History Main / ThisIsUnforgivable

8th Apr '18 9:15:03 PM MasterN
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** Higurashi Kira Episode 2 (the MagicalGirl episode) had Satoko declaring that she would not forgive [[NebuluousEvilOrganization Tokyo Magika]] for hurting her Nii-nii. Later, Oyashiro Rika and Trap Satoko declared payback time before moving on to finish off Nail Ripper and send [[spoiler: [[BigBad Miyo Takano]]]] flying.

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** Higurashi Kira Episode 2 (the MagicalGirl episode) had Satoko declaring that she would not forgive [[NebuluousEvilOrganization [[NebulousEvilOrganization Tokyo Magika]] for hurting her Nii-nii. Later, Oyashiro Rika and Trap Satoko declared payback time before moving on to finish off Nail Ripper and send [[spoiler: [[BigBad Miyo Takano]]]] flying.
8th Apr '18 9:13:03 PM MasterN
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** Higurashi Kira Episode 2 had Satoko declaring that she would not forgive Tokyo Magika for hurting her Nii-nii. Later, Oyashiro Rika and Trap Satoko declared payback time before moving on to finish off Nail Ripper and send Takano flying.

to:

** Higurashi Kira Episode 2 (the MagicalGirl episode) had Satoko declaring that she would not forgive [[NebuluousEvilOrganization Tokyo Magika Magika]] for hurting her Nii-nii. Later, Oyashiro Rika and Trap Satoko declared payback time before moving on to finish off Nail Ripper and send Takano [[spoiler: [[BigBad Miyo Takano]]]] flying.



* Maria of ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' yells this repeatedly in episode 22 before taking revenge on her abusive mother.
** Earlier, Battler was angered by Beatrice having gleefully laughed about [[spoiler:Eva-Beatrice killing and reviving Rosa and Maria over and over again]], so much so that he decided he wouldn't accept "that bitch" as his opponent. He told Virgilia that she could call her student if she wanted to, but that didn't mean he would forgive her. A disappointed Virgilia told Beato to try being more encouraging if she was to be forgiven by him and accepted as his opponent.

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* Maria [[CreepyChild Maria]] of ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' yells this repeatedly in episode 22 before taking revenge on her [[AbusiveParents abusive mother.
mother]].
** Earlier, Battler was angered by Beatrice [[WickedWitch Beatrice]] having gleefully laughed about [[spoiler:Eva-Beatrice killing and reviving Rosa and Maria over and over again]], so much so that he decided he wouldn't accept "that bitch" as his opponent. He told Virgilia that she could call her student if she wanted to, but that didn't mean he would forgive her. A disappointed Virgilia told Beato to try being more encouraging if she was to be forgiven by him and accepted as his opponent.
3rd Apr '18 7:57:37 PM Luigifan
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To the western ear, it seems quite [[{{Narm}} anti-climactic and quaint,]] [[ValuesDissonance but to the Japanese, this is ]]''SeriousBusiness.'' It is the Challenge, and it is rarely defeated. Specifically, it has to do with a notion in the Japanese culture of narrowing possibilities; if the subject can't be forgiven for a transgression, then the only ''other'' possibility is that [[DisproportionateRetribution he's about to get his head ripped off or be otherwise punished in severe fashion]].[[note]]The act, being a form of DisproportionateRetribution, might cause the person committing it to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the same person as the victim in terms of morality]].[[/note]] In Japanese culture being able to both ask for forgiveness and accept it are considered virtues, therefore refusing to accept or offer forgiveness holds a lot more weight. The person who can't forgive ''won't'' give this up. This has to do with Japan's brutal code of {{honor|BeforeReason}} dating back to the feudal era. Back in the era of the {{samurai}} this had even more teeth, since the person who made this challenge very likely ''would'' chase you to the ends of the earth for revenge, [[RevengeBeforeReason even if doing so was severely detrimental to them]]. It's only said to someone who (in the speaker's opinion) has crossed the MoralEventHorizon because it entails a burden: the speaker is ''so'' offended that UnstoppableRage is the ''only'' option. Obviously, it can overlap with PreAsskickingOneLiner, so expect serious butt-kicking in the following RightMakesMight fight.

to:

To the western ear, it seems quite [[{{Narm}} anti-climactic and quaint,]] [[ValuesDissonance but to the Japanese, this is ]]''SeriousBusiness.'' It is the Challenge, and it is rarely defeated. Specifically, it has to do with a notion in the Japanese culture of narrowing possibilities; if the subject can't be forgiven for a transgression, then the only ''other'' possibility is that [[DisproportionateRetribution he's about to get his head ripped off or be otherwise punished in severe fashion]].[[note]]The act, being a form of DisproportionateRetribution, might cause the person committing it to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the same person as the victim in terms of morality]].[[/note]] In Japanese culture culture, being able to both ask for forgiveness and accept it are considered virtues, therefore virtues; therefore, refusing to accept or offer forgiveness holds a lot more weight. The person who can't forgive ''won't'' give this up. This has to do with Japan's brutal code of {{honor|BeforeReason}} dating back to the feudal era. Back in the era of the {{samurai}} {{samurai}}, this had even more teeth, since the person who made this challenge very likely ''would'' chase you to the ends of the earth for revenge, [[RevengeBeforeReason even if doing so was severely detrimental to them]]. It's only said to someone who (in the speaker's opinion) has crossed the MoralEventHorizon because it entails a burden: the speaker is ''so'' offended that UnstoppableRage is the ''only'' option. Obviously, it can overlap with PreAsskickingOneLiner, so expect serious butt-kicking in the following RightMakesMight fight.
24th Mar '18 6:49:06 AM Nadim
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Added DiffLines:

* At the end of ''Film/DawnOfThePlanetOfTheApes'', [[spoiler: Caesar finds himself unable to forgive nor forget Koba's genocidal rampage against the humans that restarted the ape-human war and made it impossible for the apes to ever live in peace as well as violating the ApeShallNotKillApe rule by trying to kill him and murdering Ash and several other apes. Ultimately, Caesar drops Koba to his death telling him "[[YouMonster You are not ape!]]"]]


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* In ''Film/SpiderMan3'', Peter says this to Eddie right before he exposes him for forging a picture of Spider-Man robbing the bank.
-->'''Peter:''' You want forgiveness? Get religion.


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* An entire episode of ''Series/{{Friends}}'' focused on this. Joey finds out that [[YourCheatingHeart Chandler kissed his girlfriend]] and spends the episode refusing to even speak to him despite Chandler repeatedly apologizing for it and begging for his friendship. It reaches to the point where Joey even considers moving out and calling Chandler untrustworthy. Fortunately, he does give Chandler a chance to prove himself by forcing him to spend Thanksgiving trapped in a box as punishement and, in the end, forgives him.
21st Mar '18 8:39:20 PM Supreme-X15
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** In Part 3: Stardust Crusaders, one of the antagonists, Steely Dan kills Inyaba, who was [[UndyingLoyalty wholeheartedly loyal]] to Dio, holds Joseph hostage with his Stand, the Lovers, and subjects the protagonist, Jotaro Kujo to one humiliating act after another. After finally being cornered, Dan [[VillainsWantMercy begs for mercy]], but Jotaro tells it straight to his face that he'll never forgive him, and [[ExtremeMeeleRevenge savagely beats Dan]] with Star Platinum.

to:

** In Part 3: Stardust Crusaders, one of the antagonists, Steely Dan kills Inyaba, who was [[UndyingLoyalty wholeheartedly loyal]] to Dio, holds Joseph hostage with his Stand, the Lovers, and subjects the protagonist, Jotaro Kujo to one humiliating act after another. After finally being cornered, Dan [[VillainsWantMercy begs for mercy]], but Jotaro tells it straight to his face that he'll never forgive him, and [[ExtremeMeeleRevenge [[ExtremeMeleeRevenge savagely beats Dan]] with Star Platinum.
21st Mar '18 8:34:15 PM Supreme-X15
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** Later, after a long string of torment from Dio, what really set Jonathan was Dio stealing the SacredFirstKiss of Erina, Jonathan's LoveInterest. This prompts an enraged Jonathan to race home to give Dio a beating for this injustice.

to:

** Later, after a long string of torment from Dio, what really set Jonathan off was Dio stealing the SacredFirstKiss of Erina, Jonathan's LoveInterest. This prompts an enraged Jonathan to race home to give Dio a beating thrashing for this injustice.



** In Part 3: Stardust Crusaders, one of the antagonists, Steely Dan kills Inyaba, who was [[UndyingLoyalty wholeheartedly loyal]] to Dio, holds Joseph hostage with his Stand, the Lovers, and subjects the protagonist, Jotaro Kujo to one humiliating act after another. After finally being cornered, Dan [[VillainsWantMercy begs for mercy]], but Jotaro tells it straight to his face that he'll never forgive him, and savagely beats Dan with Star Platinum.

to:

** In Part 3: Stardust Crusaders, one of the antagonists, Steely Dan kills Inyaba, who was [[UndyingLoyalty wholeheartedly loyal]] to Dio, holds Joseph hostage with his Stand, the Lovers, and subjects the protagonist, Jotaro Kujo to one humiliating act after another. After finally being cornered, Dan [[VillainsWantMercy begs for mercy]], but Jotaro tells it straight to his face that he'll never forgive him, and [[ExtremeMeeleRevenge savagely beats Dan Dan]] with Star Platinum.
21st Mar '18 1:23:39 PM Evilkritter
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Villains are also quite fond of using this trope whenever everything is going wrong thanks to those puny heroes, thrown out between "ThisCannotBe" "I will have my revenge!". "This Is Unforgivable" can also be a sign of either a HeroicBSOD or a VillainousBreakdown.

to:

Villains are also quite fond of using this trope whenever everything is going wrong thanks to those puny heroes, thrown out between "ThisCannotBe" and "I will have my revenge!". "This Is Unforgivable" can also be a sign of either a HeroicBSOD or a VillainousBreakdown.
21st Mar '18 12:57:44 PM Evilkritter
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To the western ear, it seems quite [[{{Narm}} anti-climactic and quaint,]] [[ValuesDissonance but to the Japanese, this is ]]''SeriousBusiness.'' It is the Challenge, and it is rarely defeated. Specifically, it has to do with a notion in the Japanese culture of narrowing possibilities; if the subject can't be forgiven for a transgression, then the only ''other'' possibility is that [[DisproportionateRetribution he's about to get his head ripped off or be otherwise punished in severe fashion]].[[note]]The act, being a form of DisproportionateRetribution, might cause the person committing it to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the same person as the victim in terms of morality]].[[/note]] It also has to do with the fact that in Japanese culture, being able to both ask for forgiveness and accept it are considered a virtue, therefore refusing to accept their forgiveness holds a lot more weight. And the person who can't forgive ''won't'' give this up. Most of this has to do with Japan's brutal code of {{honor|BeforeReason}} dating back to the feudal era. Back in the era of the {{samurai}} and the like, this had even more teeth, since the person who made this challenge very likely ''would'' chase you to the ends of the earth for revenge, [[RevengeBeforeReason even if it was detrimental]]. Basically, it's only said to someone who (in the speaker's opinion) has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, but also entails a burden: the speaker is ''so'' offended that UnstoppableRage is the ''only'' option. Obviously, it can overlap with PreAsskickingOneLiner, so expect serious butt-kicking in the following RightMakesMight fight.

to:

To the western ear, it seems quite [[{{Narm}} anti-climactic and quaint,]] [[ValuesDissonance but to the Japanese, this is ]]''SeriousBusiness.'' It is the Challenge, and it is rarely defeated. Specifically, it has to do with a notion in the Japanese culture of narrowing possibilities; if the subject can't be forgiven for a transgression, then the only ''other'' possibility is that [[DisproportionateRetribution he's about to get his head ripped off or be otherwise punished in severe fashion]].[[note]]The act, being a form of DisproportionateRetribution, might cause the person committing it to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the same person as the victim in terms of morality]].[[/note]] It also has to do with the fact that in In Japanese culture, culture being able to both ask for forgiveness and accept it are considered a virtue, virtues, therefore refusing to accept their or offer forgiveness holds a lot more weight. And the The person who can't forgive ''won't'' give this up. Most of this This has to do with Japan's brutal code of {{honor|BeforeReason}} dating back to the feudal era. Back in the era of the {{samurai}} and the like, this had even more teeth, since the person who made this challenge very likely ''would'' chase you to the ends of the earth for revenge, [[RevengeBeforeReason even if it doing so was detrimental]]. Basically, it's severely detrimental to them]]. It's only said to someone who (in the speaker's opinion) has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, but also MoralEventHorizon because it entails a burden: the speaker is ''so'' offended that UnstoppableRage is the ''only'' option. Obviously, it can overlap with PreAsskickingOneLiner, so expect serious butt-kicking in the following RightMakesMight fight.



It is also used as a way of pointing out to the audience how evil a character is -- that they are completely beyond {{forgiveness}} and [[HeelFaceTurn redemption]]. Usually the character being issued the challenge has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, or is a CompleteMonster, so the main character can freely kill them now. Though on occasion the audience still wonders [[MoralDissonance if it was really unforgivable]]. Similarly, it can also be used to point out [[WhatAnIdiot how stupid]] a character is, their transgression being proof that they are just plain TooDumbToLive. Normally anyone confronted with this trope will feel [[ItsAllMyFault guilt and remorse]]. [[LackOfEmpathy Or not.]]

to:

It is also used as a way of pointing out to the audience how evil a character is -- that they are completely beyond {{forgiveness}} and [[HeelFaceTurn redemption]]. Usually the character being issued the challenge has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, or is a CompleteMonster, so the main character can freely kill them now. Though on occasion the audience still wonders [[MoralDissonance if it was really unforgivable]].

Similarly, it can also be used to point out [[WhatAnIdiot how stupid]] ''stupid'']] a character is, their transgression being proof that they are just plain TooDumbToLive. Normally TooDumbToLive.

Typically
anyone confronted with this trope will feel [[ItsAllMyFault guilt and remorse]]. [[LackOfEmpathy Or not.]]



See also TheCoatsAreOff for when the unforgivable results in a fight and ForgivenessRequiresDeath which offers the chance at forgiveness...[[SelfDemonstratingArticle via death]].

to:

See also TheCoatsAreOff for when the unforgivable results in escalates a fight fight's intensity, and ForgivenessRequiresDeath which offers the chance at forgiveness...[[SelfDemonstratingArticle via death]].
21st Mar '18 12:52:25 PM Evilkritter
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To the western ear, it seems quite [[{{Narm}} anti-climactic and quaint,]] [[ValuesDissonance but to the Japanese, this is ]]''SeriousBusiness.'' It is the Challenge, and it is rarely defeated. Specifically, it has to do with a notion in the Japanese culture of narrowing possibilities; if the subject can't be forgiven for a transgression, then the only ''other'' option is that [[DisproportionateRetribution he's about to get his head ripped off or otherwise punished in a severe fashion]].[[note]]The act, being a form of DisproportionateRetribution, might cause the person committing it to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the same person as the victim in terms of morality]].[[/note]] It also has to do with the fact that in Japanese culture, being able to both ask for forgiveness and accept it are considered a virtue, therefore refusing to accept their forgiveness holds a lot more weight. And the person who can't forgive ''won't'' give this up. Most of this has to do with Japan's brutal code of {{honor|BeforeReason}} dating back to the feudal era. Back in the era of the {{samurai}} and the like, this had even more teeth, since the person who made this challenge very likely ''would'' chase you to the ends of the earth for revenge, [[RevengeBeforeReason even if it was detrimental]]. Basically, it's only said to someone who (in the speaker's opinion) has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, but also entails a burden: the speaker is ''so'' offended that UnstoppableRage is the ''only'' option. Obviously, it can overlap with PreAsskickingOneLiner, so expect serious butt-kicking in the following RightMakesMight fight.

to:

To the western ear, it seems quite [[{{Narm}} anti-climactic and quaint,]] [[ValuesDissonance but to the Japanese, this is ]]''SeriousBusiness.'' It is the Challenge, and it is rarely defeated. Specifically, it has to do with a notion in the Japanese culture of narrowing possibilities; if the subject can't be forgiven for a transgression, then the only ''other'' option possibility is that [[DisproportionateRetribution he's about to get his head ripped off or be otherwise punished in a severe fashion]].[[note]]The act, being a form of DisproportionateRetribution, might cause the person committing it to [[HeWhoFightsMonsters become the same person as the victim in terms of morality]].[[/note]] It also has to do with the fact that in Japanese culture, being able to both ask for forgiveness and accept it are considered a virtue, therefore refusing to accept their forgiveness holds a lot more weight. And the person who can't forgive ''won't'' give this up. Most of this has to do with Japan's brutal code of {{honor|BeforeReason}} dating back to the feudal era. Back in the era of the {{samurai}} and the like, this had even more teeth, since the person who made this challenge very likely ''would'' chase you to the ends of the earth for revenge, [[RevengeBeforeReason even if it was detrimental]]. Basically, it's only said to someone who (in the speaker's opinion) has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, but also entails a burden: the speaker is ''so'' offended that UnstoppableRage is the ''only'' option. Obviously, it can overlap with PreAsskickingOneLiner, so expect serious butt-kicking in the following RightMakesMight fight.
21st Mar '18 12:51:23 PM Evilkritter
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"I will make you pay!", "I have had ''[[Film/StarTrekIIITheSearchForSpock enough]]'' of you!", "ThisMeansWar", "You have gone too far!", "YouMonster", "IllKillYou", "I cannot allow this to continue." "Your life is forfeit!", "You don't deserve to live.", "[[WeWillMeetAgain I'll get you for this!]]", "PrepareToDie!", etc., when used in dramatic situations, are about the only Western expressions that come even close to what "This Is Unforgivable" means in Japanese.[[note]]And since [[UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} the main Western religion]] revolves around a God who forgiveness as one of His most prominent attributes — and would very much like for His followers to emulate this trait — the lack of weight “This Is Unforgivable” has in Western culture is even more jarring.[[/note]]

It is also used as a way of pointing out to the audience how evil this character is -- that they are completely beyond {{forgiveness}} and [[HeelFaceTurn redemption]]. Particularly if the character being issued the challenge has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, especially if they are a CompleteMonster, so that the main character can freely kill them without FridgeLogic causing them to wonder [[MoralDissonance if that was really necessary]]. Similarly, it can also be used to point out [[WhatAnIdiot how stupid]] the character is, seeing how they proved to be just plain TooDumbToLive. Naturally, anyone stupid enough to make someone hit them with such a phrase is bound to feel rather [[ItsAllMyFault guilty]]. [[LackOfEmpathy Or not.]]

Much like GivingSomeoneThePointerFinger, this is becoming something of a devalued expression through overuse; it's prone to being bandied about lightly or overused, or for the hero to change phasers from "kill" to "massage" once they [[DefeatMeansFriendship beat and befriend]] the EasilyForgiven villain. This tends to break the emotional impact of "This Is Unforgivable."

In a classic fashion, villains are also quite fond of using this trope whenever everything is going wrong thanks to those puny heroes. Sometimes after they say "ThisCannotBe" and afterwards saying that they will return and such, they can be found saying this as a way of expressing that they will return for revenge against the heroes. Much like said trope, "This Is Unforgivable" can also sometimes even be a sign of either a HeroicBSOD for a heroic character or a VillainousBreakdown for a villainous character.

Sometimes phrased as "I'll never forgive you." See also TheCoatsAreOff. ForgivenessRequiresDeath offers the chance at forgiveness...at the expense of one's own life.

to:

"I will make you pay!", "I have had ''[[Film/StarTrekIIITheSearchForSpock enough]]'' of you!", "ThisMeansWar", "You have gone too far!", "YouMonster", "IllKillYou", "I cannot allow this to continue." "Your life is forfeit!", "You don't deserve to live.", "[[WeWillMeetAgain I'll get you for this!]]", "PrepareToDie!", etc., when used in dramatic situations, are about the only Western similar expressions that come even close to what but lack the severity "This Is Unforgivable" means in Japanese.[[note]]And since [[UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}} the main Western religion]] revolves around a God who forgiveness as one of His most prominent attributes — and would very much like for His followers to emulate this trait — the lack of weight “This Is Unforgivable” has in Western culture is even more jarring.[[/note]]

Japanese culture.

It is also used as a way of pointing out to the audience how evil this a character is -- that they are completely beyond {{forgiveness}} and [[HeelFaceTurn redemption]]. Particularly if Usually the character being issued the challenge has crossed the MoralEventHorizon, especially if they are or is a CompleteMonster, so that the main character can freely kill them without FridgeLogic causing them to wonder now. Though on occasion the audience still wonders [[MoralDissonance if that it was really necessary]]. unforgivable]]. Similarly, it can also be used to point out [[WhatAnIdiot how stupid]] the a character is, seeing how their transgression being proof that they proved to be are just plain TooDumbToLive. Naturally, Normally anyone stupid enough to make someone hit them confronted with such a phrase is bound to this trope will feel rather [[ItsAllMyFault guilty]].guilt and remorse]]. [[LackOfEmpathy Or not.]]

Much like GivingSomeoneThePointerFinger, this is becoming something of a devalued expression through overuse; it's overuse. It's prone to being bandied about lightly or overused, or for comedy, and sometimes the hero to will change phasers from "kill" to "massage" once "hug" mid-fight so they can [[DefeatMeansFriendship beat and befriend]] the EasilyForgiven villain. villain anyway. This tends to break the emotional impact of "This Is Unforgivable."

In a classic fashion, villains
Unforgivable" in series that do so.

Villains
are also quite fond of using this trope whenever everything is going wrong thanks to those puny heroes. Sometimes after they say heroes, thrown out between "ThisCannotBe" and afterwards saying that they "I will return and such, they can be found saying this as a way of expressing that they will return for revenge against the heroes. Much like said trope, have my revenge!". "This Is Unforgivable" can also sometimes even be a sign of either a HeroicBSOD for a heroic character or a VillainousBreakdown for a villainous character.

Sometimes phrased as "I'll never forgive you."
VillainousBreakdown.

See also TheCoatsAreOff. TheCoatsAreOff for when the unforgivable results in a fight and ForgivenessRequiresDeath which offers the chance at forgiveness...at the expense of one's own life.
[[SelfDemonstratingArticle via death]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ThisIsUnforgivable