplona's Running]] that opens the book, [[WritersHaveNoSenseOfScale with bulls knocking down statues and chunks of buildings]][[/note]] the only dance is flamenco, the only meals are chorizo, gazpacho and paella, and the only thing resembling political activism is done by the Catholic Church (which is portrayed as the mortal enemy of the [[UsefulNotes/TheFrancoRegime Francoist dictatorship]] and [[ArtisticLicenseHistory every Spanish government of the past 300 years]] ''except'' for the [[CriticalResearchFailure Second Republic]]). The main plot follows four [[AuthorAppeal sexually repressed]] HollywoodNuns [[NunTooHoly as they ride shotgun]] with a group of [[WillTheyOrWontThey alluring]] LovableRogue [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters ETA terrorists]] while they travel through the Guadarrama mountains killing fascists and being cheered on by the people, {{Zorro}}-style.

to:

* Creator/SidneySheldon's ''The Sands of Time'' grabs this trope hard in the first line of the prologue and doesn't let it go until the end of the epilogue, 400 pages later. Colorfully-costumed gypsies traveling in wooden wagons are a common sight in 1970s Segovia[[note]]We only have a couple mentions that Franco died the year before as hints of this; otherwise, the prologue and epilogue push the idea that the book is set in the modern day (1988 at the time it was released), and the description of the country is consistently between Hemingway's ''For whom the bell tolls'' and Mérimée's ''Carmen.''[[/note]], everyone is a fan of El Cid, the only source of entertainment is bullfighting-related,[[note]]a bullfighting-related,[[note]]With special mention is deserved by to the version of [[ItsAlwaysMardiGrasInNewOrleans Pamplona's Running]] that opens the book, [[WritersHaveNoSenseOfScale with where the bulls knocking knock down statues and chunks of buildings]][[/note]] buildings.]][[/note]] the only dance is flamenco, the only meals are chorizo, gazpacho and paella, and the only thing resembling political activism is done by the Catholic Church (which is portrayed as the mortal enemy of the [[UsefulNotes/TheFrancoRegime Francoist dictatorship]] and [[ArtisticLicenseHistory every Spanish government of the past 300 years]] ''except'' for the [[CriticalResearchFailure Second Republic]]). The main plot follows four [[AuthorAppeal sexually repressed]] HollywoodNuns [[NunTooHoly as they ride shotgun]] with a group of [[WillTheyOrWontThey alluring]] LovableRogue [[YourTerroristsAreOurFreedomFighters ETA terrorists]] while they travel through the Guadarrama mountains killing fascists and being cheered on by the people, {{Zorro}}-style.
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