History Main / ThisIsMyNameOnForeign

24th Apr '16 6:34:28 PM StarSword
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* ''Fanfic/StrangeTimesAreUponUs'': Ba'wov and K'Gan -> Bowie and Keegan. A case of picking a similar-sounding name rather than translating it.

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* ''Fanfic/StrangeTimesAreUponUs'': Ba'wov and K'Gan -> Bowie and Keegan. A case of picking a similar-sounding name rather than translating it.it (the characters are Klingons).
24th Apr '16 11:51:24 AM narm00
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* ''TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade'' had the Black Hand, an elite subsect of the Sabbat faction of vampires. There was also the ''Tal'mahe'Ra'' also known as ''Manus Nigrum'' (Arabic and Latin[[note]]well, CanisLatinicus: actual Latin would be ''Manus Nigra''[[/note]] for "Black Hand" respectively), an AncientConspiracy hidden throughout vampire society as a whole, which claimed to have created the Black Hand of the Sabbat.

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* ''TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade'' had has the Black Hand, an elite subsect of the Sabbat faction of vampires. There was There's also the ''Tal'mahe'Ra'' ''Tal'mahe'Ra'', also known as ''Manus Nigrum'' (Arabic and Latin[[note]]well, CanisLatinicus: actual Latin would be ''Manus Nigra''[[/note]] for "Black Hand" respectively), an AncientConspiracy hidden throughout vampire society as a whole, which claimed claims to have created the Black Hand of the Sabbat.



* In ''IronManArmoredAdventures'', Tony Stark mentions his family's last name was Starkovic before they came to the United States, though it was 'like seven generations ago'. Since his mother's name is Maria Carbonelli and according to Howard wanted to name him Antonio, Tony's first name may itself be a case of Americanizing a foreign name.

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* In ''IronManArmoredAdventures'', ''WesternAnimation/IronManArmoredAdventures'', Tony Stark mentions his family's last name was Starkovic before they came to the United States, though it was 'like seven generations ago'. Since his mother's name is Maria Carbonelli and according to Howard wanted to name him Antonio, Tony's first name may itself be a case of Americanizing a foreign name.
20th Mar '16 6:35:03 AM Aquila89
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Added DiffLines:

* Hollywood film director Lewis Milestone Americanized his name from Lieb Milstein.
12th Mar '16 8:14:03 AM HeraldAlberich
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If the character's name is changed because the work ''itself'' is being translated into a foreign language, it's a DubNameChange.

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If the character's name is changed because the work ''itself'' is being translated into a foreign language, it's a DubNameChange. When a character or family emigrates to a new country and changes their name permanently, it's a NaturalizedName.
8th Mar '16 11:24:48 AM MoonByte
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Added DiffLines:

** In an interesting case, the company did ''not'' change the name for the german market. Even advertisment has succumbed to the fact that all germans pronounce the company as Dan-On-Ee and most germans that go out of country react confused when seeing a brand they are familiar with, just to hear that person "mess up" the pronounciation.
6th Mar '16 10:07:22 AM nombretomado
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* In ''ComicBook/{{Marvel 1602}}'', an AlternateUniverse taking place in the year, you guessed it, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin 1602]], CaptainAmerica (aka Steve Rogers) is actually from a dystopian future of the normal [[MarvelUniverse 616]] timeline, but was sent back by the evil "President-For-Life" to get rid of him. He is taken in by a local Native American tribe and takes on the name Rojhaz, which isn't actually a word in any Native American language, but it would sound enough like one to the new European settlers to pass as one. (Of course, these are the same people who manage to HandWave the fact that he is apparently a ''blond-haired, blue-eyed'' Native American, so perhaps he needn't have tried so hard.) The series also includes characters 'local' to 1602 whose names would be this trope if they were aliases, like Carlos Javier (Charles Xavier), Roberto Trefusis (Bobby Drake), Hal [=McCoy=] (Hank [=McCoy=]) and Scotius Summerisle (Scott Summers). Magneto's name, "Enrique", is probably the biggest offender. (Although [[spoiler:it's not his birth name. It was given to him when he was abducted from the ghetto and forcibly converted to Christianity.]])

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* In ''ComicBook/{{Marvel 1602}}'', an AlternateUniverse taking place in the year, you guessed it, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin 1602]], CaptainAmerica ComicBook/CaptainAmerica (aka Steve Rogers) is actually from a dystopian future of the normal [[MarvelUniverse 616]] timeline, but was sent back by the evil "President-For-Life" to get rid of him. He is taken in by a local Native American tribe and takes on the name Rojhaz, which isn't actually a word in any Native American language, but it would sound enough like one to the new European settlers to pass as one. (Of course, these are the same people who manage to HandWave the fact that he is apparently a ''blond-haired, blue-eyed'' Native American, so perhaps he needn't have tried so hard.) The series also includes characters 'local' to 1602 whose names would be this trope if they were aliases, like Carlos Javier (Charles Xavier), Roberto Trefusis (Bobby Drake), Hal [=McCoy=] (Hank [=McCoy=]) and Scotius Summerisle (Scott Summers). Magneto's name, "Enrique", is probably the biggest offender. (Although [[spoiler:it's not his birth name. It was given to him when he was abducted from the ghetto and forcibly converted to Christianity.]])
21st Feb '16 5:03:58 PM Materioptikon
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* The original Master from ''Series/DoctorWho'' used "Reverend Magister" in "The Daemons" and "Professor Thasacles" in "The Time Monster". His later incarnations preferred {{Significant Anagram}}s.

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* The original Master from ''Series/DoctorWho'' used "Reverend Magister" in "The Daemons" and "Professor Thasacles" Thascalos" in "The Time Monster". His later incarnations preferred {{Significant Anagram}}s.Anagram}}s or {{Paper Thin Disguise}}s like Colonel Masters.
28th Jan '16 1:58:32 PM margdean56
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* In ''ComicBook/{{Marvel 1602}}'', an AlternateUniverse taking place in the year, you guessed it, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin 1602]], CaptainAmerica (aka Steve Rogers) is actually from a dystopian future of the normal [[MarvelUniverse 616]] timeline, but had sent back by the evil "President-For-Life" to get rid of him. He is taken in by a local Native American tribe and takes on the name Rojhaz, which isn't actually a word in any Native American language, but it would sound enough like one to the new European settlers to pass as one. (Of course, these are the same people who manage to HandWave the fact that he is apparently a ''blond-haired, blue-eyed'' Native American, so perhaps he needn't have tried so hard.) The series also includes characters 'local' to 1602 whose names would be this trope if they were aliases, like Carlos Javier (Charles Xavier), Roberto Trefusis (Bobby Drake), Hal [=McCoy=] (Hank [=McCoy=]) and Scotius Summerisle (Scott Summers). Magneto's name, "Enrique", is probably the biggest offender. (Although [[spoiler:it's not his birth name. It was given to him when he was abducted from the ghetto and forcibly converted to Christianity.]])

to:

* In ''ComicBook/{{Marvel 1602}}'', an AlternateUniverse taking place in the year, you guessed it, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin 1602]], CaptainAmerica (aka Steve Rogers) is actually from a dystopian future of the normal [[MarvelUniverse 616]] timeline, but had was sent back by the evil "President-For-Life" to get rid of him. He is taken in by a local Native American tribe and takes on the name Rojhaz, which isn't actually a word in any Native American language, but it would sound enough like one to the new European settlers to pass as one. (Of course, these are the same people who manage to HandWave the fact that he is apparently a ''blond-haired, blue-eyed'' Native American, so perhaps he needn't have tried so hard.) The series also includes characters 'local' to 1602 whose names would be this trope if they were aliases, like Carlos Javier (Charles Xavier), Roberto Trefusis (Bobby Drake), Hal [=McCoy=] (Hank [=McCoy=]) and Scotius Summerisle (Scott Summers). Magneto's name, "Enrique", is probably the biggest offender. (Although [[spoiler:it's not his birth name. It was given to him when he was abducted from the ghetto and forcibly converted to Christianity.]])
16th Jan '16 3:37:09 PM karstovich2
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* Doing this is very easy for names natively set in Chinese characters, because there are 4 languages that use (or have used) Chinese characters: Chinese (as Hanzi, 汉字), Korean (as Hanja, 한자), Japanese (as Kanji, 漢字) and Vietnamese (as chữ Hán, 𡨸漢).

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* Doing this is very easy for names natively set in Chinese characters, because there are 4 languages that use (or have used) Chinese characters: Chinese (as Hanzi, 汉字), Korean (as Hanja, 한자), Japanese (as Kanji, 漢字) and Vietnamese (as chữ Hán, 𡨸漢). Thus you get things like the most famous discovery of the Korean botanist 禹長春 (pronounced "Woo Jang-choon" in Korean) being known as the "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_of_U Triangle of U]]" because he developed it while working in Japan and going by the name "U Nagaharu".
29th Dec '15 3:43:16 PM Menshevik
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** In the 19th and 20th century, many European Jews changed their last name to make it sound less stereotypically Jewish to escape persecution or discrimination. For instance, German actor Leopold Dessauer became [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_Dessoir Ludwig Dessoir]] (Leopold is, however, a German name, and surnames combining the name of a town with the suffix "-er" are not exclusive to Jewish families, although they were frequently perceived as "Jewish"). Such a change could be accompanied or occasioned by a religious conversion, as e. g. in the case of writer Isaac Elias Itzig, who became [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Eduard_Hitzig Julius Eduard Hitzig]]; "Itzig" is an Ashkenazy variant of "Isaac" (which in the 19th century was used as a pejorative German slang word for "Jew", while "hitzig" is German for "hot-blooded" or "hot-headed". after being baptised in 1799.

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** In the 19th and 20th century, many European Jews changed their last name to make it sound less stereotypically Jewish to escape persecution or discrimination. For instance, German actor Leopold Dessauer became [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_Dessoir Ludwig Dessoir]] (Leopold is, however, a German name, and surnames combining the name of a town with the suffix "-er" are not exclusive to Jewish families, although they were frequently perceived as "Jewish"). Such a change could be accompanied or occasioned by a religious conversion, as e. g. in the case of writer Isaac Elias Itzig, who became [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Eduard_Hitzig Julius Eduard Hitzig]]; Hitzig]] when he was baptised in 1799; "Itzig" is an Ashkenazy variant of "Isaac" (which in the 19th century was used as a pejorative German slang word for "Jew", "Jew"), while "hitzig" is German for "hot-blooded" or "hot-headed". after being baptised in 1799."hot-headed".
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