History Main / TheoryOfNarrativeCausality

18th Feb '18 8:55:07 AM DVB
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* SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker believes that life is basically set up to be one big cruel joke. One of the reasons he's a villain is that he wants everyone else to believe this too. In ''ComicBook/DeathOfTheFamily'', Bruce privately admits to Alfred that the reason he never tried to kill the Joker is because he also believes his life follows a narrative, with Gotham City itself as the BigBad. Killing Joker would only force Gotham to send someone worse to challenge Batman.

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* SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker believes that life is basically set up to be one big cruel joke. One of the reasons he's a villain is that he wants everyone else to believe this too. In ''ComicBook/DeathOfTheFamily'', Bruce privately admits to Alfred that the reason he never tried to kill the Joker is because he also believes his life follows a narrative, with Gotham City itself as the BigBad. Killing Joker would only force Gotham to send someone worse to challenge Batman. This also serves to show how Batman is worried he may not be all that sane (though granted, he is not wrong.) The fact that it is later revealed in a newer arc that there are ''three Jokers'' running around has made things even more complicated.
2nd Feb '18 4:52:11 PM reddragon32145
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* This is basically the premise of ''Literature/APracticalGuideToEvil'', [[GenreSavvy with every successful hero and villain learning to exploit it]]. TheBlackKnight, for example, knows at one point that chasing down a fleeing hero would be fruitless as "fate" wouldn't let the hero die so anticlimactically.

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* This is basically the premise of ''Literature/APracticalGuideToEvil'', [[GenreSavvy with every successful hero and villain learning to exploit it]]. TheBlackKnight, for example, knows at one point that chasing down a fleeing hero who just had a climactic battle would be fruitless as "fate" wouldn't let the hero die so anticlimactically.
29th Jan '18 8:28:03 AM nanakiro
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** The only way to stop the Princess was for Sota to [[spoiler: write her original author into the special, letting the pair reconcile and placating Altair permanently.]] How was he able to do it? [[spoiler: by using Magane's inversing powers while jinxing the plan, putting the situation firmly in control of the writer by proxy.]]

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** The only way to stop the Princess was for Sota to [[spoiler: write her original author into the special, letting the pair reconcile and placating Altair permanently.]] How was he able to do it? [[spoiler: by using Magane's inversing powers while jinxing the plan, putting the situation firmly in control of the writer by proxy.]]]] It turns out to be a bit of both sides contributing, since [[spoiler:Altair altering the story turned her into the special's lead, meaning she needed a happy ending,]] while [[spoiler:Setsuna being able to be revived in some form was because the plot (Team Creators in this case) was able to will it so]].
29th Jan '18 8:21:33 AM nanakiro
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* Played with in ''Anime/ReCreators''. Stories revolve around two principal factors: the will of the author (which gives a character their basic look, personality, etc.) and the will of the reader (who has the power to accept or [[FanonDiscontinuity deny]] what the author adds to it). Both work as the out of universe version of Narrative Casualty:
** Selesia is able to get a needed EleventhHourSuperpower because her author successfully pulled off writing one for her and letting it reach a wide audience.
** The creators come up with a plan to stop the Military Uniform Princess from destroying reality, but opt to [[UnspokenPlanGuarantee never tell anyone about it citing exactly this trope]] until the episode before the plan is carried out. [[spoiler: Naturally, this fails, as merely mentioning it caused the plan to unravel.]]
** On the Audience's side: [[spoiler:Altair is able to shrug off the heroes' attacks during the ''Elmination Chamber Festival'', since PopularityPower means love from the fans can ''overturn'' Narrative Casualty to keep her in play. Team Creators has to wrestle the story out from under her, since the story the ''fans'' are making about her isn't matching up with how the special (and therefore this plot) was written to end.]]
** The only way to stop the Princess was for Sota to [[spoiler: write her original author into the special, letting the pair reconcile and placating Altair permanently.]] How was he able to do it? [[spoiler: by using Magane's inversing powers while jinxing the plan, putting the situation firmly in control of the writer by proxy.]]
11th Jan '18 8:41:04 PM Malady
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* This is basically the premise of APracticalGuideToEvil, [[GenreSavvy with every successful hero and villain learning to exploit it]]. TheBlackKnight, for example, knows at one point that chasing down a fleeing hero would be fruitless as "fate" wouldn't let the hero die so anticlimactically.
** A major plot point in Book 2 is The Rule of Three, where two foes clash three times with the loser of the first confrontation ultimately triumphing in the third. [[VillainProtagonist Catherine]] knows she's fated to lose against the Lone Swordsman but arranges the situation so she'll come out on top once the story ends. Similarly, Heiress purposefully arranged this situation between herself and Catherine so she could have a guaranteed win when it would be most useful.

to:

* This is basically the premise of APracticalGuideToEvil, ''Literature/APracticalGuideToEvil'', [[GenreSavvy with every successful hero and villain learning to exploit it]]. TheBlackKnight, for example, knows at one point that chasing down a fleeing hero would be fruitless as "fate" wouldn't let the hero die so anticlimactically.
** A major plot point in Book 2 is The Rule of Three, RuleOfThree, where two foes clash three times with the loser of the first confrontation ultimately triumphing in the third. [[VillainProtagonist Catherine]] knows she's fated to lose against the Lone Swordsman but arranges the situation so she'll come out on top once the story ends. Similarly, Heiress purposefully arranged this situation between herself and Catherine so she could have a guaranteed win when it would be most useful.
11th Jan '18 6:30:40 PM reddragon32145
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* This is basically the premise of APracticalGuideToEvil, [[GenreSavvy with every successful hero and villain learning to exploit it]]. TheBlackKnight, for example, knows at one point that chasing down a fleeing hero would be fruitless as "fate" wouldn't let the hero die so anticlimactically.
**A major plot point in Book 2 is The Rule of Three, where two foes clash three times with the loser of the first confrontation ultimately triumphing in the third. [[VillainProtagonist Catherine]] knows she's fated to lose against the Lone Swordsman but arranges the situation so she'll come out on top once the story ends. Similarly, Heiress purposefully arranged this situation between herself and Catherine so she could have a guaranteed win when it would be most useful.
15th Dec '17 10:51:51 PM SquallCloud
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Alternatively alternatively, think of the principle laid out in Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels, in which this phenomenon is not only an explicit physical law but has been codified, studied, tested, found to be an in-universe element ("narrativium") and may be the local equivalent of the strong nuclear force, although the term Narrative Causality is older than that.

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Alternatively alternatively, Alternatively, think of the principle laid out in Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels, in which this phenomenon is not only an explicit physical law but has been codified, studied, tested, found to be an in-universe element ("narrativium") and may be the local equivalent of the strong nuclear force, although the term Narrative Causality is older than that.
8th Dec '17 9:16:14 PM Xtifr
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* In ''Literature/TheJennifer Morgue'' by Creator/CharlesStross, the BigBad sets up a powerful spell of compulsion that means everything ''has'' to happen exactly the way it would in a ''Film/JamesBond'' movie, thereby making making his plan impossible to stop unless challenged by a lone, British, martini-drinking secret agent. Furthermore, his plan hinges on terminating the spell at a crucial point (when the Bond figure [[NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine gets captured by the villain]]), turning the narrative-powered hero back into a regular guy just before the EvilPlan runs to completion. Fortunately, the spell works both ways, meaning BondVillainStupidity is in full effect. And, crucially, he forgot that the basic James Bond plot formula has a number of small but significant ''variations''...

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* In ''Literature/TheJennifer Morgue'' ''Literature/TheJenniferMorgue'' by Creator/CharlesStross, the BigBad sets up a powerful spell of compulsion that means everything ''has'' to happen exactly the way it would in a ''Film/JamesBond'' movie, thereby making making his plan impossible to stop unless challenged by a lone, British, martini-drinking secret agent. Furthermore, his plan hinges on terminating the spell at a crucial point (when the Bond figure [[NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine gets captured by the villain]]), turning the narrative-powered hero back into a regular guy just before the EvilPlan runs to completion. Fortunately, the spell works both ways, meaning BondVillainStupidity is in full effect. And, crucially, he forgot that the basic James Bond plot formula has a number of small but significant ''variations''...
8th Dec '17 9:16:00 PM Xtifr
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* In ''[[Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Jennifer Morgue]]'' by Creator/CharlesStross, the BigBad sets up a powerful spell of compulsion that means everything ''has'' to happen exactly the way it would in a ''Film/JamesBond'' movie, thereby making making his plan impossible to stop unless challenged by a lone, British, martini-drinking secret agent. Furthermore, his plan hinges on terminating the spell at a crucial point (when the Bond figure [[NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine gets captured by the villain]]), turning the narrative-powered hero back into a regular guy just before the EvilPlan runs to completion. Fortunately, the spell works both ways, meaning BondVillainStupidity is in full effect. And, crucially, he forgot that the basic James Bond plot formula has a number of small but significant ''variations''...

to:

* In ''[[Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Jennifer Morgue]]'' ''Literature/TheJennifer Morgue'' by Creator/CharlesStross, the BigBad sets up a powerful spell of compulsion that means everything ''has'' to happen exactly the way it would in a ''Film/JamesBond'' movie, thereby making making his plan impossible to stop unless challenged by a lone, British, martini-drinking secret agent. Furthermore, his plan hinges on terminating the spell at a crucial point (when the Bond figure [[NoMrBondIExpectYouToDine gets captured by the villain]]), turning the narrative-powered hero back into a regular guy just before the EvilPlan runs to completion. Fortunately, the spell works both ways, meaning BondVillainStupidity is in full effect. And, crucially, he forgot that the basic James Bond plot formula has a number of small but significant ''variations''...
17th Oct '17 12:33:06 PM hamakei
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* The Anthropic Principle is arguably a real life variant of the Discworld phenomenon. Isn't it a strange coincidence that the universe happens to have produced conditions suitable to sustain life? No, because if it hadn't, we wouldn't be here to make that observation. Therefore, we create our own stories by our very existence.
[[/folder]]
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