History Main / TimeTravel

17th May '17 5:00:47 AM thatmadork
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* ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'': The entire premise is about a [[FishOutOfTemporalWater samurai warrior from ancient Japan]] being flung into the far future, where his demonic nemesis Aku has taken over the world. [[OnlyKnownByTheirNickname Jack]] travels across the world in search of time portals and other magical artifacts so he can [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong return to the past, defeat Aku and prevent the nightmare future world from ever coming to be]]. Invariably, Jack will always fail to use the artifact or portal due to some intervening circumstance. By Season 5, fifty years have passed with no luck and Jack [[TheAgeless has not aged a day]] but [[ShellShockedVeteran is a broken shell of a man]] because of it.
24th Apr '17 2:08:15 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Three ''Zelda'' games use it as a core game mechanic: ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' has Link travel back and forth seven years, ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' has him travel through a GroundhogDayLoop, and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle Of Ages]]'' has him use a harp to travel 400 years to the past and back. The mechanics aren't exactly consistent; time travel in ''Ocarina of Time'' causes a [[AlternateTimeline timeline split]], but seems to operate on a StableTimeLoop system in the ''Oracle of Ages''. And let's not get started on the various ways the time travel mechanics of ''Majora's Mask'' might work.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' heavily features this mechanic in the Lanayru area: By hitting Timeshift Stones, Link can return an area in a certain radius from the stone to how it was in the past, also reviving any creatures whose remains lie in the area. So basically you can travel through time by walking into or out of the area of effect.
*** Time travel also plays a substantial role in [[spoiler:the main story]]; among other things, [[spoiler:the finale take place ages before most of the characters were even born]], and [[spoiler:Impa is escorting Zelda around the surface at the exact same time her older self is continuing to monitor the Imprisoned]].

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* Three ''Zelda'' ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' games use it as a core game mechanic: ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime Ocarina of Time]]'' has Link travel back and forth seven years, ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' has him travel through a GroundhogDayLoop, and ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames Oracle Of Ages]]'' has him use a harp to travel 400 years to the past and back. The mechanics aren't exactly consistent; time travel in ''Ocarina of Time'' causes a [[AlternateTimeline timeline split]], but seems to operate on a StableTimeLoop system in the ''Oracle of Ages''. And let's not get started on the various ways the time travel mechanics of ''Majora's Mask'' might work.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' heavily features this mechanic in the Lanayru area: By hitting Timeshift Stones, Link can return an area in a certain radius from the stone to how it was in the past, also reviving any creatures whose remains lie in the area. So basically you can travel through time by walking into or out of the area of effect.
***
effect. Time travel also plays a substantial role in [[spoiler:the main story]]; among other things, [[spoiler:the finale take place ages before most of the characters were even born]], and [[spoiler:Impa is escorting Zelda around the surface at the exact same time her older self is continuing to monitor the Imprisoned]].
2nd Apr '17 10:34:55 AM nombretomado
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* Becomes a major theme in ''PandoraHearts'' after it is revealed that time flows differently in [[TheUnderworld the Abyss.]] Any character that falls down there, [[EldritchLocation if they make it out alive,]] hardly ever comes back to his or her original timeline.

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* Becomes a major theme in ''PandoraHearts'' ''Manga/PandoraHearts'' after it is revealed that time flows differently in [[TheUnderworld the Abyss.]] Any character that falls down there, [[EldritchLocation if they make it out alive,]] hardly ever comes back to his or her original timeline.
19th Mar '17 5:16:45 PM Doug86
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* Warhammer40K: Warp travel involves going through another dimension where FTL is possible, but it's extremely erratic and random. [[StableTimeLoop One ship ended up setting out to respond to its own distress signal sent just before it exploded]], while an ork Waaaaagh! ended up popping out of the Warp just in front of its younger self. The warboss immediately attacked and killed his past self so he could have two sets of his favorite gun. In the ensuing confusion, the Waaagh! disbanded.

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* Warhammer40K: ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': Warp travel involves going through another dimension where FTL is possible, but it's extremely erratic and random. [[StableTimeLoop One ship ended up setting out to respond to its own distress signal sent just before it exploded]], while an ork Waaaaagh! ended up popping out of the Warp just in front of its younger self. The warboss immediately attacked and killed his past self so he could have two sets of his favorite gun. In the ensuing confusion, the Waaagh! disbanded.
13th Mar '17 9:43:43 AM FF32
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* In ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange", the main character acquires the ability to time-travel, although the power only extends to a few minutes in the past, and is typically used to change some of the recent choices you make. In Episode 3, [[spoiler: she travels ''really'' far back into the past and ends up creating an alternate timeline.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange", ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange'', the main character acquires the ability to time-travel, although the power only extends to a few minutes in the past, and is typically used to change some of the recent choices you make. In Episode 3, [[spoiler: she travels ''really'' far back into the past and ends up creating an alternate timeline.]]
12th Mar '17 4:29:57 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' is about a time travelling HumanoidAlien and his human companions who travel throughout time and space in his spaceship, The TARDIS, which is usually disguised as a blue London police box and is BiggerOnTheInside. Although the show started with time travel on Earth just going to historical eras to see what happened in the past (as it was originally devised as an edutainment programme), later series would always have some alien interference in whatever was happening in the episodes set on Earth.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' is about a time travelling HumanoidAlien HumanAlien and his human companions who travel throughout time and space in his spaceship, The the TARDIS, which is usually disguised as a blue London police box and is BiggerOnTheInside. Although the show started with time travel on Earth just going to historical eras to see what happened in the past (as it was originally devised as an edutainment programme), later series would always have some alien interference in whatever was happening in the episodes set on Earth.



* ''Series/{{Timeless}}'' starts with a group of criminals stealing a secret time machine (called the Mothership) from Mason Industries in order to change past events. Mason Industries then informs the government of the existence of time travel. The NSA quickly recruits a historian, a soldier, and the remaining time machine pilot to use the prototype machine (called the Lifeboat) to go back and keep the bad guys from altering the timeline. As a rule, they fail at least in some way, so every time they come back, they hit the Internet to see how things have changed. As it turns out, [[spoiler:the "bad guy" is actually trying to erase an AncientConspiracy from history using the notes that are yet to be written by the above-mentioned historian]]. Oh, and there are personal consequences to time travel as well, as [[spoiler:the historian finds out that, after their first jump, she no longer has a sister, who was never born in the altered timeline]].



* The series ''Series/{{Timeless}}'' starts with a group of criminals stealing a secret time machine (called the Mothership) from Mason Industries in order to change past events. Mason Industries then informs the government of the existence of time travel. The NSA quickly recruits a historian, a soldier, and the remaining time machine pilot to use the prototype machine (called the Lifeboat) to go back and keep the bad guys from altering the timeline. As a rule, they fail at least in some way, so every time they come back, they hit the Internet to see how things have changed. As it turns out, [[spoiler:the "bad guy" is actually trying to erase an AncientConspiracy from history using the notes that are yet to be written by the above-mentioned historian]]. Oh, and there are personal consequences to time travel as well, as [[spoiler:the historian finds out that, after their first jump, she no longer has a sister, who was never born in the altered timeline]].



* ''Series/QuantumLeap''
* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'': One of its central premises was a "temporal cold war", in which bandits are going back in time and messing with the timeline. The rules and limitations of time travel are never explained to anyone at any time, so the writers had a license to AssPull.
* ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''.
* ''Series/{{Voyagers}}'' - this was the entire premise. The 'Voyagers' were charged to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong - they used one gadget, the ''Omni'' (which looked rather like a large gold pocketwatch), both to travel and to figure out what was wrong and how to set it right.

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* ''Series/QuantumLeap''
* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'': One of its central premises was a "temporal cold war",
''Series/{{Heroes}}'' has the character Hiro, his time travelling basically set off the whole first series in which bandits are going an attempt to change the future, it's a lot harder than you imagine, apparently. Also in the second series, he travels back in time and messing with creates the timeline. The rules and limitations of character he heard in his bedtime stories. Peter also is prone to time travel are never explained to anyone at any time, so the writers had a license to AssPull.
* ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''.
* ''Series/{{Voyagers}}'' - this was the entire premise. The 'Voyagers' were charged to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong - they used one gadget, the ''Omni'' (which looked rather like a large gold pocketwatch), both to travel and to figure out what was wrong and how to set it right.
but less often.



* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' has the character Hiro, his time travelling basically set off the whole first series in an attempt to change the future, it's a lot harder than you imagine, apparently. Also in the second series, he travels back in time and creates the character he heard in his bedtime stories. Peter also is prone to time travel but less often.
* As the titles indicate, ''Series/MiraiSentaiTimeranger'' and ''Series/PowerRangersTimeForce'' feature this; they're about TimePolice squads from the year 3000 who have chased a prisonful of escaped inmates to 2000 (''Timeranger'') / 2001 (''Time Force'').



* As the titles indicate, ''Series/MiraiSentaiTimeranger'' and ''Series/PowerRangersTimeForce'' feature this; they're about TimePolice squads from the year 3000 who have chased a prisonful of escaped inmates to 2000 (''Timeranger'') / 2001 (''Time Force'').
* ''Series/OdiseaBurbujas'' using Professor Memelovsky’s Time Slide in most of the episodes, as a way to teach children’s history as it was an educational show.



* ''Series/OdiseaBurbujas'' using Professor Memelovsky’s Time Slide in most of the episodes, as a way to teach children’s history as it was an educational show.

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%%* ''Series/QuantumLeap''
* ''Series/OdiseaBurbujas'' using Professor Memelovsky’s Time Slide ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'': One of its central premises was a "temporal cold war", in most of which bandits are going back in time and messing with the episodes, as a way timeline. The rules and limitations of time travel are never explained to teach children’s history as it anyone at any time, so the writers had a license to AssPull.
%%* ''Series/TheTimeTunnel''.
* ''Series/{{Voyagers}}'' - this
was an educational show. the entire premise. The 'Voyagers' were charged to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong - they used one gadget, the ''Omni'' (which looked rather like a large gold pocketwatch), both to travel and to figure out what was wrong and how to set it right.
14th Feb '17 10:48:04 PM DarkHunter
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** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', [[Disney/TheSwordInTheStone Merlin]] was able to create a door that led into a world based on WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts such as ''Steamboat Willie''. This is very strange considering that it breaks nearly every rule of time travel established in the later ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'', leading fans to wonder whether that door was actually time travel or something else entirely.



** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' adds time travel to the list of twists surrounding Xehanort, the series' main villain. As a result, his egomania and knack for swapping bodies and identities have reached their LogicalExtreme - the different incarnations are acting as BigBad, CoDragons and TheHeavy all at the same time, and are working on infecting even more people while they're at it.
** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', [[Disney/TheSwordInTheStone Merlin]] was able to create a door that led into a world based on WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts such as ''Steamboat Willie''. Notably, Merlin's version manages to break pretty much ''every rule'' of time travel that was established in ''3D'': You can't change the past, you don't remember time traveling when you're done, a version of yourself must exist at the destination, and [[spoiler:you must give up your physical body to do it.]]

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** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' adds establishes that time travel is possible, but rather difficult. There needs to the list of twists surrounding Xehanort, the series' main villain. As a result, his egomania and knack for swapping bodies and identities have reached their LogicalExtreme - the different incarnations are acting as BigBad, CoDragons and TheHeavy all at the same time, and are working on infecting even more people while they're at it.
** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', [[Disney/TheSwordInTheStone Merlin]] was able to create a door that led into a world based on WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts such as ''Steamboat Willie''. Notably, Merlin's version manages to break pretty much ''every rule'' of time travel that was established in ''3D'': You can't change the past, you don't remember time traveling when you're done,
be a version of yourself must exist present at the destination, time and place you wish to travel to, and [[spoiler:you must give up your physical body in order to actually make the journey]]. Furthermore, it's a case of YouAlreadyChangedThePast: anything you do in the past has already happened and cannot happen a different way. And if you're brought ''forward'' in time to the future, you will forget everything you did while time travelling when you return to the past. [[spoiler:Xehanort is revealed to be using time travel, facilitated by his younger self, to bring various versions of himself together to fulfill the "13 seekers of darkness" requirement he needs to achieve his goals. As a result, we have Master Xehanort, Young Xehanort, the false Ansem (aka Xehanort's Heartless), Xemnas, and Terra-Xehanort all working together, having been pulled from their respective times to do it.so.]]
13th Feb '17 11:27:05 AM ChronoLegion
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* The series ''Series/{{Timeless}}'' starts with a group of criminals stealing a secret time machine (called the Mothership) from Mason Industries in order to change past events. Mason Industries then informs the government of the existence of time travel. The NSA quickly recruits a historian, a soldier, and the remaining time machine pilot to use the prototype machine (called the Lifeboat) to go back and keep the bad guys from altering the timeline. As a rule, they fail at least in some way, so every time they come back, they hit the Internet to see how things have changed. As it turns out, [[spoiler:the "bad guy" is actually trying to erase an AncientConspiracy from history using the notes that are yet to be written by the above-mentioned historian]]. Oh, and there are personal consequences to time travel as well, as [[spoiler:the historian finds out that, after their first jump, she no longer has a sister, who was never born in the altered timeline]].
13th Feb '17 11:17:38 AM ChronoLegion
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* A minor sidequest in ''VideoGame/TheBookOfUnwrittenTales2'' involves going back into the past several times in order to save several books from being destroyed by a leaky roof. You use a time travel book for that purpose. Every time you go back, the game's graphics and music get more and more retro. The first time, the graphics are similar to ''VideoGame/SimonTheSorcerer''. The second time, they're more like the original ''VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland'' (your current PC is disconcerted about not being able to speak audibly). The last trip takes you to a text-based adventure, and Wilbur decides not to try going even further back in time. On the way back to the future, Wilbur tells the books that, in his time, there's this thing called "the third dimension".
18th Jan '17 5:31:39 PM Rhodes7
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* Time-travel is essential to ''Literature/Mindwarp'', a series that visits the distant future, the 1940s, and the prehistoric era.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TimeTravel