History Main / TimeyWimeyBall

12th Apr '17 8:19:26 AM immblueversion
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** First in the episode where Team Natsu gets briefly sent back to the past, creating a StableTimeLoop that affects their present selves [[labelnote:Note]](the scar on Natsu's neck, Lucy's desire to join the guild, etc.)[[/labelnote]], and later during the whole mess with the Eclipse Gate. [[spoiler:The dragon army came from the past, [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong Future Lucy came from a future where said dragons destroyed the land and wants to stop that from happening]], and Future Rogue came from a DIFFERENT future where ''that'' happened, but Acnologia took over the world and did what the dragons would do, so [[MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight he wants to stop Lucy from stopping it so he can use the dragon army to kill Acnologia and rule the world himself]]. Destroying the portal in the present timeline ended the time travel magic, sending the dragons back to the past and erasing the futures from which Future Rogue and future Lucy had come.]]

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** First in the episode where Team Natsu gets briefly sent back to the past, creating a StableTimeLoop that affects their present selves [[labelnote:Note]](the scar on Natsu's neck, Lucy's desire to join the guild, etc.)[[/labelnote]], and later during the whole mess with the Eclipse Gate. [[spoiler:The dragon army came from the past, [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong Future Lucy came from a future where said dragons destroyed the land and wants to stop that from happening]], and Future Rogue came from a DIFFERENT ''different'' future where ''that'' happened, but Acnologia took over the world and did what the dragons would do, so [[MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight he wants to stop Lucy from stopping it so he can use the dragon army to kill Acnologia and rule the world himself]]. Destroying the portal in the present timeline ended the time travel magic, sending the dragons back to the past and erasing the futures from which Future Rogue and future Future Lucy had come.]]
10th Apr '17 6:58:43 AM DarkHunter
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* ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsIII'' takes it UpToEleven: not only is the previous "each player has their own timeline" mechanic still in effect, but the realm of Lothric has absorbed elements of other realms of the past as a side effect of the resurrection of the Lords of Cinder. This includes having [[spoiler:Anor Londo]] appear in a place that makes absolutely zero sense for it to appear in. The Untended Graves and the [[spoiler:Dark Firelink Shrine]] therein are alternately suggested to be in the present, past, or a possible future in different ways. Then there's the Dreg Heap, a giant amalgamation of rubble from all eras just haphazardly piled up on top of each other, which might be in the distant future or it might be an alternate plane of reality. The Ringed City DLC also introduces the Plain of Ash, which is suggested to be the ultimate far future in which the end of the world is happening... or it might be what the world actually looks like now, with everything else being an illusion?
8th Apr '17 6:34:52 PM merotoker
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** [[spoiler:Then there is Princess Hisui's plan to use the Eclipse Gate to kill Zeref and avert all the suffering he causes in the future. Later chapters reveal that it would have caused a TemporalParadox, as Zeref was the one to conceive the idea of the Eclipse Gate]].

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** [[spoiler:Then there is Princess Hisui's plan to use the Eclipse Gate to kill Zeref and avert all the suffering he causes in the future. Later chapters reveal that it would have caused a TemporalParadox, as Zeref was the one to conceive the idea of the Eclipse Gate]].Gate.]]



* ''Film/DejaVu'' starts out well enough, but implies that the detective has already gone back in time and failed. In the original timeline, the love interest dies, and the hero's blood is all over her apartment. So apparently, in the original timeline, he went back and failed. But then in the new timeline, he gets his wounds saving the love interest. He doesn't bleed all over the love interest's place until after he saves her. So how did there end up being blood in the original timeline, but the love interests dies? What's more, [[spoiler:the ending finishes without a StableTimeLoop of any kind, so either the changes made will reset or they've created one alternate timeline where everything is hunky dory and one where everyone's dead]].



* ''Film/DejaVu'' starts out well enough, but implies that the detective has already gone back in time and failed. In the original timeline, the love interest dies, and the hero's blood is all over her apartment. So apparently, in the original timeline, he went back and failed. But then in the new timeline, he gets his wounds saving the love interest. He doesn't bleed all over the love interest's place until after he saves her. So how did there end up being blood in the original timeline, but the love interests dies? What's more, [[spoiler:the ending finishes without a StableTimeLoop of any kind, so either the changes made will reset or they've created one alternate timeline where everything is hunky dory and one where everyone's dead.]]



* ''Series/TimeTrax'' can't seem to decide if [[TimePolice Darien]] and the fugitives are in their own past or a time-shifted parallel universe. Most episodes appear to take the second option, insisting that their own time remains unchanged no matter what happens in the "past". On the other hand, in some episodes, Darien has SELMA leave coded messages in the classifieds for his boss in the 22nd century, which would only be possible in the first version. No one seems concerned about any temporal paradoxes, though, and Darien's goal is not to prevent any changes but to catch escaped criminals. One episode is notable for having both versions: Darien insists that, due to everything that has already been altered by the time travelers, an aspiring country singer may no longer become the star she was in his own history. At the same time, he accidentally becomes the inspiration for his favorite song.
* ''Series/{{Timeless}}'' for the most part appears to be fairly established in its time-travel rules. It ''is'' possible to change the past, though the result is usually a CloseEnoughTimeline. And yet, [[ForWantOfANail the Butterfly Effect]] is a very real danger, except when it comes to ''big'' historical events (a case in point - the protagonist's sister is inadvertently erased from existence because of small changes to a particular historical event, but the premature death of as important a historical figure as [[spoiler: Lord Cornwallis]] doesn't completely change American history. RippleEffectProofMemory applies to time-travelers, but there is no RippleEffectIndicator - objects that are taken to the past in the machine retain their original state irrespective of changes to the timeline. The major contradiction though is despite all this, the series seems to be getting up a StableTimeLoop - one of the main antagonist's is motivated to try to change history based on a journal he received from the protagonist's future self describing some of the events of the series!



* ''Series/TimeTrax'' can't seems to decide if [[TimePolice Darien]] and the fugitives are in their own past or a time-shifted parallel universe. Most episodes appear to take the second option, insisting that their own time remains unchanged no matter what happens in the "past". On the other hand, in some episodes, Darien has SELMA leave coded messages in the classifieds for his boss in the 22nd century, which would only be possible in the first version. No one seems concerned about any temporal paradoxes, though, and Darien's goal is not to prevent any changes but to catch escaped criminals. One episode is notable for having both versions: Darien insists that, due to everything that has already been altered by the time travelers, an aspiring country singer may no longer become the star she was in his own history. At the same time, he accidentally becomes the inspiration for his favorite song.
* ''Series/Timeless'' for the most part appears to be fairly established in its time-travel rules. It ''is'' possible to change the past, though the result is usually a CloseEnoughTimeline. And yet, the ButterflyEffect is a very real danger, except when it comes to ''big'' historical events (a case in point - the protagonist's sister is inadvertently erased from existence because of small changes to a particular historical event, but the premature death of as important a historical figure as [[spoiler: Lord Cornwallis]] doesn't completely change American history. RippleEffectProofMemory applies to time-travelers, but there is no RippleEffectIndicator - objects that are taken to the past in the machine retain their original state irrespective of changes to the timeline. The major contradiction though is despite all this, the series seems to be getting up a StableTimeLoop - one of the main antagonist's is motivated to try to change history based on a journal he received from the protagonist's future self describing some of the events of the series!



* ''VideoGame/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' manages the difficult trick of pulling this off in a game that ''doesn't feature time travel.'' [[spoiler: In the last episode, Phoenix's investigation as shown would not be possible unless he could actually travel through time, rather than being able to select different times just being a tool for the convenience of the Jury. He uses evidence he gathers in the present in the past, as well as evidence he gathers later in the same portion of the timeline in earlier incidents.]] Justified in that the Investigation you see is a simulated version being [[spoiler:played out by the Jurists.]]
* ''VideoGame/BackToTheFuture: The Game'' confuses the series' time travel mechanics even further, [[spoiler: when Marty and Doc inadvertently create a timeline where Emmett Brown never creates the time machine in the first place (and in fact never becomes "Doc" Brown). While Marty is unaffected by the changes in the timeline (so long as it doesn't result in his erasure from existence, as usual), Doc actually disappears from the [=DeLorean=] once they land in 1985. The [=DeLorean=] doesn't start to disappear until Marty managed to get the 1931 timeline mostly straightened out, but only after another Doc Brown travelled back from 1986 to pick up Marty, and it took days for the thing to finally vanish]].

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* ''VideoGame/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' manages the difficult trick of pulling this off in a game that ''doesn't feature time travel.'' [[spoiler: In the last episode, Phoenix's investigation as shown would not be possible unless he could actually travel through time, rather than being able to select different times just being a tool for the convenience of the Jury. He uses evidence he gathers in the present in the past, as well as evidence he gathers later in the same portion of the timeline in earlier incidents.]] Justified in that the Investigation you see is a simulated version being [[spoiler:played out by the Jurists.]]
Jurists]].
* ''VideoGame/BackToTheFuture: The Game'' ''VideoGame/BackToTheFutureTheGame'' confuses the series' time travel mechanics even further, [[spoiler: when Marty and Doc inadvertently create a timeline where Emmett Brown never creates the time machine in the first place (and in fact never becomes "Doc" Brown). While Marty is unaffected by the changes in the timeline (so long as it doesn't result in his erasure from existence, as usual), Doc actually disappears from the [=DeLorean=] once they land in 1985. The [=DeLorean=] doesn't start to disappear until Marty managed to get the 1931 timeline mostly straightened out, but only after another Doc Brown travelled back from 1986 to pick up Marty, and it took days for the thing to finally vanish]].



** Generally, Dragon Breaks are closely related to the lore's concept of "Hero" (all PlayerCharacters in the series are considered Heroes), an individual that is ImmuneToFate, which allows the world's fate to continue despite the myriad ways the Hero can affect the game world (often in contradictory ways in different playthroughs).

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** Generally, Dragon Breaks are closely related to the lore's concept of "Hero" (all PlayerCharacters {{Player Character}}s in the series are considered Heroes), an individual that is ImmuneToFate, which allows the world's fate to continue despite the myriad ways the Hero can affect the game world (often in contradictory ways in different playthroughs).



** In ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin Warrior Within]]'' the Prince is being chased by the Dahaka in the present, a timeline guardian who is trying to ensure that the timeline proceeds as it was meant to. He is not chased in the past. The Prince inadvertently creates a StableTimeLoop when he [[spoiler: kills Kaileena and creates the Sands of Time, the very thing that he was traveling back in time to prevent]], discovering that he has [[YouAlreadyChangedThePast already changed the past]], just as he was fated to do! At this point, he then is chased in the past as well, as he still needs to be killed for unleashing the sands. Then, he discovers a way to co-exist with himself in the same timeline, which he uses until [[spoiler: his normal self in the past timeline is killed, allowing him to remove the Mask of the Wraith.]] He then returns to the past to attempt to actually change his fate.

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** In ''[[VideoGame/PrinceOfPersiaWarriorWithin Warrior Within]]'' the Prince is being chased by the Dahaka in the present, a timeline guardian who is trying to ensure that the timeline proceeds as it was meant to. He is not chased in the past. The Prince inadvertently creates a StableTimeLoop when he [[spoiler: kills Kaileena and creates the Sands of Time, the very thing that he was traveling back in time to prevent]], discovering that he has [[YouAlreadyChangedThePast already changed the past]], just as he was fated to do! At this point, he then is chased in the past as well, as he still needs to be killed for unleashing the sands. Then, he discovers a way to co-exist with himself in the same timeline, which he uses until [[spoiler: his normal self in the past timeline is killed, allowing him to remove the Mask of the Wraith.]] Wraith]]. He then returns to the past to attempt to actually change his fate.



* ''VideoGame/UltimaI'' has you stop the evil and immortal wizard Mondain by travelling abck in time and defeating him before he became immortal. Doing so should remove the centuries of tyranny and oppression from history, as well as cause a grandfather paradox (why would you go back to defeat Mondain if he was already defeated long ago?), yet everyone remembers everything.

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* ''VideoGame/UltimaI'' has you stop the evil and immortal wizard Mondain by travelling abck back in time and defeating him before he became immortal. Doing so should remove the centuries of tyranny and oppression from history, as well as cause a grandfather paradox (why would you go back to defeat Mondain if he was already defeated long ago?), yet everyone remembers everything.



* ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange'' is pretty good about their internal rules. Max can rewind a short time (At most a few minutes) while she remembers what happened before, this is the 'first' time for everyone else. (this allows her to use 'future' conversations in the 'present.' This is also how she can change decisions in one area, but as soon as she leaves, she can't. It's too far to rewind.) However once you move beyond those rules, it starts getting confusing. [[spoiler: Starting with how she freezes time once without explanation and never done again. Time Travel through photographs is completely unexplained. As is the fact that she is 'replacing' her double from that timeline. ([[RippleEffectProofMemory though she keeps the memories of 'her' timeline]]) and she somehow had a vision of the tornado at the end of the game before she got her powers. And one of the two endings heavily implies she wasn't supposed to have the powers in the first place. In fact, several characters theorize that her powers CAUSED the tornado. Despite how she saw the Tornado BEFORE she got the powers, and her powers activated by accident trying to save someone's life. The ending is divisive.]]

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* ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange'' is pretty good about their internal rules. Max can rewind a short time (At most a few minutes) while she remembers what happened before, this is the 'first' time for everyone else. (this (This allows her to use 'future' conversations in the 'present.' This is also how she can change decisions in one area, but as soon as she leaves, she can't. It's too far to rewind.) However once you move beyond those rules, it starts getting confusing. [[spoiler: Starting with how she freezes time once without explanation and never done again. Time Travel through photographs is completely unexplained. As is the fact that she is 'replacing' her double from that timeline. ([[RippleEffectProofMemory though she keeps the memories of 'her' timeline]]) and she somehow had a vision of the tornado at the end of the game before she got her powers. And one of the two endings heavily implies she wasn't supposed to have the powers in the first place. In fact, several characters theorize that her powers CAUSED the tornado. Despite how she saw the Tornado BEFORE she got the powers, and her powers activated by accident trying to save someone's life. The ending is divisive.]]



'''[[AwesomeMcCoolname Commander Badass]]''' : Look, anyone who watches as much Doctor Who as you do gotta know that technology more 're less runs on bullshit.

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'''[[AwesomeMcCoolname Commander Badass]]''' : Look, anyone who watches as much Doctor Who ''Doctor Who'' as you do gotta know that technology more 're less runs on bullshit.



* ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatam'' screws up it's time travel rules quite confusingly. Sonic and Sally try to travel back in time to before Robotnik's coup in order to stop him, but soon discover that this is impossible and they can't change the past, merely [[StableTimeLoop act out or ensure predetermined events]] (Sonic causes Robotnik's arm to be robotized, saves his younger self from getting captured, etc.). However at the last moment Sally attempts to change the fate of her nanny by telling her future information and it works, even though it logically shouldn't have. Even more confusingly, RippleEffectProofMemory is in effect, so Sonic and Sally don't remember interacting with someone they now logically should. [[LampshadeHanging Sonic is appropriately confused]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatam'' ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatAM'' screws up it's time travel rules quite confusingly. Sonic and Sally try to travel back in time to before Robotnik's coup in order to stop him, but soon discover that this is impossible and they can't change the past, merely [[StableTimeLoop act out or ensure predetermined events]] (Sonic causes Robotnik's arm to be robotized, saves his younger self from getting captured, etc.). However at the last moment Sally attempts to change the fate of her nanny by telling her future information and it works, even though it logically shouldn't have. Even more confusingly, RippleEffectProofMemory is in effect, so Sonic and Sally don't remember interacting with someone they now logically should. [[LampshadeHanging Sonic is appropriately confused]].



* [[http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/81893/february-07-2007/tek-jansen---from-the-future This]] episode of ''Tek Jansen'', a series of shorts originally created for Creator/StephenColbert's show, illustrates how bad (or ''[[SoBadItsGood awesome]]'') this trope can get.

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* [[http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/81893/february-07-2007/tek-jansen---from-the-future cc.com/video-clips/pp2kiz/the-colbert-report-tek-jansen---from-the-future This]] episode of ''Tek Jansen'', a series of shorts originally created for Creator/StephenColbert's show, illustrates how bad (or ''[[SoBadItsGood awesome]]'') this trope can get.
2nd Apr '17 8:10:47 PM Gamermaster
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* It's openly stated by a member of the TimePolice in ''Webcomic/LsEmpire'' that all bets are off if you time travel via magic.
1st Apr '17 8:54:22 PM DustSnitch
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* David Gerrold's ''The Man Who Folded Himself'' features a time-travel belt, which has the traveller completely paranoid about the possibility of a TemporalParadox destroying him. It turns out that {{Temporal Paradox}}es are impossible; TimeTravel rewrites history except for the guy who travelled through time. Various MindScrew moments: [[spoiler:the protagonist has orgies with himself of different ages, writes himself out of history, has a family with himself as a female, eventually has that written out of history (but his son still exists) and culminates in finally giving himself (as the son, so he's his own father) the time travel device. On the last, the idea of where it came from is explored a couple of times and eventually it's hit upon that it's impossible to know where it came from, the creators must have been written out of history. Oh, and he kills {{Jesus}} at an early age. It's okay, he goes back and stops himself after finding out how much it screws with history]].

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* David Gerrold's ''The Man Who Folded Himself'' features a time-travel belt, which has the traveller completely paranoid about the possibility of a TemporalParadox destroying him. It turns out that {{Temporal Paradox}}es are impossible; TimeTravel rewrites history except for the guy who travelled through time. Various MindScrew moments: [[spoiler:the protagonist has orgies with himself of different ages, writes himself out of history, has a family with himself as a female, eventually has that written out of history (but his son still exists) and culminates in finally giving himself (as the son, so he's his own father) the time travel device. On the last, the idea of where it came from is explored a couple of times and eventually it's hit upon that it's impossible to know where it came from, the creators must have been written out of history. Oh, and he kills {{Jesus}} UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} at an early age. It's okay, he goes back and stops himself after finding out how much it screws with history]].
24th Mar '17 1:30:44 AM Tsar673
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* ''Series/Timeless'' for the most part appears to be fairly established in its time-travel rules. It ''is'' possible to change the past, though the result is usually a CloseEnoughTimeline. And yet, the ButterflyEffect is a very real danger, except when it comes to ''big'' historical events (a case in point - the protagonist's sister is inadvertently erased from existence because of small changes to a particular historical event, but the premature death of as important a historical figure as [[spoiler: Lord Cornwallis]] doesn't completely change American history. RippleEffectProofMemory applies to time-travelers, but there is no RippleEffectIndicator - objects that are taken to the past in the machine retain their original state irrespective of changes to the timeline. The major contradiction though is despite all this, the series seems to be getting up a StableTimeLoop - one of the main antagonist's is motivated to try to change history based on a journal he received from the protagonist's future self describing some of the events of the series!
21st Mar '17 12:32:56 PM morenohijazo
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* ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'': Shepherd, [[spoiler: being trapped in the Tower outside the normal bounds of the simulation]], is somehow able to communicate with previous generations and give them advice.
17th Mar '17 1:26:41 AM potatohawk
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* ''Film/{{Primer}}'' uses an [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Time_Travel_Method-2.svg interesting]] time travel method that begins to make sense.
16th Mar '17 2:12:26 PM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': In ''Iznogoud's Childhood'', Iznogoud experiments a type of time travel in which the present and the past happen at the same time for a while, which he tries to exploit by attempting to get rid of the Caliph's younger self. The whole thing eventually end up being a StableTimeLoop, in which Iznogoud's time travel is what causes his younger self (who UsedToBeASweetKid) to transform into the JerkAss we're familiar with. However, earlier in the comic, Iznogoud stabs younger Wa'at Alaaf to test the time travelling nature, and that case works on a RippleEffect basis, in which adult Wa'at Alaaf shows up with a scar he'd never had.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': In ''Iznogoud's Childhood'', Iznogoud experiments a type of time travel in which the present and the past happen at the same time for a while, which he tries to exploit by attempting to get rid of the Caliph's younger self. The whole thing eventually end up being a StableTimeLoop, in which Iznogoud's time travel is what causes his younger self (who UsedToBeASweetKid) to transform into the JerkAss we're familiar with. However, earlier in the comic, Iznogoud stabs younger Wa'at Alaaf Alahf to test the time travelling nature, and that case works on a RippleEffect basis, in which adult Wa'at Alaaf Alahf shows up with a scar he'd never had.
4th Mar '17 12:42:26 AM ShorinBJ
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** Then all logic is thrown out of the whole thing at the end of Season 2 of Flash. Barry goes back in time again to prevent his mother's death and succeeds, in effect just undoing all the changes Reverse Flash caused in the first place. The 3rd season opens with the Flashpoint timeline, a timeline where of course Barry's parents are still alive, but the particle accelerator explosion happened early somehow anyway even though Thawne is the one that made that happen, there are metahumans running around as a result, Wally is The Flash instead of Barry, Barry is gradually losing his powers because in this timeline he never got them for some reason, Joe is a hopeless drunk barely hanging onto his job, while Cisco is filthy rich and Catlin is a Pediatrician. It gets even MORE confusing when Barry subsequently reverses his change, which instead of ending up right back in the timeline as he left it resulted in a timeline where Thawne somehow never became trapped in the past thus should have resulted in the events of the first 2 seasons never happening but again they do anyway, Cisco's bother died in a car crash, Catlin now is developing ice powers, Joe and Iris are on the outs, Barry has a partner at work that never was there before, and there's a supervillain running around giving people who had powers back in Flashpoint powers again for some reason and yet another speedster supervillain behind that.

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** Then all logic is thrown out of the whole thing at the end of Season 2 of Flash. Barry goes back in time again to prevent his mother's death and succeeds, in effect just undoing all the changes Reverse Flash caused in the first place. The 3rd season opens with the Flashpoint timeline, a timeline where of course Barry's parents are still alive, but the particle accelerator explosion happened early somehow anyway even though Thawne is the one that made that happen, there are metahumans running around as a result, Wally is The Flash instead of Barry, Barry is gradually losing his powers because in this timeline he never got them for some reason, Joe is a hopeless drunk barely hanging onto his job, while Cisco is filthy rich and Catlin Caitlin is a Pediatrician. It gets even MORE confusing when Barry subsequently reverses his change, which instead of ending up right back in the timeline as he left it resulted in a timeline where Thawne somehow never became trapped in the past thus should have resulted in the events of the first 2 seasons never happening but again they do anyway, Cisco's bother died in a car crash, Catlin Caitlin now is developing ice powers, Joe and Iris are on the outs, Barry has a partner at work that never was there before, and there's a supervillain running around giving people who had powers back in Flashpoint powers again for some reason and yet another speedster supervillain behind that.
This list shows the last 10 events of 298. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TimeyWimeyBall