History Main / ThisIsMyNameOnForeign

9th Jul '17 6:53:12 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* In ""Mr. Simonelli or The Fairy Widower", one of the stories in ''Literature/TheLadiesOfGraceAdieuAndOtherStories'', Mr. Simonelli's name, Giorgio Alessandro Simonelli, is entirely based on this trope. Simonelli's mother was seduced or raped by one of the FairFolk, and because of the Fairy's unusual complexion and facial features, she believed that he was a foreigner, likely an Italian. Thus, when her father raised the child following her DeathByChildbirth, he named him by taking his own name, George Alexander Simon, and translating each part into Italian equivalents.

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* In ""Mr."Mr. Simonelli or The Fairy Widower", one of the stories in ''Literature/TheLadiesOfGraceAdieuAndOtherStories'', Mr. Simonelli's name, Giorgio Alessandro Simonelli, is entirely based on this trope. Simonelli's mother was seduced or raped by one of the FairFolk, and because of the Fairy's unusual complexion and facial features, she believed that he was a foreigner, likely an Italian. Thus, when her father raised the child following her DeathByChildbirth, he named him by taking his own name, George Alexander Simon, and translating each part into Italian equivalents.
5th Jul '17 7:15:18 AM Piterpicher
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** In Creator/OrsonScottCard's ''PastwatchTheRedemptionOfChristopherColumbus'', he specifically prefers the Latin version because he sees Latin as God's language. Partly because that's the name used by God to call to him ([[spoiler:it was actually a hologram from the future telling him to sail West instead of leading the last Crusade]]).

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** In Creator/OrsonScottCard's ''PastwatchTheRedemptionOfChristopherColumbus'', ''Literature/PastwatchTheRedemptionOfChristopherColumbus'', he specifically prefers the Latin version because he sees Latin as God's language. Partly because that's the name used by God to call to him ([[spoiler:it was actually a hologram from the future telling him to sail West instead of leading the last Crusade]]).
11th Jun '17 9:17:03 PM Number1PixarFan
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Added DiffLines:

** Which was either a CriticalResearchFailure or a BilingualBonus, because "universidad" is in fact not Spanish for "universe," but "university." He changed his name to Steven College. ("Universe" in Spanish would be "universo.")
14th May '17 12:49:35 PM Hodor2
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Added DiffLines:

* In ""Mr. Simonelli or The Fairy Widower", one of the stories in ''Literature/TheLadiesOfGraceAdieuAndOtherStories'', Mr. Simonelli's name, Giorgio Alessandro Simonelli, is entirely based on this trope. Simonelli's mother was seduced or raped by one of the FairFolk, and because of the Fairy's unusual complexion and facial features, she believed that he was a foreigner, likely an Italian. Thus, when her father raised the child following her DeathByChildbirth, he named him by taking his own name, George Alexander Simon, and translating each part into Italian equivalents.
3rd May '17 5:34:54 AM Wuz
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* In Japan you sometimes get a similar effect from alternatively reading a ''kanji'' in its Japanese or Chinese pronunciation. Thus the Minamoto clan was also known as the Genji and their mortal enemies the Taira clan as the Heike or Heishi.

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* In Japan you sometimes get a similar effect from [[AlternateCharacterReading alternatively reading reading]] a ''kanji'' in its Japanese or Chinese pronunciation. Thus the Minamoto clan was also known as the Genji and their mortal enemies the Taira clan as the Heike or Heishi.



* Doing this is very easy for names natively set in Chinese characters, because there are 4 languages that use (or have used) Chinese characters: Chinese (as Hanzi, 汉字), Korean (as Hanja, 한자), Japanese (as Kanji, 漢字) and Vietnamese (as chữ Hán, 𡨸漢). Thus you get things like the most famous discovery of the Korean botanist 禹長春 (pronounced "Woo Jang-choon" in Korean) being known as the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_U Triangle of U]]" because he developed it while working in Japan and going by the name "U Nagaharu".

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* Doing this is very easy for names natively set in Chinese characters, because there are 4 languages that use (or have used) Chinese characters: Chinese (as Hanzi, 汉字), Korean (as Hanja, 한자), Japanese (as Kanji, 漢字) and Vietnamese (as chữ Hán, 𡨸漢). Thus you get things like the most famous discovery of the Korean botanist 禹長春 (pronounced "Woo Jang-choon" in Korean) being known as the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_U Triangle of U]]" because he developed it while working in Japan and going by the name "U Nagaharu"."[[AlternateCharacterReading U Nagaharu]]".
16th Apr '17 3:05:19 PM nombretomado
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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': Subverted in one case, where a daemon was using the TrueName of a SpaceWolf squad against them. However, as it was pulling their names from the mind of someone accompanying them, it couldn't control one (Bjorn, later Bjorn the Fell-Handed) as it continually called him "Bear" instead.

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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': Subverted in one case, where a daemon was using the TrueName of a SpaceWolf Literature/SpaceWolf squad against them. However, as it was pulling their names from the mind of someone accompanying them, it couldn't control one (Bjorn, later Bjorn the Fell-Handed) as it continually called him "Bear" instead.
19th Mar '17 4:30:46 PM Doug86
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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'': Subverted in one case, where a daemon was using the TrueName of a SpaceWolf squad against them. However, as it was pulling their names from the mind of someone accompanying them, it couldn't control one (Bjorn, later Bjorn the Fell-Handed) as it continually called him "Bear" instead.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'': ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'': Subverted in one case, where a daemon was using the TrueName of a SpaceWolf squad against them. However, as it was pulling their names from the mind of someone accompanying them, it couldn't control one (Bjorn, later Bjorn the Fell-Handed) as it continually called him "Bear" instead.
12th Mar '17 12:57:58 PM AgProv
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* Even as late as the 1970's, Swiss confectionery and foodstuffs firm Nestlé accepted that monoglot Brits whose language has no accented letters would not know how to pronounce "Nestlé" as it should be in French. So even in TV adverts, the firm's name was prounced as if it were the English word "nestle"[[note]] "as ''nessle''[[/note]], with no accented-"é" on the end. Old TV adverts preserve this Anglicised pronunciation. It's only comparitively recently that TV advertising began using the correct ''nest-ley" pronunciation.

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* Even as late as the 1970's, Swiss confectionery and foodstuffs firm Nestlé accepted that monoglot Brits whose language has no accented letters would not know how to pronounce "Nestlé" as it should be in French. So even in TV adverts, the firm's name was prounced as if it were the English word "nestle"[[note]] "as ''nessle''[[/note]], with a silent "t" and no accented-"é" on the end. Old TV adverts preserve this Anglicised pronunciation.pronunciation, possibly accepting that the Brits would not recognise a poncy foreign affectation like a French grave-accented "e" and would always recognise the chocolate as being called "Nestle". It's only comparitively recently that TV advertising began using the correct ''nest-ley" pronunciation.
12th Mar '17 12:49:35 PM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

* Even as late as the 1970's, Swiss confectionery and foodstuffs firm Nestlé accepted that monoglot Brits whose language has no accented letters would not know how to pronounce "Nestlé" as it should be in French. So even in TV adverts, the firm's name was prounced as if it were the English word "nestle"[[note]] "as ''nessle''[[/note]], with no accented-"é" on the end. Old TV adverts preserve this Anglicised pronunciation. It's only comparitively recently that TV advertising began using the correct ''nest-ley" pronunciation.
20th Feb '17 6:06:23 AM Chabal2
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* In ''Literature/WarAndPeace'', Pierre Bezukhov, as part of calculating the NumberOfTheBeast, uses the name ''l'Russe Besuhof'', which is just "the Russian Bezukhov." Please note, even "Pierre Bezukhov" is an example of this trope - his Russian first name is Pyotr. At the time Tolstoy was writing most business in the Russian court was conducted in French as a result of their national Western European {{fandom}}, so the first names of his higher-class characters get translated back and forth a lot, depending upon who's speaking.

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* In ''Literature/WarAndPeace'', Pierre Bezukhov, as part of calculating the NumberOfTheBeast, uses the name ''l'Russe Besuhof'', which is just "the Russian "th'Russian Bezukhov." Please note, even "Pierre Bezukhov" is an example of this trope - his Russian first name is Pyotr. At the time Tolstoy was writing most business in the Russian court was conducted in French as a result of their national Western European {{fandom}}, so the first names of his higher-class characters get translated back and forth a lot, depending upon who's speaking.




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* ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40K'': Subverted in one case, where a daemon was using the TrueName of a SpaceWolf squad against them. However, as it was pulling their names from the mind of someone accompanying them, it couldn't control one (Bjorn, later Bjorn the Fell-Handed) as it continually called him "Bear" instead.
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