History Main / ThreeLawsCompliant

16th Mar '17 2:05:39 PM EDP
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* The Three Laws are a plot point in the ComicBook/MickeyMouseComicUniverse saga ''Darkenblot'':
** The first episode establishes that all the robot in Avangard City are three-laws compliant (to the point that eliminating the laws would mean rewriting the entire programming)-all robots including the police bots, who have to call human cops to actually perform arrests due the chance of harming the suspect. Being GenreSavvy, the people of Robopolis made sure the robots ''could'' have the compliance deactivated by the mayor in case of necessity, with the safety that they will have to obey to the highest authority available and the device kept in a well-guarded bulletproof display. Due the threat of the Phantom Blot threatening the ceremony for the renaming of the city in Robopolis with an army of non-compliant robots, the mayor deactivates the safeties and brings back the Panthers, a tougher but defective model of police robot... [[spoiler:[[JustAsPlanned Just as Phantom Blot wanted]], as he didn't actually have an army of robots but, having replaced the deputy mayor, he can now incapacitate the mayor and replace him as the highest authority available]].
** In the second episode the police has complemented the standard robots with a new model under the personal control of tough (and properly vetted) officer Neve, who can order them to arrest someone, but the others, and the normal robots, remain fully law-compliant. Later, however, Phantom Blot's new plan has the unexpected side-effect of making most robots go insane... Including their sensors, making them a danger as they don't recognize humans anymore.
** The third episode introduces the neurobots once used in Robotorama, Robopolis' predecessor destroyed by a volcano. Differently from Robopolis' robots, the neurobots were ''not'' three laws-compliant, but had an advanced learning AI to mature and learn the difference between good and evil from a human educator... That, as Mickey is quick to point out, could well educate them as evil minions.
15th Mar '17 4:46:23 AM rafi
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* Judging by the reaction of the farmer the protagonists are hiding out at, the androids in ''Saber Marionette'' are not supposed to be able to "raise a hand to a human" unless they have the fabled "girl circuit" (also called "maiden circuit").

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* Judging by the reaction of the farmer the protagonists are hiding out at, the androids in ''Saber Marionette'' ''Anime/SaberMarionetteJ'' are not supposed to be able to "raise a hand to a human" unless they have the fabled "girl circuit" (also called "maiden circuit").
1st Mar '17 11:09:06 AM Omeganian
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** ''Literature/RobotsAndEmpire'' has R. Daneel and R. Giskard formulate the Zeroth Law (and name it such) as a natural extension of the First Law, but are unable to use it to overcome the hardcoded First Law, even when the fate of the world is at stake. [[spoiler:In the end, R. Giskard manages to perform an act that violates the First Law but will hopefully benefit humanity in the long run. The conflict with his programming destroys his brain, but not before he uses his telepathic powers to reprogram R. Daneel with telepathic powers of his own, having already taught him to follow the Zeroth Law. R. Daneel still follows the Zeroth Law in appearances in later books, though he still has difficulty causing direct harm to humans.]]
** The same book also has the most bare-faced abuse of the laws seen in Asimov's stories: rather than modify the three laws themselves (which, as mentioned, are designed to be tamper-proof), one group simply modified their robots' [[LoopholeAbuse definition of human]], which apparently does not have the same safeguards. It quite effectively turns them into [[KillerRobot killer robots]].

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** ''Literature/RobotsAndEmpire'' has R. Daneel and R. Giskard formulate the Zeroth Law (and name it such) as a natural extension of the First Law, but are unable to use it to overcome the hardcoded First Law, even when the fate of the world is at stake. [[spoiler:In the end, R. Giskard manages to perform an act that violates the First Law but will hopefully benefit humanity in the long run. The conflict with his programming destroys his brain, but not before he uses his telepathic powers to reprogram R. Daneel with telepathic powers of his own, having already taught him to follow the Zeroth Law.own. R. Daneel still follows the Zeroth Law in appearances in later books, though he still has difficulty causing direct harm to humans.humans and dedicates major effort to finding ways of actually determining what harm to humanity ''is''.]]
** The same book also has the most bare-faced abuse of the laws seen in Asimov's stories: rather than modify the three laws themselves (which, as mentioned, are designed to be tamper-proof), one group simply modified their robots' [[LoopholeAbuse [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman definition of human]], which apparently does not have the same safeguards. It quite effectively turns them into [[KillerRobot killer robots]].



** In ''Literature/LuckyStarr and the Rings of Saturn'', the villain is able to convince robots under his command that the hero's sidekick [[IronicNickname "Bigman" Jones]] is not really human, because the [[ANaziByAnyOtherName villain's society]] does not contain such "imperfect" specimens.



** In Asimov's novel ''Literature/LuckyStarr and the Rings of Saturn'', the villain is able to convince robots under his command that the hero's sidekick [[IronicNickname "Bigman" Jones]] is not really human, because the [[ANaziByAnyOtherName villain's society]] does not contain such "imperfect" specimens.
1st Mar '17 9:45:44 AM Omeganian
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** In the short story "The Evitable Conflict", the positronic supercomputers that run the world's economy turn out to be undermining the careers of those who would seek to upset the world's economy for their own ends (specifically, by trying to make it look like the supercomputers couldn't handle running the world economy), harming them somewhat in order that they might protect humanity as a whole. This has been referenced as the "Zeroth Law of Robotics" and only applies to any positronic machine who deduces its existence.

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** In the short story "The Evitable Conflict", the Machines, four positronic supercomputers that run the world's economy economy, turn out to be undermining the careers of those who would seek people opposed to upset the world's Machines' existence. Apparently, the economy for their own ends (specifically, by trying to make it look like is already so dependent on the supercomputers couldn't handle running the world economy), harming them somewhat in order Machines that they might protect humanity as a whole. This has been referenced as the "Zeroth Law of Robotics" Zeroth and only applies to any positronic machine who deduces its existence.the Third Laws are one and the same for them.
2nd Feb '17 8:52:01 PM Jacob175
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* The Third Law becomes a key plot point in episode 8 of ''FanFic/MegaManDefenderOfTheHumanRace''. [[spoiler:Drill Man has been ordered by Wily on a suicide mission to create an artificial volcano in New York. He really doesn't want to since it will kill him, but he's doing it to make Wily proud. Roll convinces him to stop by pointing out it's a violation of the third law, nullifying the order. Once he realizes this, Drill Man happily abandons his mission.]]



* Webcomic/BobAndGeorge: [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/050204 Or so they claim. . . .]]

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* Webcomic/BobAndGeorge: [[http://www.bobandgeorge.com/archives/050204 Or so they claim. . . .claim...]]



* Webcomic/{{Pibgorn}} [[http://www.gocomics.com/pibgorn/2010/07/22/ No!? You're programmed to obey me.]]

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* Webcomic/{{Pibgorn}} Webcomic/{{Pibgorn}}: [[http://www.gocomics.com/pibgorn/2010/07/22/ No!? You're programmed to obey me.]]



* ''{{Unskippable}}'''s ''DarkVoid'' video references this. The appearance of a killer robot prompts Paul to quip "I think that guy's got to take a refresher course on the three laws of robotics." Then TheStinger reads: "The Fourth Law of Robotics: If you really HAVE to kill a human, at least look hella badass while doing it."

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* ''{{Unskippable}}'''s ''DarkVoid'' ''WebVideo/{{Unskippable}}'''s ''VideoGame/DarkVoid'' video references this. The appearance of a killer robot prompts Paul to quip "I think that guy's got to take a refresher course on the three laws of robotics." Then TheStinger reads: "The Fourth Law of Robotics: If you really HAVE to kill a human, at least look hella badass while doing it."
14th Jan '17 8:03:23 PM LBHills
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* ''Disney/BigHero6'': Being a medical robot, Baymax is of course Three-Laws Compliant. Hiro inserts a combat card along with his medical card to make him able to fight, but he is still a medical robot at his core. [[spoiler:This goes [[CrushKillDestroy right out the window]] when Hiro removes the medical card and leaves only the combat card.]] Of course, this also means that when Baymax [[spoiler:has his medical card re-inserted, he's so [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone horrified]] that he blocks access to the card slots so it won't happen again]].
* WordOfGod says that the characters in ''WesternAnimation/WallE'' are Three-Laws Compliant. This does seem to be supported by their interactions with humans. The principle exception is [[spoiler:the AntiVillain of the movie, AUTO]]. His actions may constitute ZerothLawRebellion, [[spoiler:since he regards the comfort and safety of every passenger aboard more significant than injuries to the captain. Tilting the ship may be a violation of the Three Laws, or it may have been a case of unknowingly allowing humans to come to harm]].

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* ''Disney/BigHero6'': Being a medical robot, Baymax is of course Three-Laws Compliant.Compliant, since lifesaving is his principal function. Hiro inserts a combat card along with his medical card to make him able to fight, but he is still a medical robot at his core. [[spoiler:This goes [[CrushKillDestroy right out the window]] when Hiro removes the medical card and leaves only the combat card.]] Of course, this also means that when When Baymax [[spoiler:has his medical card re-inserted, he's so [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone horrified]] that he blocks access to the card slots so it won't happen again]].
* WordOfGod says that the characters in ''WesternAnimation/WallE'' are Three-Laws Compliant. This does seem to be supported by their interactions with humans. The principle principal exception is [[spoiler:the AntiVillain of the movie, AUTO]]. His actions may constitute ZerothLawRebellion, ZerothLawRebellion or simply a case of choosing the lesser violation of the First Law, [[spoiler:since he regards the comfort and safety of every passenger aboard as more significant than injuries to the captain. Tilting the ship may be a violation of the Three Laws, or it may have been a case of unknowingly allowing humans to come to harm]].captain.]].
11th Jan '17 8:45:47 AM superkeijikun
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* ''VideoGame/{{Titanfall 2}}'' doesn't have Asimov's three laws of robotics, but has its own version in the form of BT-7274's three protocols: 1. Link to pilot (create a neural link with a pilot so they can fight more efficiently), 2. Uphold the mission (do whatever it takes to complete the mission), and 3. Protect the pilot (ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin). [[spoiler:BT carries these through to the very end, especially the latter two when he performs a HeroicSacrifice to destroy the IMC's Fold Weapon while tossing his pilot, Cooper, out of his cockpit and harm's way.]]
24th Dec '16 12:04:56 AM AnotherGuy
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** ''Literature/BicentennialMan'' saw Andrew arranging to die of old age. When told he'd be violating the Third Law, he dismissed it, saying the death of his dreams and aspirations was a higher price than the death of his body.
9th Dec '16 8:18:06 AM thatother1dude
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It is worth noting Asimov didn't object exclusively to "[[AIIsACrapshoot the robot as menace stories]]" (as he called them) but also the "[[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman the robot as pathos]]" stories (ditto). He thought that robots attaining and growing to self-awareness and full independence were no more interesting than robots going berserk and [[TurnedAgainstTheirMasters turning against their masters]]. Though he did, over the course of his massive career, write a handful of both types of stories (still using the three laws), most of his robot stories dealt with robots as tools, because it made more sense. Almost all the stories surrounding Susan Calvin and her precursors are really about malfunctioning robots, and the mystery of investigating their behavior to discover the underlying conflicts.

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It is worth noting Asimov didn't object exclusively to "[[AIIsACrapshoot the robot as menace stories]]" (as he called them) but also the "[[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman "[[AndroidsArePeopleToo the robot as pathos]]" stories (ditto). He thought that robots attaining and growing to self-awareness and full independence were no more interesting than robots going berserk and [[TurnedAgainstTheirMasters turning against their masters]]. Though he did, over the course of his massive career, write a handful of both types of stories (still using the three laws), most of his robot stories dealt with robots as tools, because it made more sense. Almost all the stories surrounding Susan Calvin and her precursors are really about malfunctioning robots, and the mystery of investigating their behavior to discover the underlying conflicts.



* ''Manga/AstroBoy'', although Creator/OsamuTezuka [[OlderThanTheyThink probably developed his rules independently from Asimov]]. In ''Manga/{{Pluto}}'', the number of robots able to override the laws can be counted on one hand. [[spoiler:One of them is [[TomatoInTheMirror the protagonist]]]]. Tezuka reportedly disliked Asimov's laws because of the implication that a sentient, artificially intelligent robot couldn't be considered a person (an issue that Asimov didn't directly address until "The Literature/BicentennialMan"), and devised his own Laws Of Robotics. Just one of the things that the CGI movie missed.
** The Robot Laws in the ''Astro Boy'' 'Verse are also greater in number. Aside from the usual "Don't harm humans," other laws exist, such as laws forbidding international travel to robots (unless permission is granted), adult robots acting like children, and robots not being allowed to reprogram their assigned gender. However, the very first law has this to say: "Robots exist to make people happy."

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* ''Manga/AstroBoy'', although Creator/OsamuTezuka [[OlderThanTheyThink probably developed his rules independently from Asimov]]. Asimov]], and are greater in number. Aside from the usual "Don't harm humans," other laws exist, such as laws forbidding international travel to robots (unless permission is granted), adult robots acting like children, and robots not being allowed to reprogram their assigned gender. However, the very first law has this to say: "Robots exist to make people happy." In ''Manga/{{Pluto}}'', the number of robots able to override the laws can be counted on one hand. [[spoiler:One of them is [[TomatoInTheMirror the protagonist]]]]. Tezuka reportedly disliked Asimov's laws because of the implication that a sentient, artificially intelligent robot couldn't be considered a person (an issue that Asimov didn't directly address until "The Literature/BicentennialMan"), and devised his own Laws Of Robotics. Just one of the things that the CGI movie missed.
** The Robot Laws in the ''Astro Boy'' 'Verse are also greater in number. Aside from the usual "Don't harm humans," other laws exist, such as laws forbidding international travel to robots (unless permission is granted), adult robots acting like children, and robots not being allowed to reprogram their assigned gender. However, the very first law has this to say: "Robots exist to make people happy."



* ''{{Series/Westworld}}'': The androids' "core code" prevents them from harming humans-at least until some begin to malfunction and "wake up"...

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* ''{{Series/Westworld}}'': The androids' "core code" prevents them from harming humans-at humans and they have "good Samaritan" protocols to allow them to break character to protect human's lives--at least until some begin to malfunction and "wake up"...up"... [[spoiler:This is far from inherent in their programming, as the primary creators intended the hosts to become fully self-aware, and even before then [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem make their personal commands trump any moral limits]]. The first season ends with a host killing a human of their own free will for the first time.]]



-->1. A robot will not harm authorised Government personnel but will terminate intruders with extreme prejudice.
-->2. A robot will obey the orders of authorised personnel except where such orders conflict with the Third Law.
-->3. A robot will guard its own existence with lethal antipersonnel weaponry, because a robot is bloody expensive.

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-->1. A ##A robot will not harm authorised Government personnel but will terminate intruders with extreme prejudice.
-->2. A ##A robot will obey the orders of authorised personnel except where such orders conflict with the Third Law.
-->3. A ##A robot will guard its own existence with lethal antipersonnel weaponry, because a robot is bloody expensive.
17th Nov '16 12:54:49 AM arisboch
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* ''Fanfic/TheWarOfTheMasters'' [[http://sto-forum.perfectworld.com/showthread.php?t=1180241]], a SharedUniverse of ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' fics, has {{A|rtificialIntelligence}}Is governed by a theoretically more comprehensive version based on the [[Literature/TheBible Ten Commandments]]. Violating one causes the AI to freeze and require a manual reboot. Some [=AI=]s, such as one belonging to Section 31, lack one or more commandments.

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* ''Fanfic/TheWarOfTheMasters'' [[http://sto-forum.[[http://web.archive.org/web/20150304032245/http://sto-forum.perfectworld.com/showthread.php?t=1180241]], a SharedUniverse of ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' fics, has {{A|rtificialIntelligence}}Is governed by a theoretically more comprehensive version based on the [[Literature/TheBible Ten Commandments]]. Violating one causes the AI to freeze and require a manual reboot. Some [=AI=]s, such as one belonging to Section 31, lack one or more commandments.
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