History Main / Toku

30th Jan '16 7:43:53 PM MagnusForce
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* ''Zone Fighter'', which notably had Franchise/{{Godzilla}} as a recurring character and King Ghidorah and Gigan as the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Monsters of the Week]].
to:
* ''Zone Fighter'', which notably had Franchise/{{Godzilla}} as a recurring character and King Ghidorah and Gigan as the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Monsters of the Week]].''Series/ZoneFighter''
26th Jan '16 9:22:05 PM MagnusForce
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Added DiffLines:
* ''Zone Fighter'', which notably had Franchise/{{Godzilla}} as a recurring character and King Ghidorah and Gigan as the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Monsters of the Week]].
15th Jan '16 10:51:34 AM Mikeyfan93
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* ''Series/MegaPowers'' - A Brazilian ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' knock-off from the folks at Creator/VideoBrinquedo.
3rd Jan '16 5:45:38 PM MagnusForce
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* {{Toho}} (Franchise/{{Godzilla}},{{Mothra}})
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* {{Toho}} Creator/{{Toho}} (Franchise/{{Godzilla}},{{Mothra}})
3rd Jan '16 5:45:24 PM MagnusForce
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* TsuburayaProductions ([[Franchise/UltraSeries Ultraman]]) * ToeiCompany (Franchise/KamenRider, Franchise/SuperSentai)
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* TsuburayaProductions Creator/TsuburayaProductions ([[Franchise/UltraSeries Ultraman]]) * ToeiCompany Creator/ToeiCompany (Franchise/KamenRider, Franchise/SuperSentai)
19th Dec '15 10:20:50 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/TheAquabatsSuperShow'' - Not quite in this genre, but takes a lot from it, mixed with the campy asthetics of old SidAndMartyKrofftProductions shows.
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* ''Series/TheAquabatsSuperShow'' - Not quite in this genre, but takes a lot from it, mixed with the campy asthetics aesthetics of old SidAndMartyKrofftProductions Creator/SidAndMartyKrofftProductions shows.
9th Dec '15 8:20:39 AM mlsmithca
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For that matter, lordeepdave1's edit from July of this year was also copy-pasted wholesale from The Other Wiki.
Tokusatsu (特撮) is a Japanese term that applies to any live-action film or television drama that features considerable use of special effects (tokusatsu literally translates as "special filming" in Japanese). Tokusatsu entertainment often deals with science fiction, fantasy or horror, but movies and television shows in other genres can sometimes count as tokusatsu as well. The most popular types of tokusatsu include kaiju monster movies like the Godzilla and Gamera film series; superhero TV serials such as the Kamen Rider and Metal Hero series; and mecha dramas like Giant Robo. Some tokusatsu television programs combine several of these subgenres, for example the Ultraman and Super Sentai series. Tokusatsu is one of the most popular forms of Japanese entertainment, but most tokusatsu movies and television programs are not widely known outside Asia. Tokusatsu had two major periods, dubbed the "Monster Boom" and the "Henshin Boom". The Monster Boom was started by Godzilla and famously saw the rise of many daikaiju pictures in the film industry. Henshin Boom was started by KamenRider, and it greatly influenced how action heroes worked and its effects can still be seen today in the superhero and action-adventure genre. Suitmation (スーツメーション Sūtsumēshon?) is a term originally used in Japan for a tokusatsu technique to portray a daikaiju (giant monster) using a suit actor in a monster suit, often moving through scale model scenery to give the impression of large size, as well as filming them at a higher framerate, to make them appear slower. The term can be used when puppet does not apply, since the puppet is being worn by an actor, and when costume does not apply, since the costume is also being controlled by a puppeteer. The technique was initially developed by Eiji Tsuburaya for use in Godzilla films and then used for his Ultra Series productions. The following are considered suitmation: the creature costumes of some B-movies, notably An American Werewolf in London, and the American television satire Dinosaurs; the full-body costumes of Jim Henson's Creature Shop, in particular the pre-Creature Shop creations of The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth; and also other creations of his such as Big Bird and Sweetums. The 2009 film ''Where the Wild Things Are'' uses a suitmation technique combined with computer-generated imagery to depict the Wild Things. Toku series and franchises include:A suit actor (スーツアクター sūtsu akutā?) is a member of, usually, a Japanese tokusatsu production who works similar to a stunt performer. However, the suit actor does all of his or her stunts while in a full costume that normally obscures their identity from the viewer (typically the transformed character) and performs pantomime, as an actor's voice will generally be dubbed during after-recording process (アフレコ afureko?).
to:
Tokusatsu (特撮) "Tokusatsu" (特撮), often shortened to just "Toku", is a the Japanese term that applies to any live-action film or television drama that features considerable use effects genre[[note]]("Tokusatsu" coming from "tokushu satsuei," meaning "special photography")[[/note]]. Though the overlap is not total, it can, at least casually, be considered the live-action analogue to {{Anime}} (at least, to the subset of anime best known to casual viewers in the west). Originally, Toku differentiated itself from western visual effects genres by its preference for "live" effects (ie. PeopleInRubberSuits) over the equally phony special effects (tokusatsu literally translates as "special filming" in Japanese). Tokusatsu entertainment often deals with science fiction, fantasy or horror, but movies and television shows in other genres can sometimes count as tokusatsu as well. The most popular types of tokusatsu include kaiju monster movies like created during editing (at the Godzilla and Gamera film series; superhero TV serials such as the Kamen Rider and Metal Hero series; and mecha dramas like Giant Robo. Some tokusatsu television programs combine several of these subgenres, for example the Ultraman and Super Sentai series. Tokusatsu is one time of the most popular genre's birth, specifically the stop-motion techniques pioneered by Creator/RayHarryhausen, now CGI). Modern Toku uses both forms of Japanese entertainment, effect, but most tokusatsu movies and television programs "live" effects are not widely known outside Asia. still preferred, particularly WireFu. Tokusatsu had two major periods, dubbed the "Monster Boom" and the "Henshin Boom". The Monster Boom was started by Godzilla and famously saw the rise of many daikaiju pictures in the film industry. Henshin Boom was started by KamenRider, ''Franchise/KamenRider'', and it greatly influenced how action heroes worked and its effects can still be seen today in the superhero and action-adventure genre. Suitmation (スーツメーション Sūtsumēshon?) Like Anime and Manga, Toku is a term originally used one of those terms that means slightly different things in Japan for a tokusatsu technique and the West. While Westerners use it to portray a daikaiju (giant monster) using a suit actor refer almost exclusively to the Japanese superhero shows, in a monster suit, often moving through Japan it simply refers to any live-action production which makes extensive use of special effects. This means that, to the Japanese, things like ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', ''Series/StargateSG1'', ''Series/DoctorWho'', ''Series/KnightRider'', and ''Series/RedDwarf'' count as Toku. This list also includes shows that use puppetry, like Gerry Anderson's {{Supermarionation}} series ''Series/{{Thunderbirds}}'' and ''{{Series/Terrahawks}}'', and even ''ThomasTheTankEngine''. Far and away, the [[TropeCodifier most popular early example]] of Toku is the ''Franchise/{{Godzilla}}'' film franchise, which exemplifies many of the genre's tropes: PeopleInRubberSuits smashing scale model scenery to give cities, and an abundance of {{squib}}s. Most of the impression examples of large size, as well as filming them at a higher framerate, to make them appear slower. The term can be used when puppet does not apply, since Toku series are actually [[SeriesFranchise franchises]] of the puppet is being worn by an actor, {{Sentai}} and when costume does not apply, since the costume is also being controlled by a puppeteer. The technique was initially developed by Eiji Tsuburaya for use in Godzilla films and then used for his Ultra Series productions. The following are considered suitmation: the creature costumes of some B-movies, notably An American Werewolf in London, and the American television satire Dinosaurs; the full-body costumes of Jim Henson's Creature Shop, in particular the pre-Creature Shop creations of The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth; and also other creations of his such as Big Bird and Sweetums. The 2009 film ''Where the Wild Things Are'' uses a suitmation technique combined with computer-generated imagery to depict the Wild Things. HenshinHero variety, producing many separate but related series. Toku series and franchises include:A suit actor (スーツアクター sūtsu akutā?) is a member of, usually, a Japanese tokusatsu production who works similar to a stunt performer. However, the suit actor does all of his or her stunts while in a full costume that normally obscures their identity from the viewer (typically the transformed character) and performs pantomime, as an actor's voice will generally be dubbed during after-recording process (アフレコ afureko?). include:
9th Dec '15 8:14:11 AM mlsmithca
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Reverting edits copy-pasted wholesale from The Other Wiki.
The 2009 film Where the Wild Things Are uses a suitmation technique combined with computer-generated imagery to depict the Wild Things. The latest to utilize this technique are the two-part live-action adaptation of, "Attack on Titan", where the the titan-shifters are being portrayed by actors in suits, in particular, the Rogue Titan (Eren Yeager), the Armored Titan (Captain Shikishima), and the Colossal Titan (General Kubal). Unfortunately, with the exception of these characters, only a mere number of Titans were actually utilizing this technique of suitmation, with their facial make-up being replaced with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Popular franchises Protagonists of the popular tokusatsu franchises of the late 1970s (from back to front, left to right): The Ultraman (Ultra Series), Battle Fever J (Super Sentai), Kamen Rider Stronger and Kamen Rider V3 (Kamen Rider Series), and Spider-Man. The photo also features anime character Doraemon on the far left. Since about 1960, several long-running television-series have combined various other themes. Tsuburaya Productions has had the Ultra Series starting with Ultra Q and Ultraman in 1966. P Productions began their foray into tokusatsu in 1966 with the series Ambassador Magma. They also had involvement in the Lion-Maru series which concluded in November 2006. Toei Company has several series that fall under their Toei Superheroes category of programming, starting in 1961 with the single series, Moonlight Mask. Then, they produced several other long running series, starting with Shotaro Ishinomori's Kamen Rider Series in 1971, the Super Sentai series in 1975, the Metal Hero Series in 1982, and the Toei Fushigi Comedy Series in 1981. Toei also produced several other television series based on Ishinomori's works, including Android Kikaider and Kikaider 01, Robot Detective, Inazuman and Inazuman Flash, and Kaiketsu Zubat. Toei was also involved in the Spider-Man television series, which influenced their subsequent Super Sentai series. In 2003, TV Asahi began broadcasting the Super Sentai and Kamen Rider series in a one-hour block known as Super Hero Time. Toho, the creators of Godzilla, also had their hands in creating the Chouseishin Series of programs from 2003 to 2006. In 2006, Keita Amemiya's Garo, a mature late-night tokusatsu drama was released, starting a franchise composed of several television series and films. Other mature late-night series followed, including a revival of Lion-Maru in Lion-Maru G, the Daimajin Kanon television series (based on the Daimajin film series), and Shougeki Gouraigan!! (also created by Amemiya). Outside Japan Tokusatsu techniques have spread outside Japan due to the popularity of the Godzilla films, as well as the Power Rangers boom in the 1990s. Japanese fan films Hideaki Anno, Yoshiyuki Sadamoto, Takami Akai, and Shinji Higuchi set up a fan-based group called Daicon Film, which they renamed Gainax in 1985 and turned into an animation studio. Besides anime sequences, they also produced a series of tokusatsu shorts parodying monster movies and superhero shows. These productions include Patriotic Squadron Dai-Nippon (1983), Swift Hero Noutenki (1982), Return of Ultraman (1983) and The Eight-Headed Giant Serpent Strikes Back (1985). Adaptations[edit] Godzilla, King of the Monsters! first appeared in English in 1956. Rather than a simple dub of the Japanese-language original, this work represented an entirely re-edited version which restructured the plot to incorporate a new character played by an American actor, Raymond Burr. Ultraman gained popularity when United Artists dubbed it for American audiences in the 1960s. A major influx of tokusatsu adaptations came to American television in the 1990s, starting in 1993 with Saban Entertainment's purchase of footage from Toei's sixteenth installment of their long-running Super Sentai series, Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger to become Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers and start the popular Power Rangers franchise. Subsequent seasons of Super Sentai would be adapted in similar fashion for later seasons of the show. Saban also purchased footage from several of the Metal Hero Series television programs, turning Choujinki Metalder, Jikuu Senshi Spielban, and Uchuu Keiji Shaider into VR Troopers in 1994 and Juukou B-Fighter and its sequel B-Fighter Kabuto into Big Bad Beetleborgs and its sequel Beetleborgs Metallix in 1996 and 1997. They also purchased the Kamen Rider Series' Kamen Rider Black RX to produce Saban's Masked Rider in 1995. Around this time, DIC Entertainment attempted to compete with Power Rangers by taking Tsuburaya Productions' Denkou Choujin Gridman to create Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad in 1994, before later attempting an original concept. In 2002, 4Kids Entertainment bought the rights to Ultraman Tiga, but simply produced a dub of the Japanese footage, broadcast on the Fox Box. And in 2009, Adness Entertainment took 2002's Kamen Rider Ryuki and turned it into Kamen Rider: Dragon Knight, which began broadcast on The CW4Kids in 2009. It won the first Daytime Emmy for "Outstanding Stunt Coordination" for its original scenes. Original productions In 1961 England-based film-makers produced the Godzilla-style film, Gorgo, which used the same suitmation technique as the Godzilla films. That same year, Saga Studios in Denmark made another Godzilla-style giant monster film, Reptilicus, bringing its monster to life using a marionette on a miniature set. In 1967, South Korea produced its own monster movie titled Yonggary. In 1975, Shaw Brothers produced a superhero film called The Super Inframan, based on the huge success of Ultraman and Kamen Rider there. The film starred Danny Lee in the title role. Although there were several other similar superhero productions in Hong Kong, The Super Inframan came first. With help from Japanese special effects artists under Sadamasa Arikawa, they also produced a Japanese-styled monster movie, The Mighty Peking Man, in 1977. Concurrent with their work on Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad, DIC attempted an original concept based on the popularity of Power Rangers in 1994's Tattooed Teenage Alien Fighters from Beverly Hills. In 1998, video from an attempted Power Rangers-styled adaptation of Sailor Moon surfaced, combining original footage of American actresses with original animated sequences; despite no participation on behalf of Saban Entertainment (instrumental behind Power Rangers, VR Troopers, and Beetleborgs), the footage is derisively called "Saban Moon". In the 2000s, production companies in East Asia began producing their own original tokusatsu-inspired television series: Thailand's Sport Ranger and South Korea's Erexion in 2006, China's Armor Hero pinyin: Kǎi Jiǎ Yǒng Sh) in 2009, Giant Saver pinyin: Jshn zhn j du) in 2013, Metal Kaiser 士; pinyin: Wǔ Lng Q Jin Sh) and Indonesia's Bima Satria Garuda which began in 2013 Homage and parody In 2001, Buki X-1 Productions, a French fan-based production company, produced its own series, Jushi Sentai France Five (now called Shin Kenjushi France Five), a tribute to Toei's long running Super Sentai series. The low-budget television series Kaiju Big Battel directly parodies monster and Kyodai Hero films and series by immersing their own costumed characters in professional wrestling matches among cardboard buildings. In 2006, Mighty Moshin' Emo Rangers premiered on the internet as a Power Rangers spoof, but was quickly picked up by MTV UK for broadcast. In 2006, Insector Sun, a low-budget tribute to Kamen Rider was produced by Brazilian fans.
to:
The 2009 film Where ''Where the Wild Things Are Are'' uses a suitmation technique combined with computer-generated imagery to depict the Wild Things. The latest to utilize this technique are the two-part live-action adaptation of, "Attack on Titan", where the the titan-shifters are being portrayed by actors in suits, in particular, the Rogue Titan (Eren Yeager), the Armored Titan (Captain Shikishima), Things. Toku series and the Colossal Titan (General Kubal). Unfortunately, with the exception of these characters, only a mere number of Titans were actually utilizing this technique of suitmation, with their facial make-up being replaced with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Popular franchises Protagonists of the popular tokusatsu franchises of the late 1970s (from back to front, left to right): The Ultraman (Ultra Series), Battle Fever J (Super Sentai), Kamen Rider Stronger and Kamen Rider V3 (Kamen Rider Series), and Spider-Man. The photo also features anime character Doraemon on the far left. Since about 1960, several long-running television-series have combined various other themes. Tsuburaya Productions has had the Ultra Series starting with Ultra Q and Ultraman in 1966. P Productions began their foray into include:A suit actor (スーツアクター sūtsu akutā?) is a member of, usually, a Japanese tokusatsu in 1966 with the series Ambassador Magma. They also had involvement in the Lion-Maru series which concluded in November 2006. Toei Company has several series that fall under their Toei Superheroes category of programming, starting in 1961 with the single series, Moonlight Mask. Then, they produced several other long running series, starting with Shotaro Ishinomori's Kamen Rider Series in 1971, the Super Sentai series in 1975, the Metal Hero Series in 1982, and the Toei Fushigi Comedy Series in 1981. Toei also produced several other television series based on Ishinomori's works, including Android Kikaider and Kikaider 01, Robot Detective, Inazuman and Inazuman Flash, and Kaiketsu Zubat. Toei was also involved in the Spider-Man television series, which influenced their subsequent Super Sentai series. In 2003, TV Asahi began broadcasting the Super Sentai and Kamen Rider series in a one-hour block known as Super Hero Time. Toho, the creators of Godzilla, also had their hands in creating the Chouseishin Series of programs from 2003 to 2006. In 2006, Keita Amemiya's Garo, a mature late-night tokusatsu drama was released, starting a franchise composed of several television series and films. Other mature late-night series followed, including a revival of Lion-Maru in Lion-Maru G, the Daimajin Kanon television series (based on the Daimajin film series), and Shougeki Gouraigan!! (also created by Amemiya). Outside Japan Tokusatsu techniques have spread outside Japan due to the popularity of the Godzilla films, as well as the Power Rangers boom in the 1990s. Japanese fan films Hideaki Anno, Yoshiyuki Sadamoto, Takami Akai, and Shinji Higuchi set up a fan-based group called Daicon Film, which they renamed Gainax in 1985 and turned into an animation studio. Besides anime sequences, they also produced a series of tokusatsu shorts parodying monster movies and superhero shows. These productions include Patriotic Squadron Dai-Nippon (1983), Swift Hero Noutenki (1982), Return of Ultraman (1983) and The Eight-Headed Giant Serpent Strikes Back (1985). Adaptations[edit] Godzilla, King of the Monsters! first appeared in English in 1956. Rather than a simple dub of the Japanese-language original, this work represented an entirely re-edited version which restructured the plot to incorporate a new character played by an American actor, Raymond Burr. Ultraman gained popularity when United Artists dubbed it for American audiences in the 1960s. A major influx of tokusatsu adaptations came to American television in the 1990s, starting in 1993 with Saban Entertainment's purchase of footage from Toei's sixteenth installment of their long-running Super Sentai series, Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger to become Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers and start the popular Power Rangers franchise. Subsequent seasons of Super Sentai would be adapted in similar fashion for later seasons of the show. Saban also purchased footage from several of the Metal Hero Series television programs, turning Choujinki Metalder, Jikuu Senshi Spielban, and Uchuu Keiji Shaider into VR Troopers in 1994 and Juukou B-Fighter and its sequel B-Fighter Kabuto into Big Bad Beetleborgs and its sequel Beetleborgs Metallix in 1996 and 1997. They also purchased the Kamen Rider Series' Kamen Rider Black RX to produce Saban's Masked Rider in 1995. Around this time, DIC Entertainment attempted to compete with Power Rangers by taking Tsuburaya Productions' Denkou Choujin Gridman to create Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad in 1994, before later attempting an original concept. In 2002, 4Kids Entertainment bought the rights to Ultraman Tiga, but simply produced a dub of the Japanese footage, broadcast on the Fox Box. And in 2009, Adness Entertainment took 2002's Kamen Rider Ryuki and turned it into Kamen Rider: Dragon Knight, which began broadcast on The CW4Kids in 2009. It won the first Daytime Emmy for "Outstanding Stunt Coordination" for its original scenes. Original productions In 1961 England-based film-makers produced the Godzilla-style film, Gorgo, which used the same suitmation technique as the Godzilla films. That same year, Saga Studios in Denmark made another Godzilla-style giant monster film, Reptilicus, bringing its monster to life using a marionette on a miniature set. In 1967, South Korea produced its own monster movie titled Yonggary. In 1975, Shaw Brothers produced a superhero film called The Super Inframan, based on the huge success of Ultraman and Kamen Rider there. The film starred Danny Lee in the title role. Although there were several other similar superhero productions in Hong Kong, The Super Inframan came first. With help from Japanese special effects artists under Sadamasa Arikawa, they also produced a Japanese-styled monster movie, The Mighty Peking Man, in 1977. Concurrent with their work on Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad, DIC attempted an original concept based on the popularity of Power Rangers in 1994's Tattooed Teenage Alien Fighters from Beverly Hills. In 1998, video from an attempted Power Rangers-styled adaptation of Sailor Moon surfaced, combining original footage of American actresses with original animated sequences; despite no participation on behalf of Saban Entertainment (instrumental behind Power Rangers, VR Troopers, and Beetleborgs), the footage is derisively called "Saban Moon". In the 2000s, production companies who works similar to a stunt performer. However, the suit actor does all of his or her stunts while in East Asia began producing a full costume that normally obscures their own original tokusatsu-inspired television series: Thailand's Sport Ranger identity from the viewer (typically the transformed character) and South Korea's Erexion in 2006, China's Armor Hero pinyin: Kǎi Jiǎ Yǒng Sh) in 2009, Giant Saver pinyin: Jshn zhn j du) in 2013, Metal Kaiser 士; pinyin: Wǔ Lng Q Jin Sh) and Indonesia's Bima Satria Garuda which began in 2013 Homage and parody In 2001, Buki X-1 Productions, a French fan-based production company, produced its own series, Jushi Sentai France Five (now called Shin Kenjushi France Five), a tribute to Toei's long running Super Sentai series. The low-budget television series Kaiju Big Battel directly parodies monster and Kyodai Hero films and series by immersing their own costumed characters in professional wrestling matches among cardboard buildings. In 2006, Mighty Moshin' Emo Rangers premiered on the internet performs pantomime, as a Power Rangers spoof, but was quickly picked up by MTV UK for broadcast. In 2006, Insector Sun, a low-budget tribute to Kamen Rider was produced by Brazilian fans.an actor's voice will generally be dubbed during after-recording process (アフレコ afureko?).
8th Dec '15 11:40:48 PM lordeepdave1
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latest update
The 2009 film Where the Wild Things Are uses a suitmation technique combined with computer-generated imagery to depict the Wild Things.
to:
The 2009 film Where the Wild Things Are uses a suitmation technique combined with computer-generated imagery to depict the Wild Things. \n The latest to utilize this technique are the two-part live-action adaptation of, "Attack on Titan", where the the titan-shifters are being portrayed by actors in suits, in particular, the Rogue Titan (Eren Yeager), the Armored Titan (Captain Shikishima), and the Colossal Titan (General Kubal). Unfortunately, with the exception of these characters, only a mere number of Titans were actually utilizing this technique of suitmation, with their facial make-up being replaced with computer-generated imagery (CGI).
6th Dec '15 12:53:53 AM lordeepdave1
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Toku series and franchises include:A suit actor (スーツアクター sūtsu akutā?) is a member of, usually, a Japanese tokusatsu production who works similar to a stunt performer. However, the suit actor does all of his or her stunts while in a full costume that normally obscures their identity from the viewer (typically the transformed character) and performs pantomime, as an actor's voice will generally be dubbed during after-recording process (アフレコ afureko?).
to:
Toku Popular franchises Protagonists of the popular tokusatsu franchises of the late 1970s (from back to front, left to right): The Ultraman (Ultra Series), Battle Fever J (Super Sentai), Kamen Rider Stronger and Kamen Rider V3 (Kamen Rider Series), and Spider-Man. The photo also features anime character Doraemon on the far left. Since about 1960, several long-running television-series have combined various other themes. Tsuburaya Productions has had the Ultra Series starting with Ultra Q and Ultraman in 1966. P Productions began their foray into tokusatsu in 1966 with the series Ambassador Magma. They also had involvement in the Lion-Maru series which concluded in November 2006. Toei Company has several series that fall under their Toei Superheroes category of programming, starting in 1961 with the single series, Moonlight Mask. Then, they produced several other long running series, starting with Shotaro Ishinomori's Kamen Rider Series in 1971, the Super Sentai series in 1975, the Metal Hero Series in 1982, and the Toei Fushigi Comedy Series in 1981. Toei also produced several other television series based on Ishinomori's works, including Android Kikaider and Kikaider 01, Robot Detective, Inazuman and Inazuman Flash, and Kaiketsu Zubat. Toei was also involved in the Spider-Man television series, which influenced their subsequent Super Sentai series. In 2003, TV Asahi began broadcasting the Super Sentai and Kamen Rider series in a one-hour block known as Super Hero Time. Toho, the creators of Godzilla, also had their hands in creating the Chouseishin Series of programs from 2003 to 2006. In 2006, Keita Amemiya's Garo, a mature late-night tokusatsu drama was released, starting a franchise composed of several television series and franchises include:A suit actor (スーツアクター sūtsu akutā?) is films. Other mature late-night series followed, including a member of, usually, a revival of Lion-Maru in Lion-Maru G, the Daimajin Kanon television series (based on the Daimajin film series), and Shougeki Gouraigan!! (also created by Amemiya). Outside Japan Tokusatsu techniques have spread outside Japan due to the popularity of the Godzilla films, as well as the Power Rangers boom in the 1990s. Japanese fan films Hideaki Anno, Yoshiyuki Sadamoto, Takami Akai, and Shinji Higuchi set up a fan-based group called Daicon Film, which they renamed Gainax in 1985 and turned into an animation studio. Besides anime sequences, they also produced a series of tokusatsu shorts parodying monster movies and superhero shows. These productions include Patriotic Squadron Dai-Nippon (1983), Swift Hero Noutenki (1982), Return of Ultraman (1983) and The Eight-Headed Giant Serpent Strikes Back (1985). Adaptations[edit] Godzilla, King of the Monsters! first appeared in English in 1956. Rather than a simple dub of the Japanese-language original, this work represented an entirely re-edited version which restructured the plot to incorporate a new character played by an American actor, Raymond Burr. Ultraman gained popularity when United Artists dubbed it for American audiences in the 1960s. A major influx of tokusatsu adaptations came to American television in the 1990s, starting in 1993 with Saban Entertainment's purchase of footage from Toei's sixteenth installment of their long-running Super Sentai series, Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger to become Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers and start the popular Power Rangers franchise. Subsequent seasons of Super Sentai would be adapted in similar fashion for later seasons of the show. Saban also purchased footage from several of the Metal Hero Series television programs, turning Choujinki Metalder, Jikuu Senshi Spielban, and Uchuu Keiji Shaider into VR Troopers in 1994 and Juukou B-Fighter and its sequel B-Fighter Kabuto into Big Bad Beetleborgs and its sequel Beetleborgs Metallix in 1996 and 1997. They also purchased the Kamen Rider Series' Kamen Rider Black RX to produce Saban's Masked Rider in 1995. Around this time, DIC Entertainment attempted to compete with Power Rangers by taking Tsuburaya Productions' Denkou Choujin Gridman to create Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad in 1994, before later attempting an original concept. In 2002, 4Kids Entertainment bought the rights to Ultraman Tiga, but simply produced a dub of the Japanese footage, broadcast on the Fox Box. And in 2009, Adness Entertainment took 2002's Kamen Rider Ryuki and turned it into Kamen Rider: Dragon Knight, which began broadcast on The CW4Kids in 2009. It won the first Daytime Emmy for "Outstanding Stunt Coordination" for its original scenes. Original productions In 1961 England-based film-makers produced the Godzilla-style film, Gorgo, which used the same suitmation technique as the Godzilla films. That same year, Saga Studios in Denmark made another Godzilla-style giant monster film, Reptilicus, bringing its monster to life using a marionette on a miniature set. In 1967, South Korea produced its own monster movie titled Yonggary. In 1975, Shaw Brothers produced a superhero film called The Super Inframan, based on the huge success of Ultraman and Kamen Rider there. The film starred Danny Lee in the title role. Although there were several other similar superhero productions in Hong Kong, The Super Inframan came first. With help from Japanese special effects artists under Sadamasa Arikawa, they also produced a Japanese-styled monster movie, The Mighty Peking Man, in 1977. Concurrent with their work on Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad, DIC attempted an original concept based on the popularity of Power Rangers in 1994's Tattooed Teenage Alien Fighters from Beverly Hills. In 1998, video from an attempted Power Rangers-styled adaptation of Sailor Moon surfaced, combining original footage of American actresses with original animated sequences; despite no participation on behalf of Saban Entertainment (instrumental behind Power Rangers, VR Troopers, and Beetleborgs), the footage is derisively called "Saban Moon". In the 2000s, production who works similar to a stunt performer. However, the suit actor does all of his or her stunts while companies in a full costume that normally obscures East Asia began producing their identity from own original tokusatsu-inspired television series: Thailand's Sport Ranger and South Korea's Erexion in 2006, China's Armor Hero pinyin: Kǎi Jiǎ Yǒng Sh) in 2009, Giant Saver pinyin: Jshn zhn j du) in 2013, Metal Kaiser 士; pinyin: Wǔ Lng Q Jin Sh) and Indonesia's Bima Satria Garuda which began in 2013 Homage and parody In 2001, Buki X-1 Productions, a French fan-based production company, produced its own series, Jushi Sentai France Five (now called Shin Kenjushi France Five), a tribute to Toei's long running Super Sentai series. The low-budget television series Kaiju Big Battel directly parodies monster and Kyodai Hero films and series by immersing their own costumed characters in professional wrestling matches among cardboard buildings. In 2006, Mighty Moshin' Emo Rangers premiered on the viewer (typically the transformed character) and performs pantomime, internet as an actor's voice will generally be dubbed during after-recording process (アフレコ afureko?). a Power Rangers spoof, but was quickly picked up by MTV UK for broadcast. In 2006, Insector Sun, a low-budget tribute to Kamen Rider was produced by Brazilian fans.
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