History Main / ThrivingGhostTown

6th Dec '17 11:01:20 AM BeerBaron
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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' started out with solid aversions of this trope, but later titles play it straight. This goes hand in hand with the switch to SpaceCompression; the examples there have more information on that. As for the towns themselves--
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena'' thoroughly averts this, as noted. Numerous villages, towns, and cities all across the continent of Tamriel are visitable, and all of them have the size and population to justify their local economy.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'' also averts this, with full-sized populated areas. The larger cities have hundreds of buildings and thousands of people. However, many of these houses can't be entered, even by the most skilled and determined lockpicks. "This house contains nothing of interest." Further, shops close at night, at which time an enterprising burglar can break in to strip the shelves bare. Players who loiter in the shop until after closing can also clear the shelves free of charge, at no risk to their criminal record.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' is the point where the series plays the trope straight, along with having SpaceCompression. Bethesda did this on purpose to address criticisms of ''Daggerfall'' that, despite the sheer size of locations and cities, they don't have a whole lot of individuality or character to them.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' also continues to play this straight; towns with a believable population are reduced to shadows of their former selves thanks to the SpaceCompression. The way the world has shrunken down stands out when comparing locations featured in ''Arena'' to ''Skyrim'', such as the town of Riverwood. In ''Arena'' it's a bustling town that contains 200 or 300 buildings, but in ''Skyrim'' it's a hamlet with seven houses.
*** Particularly noteworthy in Skyrim is the complete removal of about 4-5 small towns entirely from the world map, with 3 being just random inns along the road. This wouldn't be so notable if it wasn't for the fact that one of towns reduced to an inn was Old Hroldan, which was the site of a major battle that would be the start of TheEmpire (you know, the major good guy faction in Tamriel). The game even mentions that Hroldan should be a town and calls attention to it with a quest due to its historical significance.

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series started out with solid aversions of averting this trope, but later titles play it straight. This goes hand in hand with the switch to SpaceCompression; the examples there have more information on that. As for the towns themselves--
To note by game:
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' thoroughly averts this, as noted. Numerous avert this trope. Both cover massive areas the size of real-world counties with countless villages, towns, and cities all across the continent of Tamriel are visitable, and all of them have the to visit. Each is a realistic size and population to have populations which justify their local economy.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall'' also averts this, with full-sized populated areas. The larger cities have hundreds
economy. That said, virtually all of buildings the locations and thousands of people. However, many of these houses can't be entered, even by [=NPCs=] who aren't quest related are [[RandomlyGeneratedLevels randomly]] or [[ProceduralGeneration procedurally]] generated. Cities get repetitive and the most skilled and determined lockpicks. "This house contains nothing vast majority of interest." Further, shops close at night, at which time an enterprising burglar can break in to strip the shelves bare. Players who loiter in the shop until after closing can also clear the shelves free [=NPCs=] end up as virtual clones of charge, at no risk to their criminal record.
one another.
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' is the point where the series plays the trope straight, straight along with having being the first game in the series follow its VideoGame3DLeap, fully utilizing SpaceCompression. Bethesda did this on purpose to address criticisms of ''Daggerfall'' that, despite the sheer size of locations and cities, they don't have a whole lot of individuality or character to them.
them. This results in stated-to-be-massive cities like Vivec being small with populations of barely 100, while smaller towns and villages end up with single digit populations. As TropesAreNotBad, the space compression allows for far greater content ''density'' while the smaller cities and lower populations prevent CPU resources from being wasted rendering superfluous buildings and tracking random [=NPCs=].
** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' also ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' offers one of the most blatant examples in the series with the Imperial City. According to series' lore, the Imperial City Isle is said to be the size of Great Britain. However, in-game, you can swim a lap around the entire island in about 20 real life minutes.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'':
*** ''Skyrim''
continues to play the series' trend of playing this straight; towns straight. Towns with a believable population are reduced to shadows of their former selves thanks to the SpaceCompression. The way the world has shrunken down stands out when comparing locations featured in ''Arena'' to ''Skyrim'', such as the town of Riverwood. In ''Arena'' it's a bustling town that contains 200 or 300 buildings, but in ''Skyrim'' it's a hamlet with seven houses.
*** Particularly noteworthy in Skyrim ''Skyrim'' is the complete removal of about 4-5 small towns entirely from the world map, with 3 being just random inns along the road. This wouldn't be so notable if it wasn't for the fact that one of towns reduced to an inn was Old Hroldan, which was the site of a major battle that would be the start of TheEmpire (you know, the major good guy faction in Tamriel). The game even mentions that Hroldan should be a town and calls attention to it with a quest due to its historical significance.
4th Sep '17 12:49:58 PM HalcyonDayz
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** Sanctuary, the Crimson Raiders' home base and last bastion of resistance against Hyperion, has maybe thirty-five inhabitants, maybe a third of which are plot important and not just generic [=NPCs=].

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** Sanctuary, the Crimson Raiders' home base and last bastion of resistance against Hyperion, has maybe thirty-five inhabitants, maybe a third of which are plot important and not just generic [=NPCs=].{{Non Player Character}}s.



* The ''GrandTheftAuto'' game series, particularly later ones, are masters at maintaining the illusion of a thriving metropolis but conserving resources. In ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' and ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV'', while there are may be dozens of NPC characters seen walking around a particular area, and just as many vehicles, the number of buildings one can actually enter and interact with (do activities, etc) is actually very small. And while one can interact with NPCs and vehicles - hijacking the cars, attacking, and even in ''GTA V'' speaking to a little - the number of plot relevant NPCs that one can interact with is very small.

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* The ''GrandTheftAuto'' game series, particularly later ones, are masters at maintaining the illusion of a thriving metropolis but conserving resources. In ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' and ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoV'', while there are may be dozens of NPC characters seen walking around a particular area, and just as many vehicles, the number of buildings one can actually enter and interact with (do activities, etc) is actually very small. And while one can interact with NPCs {{Non Player Character}}s and vehicles - hijacking the cars, attacking, and even in ''GTA V'' speaking to a little - the number of plot relevant NPCs [=NPCs=] that one can interact with is very small.
8th Aug '17 5:12:47 AM Folamh3
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* ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedI'' averts this in a big way with teeming cities, not many different faces but lots of people.
28th Jun '17 11:02:00 PM Abodos
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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' makes efforts to justify this. The story takes place AfterTheEnd, when a good chunk of Hyrule's population was massacred by Calamity Ganon. The villages that are still around have about two dozen or so people living in them, with many more scattered across the wilderness.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' makes efforts to justify this. The story takes place AfterTheEnd, when a good chunk of Hyrule's population was massacred by Calamity Ganon. The villages that are still around have about two three dozen or so people named [=NPC=]s living in them, with many more scattered across the wilderness.
28th Jun '17 10:58:20 PM Abodos
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Added DiffLines:

** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaBreathOfTheWild'' makes efforts to justify this. The story takes place AfterTheEnd, when a good chunk of Hyrule's population was massacred by Calamity Ganon. The villages that are still around have about two dozen or so people living in them, with many more scattered across the wilderness.
21st Jun '17 4:50:24 PM FGHIK
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Some games {{handwave}} this by implying the town is much larger via expansive background images; our heroes, for whatever reason, are [[GatelessGhetto only visiting a small portion of it.]] Some modern games try to slightly avert this by adding numbers of [[FacelessMasses non-interactable]] pedestrians into city scenes, or buildings that the player cannot enter to give the ''illusion'' of a larger populace and settlement.

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Some games {{handwave}} this by implying the town is much larger via expansive background images; our heroes, for whatever reason, are [[GatelessGhetto only visiting a small portion of it.]] Some modern games try to slightly avert this by adding numbers of [[FacelessMasses generic or non-interactable]] pedestrians into city scenes, or buildings that the player cannot enter to give the ''illusion'' of a larger populace and settlement.
20th May '17 12:04:16 PM nombretomado
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* Several of the later ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' games, ''VideoGame/UltimaVII'' in particular, have towns larger than the norm, where every NPC has a home they return to at night. Still, even the capital city of Britain has a population of fifty or so. ''The entire game'' clocks in at slightly over 100.

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* Several of the later ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'' games, ''VideoGame/UltimaVII'' in particular, have towns larger than the norm, where every NPC has a home they return to at night. Still, even the capital city of Britain has a population of fifty or so. ''The entire game'' clocks in at slightly over 100.
30th Apr '17 2:26:39 PM nombretomado
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** ''VideoGame/HometownStory'' downplays this. The town clocks at 100 inhabitants at OneHundredPercentCompletion, and has the same set of businesses as the ''HarvestMoon'' games, but somehow manages to make a living for not only one but ''two'' blacksmith shops, one of which is run by a pair of twins.

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** ''VideoGame/HometownStory'' downplays this. The town clocks at 100 inhabitants at OneHundredPercentCompletion, and has the same set of businesses as the ''HarvestMoon'' ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'' games, but somehow manages to make a living for not only one but ''two'' blacksmith shops, one of which is run by a pair of twins.
21st Apr '17 4:26:55 AM zaqq
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A typical town the heroes find themselves in usually consists of the following; a [[TraumaInn Inn]], a weapons/armor shop (the true metropolis may have a separate shop for each), an "item" shop, a specialty shop relating to the game's [[FunctionalMagic magic system]], and no more than three houses. In extreme examples, [[OnlyShopInTown only one shop of any kind is seen]], and it [[AnEconomyIsYou only stocks items relevant to gameplay]]. With the exception of those {{NPC}}s living in those houses, the entire remainder of the population is apparently homeless; some {{NPC}}s seem to exist for the sole purpose of standing in a specific location and [[WelcomeToCorneria talking to passers-by.]]

to:

A typical town the heroes find themselves in usually consists of the following; a an [[TraumaInn Inn]], a weapons/armor shop (the true metropolis may have a separate shop for each), an "item" shop, a specialty shop relating to the game's [[FunctionalMagic magic system]], and no more than three houses. In extreme examples, [[OnlyShopInTown only one shop of any kind is seen]], and it [[AnEconomyIsYou only stocks items relevant to gameplay]]. With the exception of those {{NPC}}s living in those houses, the entire remainder of the population is apparently homeless; some {{NPC}}s seem to exist for the sole purpose of standing in a specific location and [[WelcomeToCorneria talking to passers-by.]]
21st Apr '17 4:25:30 AM zaqq
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** Santuary, the Crimson Raiders' home base and last bastion of resistance against Hyperion, has maybe thirty-five inhabitants, maybe a third of which are plot important and not just generic [=NPCs=].

to:

** Santuary, Sanctuary, the Crimson Raiders' home base and last bastion of resistance against Hyperion, has maybe thirty-five inhabitants, maybe a third of which are plot important and not just generic [=NPCs=].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ThrivingGhostTown