History Main / ThereAreNotherapists

26th Jul '17 6:05:24 AM Dracis
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* ''Splendidly'' averted in ''FanFic/ToTheStars'' with the [[NGOSuperpower Mahou Shoujo Youkai]]'s Mental Health Division. As [[MagicalGirl Magical Girls]]' powers are linked to their emotions, and as falling into despair can destroy their [[SoulJar soul gems]], with lethal results, the MSY has a vested interest in keeping its members sane. (Not to mention the damage a rogue, insane magical girl could wreak before she was stopped.) The fact that many Mental Health Division workers have some form of {{Telepathy}} or even MindControl certainly helps their job.
1st Jul '17 7:01:36 PM HighCrate
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* TheShrink: If a character does go to a therapist but the therapist is unskilled, condemnatory, or otherwise problematic, see TheShrink; versions 1 and 2. If this trope is averted when the character goes to a good therapist and gets the help they need, see TheShrink; version 3.

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* TheShrink: If Complete with {{Internal Subtrope}}s for situations in which a character does go to a therapist but the therapist is unskilled, condemnatory, or otherwise problematic, see TheShrink; versions 1 and 2. If those in which this trope is averted when the character goes to a good therapist and gets the help they need, see TheShrink; version 3.need.
26th Jun '17 1:22:14 AM BlackBaroness
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* Justified in ''VideoGame/YumeNikki'', as the protagonist is a {{hikikomori}} that adamantly refuses to leave her room to see a therapist, despite being in dire need of one.

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* Justified [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in ''VideoGame/YumeNikki'', as the protagonist is a {{hikikomori}} that adamantly refuses to leave her room to see a therapist, despite being in dire need of one.
26th Jun '17 1:21:26 AM BlackBaroness
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* Justified in ''VideoGame/YumeNikki'', as the protagonist is a {{hikikomori}} that adamantly refuses to leave her room to see a therapist, despite being in dire need of one.
19th Jun '17 7:36:41 AM Rhivana
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In most fiction, there are ''no'' official systems in place to protect those who are psychologically vulnerable. Nobody is ever concerned that the kid who watched their parents die might be considering suicide, [[FreudianExcuse homicide]], or [[Franchise/{{Batman}} fighting crime]] [[Series/{{Dexter}} without due process]]. Fiction is full of [[BunnyEarsLawyer Bunny-Ears Lawyers]] but this will be ignored so long as they're not [[AxCrazy crazy with axes]].

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In most fiction, there are ''no'' official systems in place to protect those who are psychologically vulnerable. Nobody is ever concerned that the kid who watched their parents die might be considering suicide, [[DrivenToSuicide suicide]], [[FreudianExcuse homicide]], or [[Franchise/{{Batman}} fighting crime]] [[Series/{{Dexter}} without due process]]. Fiction is full of [[BunnyEarsLawyer Bunny-Ears Lawyers]] but this will be ignored so long as they're not [[AxCrazy crazy with axes]].
17th Jun '17 3:35:02 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' tried to avoid this somewhat by instituting the position of "Ship's Counselor", but still ran into it on occasion. ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' and ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' had excuses though: Ezri Dax was still in training when she was assigned as counselor, while Captain Janeway said in an early episode that ''Voyager'' hadn't been expected to need one (being that the mission they were ''supposed'' to have took place well within shouting distance of a major starbase, Deep Space 9). Chakotay (with his VisionQuest), Neelix (as Morale Officer), and Tuvok (using Vulcan meditation techniques) usually take up the role.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' tried to avoid this somewhat by instituting the position of "Ship's Counselor", but still ran into it on occasion. ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' and ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' had excuses though: Ezri Dax was still in training when she was assigned as counselor, while Captain Janeway said in an early episode that ''Voyager'' hadn't been expected to need one (being that the mission they were ''supposed'' to have took place well within shouting distance of a major starbase, Deep Space 9). Chakotay (with his VisionQuest), Neelix (as Morale Officer), and Tuvok (using Vulcan meditation techniques) usually take up the role. It's also something of a RunningGag that actually seeing a counselor ''always'' makes the situation worse.
17th Jun '17 10:08:38 AM whatkindofadayhasitbeen
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* Averted multiple times over in ''Series/TheWestWing''.
** Josh is by far the most notable example. He is seeing a therapist at the beginning of the series (although he stops due to the political danger of a senior aide going to weekly therapy). After he is [[spoiler: shot in the chest at the end of Season 1]], Josh is mandated by Leo to meet with Stanley, a trauma therapist, due to him [[spoiler: showing many, many significant red flags of PTSD, including yelling at the President over a minor issue]]. Josh attempts to shrug off his issues and deflect painful questions by being deliberately irritating and difficult, but Stanley is completely unfazed by his aggression and (after eight full hours of circling) gets him to admit that he didn't cut his hand on a glass as he previously claimed, but[[SelfHarm broke a window in his apartment during a flashback]]. Stanley diagnoses him with [[spoiler: PTSD]], and tells Josh that he is not and will never be 'cured', but he can get better and recover over time.
*** Josh and Leo later have several vague conversations about Josh's PTSD, and two years after the incident, Donna calls Stanley to inform him of a [[spoiler: shooting at the White House]] because she is worried about Josh's mental health, indicating that he is recovering, but is not the same as he was before.
** Despite having both been sober for years, Leo and Hoynes continue to regularly attend AA meetings, emphasizing that addiction never goes away and has to be managed no matter how long you have been sober for.
** After she is [[spoiler: seriously injured in a bombing]], Donna [[spoiler: is extremely heavily implied to have PTSD]], confirmed when Kate pulls her aside to ask how she is doing and offer to talk if Donna needs to - she doesn't force anything on her, simply volunteers her help. Donna thanks her and says that she knows she needs help, but isn't ready.
17th Jun '17 8:09:10 AM Kalaong
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* DysfunctionJunction: For stories (or works) where a main plot of the story is that those ''entire'' characters being cast are ''crazy''.

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* DysfunctionJunction: For stories (or works) where a main plot of the story is that those ''entire'' ''all'' the characters being in the cast are ''crazy''.crazy.
* MedicateTheMedium: If you learn you have PsychicPowers, the ''last'' person you want to talk to is a therapist, as they will lock you up and drug you - either because they don't believe you or they ''do'' and have a standing order to suppress psychic powers.
11th Jun '17 9:49:18 PM nombretomado
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* Deconstructed in ''VideoGame/BlazeUnion''. We learn very early on that its BrokenHero, Gulcasa, has a lot of serious issues due to having been abused and abandoned by his parents, and he's only able to function because his childhood friends (who are also pretty much his adoptive parents) [[LivingEmotionalCrutch are there to act as amateur counselors for him]]. During the canon route of the game, Siskier dies, and [[TraumaCongaLine this is really only just the start]]. Gulcasa blames himself for everything, and winds up with a raging case of PTSD which [[FailureKnight makes him so terrified of failure]] that he stops hesitating altogether and starts acting much more stoically. His remaining childhood friend and mentor mistake his symptoms for Gulcasa losing his humanity, as [[FantasticRacism it was conveniently revealed that he's part demon]]. [[EtTuBrute And they try to kill him]], leaving Gulcasa a complete psychological wreck. The only people who even bother to try to help him have their own agendas, not to mention their own festering cesspools of mental-emotional trauma. In all likelihood, things wouldn't have gone [[KillEmAll quite so badly]] for Gulcasa and company [[YggdraUnion three years later]] if someone had just gotten the poor kid a competent grief counselor.

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* Deconstructed in ''VideoGame/BlazeUnion''. We learn very early on that its BrokenHero, Gulcasa, has a lot of serious issues due to having been abused and abandoned by his parents, and he's only able to function because his childhood friends (who are also pretty much his adoptive parents) [[LivingEmotionalCrutch are there to act as amateur counselors for him]]. During the canon route of the game, Siskier dies, and [[TraumaCongaLine this is really only just the start]]. Gulcasa blames himself for everything, and winds up with a raging case of PTSD which [[FailureKnight makes him so terrified of failure]] that he stops hesitating altogether and starts acting much more stoically. His remaining childhood friend and mentor mistake his symptoms for Gulcasa losing his humanity, as [[FantasticRacism it was conveniently revealed that he's part demon]]. [[EtTuBrute And they try to kill him]], leaving Gulcasa a complete psychological wreck. The only people who even bother to try to help him have their own agendas, not to mention their own festering cesspools of mental-emotional trauma. In all likelihood, things wouldn't have gone [[KillEmAll quite so badly]] for Gulcasa and company [[YggdraUnion [[VideoGame/YggdraUnion three years later]] if someone had just gotten the poor kid a competent grief counselor.
29th May '17 10:24:40 AM pi4t
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** Up to then, however, this was played straight among the heroes of Brockton Bay (while being averted in the world at large) - while making the above request, Weld calls out his superiors for ''not'' having any sort of psychiatric help already in place.
** For obvious reasons, villains tend not to seek out therapists, and for equally obvious reasons there aren't many therapists who are willing to deal with villains who could decide to attack them at any moment. Combined with the fact that many capes have [[TraumaticSuperpowerAwakening serious psychological issues already,]] this helps to explain the prevalence of villains in the setting.
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