History Main / TimeTravel

14th Feb '17 10:48:04 PM DarkHunter
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** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', [[Disney/TheSwordInTheStone Merlin]] was able to create a door that led into a world based on WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts such as ''Steamboat Willie''. This is very strange considering that it breaks nearly every rule of time travel established in the later ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'', leading fans to wonder whether that door was actually time travel or something else entirely.



** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' adds time travel to the list of twists surrounding Xehanort, the series' main villain. As a result, his egomania and knack for swapping bodies and identities have reached their LogicalExtreme - the different incarnations are acting as BigBad, CoDragons and TheHeavy all at the same time, and are working on infecting even more people while they're at it.
** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', [[Disney/TheSwordInTheStone Merlin]] was able to create a door that led into a world based on WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts such as ''Steamboat Willie''. Notably, Merlin's version manages to break pretty much ''every rule'' of time travel that was established in ''3D'': You can't change the past, you don't remember time traveling when you're done, a version of yourself must exist at the destination, and [[spoiler:you must give up your physical body to do it.]]

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** ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' adds establishes that time travel is possible, but rather difficult. There needs to the list of twists surrounding Xehanort, the series' main villain. As a result, his egomania and knack for swapping bodies and identities have reached their LogicalExtreme - the different incarnations are acting as BigBad, CoDragons and TheHeavy all at the same time, and are working on infecting even more people while they're at it.
** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', [[Disney/TheSwordInTheStone Merlin]] was able to create a door that led into a world based on WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts such as ''Steamboat Willie''. Notably, Merlin's version manages to break pretty much ''every rule'' of time travel that was established in ''3D'': You can't change the past, you don't remember time traveling when you're done,
be a version of yourself must exist present at the destination, time and place you wish to travel to, and [[spoiler:you must give up your physical body in order to actually make the journey]]. Furthermore, it's a case of YouAlreadyChangedThePast: anything you do in the past has already happened and cannot happen a different way. And if you're brought ''forward'' in time to the future, you will forget everything you did while time travelling when you return to the past. [[spoiler:Xehanort is revealed to be using time travel, facilitated by his younger self, to bring various versions of himself together to fulfill the "13 seekers of darkness" requirement he needs to achieve his goals. As a result, we have Master Xehanort, Young Xehanort, the false Ansem (aka Xehanort's Heartless), Xemnas, and Terra-Xehanort all working together, having been pulled from their respective times to do it.so.]]
13th Feb '17 11:27:05 AM ChronoLegion
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* The series ''Series/{{Timeless}}'' starts with a group of criminals stealing a secret time machine (called the Mothership) from Mason Industries in order to change past events. Mason Industries then informs the government of the existence of time travel. The NSA quickly recruits a historian, a soldier, and the remaining time machine pilot to use the prototype machine (called the Lifeboat) to go back and keep the bad guys from altering the timeline. As a rule, they fail at least in some way, so every time they come back, they hit the Internet to see how things have changed. As it turns out, [[spoiler:the "bad guy" is actually trying to erase an AncientConspiracy from history using the notes that are yet to be written by the above-mentioned historian]]. Oh, and there are personal consequences to time travel as well, as [[spoiler:the historian finds out that, after their first jump, she no longer has a sister, who was never born in the altered timeline]].
13th Feb '17 11:17:38 AM ChronoLegion
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* A minor sidequest in ''VideoGame/TheBookOfUnwrittenTales2'' involves going back into the past several times in order to save several books from being destroyed by a leaky roof. You use a time travel book for that purpose. Every time you go back, the game's graphics and music get more and more retro. The first time, the graphics are similar to ''VideoGame/SimonTheSorcerer''. The second time, they're more like the original ''VideoGame/TheSecretOfMonkeyIsland'' (your current PC is disconcerted about not being able to speak audibly). The last trip takes you to a text-based adventure, and Wilbur decides not to try going even further back in time. On the way back to the future, Wilbur tells the books that, in his time, there's this thing called "the third dimension".
18th Jan '17 5:31:39 PM Rhodes7
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* Time-travel is essential to ''Literature/Mindwarp'', a series that visits the distant future, the 1940s, and the prehistoric era.
10th Jan '17 8:36:48 PM TheFantasyChronicler
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* In ''Anime/{{Simoun}}'', time travel requires the successful completion of the Emerald Ri Maajon, an extremely dangerous maneuver that can only be accomplished by a pair of the most skillful pilots with [[TeamSpirit a powerful emotional bond]] with each other. Failed attempts are generally fatal, with [[NuclearWeaponsTaboo explosive consequences]].



* In ''Anime/{{Simoun}}'', time travel requires the successful completion of the Emerald Ri Maajon, an extremely dangerous maneuver that can only be accomplished by a pair of the most skillful pilots with [[TeamSpirit a powerful emotional bond]] with each other. Failed attempts are generally fatal, with [[NuclearWeaponsTaboo explosive consequences]].



* In ''ComicBook/UniversalWarOne'', scientists build a space station that accidentally opens a wormhole, allowing limited time travel. [[spoiler: Then Kalish solves the equations that allow anybody to travel through time and space without limitation.]]



* In ''ComicBook/UniversalWarOne'', scientists build a space station that accidentally opens a wormhole, allowing limited time travel. [[spoiler: Then Kalish solves the equations that allow anybody to travel through time and space without limitation.]]



* In ''Film/DonnieDarko'' people in the future will be able to mess with the past without leaving the future via machine. Such meddling causes alternate universes which must be destroyed or they'll erase the future-people's universe.

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* In ''Film/DonnieDarko'' people [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100704194442/http://www.cvil.wustl.edu/~gary/SF/time-movies.html This website]] lists almost every single Time Travel movie ever made, from 1921's ''A Connecticut Yankee in the future will be able King Arthur's Court'' up to mess with the past without leaving the future via machine. Such meddling causes alternate universes which must be destroyed or they'll erase the future-people's universe.2009's ''Film/StarTrek''.



* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' series
** In ''Film/TheTerminator'', only organic things could be sent through time. No weapons or clothes or anything but the time traveller.
** Stretched by LoopholeAbuse starting with ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay''. The only thing that allowed the original T-800 model 101 to go back through time was the fact it was a shell surrounded by living tissue. Following that, Skynet manages to send other Terminators back which are made of, or covered by, liquid metal or nanobots that mimic human flesh. Noted by many reviewers is that this discovery creates all new plot holes, such as the fact that now, the machines should be able smuggle back anything they want into the past, so long as it's covered by that stuff.
* In Jean Claude Van Damme's ''Film/{{Timecop}}'', there's a federal agency responsible for going after people who attempt to go back in time. He winds up [[spoiler: having to go back in time himself to save his wife from dying, which is what he was hired to keep other people from doing.]]
* ''Franchise/StarTrek 4'', 7, 8 and 11 all use time travel as a device, by a different method each time.
* [[http://web.archive.org/web/20100704194442/http://www.cvil.wustl.edu/~gary/SF/time-movies.html This website]] lists almost every single Time Travel movie ever made, from 1921's ''A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court'' up to 2009's ''Film/StarTrek''.
* ''Film/FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutTimeTravel'' has several of the above mentioned categories (notably SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong taken to KnightTemplar extremes, as [[spoiler: an entire group exists to kill great people just after their greatest achievement, so they never decline in quality]] as [[ConversationalTroping discusses]] the rest.
* In ''Film/TwelveMonkeys'', James Cole travels to the past several times, to find a sample of TheVirus before it become ThePlague.



* In ''Film/DonnieDarko'' people in the future will be able to mess with the past without leaving the future via machine. Such meddling causes alternate universes which must be destroyed or they'll erase the future-people's universe.
* ''Film/FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutTimeTravel'' has several of the above mentioned categories (notably SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong taken to KnightTemplar extremes, as [[spoiler: an entire group exists to kill great people just after their greatest achievement, so they never decline in quality]] as [[ConversationalTroping discusses]] the rest.
* In ''Film/{{Predestination}}'', Temporal Agent go back in time to prevent crimes.



* In ''Film/{{Predestination}}'', Temporal Agent go back in time to prevent crimes.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek 4'', 7, 8 and 11 all use time travel as a device, by a different method each time.
* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' series.
** In ''Film/TheTerminator'', only organic things could be sent through time. No weapons or clothes or anything but the time traveller.
** Stretched by LoopholeAbuse starting with ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay''. The only thing that allowed the original T-800 model 101 to go back through time was the fact it was a shell surrounded by living tissue. Following that, Skynet manages to send other Terminators back which are made of, or covered by, liquid metal or nanobots that mimic human flesh. Noted by many reviewers is that this discovery creates all new plot holes, such as the fact that now, the machines should be able smuggle back anything they want into the past, so long as it's covered by that stuff.
* In ''Film/{{Predestination}}'', Temporal Agent Jean Claude Van Damme's ''Film/{{Timecop}}'', there's a federal agency responsible for going after people who attempt to go back in time. He winds up [[spoiler: having to go back in time himself to prevent crimes.save his wife from dying, which is what he was hired to keep other people from doing.]]
* In ''Film/TwelveMonkeys'', James Cole travels to the past several times, to find a sample of TheVirus before it become ThePlague.



* In Creator/GeneWolfe's "Free Live Free" is a character study of some down and outers in 1980s Chicago, but uses time travel to enable the otherwise unexplainable series of events that reveal the main characters. The time machine is left behind when a time travel occurs. The means by which jumpers to the future are able to get back (not taking the machine with them) is very poetically handled if you see technology from a poetic point of view; Miyazaki might like it. There is never more than one version of a person, so if you go back to a time in which you previously lived, the previous you disappears when the new you arrives (but the travelling version is also affected by this by a folding in of character traits). This whole entry would be a spoiler on any other page, as the book is partly a mystery novel, and figuring out that time travel was involved is part of the detective's task.
* Kim Stanley Robinson's "Galileo's Dream" ties together quantum mechanics and cosmology in it's unique form of time travel, which manages to merge the concepts of AlternateUniverse and TemporalMutability - The ButterflyOfDoom lives comfortably alongside YouCantFightFate. The book allows itself the leeway to be fantastical by basing itself in Renaissance fantasy literature, but it still manages to achieve this TimeyWimeyBall in a very scientifically satisfying way. In fact, nearly every single time travel related trope manages to make an appearance in the novel in one form or another, with the plot turning out to revolve around [[spoiler:a bona fide temporal war]] - a concept that is rarely made to make sense. Interestingly, in Robinson's universe, [[OurTimeTravelIsDifferent time is not a dimension]] - instead [[spoiler:it is a manifold of three different dimensions, one of which conveniently runs backwards.]]
* In Sean Ferrill's ''The Man in the Empty Suit'', the narrator celebrates his subjective birthday every year by visiting a party 100 years after he was born. This, of course, means that every other version of himself is also in attendance. Temporal paradoxes are dealt with in an interesting way-- each version of himself is "tethered" to a younger version. When one of them creates a paradox, they become "untethered", having come from different timelines, but still existing on the same timeline. Confused? So is he.



* In Sean Ferrill's ''The Man in the Empty Suit'', the narrator celebrates his subjective birthday every year by visiting a party 100 years after he was born. This, of course, means that every other version of himself is also in attendance. Temporal paradoxes are dealt with in an interesting way-- each version of himself is "tethered" to a younger version. When one of them creates a paradox, they become "untethered", having come from different timelines, but still existing on the same timeline. Confused? So is he.
* In Creator/GeneWolfe's "Free Live Free" is a character study of some down and outers in 1980s Chicago, but uses time travel to enable the otherwise unexplainable series of events that reveal the main characters. The time machine is left behind when a time travel occurs. The means by which jumpers to the future are able to get back (not taking the machine with them) is very poetically handled if you see technology from a poetic point of view; Miyazaki might like it. There is never more than one version of a person, so if you go back to a time in which you previously lived, the previous you disappears when the new you arrives (but the travelling version is also affected by this by a folding in of character traits). This whole entry would be a spoiler on any other page, as the book is partly a mystery novel, and figuring out that time travel was involved is part of the detective's task.
* Kim Stanley Robinson's "Galileo's Dream" ties together quantum mechanics and cosmology in it's unique form of time travel, which manages to merge the concepts of AlternateUniverse and TemporalMutability - The ButterflyOfDoom lives comfortably alongside YouCantFightFate. The book allows itself the leeway to be fantastical by basing itself in Renaissance fantasy literature, but it still manages to achieve this TimeyWimeyBall in a very scientifically satisfying way. In fact, nearly every single time travel related trope manages to make an appearance in the novel in one form or another, with the plot turning out to revolve around [[spoiler:a bona fide temporal war]] - a concept that is rarely made to make sense. Interestingly, in Robinson's universe, [[OurTimeTravelIsDifferent time is not a dimension]] - instead [[spoiler:it is a manifold of three different dimensions, one of which conveniently runs backwards.]]



* ''Series/{{Blackadder}} Back and Forth'' featured Blackadder and Baldrick traveling through time when Baldrick accidentally made a working time machine. Then they go back to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong when they change history by accident. [[spoiler: Then they MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight so Blackadder could become king. For once, it ''worked''. ]]



* In ''Series/TimeTrax'', the method varied, but the rules were that you could only travel between two set time periods (The Present and The Future), and more than two trips in a lifetime are lethal.

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* In ''Series/TimeTrax'', the method varied, but the rules were that you could only ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' had an interesting variation: The title characters cannot actually travel between two set time periods (The Present and The Future), and through time, as their portals always lead them to a parallel Earth during the current year. However, one such world is a place where events play out exactly the same as they did on the Sliders' earth, but at a much slower rate, so when the Sliders' arrive, it seems to them be more than two trips in a lifetime are lethal.ten years earlier.



* In ''Series/TimeTrax'', the method varied, but the rules were that you could only travel between two set time periods (The Present and The Future), and more than two trips in a lifetime are lethal.



* ''Series/{{Blackadder}} Back and Forth'' featured Blackadder and Baldrick traveling through time when Baldrick accidentally made a working time machine. Then they go back to SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong when they change history by accident. [[spoiler: Then they MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight so Blackadder could become king. For once, it ''worked''. ]]
* ''Series/{{Sliders}}'' had an interesting variation: The title characters cannot actually travel through time, as their portals always lead them to a parallel Earth during the current year. However, one such world is a place where events play out exactly the same as they did on the Sliders' earth, but at a much slower rate, so when the Sliders' arrive, it seems to them be more than ten years earlier.



* Downplayed in ''Pinball/AustinPowers''; shoot the center ramp up to the Time Machine four times to start Time Machine Multiball.



* Similarly, ''Pinball/TimeMachineDataEast'' has a [[Franchise/BackToTheFuture silver sports car]] that morphs as it travels from TheEighties to TheFifties.
* Downplayed in ''Pinball/AustinPowers''; shoot the center ramp up to the Time Machine four times to start Time Machine Multiball.

to:

* ** Similarly, ''Pinball/TimeMachineDataEast'' has a [[Franchise/BackToTheFuture silver sports car]] that morphs as it travels from TheEighties to TheFifties.
* Downplayed in ''Pinball/AustinPowers''; shoot the center ramp up to the Time Machine four times to start Time Machine Multiball.
TheFifties.



* In the RolePlayingGame ''TabletopGame/FengShui'', a region of cross-time 'space' called the Netherworld allows characters to move between four different points in history (69 AD, 1850 AD, 1996 AD and 2056 AD). These junctures are [[MeanwhileInTheFuture fixed with relation to each other]], treating the start of the campaign as zero-hour for all of them. So, if you enter the Netherworld in 1996, travel back to 69 AD, stay for six months and then return to '96, it will be six months later there, as well. A second use of {{phlebotinum}} states that only people who control powerful feng shui sites can actually change the future by changing the past; everyone else just sees history work itself around the change.



* In the RolePlayingGame ''TabletopGame/FengShui'', a region of cross-time 'space' called the Netherworld allows characters to move between four different points in history (69 AD, 1850 AD, 1996 AD and 2056 AD). These junctures are [[MeanwhileInTheFuture fixed with relation to each other]], treating the start of the campaign as zero-hour for all of them. So, if you enter the Netherworld in 1996, travel back to 69 AD, stay for six months and then return to '96, it will be six months later there, as well. A second use of {{phlebotinum}} states that only people who control powerful feng shui sites can actually change the future by changing the past; everyone else just sees history work itself around the change.



* ''The Clumsies'' and ''The Clumsies 2: Butterfly Effect'' involve going back and fixing the effects of accidental time travel.
* In the ''Flux Family Secrets'' series the titular family is responsible for maintaining the integrity of the past.
* Time travel as well as going back in time to fix any mistakes in history caused by the antagonists (and sometimes the protagonists) is the premise of the online hidden objects game ''VideoGame/GardensOfTime.''



* In the ''Flux Family Secrets'' series the titular family is responsible for maintaining the integrity of the past.
* ''The Clumsies'' and ''The Clumsies 2: Butterfly Effect'' involve going back and fixing the effects of accidental time travel.
* The main character in ''Time Hollow'' does quite a bit of time-traveling (via a pen that "draws" windows in the time stream) in order to fix the effects of temporal meddling and get his parents and old life back.
* In ''Tesla's Tower: The Wardenclyffe Mystery'' Nikola Tesla sends time travel device plans to the present so that the main character, a distant descendant of his, can go back and correct or prevent the sabotaged experiment which resulted in everyone in the world losing the ability to see color.

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* In ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange", the ''Flux Family Secrets'' series the titular family is responsible for maintaining the integrity of the past.
* ''The Clumsies'' and ''The Clumsies 2: Butterfly Effect'' involve going back and fixing the effects of accidental time travel.
* The
main character in ''Time Hollow'' does quite a bit of time-traveling (via a pen that "draws" windows in the time stream) in order to fix the effects of temporal meddling and get his parents and old life back.
* In ''Tesla's Tower: The Wardenclyffe Mystery'' Nikola Tesla sends time travel device plans to the present so that the main character, a distant descendant of his, can go back and correct or prevent the sabotaged experiment which resulted in everyone in the world losing
acquires the ability to see color.time-travel, although the power only extends to a few minutes in the past, and is typically used to change some of the recent choices you make. In Episode 3, [[spoiler: she travels ''really'' far back into the past and ends up creating an alternate timeline.]]



* In ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange", the main character acquires the ability to time-travel, although the power only extends to a few minutes in the past, and is typically used to change some of the recent choices you make. In Episode 3, [[spoiler: she travels ''really'' far back into the past and ends up creating an alternate timeline.]]
* Time travel as well as going back in time to fix any mistakes in history caused by the antagonists (and sometimes the protagonists) is the premise of the online hidden objects game ''VideoGame/GardensOfTime.''

to:

* In ''VideoGame/LifeIsStrange", ''Tesla's Tower: The Wardenclyffe Mystery'' Nikola Tesla sends time travel device plans to the present so that the main character, a distant descendant of his, can go back and correct or prevent the sabotaged experiment which resulted in everyone in the world losing the ability to see color.
* The
main character acquires the ability to time-travel, although the power only extends to in ''Time Hollow'' does quite a few minutes bit of time-traveling (via a pen that "draws" windows in the past, and is typically used to change some of the recent choices you make. In Episode 3, [[spoiler: she travels ''really'' far back into the past and ends up creating an alternate timeline.]]
* Time travel as well as going back in
time stream) in order to fix any mistakes in history caused by the antagonists (and sometimes the protagonists) is the premise effects of the online hidden objects game ''VideoGame/GardensOfTime.''temporal meddling and get his parents and old life back.



* ''Podcast/ArsParadoxica'' is built around this, with the protagonist (Dr. Sally Grissom) being accidentally flung into the 1940s with a Higgs Field Inhibitor. The rest of the podcast centers around her trying to fix the machine, dubbed the Timepiece, and the American government's interest in what she brings from the future...



* ''Podcast/ArsParadoxica'' is built around this, with the protagonist (Dr. Sally Grissom) being accidentally flung into the 1940s with a Higgs Field Inhibitor. The rest of the podcast centers around her trying to fix the machine, dubbed the Timepiece, and the American government's interest in what she brings from the future...



* In ''WesternAnimation/TimeSquad'' the characters have to constantly go back in time in order to stop goofups in the timeline (because time is like a rope and as it grows it becomes frayed). HilarityEnsues when they encounter historical figures doing crazy things, such as Eli Whitney creating flesh-eating robots instead of the cotton gin, Ludwig von Beethoven becoming a wrestler instead of a composer, or UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush thinking that the answer to all of the country's problems is a giant ball of twine.



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' calls attention to the many types of time travel in an episode when future people emigrate to the present. The news anchor announces that "apparently this is using 'Terminator' rules"

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' calls attention to the many types of time travel in an episode when future people emigrate to the present. The news anchor announces that "apparently this is using 'Terminator' rules"rules".
* In ''WesternAnimation/TimeSquad'' the characters have to constantly go back in time in order to stop goofups in the timeline (because time is like a rope and as it grows it becomes frayed). HilarityEnsues when they encounter historical figures doing crazy things, such as Eli Whitney creating flesh-eating robots instead of the cotton gin, Ludwig von Beethoven becoming a wrestler instead of a composer, or UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush thinking that the answer to all of the country's problems is a giant ball of twine.



* All the ''Anime/TimeBokan'' series (with the exception of ''Anime/{{Yatterman}}'') feature heroes and villain travel in the time for a specific objective in every episode and battle with their MiniMecha or HumongousMecha.



* A major theme and the focal point of ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate''. There are multiple types of time machines and they all depend on the use of black holes. However, prototypes could only send back emails or some sort of electrical pulse because sending matter back in time causes it to turn into some jelly-like substance. ''Steins Gate'' uses the John Titor hoax from real life as if it were real, to create a plotline based on world lines and stable time loops.

to:

* A The ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' stories/anime feature time travelers, most notably [[{{Woobie}} Mikuru]]. It gets important in a major theme way in the novels, which also push Mikuru from being the NeutralFemale somewhat. [[spoiler:They travel to [[ArcWords 3 years ago]], and [[TrustPassword Kyon is the focal point of ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate''. There are multiple types of goddamn John Smith!]] ]] The 7th novel also circles around it, this time machines with a Mikuru from a week in the future, setting off events to inspire the future inventor of time-travel and they all depend on set off events necessary to bring about her organization. Like by nailing a can to the use of black holes. However, prototypes could only ground to send back emails a man to hospital so that he can meet his future wife, or some sort of electrical pulse because sending matter back in time causes it to turn by dropping a turtle into some jelly-like substance. ''Steins Gate'' uses freezing water to teach the John Titor hoax from real life as if inventor of time-travel something.
** For everyone who has questions, I present you [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/timeline.png this]]. If
it were real, to create a plotline based on world lines and stable time loops.even ''[[MindScrew helps]]''. Careful of spoilers.



* A major theme and the focal point of ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate''. There are multiple types of time machines and they all depend on the use of black holes. However, prototypes could only send back emails or some sort of electrical pulse because sending matter back in time causes it to turn into some jelly-like substance. ''Steins Gate'' uses the John Titor hoax from real life as if it were real, to create a plotline based on world lines and stable time loops.



* The ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' stories/anime feature time travelers, most notably [[{{Woobie}} Mikuru]]. It gets important in a major way in the novels, which also push Mikuru from being the NeutralFemale somewhat. [[spoiler:They travel to [[ArcWords 3 years ago]], and [[TrustPassword Kyon is the goddamn John Smith!]] ]] The 7th novel also circles around it, this time with a Mikuru from a week in the future, setting off events to inspire the future inventor of time-travel and set off events necessary to bring about her organization. Like by nailing a can to the ground to send a man to hospital so that he can meet his future wife, or by dropping a turtle into freezing water to teach the inventor of time-travel something.
** For everyone who has questions, I present you [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/timeline.png this]]. If it even ''[[MindScrew helps]]''. Careful of spoilers.

to:

* The ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'' stories/anime All the ''Anime/TimeBokan'' series (with the exception of ''Anime/{{Yatterman}}'') feature time travelers, most notably [[{{Woobie}} Mikuru]]. It gets important in a major way heroes and villain travel in the novels, which also push Mikuru from being the NeutralFemale somewhat. [[spoiler:They travel to [[ArcWords 3 years ago]], and [[TrustPassword Kyon is the goddamn John Smith!]] ]] The 7th novel also circles around it, this time for a specific objective in every episode and battle with a Mikuru from a week in the future, setting off events to inspire the future inventor of time-travel and set off events necessary to bring about her organization. Like by nailing a can to the ground to send a man to hospital so that he can meet his future wife, their MiniMecha or by dropping a turtle into freezing water to teach the inventor of time-travel something.
** For everyone who has questions, I present you [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/timeline.png this]]. If it even ''[[MindScrew helps]]''. Careful of spoilers.
HumongousMecha.



* ''Manga/LetsLagoon'' where the fog surrounding the deserted island can cause things to travel through time.
10th Jan '17 3:59:12 PM book
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** She doesn't do it because [[spoiler: Hana is not part of the timeline, she's from a deleted timeline and is the only reason the characters know time has been changed.]]
14th Dec '16 5:23:30 AM Luppercus
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* ''Series/OdiseaBurbujas'' using Professor Memelovsky’s Time Slide in most of the episodes, as a way to teach children’s history as it was an educational show.
22nd Nov '16 2:56:52 AM Troperinik
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* The main cast of ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' own a time machine, and they occasionally use it for various purposes.
26th Oct '16 6:02:31 AM Tightwire
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# YouCantFightFate: Characters go to the future! They must get back to their own time and prevent the future from going horribly horribly wrong. Sometimes, they can't, in which case it's YouCannotChangeTheFuture or a StableTimeLoop (see below).

# SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: Characters go to the past! Again, this is usually to "fix" the future -- that is, the characters' "present." Often this involves correcting a TemporalParadox. Remember, Hitler has [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct Time Travel Exemption]].
** MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight: Characters go to the past! But... not to fix the present or future. They want to change the events in some way, to favor themselves or their employer. Generally [[BadFuture bad things ensue]].
** TerminatorTwosome: Both of the above at once; a villain goes back to change the future in their favor, and a hero follows to put a stop to it.

# StableTimeLoop: Characters go to the past! And in the past, they turn out to be responsible for the events that led to their "present." In other words, YouAlreadyChangedThePast. This is similar to YouCantFightFate, but in the present instead of the future.

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# YouCantFightFate: Characters go to When the future! ''first'' journey involves going into the ''future''. They must get back to their own time and prevent the future from going horribly horribly wrong. Sometimes, Sometimes they can't, in which case it's YouCannotChangeTheFuture or a StableTimeLoop (see below).

# SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: Characters go to the past! Again, this is usually to "fix" the future -- that is, the characters' "present." Often this involves correcting a TemporalParadox. Remember, Hitler has [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct Time Travel Exemption]].
** MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight: Characters go to the past! But... not to fix the present or future. They want to change the events in some way, to favor themselves or their employer. Generally [[BadFuture bad things ensue]].
** TerminatorTwosome: Both of the above at once; a villain goes back to change the future in their favor, and a hero follows to put a stop to it.

they've just created a...

# StableTimeLoop: Characters go to the past! And in the past, they turn out to be responsible for the events that led to their "present." In other words, YouAlreadyChangedThePast. This is similar to YouCantFightFate, but now in the past's present instead of the future.



# SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: When the first journey is into the past. Again, this is usually to ''fix'' things - that is, the characters' 'present'. It can involve correcting a TemporalParadox. Remember, Hitler has [[HitlersTimeTravelExemptionAct Time Travel Exemption]].
** MakeWrongWhatOnceWentRight: See above. But... not to fix the present or future. This is the job of the bad guy, who has selfish reasons that favour themselves or their employer. It can create a BadFuture, but it can also cause the...

# TerminatorTwosome: Both of the above at once; a villain goes back to change the future in their favour, and a hero follows to put a stop to it or correct it.



# ResetButton: The characters go through a world of crap, or somebody "changes history", and they resort to time travel to fix it. If they succeed, the time-line fixes itself and the characters awaken having no knowledge that anything was ever different. Occasionally, [[RippleEffectProofMemory only the time-travellers remember]] -- at least, the ones who were alive at the point of fix. If they don't succeed, the series has just received a ReTool or StoryReset.

# TrappedInThePast: The characters are stuck in another time with no way of return (a.k.a. forced to take TheSlowPath) and must choose between quietly living out their lives without changing history or [[GivingRadioToTheRomans working to change the world]] to their (and the natives') benefit. You'd be amazed how few people seem to pick the first option.

# AlternateTimeline: The characters' time-travel has split their universe in twain. There's the universe they're in (that they've "changed") and the universe they're not in (the "old" universe that wasn't changed).

# TimeyWimeyBall: When all of the above can be invoked to suit the plot.

to:

# ResetButton: The characters go through a world of crap, or somebody "changes history", and they resort to time travel to fix prevent it. If they succeed, the time-line fixes itself and the characters awaken having no knowledge that anything was ever different. Occasionally, [[RippleEffectProofMemory only the time-travellers remember]] -- at least, the ones who were alive at the point of fix. If they don't succeed, the series has just received a ReTool or StoryReset.

# TrappedInThePast: The characters are stuck in another time with no way of return (a.k.a. forced to take TheSlowPath) and must choose between quietly living out their lives without changing history or [[GivingRadioToTheRomans working to change the world]] to their (and the natives') benefit. You'd be amazed how few people seem to pick the first option.

Or they might just rely on YouCantFightFate and its relatives., and let history get on with making itself.

# AlternateTimeline: The characters' time-travel has split their universe in twain. There's the universe future they're in (that they've "changed") and the universe future they're not in (the "old" universe that wasn't changed).

changed). They will probably never be able to return to their old universe.

# TimeyWimeyBall: When all any of the above can be invoked to suit the plot.



Because OurTimeTravelIsDifferent, the time traveler can experience a variety of experiences when traveling in time. For example, the three major types treat time as the fast-forward or rewind buttons on your remote, a tunnel that you or the machine travel through, and instantaneous (temporal) teleportation.

to:

Because OurTimeTravelIsDifferent, the time traveler traveller can experience a variety of experiences when traveling travelling in time. For example, the three major types treat time as the fast-forward or rewind buttons on your remote, a tunnel that you or the machine travel through, and instantaneous (temporal) teleportation.



Note that the StableTimeLoop and AlternateUniverse (when done properly; i.e., the time-traveller(s) can never get back to the first universe) resolutions are the only ones logically consistent with typical ideas of causality, so stories wishing to be more "realistic" should favor these.

Stories not wishing to be "realistic", of course, can just ignore the whole TemporalParadox thing for some reason. Maybe the time travelers have RippleEffectProofMemory or otherwise get to ignore their own pasts making them immune to changes in the timeline. After all, it's not like we actually know what will happen, right? [[MindScrew Right]]?

to:

Note that the StableTimeLoop and AlternateUniverse (when done properly; i.e., the time-traveller(s) can never get back to the first universe) resolutions are the only ones even ''slightly'' logically consistent with typical ideas of causality, so stories wishing to be more "realistic" should favor favour these.

Stories not wishing to be "realistic", of course, can just ignore the whole TemporalParadox thing for some reason. Maybe the time travelers travellers have RippleEffectProofMemory or otherwise get to ignore their own pasts making them immune to changes in the timeline. timeline - although theoretically seeing as they've just been subjected to the impossible, their bodies and minds might be different anyway now. After all, it's not like we actually know what will happen, right? [[MindScrew Right]]?
Right]]?!
14th Oct '16 2:05:33 PM nombretomado
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** Likewise, in ''EliteBeatAgents'', one of the missions involve travelling back in time (by purpose) to Florence in the 15th Century, to help Leonardo Da Vinci win the heart of Mona Lisa and eventually create his masterpiece of painting.

to:

** Likewise, in ''EliteBeatAgents'', ''VideoGame/EliteBeatAgents'', one of the missions involve travelling back in time (by purpose) to Florence in the 15th Century, to help Leonardo Da Vinci win the heart of Mona Lisa and eventually create his masterpiece of painting.
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