History Main / TimeDilation

22nd Apr '17 3:17:49 PM SinDustries
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This is sometimes extrapolated by science fiction authors to apply to FTL Travel as well, though this does not make much sense physically. Many writers extend this so traveling faster than light means aging backwards, that isn't how the math says it works. The time scale factor for speeds faster than ''c'' is imaginary, not negative. However, if an object is travelling faster-than-light that means there is always some slower-than-light frame reference that sees the object travelling backwards in time -- or possibly moving in the opposite direction, with events on the object occurring backwards[[note]]This, contrary to popular belief, would not imply TimeTravel: an observer still exists that sees events happening in the "proper" order. Trouble is, both types of observers -- those that see our superluminal buddy going forwards and those that see him going backwards -- can simultaneously exist. And they do not agree on the relative order of events. Woe and behold, causality is thrown out the window in a much harsher way than any Grandfather Paradox ever dared attempt.[[/note]]. TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachyon an article]] on tachyons, theoretical objects that move faster than the speed of light, and explains how this works.

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This is sometimes extrapolated by science fiction authors to apply to FTL Travel as well, though this does not make much sense physically. Many writers extend this so traveling faster than light means aging backwards, but that isn't how the math says it works. The time scale factor for speeds faster than ''c'' is imaginary, not negative. However, if If an object is travelling faster-than-light faster-than-light, though, that means there is always some slower-than-light frame reference that sees the object travelling backwards in time -- or possibly moving in the opposite direction, with events on the object occurring backwards[[note]]This, contrary to popular belief, would not imply TimeTravel: an observer still exists that sees events happening in the "proper" order. Trouble is, both types of observers -- those that see our superluminal buddy going forwards and those that see him going backwards -- can simultaneously exist. And they do not agree on the relative order of events. Woe and behold, causality is thrown out the window in a much harsher way than any Grandfather Paradox ever dared attempt.[[/note]]. TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachyon an article]] on tachyons, theoretical objects that move faster than the speed of light, and explains how this works.
31st Mar '17 3:45:18 PM nombretomado
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* ''OrionsArm'' has relativistic space travel at speeds in excess of .9c, but it's usually requires a Transapient tech ReactionlessDrive. But it's not much of an issue because people can have essentially unlimited lifespans (average Nearbaseline lifespan is about 3000 years). Also the setting's PortalNetwork requires the two mouths of the wormhole to be towed into position at sub-relativistic speeds (~.77c).

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* ''OrionsArm'' ''WebOriginal/OrionsArm'' has relativistic space travel at speeds in excess of .9c, but it's usually requires a Transapient tech ReactionlessDrive. But it's not much of an issue because people can have essentially unlimited lifespans (average Nearbaseline lifespan is about 3000 years). Also the setting's PortalNetwork requires the two mouths of the wormhole to be towed into position at sub-relativistic speeds (~.77c).
18th Mar '17 5:03:14 PM thatother1dude
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* A musical example: Music/{{Queen}}'s "'39" is about a crewman on a spaceship who travels to a distant planet and returns after a year, only to discover that a hundred years have passed back home and only the descendants of his loved ones remain. It ends on quite a down note.

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* A musical example: Music/{{Queen}}'s "'39" from ''Music/ANightAtTheOpera'' is about a crewman on a spaceship who travels to a distant planet and returns after a year, only to discover that a hundred years have passed back home and only the descendants of his loved ones remain. It ends on quite a down note.
27th Feb '17 10:50:49 PM Discar
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* ''Literature/WeAreLegionWeAreBob'': Since the SURGE drive allows ships to move at near-light speed, time dilation is common. Furthermore, the Bobs can adjust their frame rate so that years pass like days. Some of them have different opinions on using it--Riker stubbornly sticks to real time unless absolutely necessary, while Homer is happy to adjust his frame rate to meet his needs from moment to moment.
16th Feb '17 7:37:18 AM Bissek
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* In ''Literature/TheLostFleet'' and its spinoffs, it is mentioned that since spaceships can be travelling at up to a quarter of light speed, time dilation and relativistic distortion can be a problem. Every ship in a formation likely has a different time on their internal clocks from the others, and is seeing a slightly different sensor return than everyone else. It's mentioned that until Geary was found, the art of compensating for time dilation to allow for tactical maneuvering more complicated than AttackAttackAttack was a lost art.
30th Oct '16 11:08:18 AM nombretomado
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* ''{{GURPS}}: Spaceships'' goes so far as to provide the equation for relativistic time dilation to be used for ships with sufficiently powerful engines.

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* ''{{GURPS}}: ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}: Spaceships'' goes so far as to provide the equation for relativistic time dilation to be used for ships with sufficiently powerful engines.
18th Sep '16 7:03:47 AM Austin
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* A musical example: Queen's "'39" is about a crewman on a spaceship who travels to a distant planet and returns after a year, only to discover that a hundred years have passed back home and only the descendants of his loved ones remain. It ends on quite a down note.

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* A musical example: Queen's Music/{{Queen}}'s "'39" is about a crewman on a spaceship who travels to a distant planet and returns after a year, only to discover that a hundred years have passed back home and only the descendants of his loved ones remain. It ends on quite a down note.
18th Sep '16 7:02:38 AM Austin
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* The origin story of [[ValiantComics X-O Manowar]]: a Visigoth soldier is enslaved by aliens on a slower-than-light ship. Seven years passed on the ship, but 1600 years passed on Earth by the time he returned.

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* The origin story of [[ValiantComics X-O Manowar]]: ComicBook/XOManowar: a Visigoth soldier is enslaved by aliens on a slower-than-light ship. Seven years passed on the ship, but 1600 years passed on Earth by the time he returned.



* Inverted in ''The Clockwork Rocket'' by Creator/GregEgan, which takes place in a universe where the laws of physics are different from ours, and traveling quickly means ''more'' time passes. The protagonists take a trip in a high-speed GenerationShip in order to have enough time to develop the technology they need to avert a coming disaster.

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* Inverted in ''The ''[[Literature/{{Orthogonal}} The Clockwork Rocket'' Rocket]]'' by Creator/GregEgan, which takes place in a universe where the laws of physics are different from ours, and traveling quickly means ''more'' time passes. The protagonists take a trip in a high-speed GenerationShip in order to have enough time to develop the technology they need to avert a coming disaster.
15th Sep '16 1:28:33 AM PaulA
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* The sequels to ''EndersGame'' take place 3,000 years after it, but involve many of the same characters as they've spent most of their life on spaceships traveling at relativistic speeds. However, he got the bit about TimeDilation working both ways wrong. UsefulNotes/{{Relativity}} and [[spoiler:[[SubspaceAnsible Subspace Ansibles]]]] don't mix well.

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* The sequels to ''EndersGame'' ''Literature/EndersGame'' take place 3,000 years after it, but involve many of the same characters as they've spent most of their life on spaceships traveling at relativistic speeds. However, he got the bit about TimeDilation working both ways wrong. UsefulNotes/{{Relativity}} and [[spoiler:[[SubspaceAnsible Subspace Ansibles]]]] don't mix well.
17th Aug '16 4:55:05 PM HiddenWindshield
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* This is the central premise of the novel ''Literature/TheWorldAtTheEndOfTime'', also by Creator/FrederikPohl. Everything starts when Wan-To, the [[StarfishAliens really non-human]] protagonist of the game sends as decoys during its war against other entities as it several groups of stars moving in weird ways, using physical copies of him for the dirty job [[spoiler: it turns one of those groups is where is located the human colony in which the main protagonist of the history lives. Since the physical copy has no instructions on when to stop, it accelerates the stars and everything in orbit around them to ''really relativistic'' speeds, to the point that when it decides to decelerate after 4,000 years, ''[[TimeAbyss 10.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 years]]'' have passed in the outside Universe, more than enough for all the stars to die.]]

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* This is the central premise of the novel ''Literature/TheWorldAtTheEndOfTime'', also by Creator/FrederikPohl. Everything starts when Wan-To, the [[StarfishAliens really non-human]] protagonist of the game a [[EnergyBeings plasma-based lifeform]] that's at war with some other such entities, sends as decoys during its war against other entities as it several groups of stars moving in weird ways, using physical out some [[MesACrowd copies of him for itself]] to decoy its enemies by [[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien moving some stars around]]. [[spoiler:One such copy winds up in the dirty job [[spoiler: it turns one star of those groups is where is located the a human colony in which the main protagonist of the history lives. colony. Since the physical this particular copy has had no instructions on when to stop, it accelerates the stars and everything in orbit around them to ''really relativistic'' speeds, to the point that when speeds. When it finally decides to decelerate decelerate, after about 4,000 years, ''[[TimeAbyss 10.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 years]]'' years or so, ''ten duodecillion''[[note]]That's a one followed by forty zeroes[[/note]] years have passed in the outside Universe, universe, more than enough for all the rest of the stars to die.]]all die]].
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