History Main / TimeyWimeyBall

26th Apr '16 10:33:48 AM Scorpion451
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Compare CloseEnoughTimeline. Occasionally, anything involving this may decide to pull out the TemporalParadox card. A TimeCrash is what happens when this ''isn't'' in play. See also NarniaTime. Aside from shape, unrelated to [[BallIndex ball-shaped behavior tropes]] and possibly TheMultiverse. You had better hope it is unrelated to HappyFunBall.

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Compare CloseEnoughTimeline. Occasionally, anything involving this may decide to pull out the TemporalParadox card.card, and/or TheMultiverse. A TimeCrash is what happens when this ''isn't'' in play. See also NarniaTime. Aside from shape, unrelated to [[BallIndex ball-shaped behavior tropes]] and possibly TheMultiverse.tropes]]. You had better hope it is unrelated to HappyFunBall.
22nd Apr '16 7:31:38 AM sorako
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* ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'': The fucking up of the entire time-space continuum. Time travel duplicates. Clones? Parents? Putting what is confusing about the time travel involved into words is, in itself, extremely confusing.

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* ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'': The fucking up of the entire time-space continuum. Time travel duplicates. Clones? Parents? Trying to trace the law of causality after a case of NiceJobBreakingItHero would cause more brain damage than the combined screws of Quantum Mechanics, Relativity, and Superstring Theory put together! Just one of the results was a situation where thanks to incorporating every single type of TimeTravel, you can't say if it is AlwaysIdenticalTwins, AlternateSelf, IdenticalGrandson, GenerationXerox, CloningBlues, MyOwnGrampa, TangledFamilyTree, EveryoneIsRelated or a blow your brain combo of all of these put together simultaneously! Putting what is confusing about the time travel involved into words is, in itself, extremely confusing.
21st Apr '16 9:39:43 PM sorako
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* ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuper-Heroes''. [[ContinuitySnarl There's three of them.]] One of their enemies, the Infinite Man, is the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Timey-Wimey Ball.
** ''Two'' of their enemies. The Time Trapper is arguably even worse, as he's the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the heat death of the universe.

to:

* ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuper-Heroes''.''ComicBook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}''. [[ContinuitySnarl There's three of them.]] One of their enemies, the Infinite Man, is the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Timey-Wimey Ball.
**
''Two'' of their enemies. The Time Trapper is arguably even worse, as he's enemies are the AnthropomorphicPersonification {{Anthropomorphic Personification}}s of the heat death of the universe.Timey-Wimey Ball.
21st Apr '16 9:38:00 PM sorako
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* Franchise/TheDCU has all sorts of fun here, especially when ''ComicBook/BoosterGold'' is involved, but it's been proven time and again that trying to ScrewDestiny usually ends badly. Aside from that, the Timey-Wimey Ball hurts Booster's head as much as it hurts the audience's.

to:

* Franchise/TheDCU has all sorts of fun here, especially when ''ComicBook/BoosterGold'' ComicBook/BoosterGold is involved, but it's been proven time and again that trying to ScrewDestiny usually ends badly. Aside from that, the Timey-Wimey Ball hurts Booster's head as much as it hurts the audience's.



* ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuperHeroes''. [[ContinuitySnarl There's three of them.]] One of their enemies, the Infinite Man, is the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Timey-Wimey Ball.

to:

* ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuperHeroes''.''ComicBook/LegionOfSuper-Heroes''. [[ContinuitySnarl There's three of them.]] One of their enemies, the Infinite Man, is the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Timey-Wimey Ball.
21st Apr '16 9:36:05 PM sorako
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* Marvel Comics' ''ComicBook/AdamWarlock'', specifically his evil future self The Magus embodies this trope. Adam Warlock met his futureself and immediately The Magus set about trying to ensure Adam would turn into him. This did not work when "Thanos" and the In-Betweener interfered and Adam was given a choice of timelines, wherein he chose the shortest. The Magus appeared again when Adam Warlock attained the Infinity Guantlet and divested himself of his good self (The Goddess) and his evil self (The Magus). The Magus initiated the Infinity War, but was defeated. Later, to seal the Fault in space caused, in part by the Annihilation Wave, The Phalanx Invasion, and the War of Kings, Adam Warlock [[spoiler: who, as he expanded magical energy slowly started turning into The Magus, used an "unused" timeline to repair the fault. That particular "unused" timeline was the one in which he became The Magus.]]



* In the 1980s Marvel ''ComicBook/TheTransformers'' comic, one can alter the past to suit the present. However, there is also the possibility that one travels to a different universe that is simply the same as your own. So thus, any attempt to travel back in time to, say, [[spoiler: build a giant cannon to destroy the dark god who created you when he turns his attention to Earth in order to free yourself from his control as Galvatron tried to]], can potentially end in failure as it is not your own universe. [[spoiler: As it turned out, it WAS Galvatron's own universe.]]
* Franchise/TheDCU has all sorts of fun here, especially when ComicBook/BoosterGold is involved, but it's been proven time and again that trying to ScrewDestiny usually ends badly. Aside from that, the Timey-Wimey Ball hurts Booster's head as much as it hurts the audience's.
* ''ComicBook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}''. [[ContinuitySnarl There's three of them.]] One of their enemies, the Infinite Man, is the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Timey-Wimey Ball.
** ''Two'' of their enemies. The Time Trapper is arguably even worse, as he's the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the heat death of the universe.
* An issue of ''[[Franchise/TheFlash Impulse]]'' had a mad scientist invent a time machine, and attempt to change the past so that he would rule the world. Impulse and Max Mercury go back in time to stop him, but wind up stuck in the far distant past. Max lectures Bart on the ButterflyOfDoom, and how even eating a fish might cause irreparable harm to the future. But then they discover that the mad scientist is now trapped in the past as well. The three of them decide that the best way to get home is ''to cause as much damage and destruction as possible''. Their [[InsaneTrollLogic logic]] is that if they completely change the past, it will alter the future so much that the scientist will never exist, which means he will never invent his time machine, which means they won't have travelled to the past in the first place, which means they won't actually cause any damage at all and find themselves back home. Confused?

to:

* In the 1980s Marvel ''ComicBook/TheTransformers'' comic, one can alter the past to suit the present. However, there is also the possibility that one travels to a different universe that is simply the same as your own. So thus, any attempt to travel back in time to, say, [[spoiler: build a giant cannon to destroy the dark god who created you when he turns his attention to Earth in order to free yourself from his control as Galvatron tried to]], can potentially end in failure as it is not your own universe. [[spoiler: As it turned out, it WAS Galvatron's own universe.]]
* Franchise/TheDCU has all sorts of fun here, especially when ComicBook/BoosterGold ''ComicBook/BoosterGold'' is involved, but it's been proven time and again that trying to ScrewDestiny usually ends badly. Aside from that, the Timey-Wimey Ball hurts Booster's head as much as it hurts the audience's.
* ''ComicBook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}''. [[ContinuitySnarl There's three of them.]] One of their enemies, the Infinite Man, is the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Timey-Wimey Ball.
** ''Two'' of their enemies. The Time Trapper is arguably even worse, as he's the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the heat death of the universe.
* An issue of ''[[Franchise/TheFlash Impulse]]'' had a mad scientist invent a time machine, and attempt to change the past so that he would rule the world. Impulse and Max Mercury go back in time to stop him, but wind up stuck in the far distant past. Max lectures Bart on the ButterflyOfDoom, and how even eating a fish might cause irreparable harm to the future. But then they discover that the mad scientist is now trapped in the past as well. The three of them decide that the best way to get home is ''to cause as much damage and destruction as possible''. Their [[InsaneTrollLogic logic]] is that if they completely change the past, it will alter the future so much that the scientist will never exist, which means he will never invent his time machine, which means they won't have travelled to the past in the first place, which means they won't actually cause any damage at all and find themselves back home. Confused?
audience's.



** [[Characters/TheFlashEvilSpeedsters Professor Zoom]] has (retroactively) had his hands on the Timey-Wimey Ball from day one. In a single issue you see him edit his brother, parents, scholarly rival, and lover out of ''his own history'', apparently to make sure he'll actually become the supervillain he is. ItMakesSenseInContext.

to:

** [[Characters/TheFlashEvilSpeedsters Professor Zoom]] Zoom has (retroactively) had his hands on the Timey-Wimey Ball from day one. In a single issue you see him edit his brother, parents, scholarly rival, and lover out of ''his own history'', apparently to make sure he'll actually become the supervillain he is. ItMakesSenseInContext.



** An issue of ''Impulse'' had a MadScientist invent a time machine, and attempt to change the past so that he would rule the world. Impulse and Max Mercury go back in time to stop him, but wind up stuck in the far distant past. Max lectures Bart on the ButterflyOfDoom, and how even eating a fish might cause irreparable harm to the future. But then they discover that the mad scientist is now trapped in the past as well. The three of them decide that the best way to get home is ''to cause as much damage and destruction as possible''. Their [[InsaneTrollLogic logic]] is that if they completely change the past, it will alter the future so much that the scientist will never exist, which means he will never invent his time machine, which means they won't have travelled to the past in the first place, which means they won't actually cause any damage at all and find themselves back home. Confused?
* ''ComicBook/GoldDigger'': With all the dimension-hopping, time-traveling technology in Gold Digger, naturally there's a lot of Timey-Wimey Ball action going on. However, of special note is issue #50 of the color series, which features an artifact that is an ''actual ball of string that can warp time and space''.
* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': In ''Iznogoud's Childhood'', Iznogoud experiments a type of time travel in which the present and the past happen at the same time for a while, which he tries to exploit by attempting to get rid of the Caliph's younger self. The whole thing eventually end up being a StableTimeLoop, in which Iznogoud's time travel is what causes his younger self (who UsedToBeASweetKid) to transform into the JerkAss we're familiar with. However, earlier in the comic, Iznogoud stabs younger Wa'at Alaaf to test the time travelling nature, and that case works on a RippleEffect basis, in which adult Wa'at Alaaf shows up with a scar he'd never had.
* ''ComicBook/LegionOfSuperHeroes''. [[ContinuitySnarl There's three of them.]] One of their enemies, the Infinite Man, is the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the Timey-Wimey Ball.
** ''Two'' of their enemies. The Time Trapper is arguably even worse, as he's the AnthropomorphicPersonification of the heat death of the universe.



* Marvel Comics' ''ComicBook/AdamWarlock'', specifically his evil future self The Magus embodies this trope. Adam Warlock met his futureself and immediately The Magus set about trying to ensure Adam would turn into him. This did not work when "Thanos" and the In-Betweener interfered and Adam was given a choice of timelines, wherein he chose the shortest. The Magus appeared again when Adam Warlock attained the Infinity Guantlet and divested himself of his good self (The Goddess) and his evil self (The Magus). The Magus initiated the Infinity War, but was defeated. Later, to seal the Fault in space caused, in part by the Annihilation Wave, The Phalanx Invasion, and the War of Kings, Adam Warlock [[spoiler: who, as he expanded magical energy slowly started turning into The Magus, used an "unused" timeline to repair the fault. That particular "unused" timeline was the one in which he became The Magus.]]



* In the 1980s Marvel ''ComicBook/TheTransformers'' comic, one can alter the past to suit the present. However, there is also the possibility that one travels to a different universe that is simply the same as your own. So thus, any attempt to travel back in time to, say, [[spoiler: build a giant cannon to destroy the dark god who created you when he turns his attention to Earth in order to free yourself from his control as Galvatron tried to]], can potentially end in failure as it is not your own universe. [[spoiler: As it turned out, it WAS Galvatron's own universe.]]
* Creator/JohnByrne's run on ''Franchise/WonderWoman'' has a classic example of the rules changing within a story. When Diana's mother becomes the new Wonder Woman, [[Franchise/TheFlash Jay Garrick]] recognises her as the mysterious woman who was involved in ''one'' of his adventures in UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, and who he never really met. When he tells Hippolyta this, she travels to the past in order to maintain the timeline by ensuring everything happens the way Jay remembers. Once she gets there, however, she decides to stick around and become the Golden Age Wonder Woman and a member of the Comicbook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica. History is therefore completely altered after all, but no-one seems to mind.



* ''ComicBook/GoldDigger'': With all the dimension-hopping, time-traveling technology in Gold Digger, naturally there's a lot of Timey-Wimey Ball action going on. However, of special note is issue #50 of the color series, which features an artifact that is an ''actual ball of string that can warp time and space''.
* Creator/JohnByrne's run on ''Franchise/WonderWoman'' has a classic example of the rules changing within a story. When Diana's mother becomes the new Wonder Woman, [[Franchise/TheFlash Jay Garrick]] recognises her as the mysterious woman who was involved in ''one'' of his adventures in UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, and who he never really met. When he tells Hippolyta this, she travels to the past in order to maintain the timeline by ensuring everything happens the way Jay remembers. Once she gets there, however, she decides to stick around and become the Golden Age Wonder Woman and a member of the Comicbook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica. History is therefore completely altered after all, but no-one seems to mind.
* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': In ''Iznogoud's Childhood'', Iznogoud experiments a type of time travel in which the present and the past happen at the same time for a while, which he tries to exploit by attempting to get rid of the Caliph's younger self. The whole thing eventually end up being a StableTimeLoop, in which Iznogoud's time travel is what causes his younger self (who UsedToBeASweetKid) to transform into the JerkAss we're familiar with. However, earlier in the comic, Iznogoud stabs younger Wa'at Alaaf to test the time travelling nature, and that case works on a RippleEffect basis, in which adult Wa'at Alaaf shows up with a scar he'd never had.

to:

* ''ComicBook/GoldDigger'': With all the dimension-hopping, time-traveling technology in Gold Digger, naturally there's a lot of Timey-Wimey Ball action going on. However, of special note is issue #50 of the color series, which features an artifact that is an ''actual ball of string that can warp time and space''.
* Creator/JohnByrne's run on ''Franchise/WonderWoman'' has a classic example of the rules changing within a story. When Diana's mother becomes the new Wonder Woman, [[Franchise/TheFlash Jay Garrick]] recognises her as the mysterious woman who was involved in ''one'' of his adventures in UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks, and who he never really met. When he tells Hippolyta this, she travels to the past in order to maintain the timeline by ensuring everything happens the way Jay remembers. Once she gets there, however, she decides to stick around and become the Golden Age Wonder Woman and a member of the Comicbook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica. History is therefore completely altered after all, but no-one seems to mind.
* ''ComicBook/{{Iznogoud}}'': In ''Iznogoud's Childhood'', Iznogoud experiments a type of time travel in which the present and the past happen at the same time for a while, which he tries to exploit by attempting to get rid of the Caliph's younger self. The whole thing eventually end up being a StableTimeLoop, in which Iznogoud's time travel is what causes his younger self (who UsedToBeASweetKid) to transform into the JerkAss we're familiar with. However, earlier in the comic, Iznogoud stabs younger Wa'at Alaaf to test the time travelling nature, and that case works on a RippleEffect basis, in which adult Wa'at Alaaf shows up with a scar he'd never had.



* ''Fanfic/KyonBigDamnHero'' has much more TimeTravel going on than [[LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya the original]] -- to the point that at any point of story there is at least one open [[StableTimeLoop loop]]. Amusingly, Kyon once [[ShoutOut quoted]] [[Series/DoctorWho the Doctor]] when trying to explain his understanding of TimeTravel.
* In ''Fanfic/MyImmortal'', the main character Ebony travels back in time to teach a young Voldemort about love. But when she does, the plot really starts to get strange. A few examples are that characters in the past know what will happen in the present, that items will not work in time-periods where its not invented yet and that people can't die outside their native time-period.



* Similarly, ''[[http://archiveofourown.org/works/471497/chapters/815855 Time v3.0]]'', being a ''Doctor Who'' fanfic that does its best to encompass all the chaotic mess that was the Time War, uses this trope up, down, and sideways.

to:

* Similarly, ''[[http://archiveofourown.org/works/471497/chapters/815855 Time v3.0]]'', being a ''Doctor Who'' fanfic ''Fanfic/KyonBigDamnHero'' has much more TimeTravel going on than [[LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya the original]] -- to the point that does its best to encompass all at any point of story there is at least one open [[StableTimeLoop loop]]. Amusingly, Kyon once [[ShoutOut quoted]] [[Series/DoctorWho the chaotic mess that was the Time War, uses this trope up, down, and sideways.Doctor]] when trying to explain his understanding of TimeTravel.


Added DiffLines:

* In ''Fanfic/MyImmortal'', the main character Ebony travels back in time to teach a young Voldemort about love. But when she does, the plot really starts to get strange. A few examples are that characters in the past know what will happen in the present, that items will not work in time-periods where its not invented yet and that people can't die outside their native time-period.
* Similarly, ''[[http://archiveofourown.org/works/471497/chapters/815855 Time v3.0]]'', being a ''Doctor Who'' fanfic that does its best to encompass all the chaotic mess that was the Time War, uses this trope up, down, and sideways.
21st Apr '16 9:29:19 PM sorako
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* The ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlertSeries'' - seriously, the series by now has something in the range of 2 separate timelines from the [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert first game]], two from [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert2 the second]], two from that game's expansion, and then three from [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert3 the third game]], with a further three paths from THAT game's expansion. Even more brain-busting, ''Red Alert'' led to ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn Tiberian Dawn]]'' by way of Allies winning both ''Red Alert 1'' and ''2'' - ''Red Alert 3'' is made by way as a divergence at the end of ''Red Alert 2''. Add to that the events of ''Yuri's Revenge'' which is its own separate divergence and has the nice consequence of there being two "commanders" (the player) in different places at the same point in the timeline, although the divergent timelines are merged at the end.



* The ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlertSeries'' - seriously, the series by now has something in the range of 2 separate timelines from the [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert first game]], two from [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert2 the second]], two from that game's expansion, and then three from [[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRedAlert3 the third game]], with a further three paths from THAT game's expansion. Even more brain-busting, ''Red Alert'' led to ''[[VideoGame/CommandAndConquerTiberianDawn Tiberian Dawn]]'' by way of Allies winning both ''Red Alert 1'' and ''2'' - ''Red Alert 3'' is made by way as a divergence at the end of ''Red Alert 2''. Add to that the events of ''Yuri's Revenge'' which is its own separate divergence and has the nice consequence of there being two "commanders" (the player) in different places at the same point in the timeline, although the divergent timelines are merged at the end.



* ''VideoGame/UltimaI'' has you stop the evil and immortal wizard Mondain by travelling abck in time and defeating him before he became immortal. Doing so should remove the centuries of tyranny and oppression from history, as well as cause a grandfather paradox (why would you go back to defeat Mondain if he was already defeated long ago?), yet everyone remembers everything.



* ''VideoGame/UltimaI'' has you stop the evil and immortal wizard Mondain by travelling abck in time and defeating him before he became immortal. Doing so should remove the centuries of tyranny and oppression from history, as well as cause a grandfather paradox (why would you go back to defeat Mondain if he was already defeated long ago?), yet everyone remembers everything.
21st Apr '16 9:26:32 PM sorako
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* In ''A Tale of Time City'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones, the titular city exists outside of the flow of history on the rest of the world. From this vantage point, the citizens see that history works like weather patterns -- it shifts back and forth with minute details thanks to the butterfly effect and time loops. Basically, a more detailed explanation of the Timey-Wimey Ball, where shifts in the time travel theories are explained away as the changing "weather patterns" of time. For instance, on one day in Time City the inhabitants may observe that UsefulNotes/WorldWarII begins in 1939, but on another day they may notice that it has changed to 1938. Perhaps time in the book is two-dimensional, with Time City time orthogonal to time everywhere else. [[spoiler:Except it turns out that the history of Time City can shift back and forth too...]]


Added DiffLines:

* In ''A Tale of Time City'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones, the titular city exists outside of the flow of history on the rest of the world. From this vantage point, the citizens see that history works like weather patterns -- it shifts back and forth with minute details thanks to the butterfly effect and time loops. Basically, a more detailed explanation of the Timey-Wimey Ball, where shifts in the time travel theories are explained away as the changing "weather patterns" of time. For instance, on one day in Time City the inhabitants may observe that UsefulNotes/WorldWarII begins in 1939, but on another day they may notice that it has changed to 1938. Perhaps time in the book is two-dimensional, with Time City time orthogonal to time everywhere else. [[spoiler:Except it turns out that the history of Time City can shift back and forth too...]]
21st Apr '16 9:24:30 PM sorako
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* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' gets...''vague'' with how time travel works. At first at seems like traveling to the past always creates a fresh new timeline, or "string," where none of your other trips happened, and if you screw something up, you can always make a new string where you didn't. However, it turns out that the strings can become tangled if there are too many of them, and making changes to history is like plucking the strings, causing them to "harmonize" with each other. If you get too many strings harmonizing, time itself will [[TimeCrash shatter]] from the vibrations. Jake nearly causes this to happen by [[spoiler: saving JFK's life]], but somehow he's able to save the world by making ''another'' string where that doesn't happen. All of this is explained by a hobo who's been driven insane by a very nasty version of RippleEffectProofMemory (imagine remembering hundreds of different futures all at once, all in equal clarity) so there's a lot the reader never finds out.



* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' gets...''vague'' with how time travel works. At first at seems like traveling to the past always creates a fresh new timeline, or "string," where none of your other trips happened, and if you screw something up, you can always make a new string where you didn't. However, it turns out that the strings can become tangled if there are too many of them, and making changes to history is like plucking the strings, causing them to "harmonize" with each other. If you get too many strings harmonizing, time itself will [[TimeCrash shatter]] from the vibrations. Jake nearly causes this to happen by [[spoiler: saving JFK's life]], but somehow he's able to save the world by making ''another'' string where that doesn't happen. All of this is explained by a hobo who's been driven insane by a very nasty version of RippleEffectProofMemory (imagine remembering hundreds of different futures all at once, all in equal clarity) so there's a lot the reader never finds out.

to:

* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' gets...''vague'' with how In ''[[Literature/JohnnyMaxwellTrilogy Johnny and the Bomb]]'', Pratchett explains that most time travel works. At first at seems like traveling travellers forget the original timeline when they return to the past always creates a fresh new timeline, or "string," where none one because of your other trips happened, and the human tendency to [[WeirdnessCensor accept what's around them as normal]]; but if you screw something up, really try (or are reminded of it by some useful clue) you can always make a new string where you didn't. However, it turns out that the strings can become tangled if there are too many of them, and making changes remember how things used to history is like plucking the strings, causing them to "harmonize" with each other. If you get too many strings harmonizing, time itself will [[TimeCrash shatter]] from the vibrations. Jake nearly causes this to happen by [[spoiler: saving JFK's life]], but somehow he's able to save the world by making ''another'' string where that doesn't happen. All of this is explained by a hobo who's been driven insane by a very nasty version of RippleEffectProofMemory (imagine remembering hundreds of different futures all at once, all in equal clarity) so there's a lot the reader never finds out.be.



* In ''[[Literature/JohnnyMaxwellTrilogy Johnny and the Bomb]]'', Pratchett explains that most time travellers forget the original timeline when they return to the new one because of the human tendency to [[WeirdnessCensor accept what's around them as normal]]; but if you really try (or are reminded of it by some useful clue) you can remember how things used to be.
21st Apr '16 9:21:48 PM sorako
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* The time travel in ''Film/AboutTime'' appears to have at least two different modes, but the explanation is very scanty. Tim can go back to a previous occasion and change what he did, but then he can choose to either live from that point onwards, or snap forward to where he jumped from and see what the changes have been. The event described in SecretKeeper seems to suggest [[spoiler: he can also undo these changes.]]



* ''Film/LostInSpace'' contains a plot where John and Don walk into the future by an energy field just to find future Will and Dr. Smith creating that energy field as a result to build a machine to travel into the past, because the entire family was wiped out as a result of John and Don disappearing by walking into the future. When present Will and Dr. Smith enter the bubble, nothing happens to their future selves. Hell, Future Dr. Smith killed his past self without a second thought.



* The time travel in ''Film/AboutTime'' appears to have at least two different modes, but the explanation is very scanty. Tim can go back to a previous occasion and change what he did, but then he can choose to either live from that point onwards, or snap forward to where he jumped from and see what the changes have been. The event described in SecretKeeper seems to suggest [[spoiler: he can also undo these changes.]]
* ''Film/LostInSpace'' contains a plot where John and Don walk into the future by an energy field just to find future Will and Dr. Smith creating that energy field as a result to build a machine to travel into the past, because the entire family was wiped out as a result of John and Don disappearing by walking into the future. When present Will and Dr. Smith enter the bubble, nothing happens to their future selves. Hell, Future Dr. Smith killed his past self without a second thought.



* The film version of ''Film/ASoundOfThunder'' (if not [[Literature/ASoundOfThunder the book]]) uses hilariously inconsistent rules of time travel (and those rules don't make much sense ''before'' they start breaking them). It's a crucial plot point that the characters keep returning to the exact same point in time, but never run into previous versions of themselves (no explanation for that is given)... until the time they do (no explanation for that either). Plants smash through the walls of a building because the past was changed in such a way as to cause plants to grow larger and more aggressively (no explanation is given as to why someone decided to build the building in the spot where, in the new timeline, a giant tree has been growing for ages -- not to mention why the tree that's always been there smashes through the floor while people watch instead of just appearing as it if had always been there). At one point, the characters are unable to travel back to the point in time they want to reach because there's a time disturbance between the present and their destination in the past; the solution? Travel back to an ''even earlier'' point and then go forward (if you guessed that no explanation is given as to why the time disturbance is somehow not blocking that too, you've been paying attention). There were explanations - that the changes come in waves, changing things in fits and starts, not all as a whole. As for having to travel further back, that's easy to explain. Think of it as trying to get into a house, but the front door has something pressed against it stopping you from opening it. What do you do? Go in through the back door and then walk through the house to the front door to remove the blockage. Simples!



* The film version of ''Film/ASoundOfThunder'' (if not [[Literature/ASoundOfThunder the book]]) uses hilariously inconsistent rules of time travel (and those rules don't make much sense ''before'' they start breaking them). It's a crucial plot point that the characters keep returning to the exact same point in time, but never run into previous versions of themselves (no explanation for that is given)... until the time they do (no explanation for that either). Plants smash through the walls of a building because the past was changed in such a way as to cause plants to grow larger and more aggressively (no explanation is given as to why someone decided to build the building in the spot where, in the new timeline, a giant tree has been growing for ages -- not to mention why the tree that's always been there smashes through the floor while people watch instead of just appearing as it if had always been there). At one point, the characters are unable to travel back to the point in time they want to reach because there's a time disturbance between the present and their destination in the past; the solution? Travel back to an ''even earlier'' point and then go forward (if you guessed that no explanation is given as to why the time disturbance is somehow not blocking that too, you've been paying attention). There were explanations - that the changes come in waves, changing things in fits and starts, not all as a whole. As for having to travel further back, that's easy to explain. Think of it as trying to get into a house, but the front door has something pressed against it stopping you from opening it. What do you do? Go in through the back door and then walk through the house to the front door to remove the blockage. Simples!
21st Apr '16 9:18:41 PM sorako
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* Creator/RobertAHeinlein:
** Heinlein wrote a short story called ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps'', in which the protagonist exploits a time machine to move himself forward in time. Simple enough. The MindScrew comes in when [[spoiler: he does this by his future self sending back his intermediate self to persuade his past self to enter the machine's portal. When the past self becomes the intermediate self, he attempts to double cross the future self, but that double cross naturally results in him becoming the future self.]] Follow all that?
** For a real, double whammy version of mind screw, read ''Literature/AllYouZombies'' [[spoiler: which chronicles a young man (later revealed to be post-real-sex change) taken back in time and tricked into impregnating his younger, female self (before s/he underwent said sex change); then he turns out to be the offspring of that union (time-relocated yet again), with the paradoxical result that he is both his own mother and father. As the story unfolds, all the major characters -- the young single mother, her seducer, the alcoholic writer, the bartender who recruits him into the time-travel corps, ''and even the baby'' -- are revealed to be the same person, at different stages of her/his life.]] How's your mind doing now?
* Creator/PoulAnderson:
** ''Literature/TimePatrol'' stories are [[ShownTheirWork historically well-researched]] and confusing as '''hell.''' Among other things, the future is "uptime" and the past is "downtime," which makes it sound counterintuitively like time is a river that flows uphill. (This is consistent with convention in geology and archeology, where an earlier period is "lower" because its evidence is in deeper strata.)
** Ditto in the ''1632'' series, the Grantville inhabitants from 2000 are "uptimers," the seventeenth century natives are "downtimers."
** The same terminology is used in [[Creator/IsaacAsimov The End of Eternity]], where use words like "downwhen", "upwhen", "anywhen" and "everywhen".

to:

* Creator/RobertAHeinlein:
** Heinlein wrote a short story called ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps'', in
''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' made use of TimeTravel occasionally, and each time it apparently worked differently. Different techniques of TimeTravel were involved, at least one of which was by use of a [[TimeMachine thingy]] created by the protagonist exploits a time machine closest thing to move himself forward in time. Simple enough. The MindScrew comes in when [[spoiler: he does this by his future self sending back his intermediate self to persuade his past self to enter the machine's portal. When the past self becomes the intermediate self, he attempts to double cross the future self, but that double cross naturally results in him becoming the future self.]] Follow all that?
** For
a real, double whammy version of mind screw, read ''Literature/AllYouZombies'' [[spoiler: which chronicles a young man (later revealed to be post-real-sex change) taken back in time and tricked into impregnating his younger, female self (before s/he underwent said sex change); then he turns out to be the offspring of that union (time-relocated yet again), with the paradoxical result that he is both his own mother and father. As the story unfolds, all the major characters -- the young single mother, her seducer, the alcoholic writer, the bartender who recruits him into the time-travel corps, ''and even the baby'' -- are revealed to be the same person, at different stages of her/his life.]] How's your mind doing now?
* Creator/PoulAnderson:
** ''Literature/TimePatrol'' stories are [[ShownTheirWork historically well-researched]] and confusing as '''hell.''' Among other things, the future is "uptime" and the past is "downtime," which makes it sound counterintuitively like time is a river that flows uphill. (This is consistent with convention in geology and archeology, where an earlier period is "lower" because its evidence is in deeper strata.)
** Ditto
{{God}} in the ''1632'' series, the Grantville inhabitants from 2000 are "uptimers," the seventeenth century natives are "downtimers."
**
and another (a BadFuture-esque thing) was just flat-out never explained. The same terminology is used in [[Creator/IsaacAsimov The End of Eternity]], where use words like "downwhen", "upwhen", "anywhen" and "everywhen".bad future was apparently [[spoiler:a dream caused by an advanced being for some reason. Maybe.]]



* In Creator/JasperFforde's ''Literature/ThursdayNext'' novels, not only do the rules of TimeTravel make no sense whatsoever, the main character (whose father is a time-traveller) realises this, and often {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it. In one book, the rules actually seem to change over the course of a conversation with her dad, but she realizes there's no point in even asking.
** In ''[[Literature/ThursdayNext First Among Sequels]]'', there is a subplot revolving around the fact that the time-travellers have mapped almost the entire future and found that TimeTravel has not yet been invented. By the end of the book, [[spoiler:Thursday and co. have managed to ensure that TimeTravel is ''never'' invented, and thus, could never have been used earlier in the series]]. This means that several events from the previous four books including the plays of Creator/WilliamShakespeare [[spoiler:and the ''beginning of all life on earth'']] logically could not have happened. Since many of these events were the results of {{Stable Time Loop}}s anyway, this is a case of Ascended TimeParadox. Or MindScrew turned UpToEleven. Either way, it's probably best just to apply the MST3KMantra and enjoy the series.
** A significant part of the plot of ''The Woman Who Died a Lot'' is that the non-existence of time travel in a world where many people know they ''used'' to work for the [[TimePolice ChronoGuard]] has actually made the Timey-Wimey Ball ''worse''.
* David Gerrold's ''The Man Who Folded Himself'' features a time-travel belt, which has the traveller completely paranoid about the possibility of a TemporalParadox destroying him. It turns out that {{Temporal Paradox}}es are impossible; TimeTravel rewrites history except for the guy who travelled through time. Various MindScrew moments: [[spoiler:the protagonist has orgies with himself of different ages, writes himself out of history, has a family with himself as a female, eventually has that written out of history (but his son still exists) and culminates in finally giving himself (as the son, so he's his own father) the time travel device. On the last, the idea of where it came from is explored a couple of times and eventually it's hit upon that it's impossible to know where it came from, the creators must have been written out of history. Oh, and he kills {{Jesus}} at an early age. It's okay, he goes back and stops himself after finding out how much it screws with history.]]
* Creator/HarryHarrison's ''Literature/TheStainlessSteelRat Saves the World'' features two overlapping timelines (one of which only has a temporary existence) ''and'' a loop. The lead character travels back in time to stop the Special Corps being removed from history, and manages to disrupt the enemy's plan. He then follows them further back in time, landing in an alternate history where Napoleon conquered Britain. He messes up the controls on the enemy time machine, and (after being rescued shortly before the alternate history disappears) follows them forward (but still long before his own time). He finds the villains (after a ''long'' time for them -- so long they've forgotten everything except that he's the Enemy), but is unable to stop them; they travel back in time, and he's only saved by a time machine -- allowing him to return to his own time -- which he then sends back with the instructions for what he just did. [[spoiler:Finally, he's told not to worry that he didn't stop the villains; they've just travelled to the first place he met them, where they will then travel back and create an alternate history where Napoleon conquered Britain, before...]]
* In ''A Tale of Time City'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones, the titular city exists outside of the flow of history on the rest of the world. From this vantage point, the citizens see that history works like weather patterns -- it shifts back and forth with minute details thanks to the butterfly effect and time loops. Basically, a more detailed explanation of the Timey-Wimey Ball, where shifts in the time travel theories are explained away as the changing "weather patterns" of time. For instance, on one day in Time City the inhabitants may observe that UsefulNotes/WorldWarII begins in 1939, but on another day they may notice that it has changed to 1938. Perhaps time in the book is two-dimensional, with Time City time orthogonal to time everywhere else. [[spoiler:Except it turns out that the history of Time City can shift back and forth too...]]

to:

* In Creator/JasperFforde's ''Literature/ThursdayNext'' novels, not only do Connie Willis's stories, the rules of TimeTravel make no sense whatsoever, the main character (whose father is a time-traveller) realises this, and often {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it. In one book, the rules actually seem to change over the course of a conversation with her dad, but she realizes there's no point in even asking.
** In ''[[Literature/ThursdayNext First Among Sequels]]'', there is a subplot revolving around the fact that the time-travellers have mapped almost the entire future and found that TimeTravel has not yet been invented. By the end of the book, [[spoiler:Thursday and co. have managed to ensure that TimeTravel is ''never'' invented, and thus, could never have been used earlier in the series]]. This means that several events from the previous four books including the plays of Creator/WilliamShakespeare [[spoiler:and the ''beginning of all life on earth'']] logically could not have happened. Since many of these events were the results of {{Stable Time Loop}}s anyway, this is a case of Ascended TimeParadox. Or MindScrew turned UpToEleven. Either way, it's probably best just to apply the MST3KMantra and enjoy the series.
** A significant part of the plot of ''The Woman Who Died a Lot'' is that the non-existence of time travel in a world where many people know they ''used'' to work for the [[TimePolice ChronoGuard]] has actually made the Timey-Wimey Ball ''worse''.
* David Gerrold's ''The Man Who Folded Himself'' features a time-travel belt, which has the traveller completely paranoid about the possibility of a TemporalParadox destroying him. It turns out that {{Temporal Paradox}}es are impossible; TimeTravel rewrites history except for the guy who travelled through time. Various MindScrew moments: [[spoiler:the protagonist has orgies with himself of different ages, writes himself out of history, has a family with himself as a female, eventually has that written out of history (but his son still exists) and culminates in finally giving himself (as the son, so he's his own father) the time travel device. On the last, the idea of where it came from is explored a couple of times and eventually it's hit upon that it's impossible to know where it came from, the creators must have been written out of history. Oh, and he kills {{Jesus}} at an early age. It's okay, he goes back and stops himself after finding out how much it screws with history.]]
* Creator/HarryHarrison's ''Literature/TheStainlessSteelRat Saves the World'' features two overlapping timelines (one of which only has a temporary existence) ''and'' a loop. The lead character travels back in time to stop the Special Corps being removed from history, and manages to disrupt the enemy's plan. He then follows them further back in time, landing in an alternate history where Napoleon conquered Britain. He messes up the controls on the enemy time machine, and (after being rescued shortly before the alternate history disappears) follows them forward (but still long before his own time). He finds the villains (after a ''long'' time for them -- so long they've forgotten everything except that he's the Enemy), but is unable to stop them; they travel back in time, and he's only saved by a
time machine -- allowing him to return to his own time -- which he then sends back with the instructions for what he just did. [[spoiler:Finally, he's told you not to worry that he didn't stop the villains; they've just travelled your target time-and-place but to the first place he met them, where they nearest point such that your actions will then travel back and create an alternate not change history. (This is consistent with James Hogan's theory mentioned above, though the mechanism is not explicitly stated.) In ''Doomsday Book'' (which shared the Hugo Award in 1993), a history student aiming for England 1328 lands instead in 1348, where Napoleon conquered Britain, before...]]
* In ''A Tale of Time City'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones, the titular city exists outside of the flow of
she can't affect history on the rest because everyone she meets will shortly be dead of the world. From this vantage point, the citizens see that history works like weather patterns -- it shifts back and forth with minute details thanks to the butterfly effect and time loops. Basically, a more detailed explanation of the Timey-Wimey Ball, where shifts in the time travel theories are explained away as the changing "weather patterns" of time. For instance, on one day in Time City the inhabitants may observe that UsefulNotes/WorldWarII begins in 1939, but on another day they may notice that it has changed to 1938. Perhaps time in the book is two-dimensional, with Time City time orthogonal to time everywhere else. [[spoiler:Except it turns out that the history of Time City can shift back and forth too...]]Plague.



* Creator/JackChalker's ''Literature/DowntimingTheNightside'': People leaping through time can affect changes. If the change is small enough, nothing much happens to the timeline, but significant changes can happen. Karl Marx is killed 3 different times, at 3 different points of his life. At the end of his life, not too significant. After he publishes ''Das Kapital'', not too bad either. '''Before''' he publishes it on the other hand... And this is just the tip of the timey-wimey iceberg.
* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' gets...''vague'' with how time travel works. At first at seems like traveling to the past always creates a fresh new timeline, or "string," where none of your other trips happened, and if you screw something up, you can always make a new string where you didn't. However, it turns out that the strings can become tangled if there are too many of them, and making changes to history is like plucking the strings, causing them to "harmonize" with each other. If you get too many strings harmonizing, time itself will [[TimeCrash shatter]] from the vibrations. Jake nearly causes this to happen by [[spoiler: saving JFK's life]], but somehow he's able to save the world by making ''another'' string where that doesn't happen. All of this is explained by a hobo who's been driven insane by a very nasty version of RippleEffectProofMemory (imagine remembering hundreds of different futures all at once, all in equal clarity) so there's a lot the reader never finds out.
* David Gerrold's ''The Man Who Folded Himself'' features a time-travel belt, which has the traveller completely paranoid about the possibility of a TemporalParadox destroying him. It turns out that {{Temporal Paradox}}es are impossible; TimeTravel rewrites history except for the guy who travelled through time. Various MindScrew moments: [[spoiler:the protagonist has orgies with himself of different ages, writes himself out of history, has a family with himself as a female, eventually has that written out of history (but his son still exists) and culminates in finally giving himself (as the son, so he's his own father) the time travel device. On the last, the idea of where it came from is explored a couple of times and eventually it's hit upon that it's impossible to know where it came from, the creators must have been written out of history. Oh, and he kills {{Jesus}} at an early age. It's okay, he goes back and stops himself after finding out how much it screws with history.]]
* Creator/PoulAnderson:
** ''Literature/TimePatrol'' stories are [[ShownTheirWork historically well-researched]] and confusing as '''hell.''' Among other things, the future is "uptime" and the past is "downtime," which makes it sound counterintuitively like time is a river that flows uphill. (This is consistent with convention in geology and archeology, where an earlier period is "lower" because its evidence is in deeper strata.)
** Ditto in the ''1632'' series, the Grantville inhabitants from 2000 are "uptimers," the seventeenth century natives are "downtimers."
** The same terminology is used in [[Creator/IsaacAsimov The End of Eternity]], where use words like "downwhen", "upwhen", "anywhen" and "everywhen".
* In ''A Tale of Time City'' by Creator/DianaWynneJones, the titular city exists outside of the flow of history on the rest of the world. From this vantage point, the citizens see that history works like weather patterns -- it shifts back and forth with minute details thanks to the butterfly effect and time loops. Basically, a more detailed explanation of the Timey-Wimey Ball, where shifts in the time travel theories are explained away as the changing "weather patterns" of time. For instance, on one day in Time City the inhabitants may observe that UsefulNotes/WorldWarII begins in 1939, but on another day they may notice that it has changed to 1938. Perhaps time in the book is two-dimensional, with Time City time orthogonal to time everywhere else. [[spoiler:Except it turns out that the history of Time City can shift back and forth too...]]



* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' made use of TimeTravel occasionally, and each time it apparently worked differently. Different techniques of TimeTravel were involved, at least one of which was by use of a [[TimeMachine thingy]] created by the closest thing to a {{God}} in the series, and another (a BadFuture-esque thing) was just flat-out never explained. The bad future was apparently [[spoiler:a dream caused by an advanced being for some reason. Maybe.]]

to:

* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'' made use of TimeTravel occasionally, and each time it apparently worked differently. Different techniques of TimeTravel were involved, at least one of which was by use of a [[TimeMachine thingy]] created by the closest thing to a {{God}} in the series, and another (a BadFuture-esque thing) was just flat-out never explained. ''[[Literature/{{Dragons}} The bad future was apparently [[spoiler:a dream caused by an advanced being for some reason. Maybe.]]Last Dragon Chronicles]]'': Oh God. There are too many examples to list, though things start getting particularly crazy from ''Dark Fire'' onward. Taken to extremes in ''The Fire Ascending''.



* ''[[Literature/{{Dragons}} The Last Dragon Chronicles]]'': Oh God. There are too many examples to list, though things start getting particularly crazy from ''Dark Fire'' onward. Taken to extremes in ''The Fire Ascending''.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': The novel ''Q-Squared'' introduces several alternate realities, including one based on the BadFuture in ''Yesterday's Enterprise''. However, in this case, when the Ent-D finds the Ent-C, all the crew aboard it are already dead. Afraid of Klingons getting their hands on a Federation warship (even an old one), they scuttle it and move on. Oh, and by the end of the novel, that reality is even worse off, since [[spoiler:its Picard and Riker are dead]].
* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'': The novel trilogy ''War of the Ancients''. Despite some dramatic changes (such as saving an entire race that originally went extinct), it's apparently okay to mess with time as long as the end result is roughly the same. Of course, it also helps explaining why said race appears rather plentiful in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' after having been said to be extinct in an earlier novel...
* In Connie Willis's stories, the time machine sends you not to your target time-and-place but to the nearest point such that your actions will not change history. (This is consistent with James Hogan's theory mentioned above, though the mechanism is not explicitly stated.) In ''Doomsday Book'' (which shared the Hugo Award in 1993), a history student aiming for England 1328 lands instead in 1348, where she can't affect history because everyone she meets will shortly be dead of the Plague.
* Creator/JackChalker's Literature/DowntimingTheNightside: People leaping through time can affect changes. If the change is small enough, nothing much happens to the timeline, but significant changes can happen. Karl Marx is killed 3 different times, at 3 different points of his life. At the end of his life, not too significant. After he publishes ''Das Kapital'', not too bad either. '''Before''' he publishes it on the other hand... And this is just the tip of the timey-wimey iceberg.



* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' gets...''vague'' with how time travel works. At first at seems like traveling to the past always creates a fresh new timeline, or "string," where none of your other trips happened, and if you screw something up, you can always make a new string where you didn't. However, it turns out that the strings can become tangled if there are too many of them, and making changes to history is like plucking the strings, causing them to "harmonize" with each other. If you get too many strings harmonizing, time itself will [[TimeCrash shatter]] from the vibrations. Jake nearly causes this to happen by [[spoiler: saving JFK's life]], but somehow he's able to save the world by making ''another'' string where that doesn't happen. All of this is explained by a hobo who's been driven insane by a very nasty version of RippleEffectProofMemory (imagine remembering hundreds of different futures all at once, all in equal clarity) so there's a lot the reader never finds out.

to:

* ''Literature/ElevenTwentyTwoSixtyThree'' gets...''vague'' with how Creator/RobertAHeinlein:
** Heinlein wrote a short story called ''Literature/ByHisBootstraps'', in which the protagonist exploits a
time travel works. At first at seems like traveling machine to the past always creates a fresh new timeline, or "string," where none of your other trips happened, and if you screw something up, you can always make a new string where you didn't. However, it turns out that the strings can become tangled if there are too many of them, and making changes to history is like plucking the strings, causing them to "harmonize" with each other. If you get too many strings harmonizing, time itself will [[TimeCrash shatter]] from the vibrations. Jake nearly causes this to happen by move himself forward in time. Simple enough. The MindScrew comes in when [[spoiler: saving JFK's life]], he does this by his future self sending back his intermediate self to persuade his past self to enter the machine's portal. When the past self becomes the intermediate self, he attempts to double cross the future self, but somehow he's able to save the world by making ''another'' string where that doesn't happen. All of this is explained by double cross naturally results in him becoming the future self.]] Follow all that?
** For
a hobo who's been driven insane by a very nasty real, double whammy version of RippleEffectProofMemory (imagine remembering hundreds mind screw, read ''Literature/AllYouZombies'' [[spoiler: which chronicles a young man (later revealed to be post-real-sex change) taken back in time and tricked into impregnating his younger, female self (before s/he underwent said sex change); then he turns out to be the offspring of that union (time-relocated yet again), with the paradoxical result that he is both his own mother and father. As the story unfolds, all the major characters -- the young single mother, her seducer, the alcoholic writer, the bartender who recruits him into the time-travel corps, ''and even the baby'' -- are revealed to be the same person, at different futures stages of her/his life.]] How's your mind doing now?
* Creator/HarryHarrison's ''Literature/TheStainlessSteelRat Saves the World'' features two overlapping timelines (one of which only has a temporary existence) ''and'' a loop. The lead character travels back in time to stop the Special Corps being removed from history, and manages to disrupt the enemy's plan. He then follows them further back in time, landing in an alternate history where Napoleon conquered Britain. He messes up the controls on the enemy time machine, and (after being rescued shortly before the alternate history disappears) follows them forward (but still long before his own time). He finds the villains (after a ''long'' time for them -- so long they've forgotten everything except that he's the Enemy), but is unable to stop them; they travel back in time, and he's only saved by a time machine -- allowing him to return to his own time -- which he then sends back with the instructions for what he just did. [[spoiler:Finally, he's told not to worry that he didn't stop the villains; they've just travelled to the first place he met them, where they will then travel back and create an alternate history where Napoleon conquered Britain, before...]]
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': The novel ''Q-Squared'' introduces several alternate realities, including one based on the BadFuture in ''Yesterday's Enterprise''. However, in this case, when the Ent-D finds the Ent-C,
all at once, all in equal clarity) so the crew aboard it are already dead. Afraid of Klingons getting their hands on a Federation warship (even an old one), they scuttle it and move on. Oh, and by the end of the novel, that reality is even worse off, since [[spoiler:its Picard and Riker are dead]].
* In Creator/JasperFforde's ''Literature/ThursdayNext'' novels, not only do the rules of TimeTravel make no sense whatsoever, the main character (whose father is a time-traveller) realises this, and often {{lampshade|Hanging}}s it. In one book, the rules actually seem to change over the course of a conversation with her dad, but she realizes
there's no point in even asking.
** In ''[[Literature/ThursdayNext First Among Sequels]]'', there is
a lot subplot revolving around the reader fact that the time-travellers have mapped almost the entire future and found that TimeTravel has not yet been invented. By the end of the book, [[spoiler:Thursday and co. have managed to ensure that TimeTravel is ''never'' invented, and thus, could never finds out.have been used earlier in the series]]. This means that several events from the previous four books including the plays of Creator/WilliamShakespeare [[spoiler:and the ''beginning of all life on earth'']] logically could not have happened. Since many of these events were the results of {{Stable Time Loop}}s anyway, this is a case of Ascended TimeParadox. Or MindScrew turned UpToEleven. Either way, it's probably best just to apply the MST3KMantra and enjoy the series.
** A significant part of the plot of ''The Woman Who Died a Lot'' is that the non-existence of time travel in a world where many people know they ''used'' to work for the [[TimePolice ChronoGuard]] has actually made the Timey-Wimey Ball ''worse''.
* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'': The novel trilogy ''War of the Ancients''. Despite some dramatic changes (such as saving an entire race that originally went extinct), it's apparently okay to mess with time as long as the end result is roughly the same. Of course, it also helps explaining why said race appears rather plentiful in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' after having been said to be extinct in an earlier novel...



* Time travel in ''Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic'' at first ''appears'' to work in a StableTimeLoop fashion, but then it's revealed that [[spoiler: It's possible to "break" a StableTimeLoop, an action capable of ''destroying the entire universe.'' [[OhCrap Several time loops have already been broken]].]] And now [[spoiler: Every universe, save the "espionage" theme universe, has been destroyed. They got better.]] [[RunningGag And now]] apparently the timeline is too broken to go back pre-1933 (specifically the date of the Reichstag Fire). Complete with a link to this very article.



* Time travel in ''Webcomic/IrregularWebcomic'' at first ''appears'' to work in a StableTimeLoop fashion, but then it's revealed that [[spoiler: It's possible to "break" a StableTimeLoop, an action capable of ''destroying the entire universe.'' [[OhCrap Several time loops have already been broken]].]] And now [[spoiler: Every universe, save the "espionage" theme universe, has been destroyed. They got better.]] [[RunningGag And now]] apparently the timeline is too broken to go back pre-1933 (specifically the date of the Reichstag Fire). Complete with a link to this very article.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TimeyWimeyBall