History Main / TheThemeparkVersion

19th Jan '17 4:23:10 AM erforce
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** The games are based on many popular American crime movies and tropes but often the distorted the popular-culture vision rather than the UnbuiltTrope of the original. Brian de Palma's Film/{{Scarface}} starring Creator/AlPacino is an anti-drug story and a tragedy, the SpiritualAdaptation VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity is a sociopath's gleeful and successful RoaringRampageOfRevenge with none of the qualms and drawbacks of dealing drugs addressed once in the game.

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** The games are based on many popular American crime movies and tropes but often the distorted the popular-culture vision rather than the UnbuiltTrope of the original. Brian de Palma's Film/{{Scarface}} ''Film/{{Scarface|1983}}'' starring Creator/AlPacino is an anti-drug story and a tragedy, the SpiritualAdaptation VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity is a sociopath's gleeful and successful RoaringRampageOfRevenge with none of the qualms and drawbacks of dealing drugs addressed once in the game.
17th Jan '17 11:38:42 PM CaptEquinox
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* Creator/BuffaloBill's ''WildWest'' shows were highly succesful at the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th. They claimed to be historically accurate representations of the era and spared no costs to give the audience what they wanted with Native Americans, cowboys, stagecoaches, dramatized gun fights and horse riding. In reality all of it was a romanticized version that nevertheless caught on in the general consciousness, especially in Europe where the ''cowboys and Indians era'' has always remained popular.

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* Creator/BuffaloBill's ''WildWest'' shows were highly succesful at the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th. They claimed to be historically accurate representations of the era and spared no costs to give the audience what they wanted with Native Americans, cowboys, stagecoaches, dramatized gun fights and horse riding. In reality all of it was a romanticized version that nevertheless caught on in the general consciousness, especially in Europe where the ''cowboys and Indians era'' has always remained popular. (He did have actual Native American actors and dancers.[[note]]among them Sitting Bull and a very young Nick Black Elk, who tells the story of his experiences including a CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming meeting with QueenVicky in ''Black Elk Speaks'' by John Neihardt.[[/note]])



* In American film and literature, many Native Americans suffer from this trope. Pick any nation you like, and if you bother to do the research, you will find a complex society with all the trimmings: a working economy, clearly defined values and morals, a deep religion, a highly developed language, and a well-developed justice system. Yet some authors portray Native Americans as backward, childlike people who all talk like Tonto, and others portray them all as a nature-bonded MagicalNativeAmerican stereotype who are mercilessly slaughtered by the brutish white man. It's difficult at times to ascertain which is more offensive.

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* In American film and literature, many Native Americans suffer from this trope. Pick any nation you like, and if you bother to do the research, you will find a complex society with all the trimmings: a working economy, clearly defined values and morals, a deep religion, a highly developed language, and a well-developed justice system. Yet some authors portray Native Americans as backward, childlike people who all [[YouNoTakeCandle talk like Tonto, Tonto]][[note]]forgetting that Tonto was often portrayed as being smarter than TheLoneRanger[[/note]], and others portray them all as a nature-bonded Noble Savage MagicalNativeAmerican stereotype stereotypes in BraidsBeadsAndBuckskins who are mercilessly slaughtered by the brutish white man. It's difficult at times to ascertain which is more offensive.



** In an interesting inversion, the word "Xmas" for Christmas is often wrongfully accused of being this trope. The assumption is that the X is used to remove any implications of {{Jesus}} from the holiday. In fact, it comes from the fact that X is the first letter in Jesus' title (Χριστός or Christos) in Greek. (And, if you really want to be pedantic, Christmas originated as a pagan holiday that was HijackedByJesus because most of the non-Christian world had some sort of winter festival and the Christians figured they may as well join the party.)

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** In an interesting inversion, the word "Xmas" for Christmas is often wrongfully accused of being this trope. The assumption is that the X is used to remove any implications of {{Jesus}} from the holiday. In fact, it comes from the fact that X is the first letter in Jesus' title (Χριστός or Christos) in Greek. (Perhaps medieval monks started this -- they had to write "Christ" so much in their copying work that they started writing X as shorthand.) This is also why Catholic churches have a big XP on things -- it's "CHR", the first letters in "Christ". (And, if you really want to be pedantic, Christmas originated as a pagan holiday that was HijackedByJesus because most of the non-Christian world had some sort of winter festival and the Christians figured they may as well join the party.)) The expression "Xian" for Christian was originally not a pejorative, but came from online religion discussion groups where like those medieval monks you had to type "Christian" so much that Xian became the shorthand.



** March: Either people flying kites in the wind or a leprechaun with a pot o' gold (for Saint Patrick's Day).
** April: "April Showers," raincoats and boots and umbrellas.

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** March: Either people flying kites in the wind or a leprechaun with a pot o' gold (for Saint Patrick's Day).
Day). Easter themes may show up if Easter is celebrated this month.
** April: "April Showers," raincoats and boots and umbrellas.umbrellas, or Easter stuff if it comes this month.
** May: "May Flowers", a lush garden scene,



** September: Anything having to do with kids going back to school (pencils, apples, rulers, blackboards, etc.).

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** September: Anything having to do with kids going back to school (pencils, apples, rulers, blackboards, etc.). Or falling autumn leaves.



** December: Christmas, trees, ornaments and Santa Claus.

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** December: Christmas, trees, ornaments ornaments, poinsettias and Santa Claus. Maybe some sparkly blue decor and Stars of David for Chanukah if you're lucky.
11th Jan '17 5:54:13 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* Of course TheWildWest as codified in TheWestern is itself a theme park distortion to begin with. Creator/SamuelFuller lamented as such:
-->''"I love the West. I read a lot about the West, and I'm shocked, I'm ashamed that in pictures they have not made the true story of the winning of the West--comprising 90 percent foreigners, 100 percent laborers, nothing to do with guns. Streets, mountains, roads, bridges, streams, forests--that's the winning of the West to me. Hard! Tremendous, tremendous fight. But [instead] we have, as you know, cowboys and Indians and all that."''
** Film history's idea of TheWestern genre divides classical westerns from revisionist westerns and spaghetti westerns where the latter is seen as truer because RealIsBrown and its DarkerAndEdgier. This idea is itself a theme park reduction since many classical westerns such as those made by Creator/JohnFord and Creator/DelmerDaves are complex, political works that deal with institutions, violence, racism and ethnic conflicts while revisionist westerns by Leone, Peckinpah and later films rarely deal with politics and Native American displacement. It was Ford who cast actual Navajo as extras and paid them on union scale in a time of discrimination while the revisionist Westerns focused as they were on being GenreKiller Last Western, ended up drying up the parts for Native Americans on the American screen.
11th Jan '17 5:14:21 PM JulianLapostat
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* ''Franchise/AssassinsCreed'' while praised for being (at least in earlier games) revisionist and subversive of tropes and HollywoodHistory still more or less presents simplified versions of actual historical periods, nations and cultures.
** VideoGame/AssassinsCreedI and the other games more or less dials down the role of religion in the actual medieval era, insisting that such religious sects as UsefulNotes/TheHashshashin and UsefulNotes/TheKnightsTemplar were HidingBehindReligion and really secular humanists. While this compromise makes commercial sense and fits with the overall meta-narrative, it ends up giving a distorted view of the period and history.
** The later games rarely tackle the importance of class and social background. The blending mechanic allows a Native American like Connor to hide in a group of Colonial Bostonians, a cockney thug like Jacob Frye to talk on even terms with the British Prime Minister and for the Florentine exile and outsider Ezio Auditore to easily interact with a range of class groups in a time where costume, rank, title and appearance were crucial social signifiers.
** The games also codified LeParkour in games as a climbing and traversal mechanic which simplifies both the human body and the surfaces and architecture of various cities to facilitate said gameplay. Other mechanics such as the naval gameplay of VideoGame/AssassinsCreedIVBlackFlag is more or less a simplified and condensed simulation of naval combat with ships easily navigated the wind and the waves.



* ''VideoGame/{{Ryse Son Of Rome}}'' does this to Ancient Rome, by taking [[ArtisticLicenseHistory wild liberties with History]] such as having Nero's Rome sacked by barbarians - the city also having hydraulic technology for lifts way ahead of its time -, as well as Romans fluent in [[TheQueensLatin Queens Latin]], ExplodingBarrels and [[EverythingIsBetterWithExplosions shell shock]], a [[Film/{{Gladiator}} gladiator duel between the Hero and some guy named Commodus]], along with borrowing indiscriminately from Greek and Roman mythology, which end up playing as [[DeusExMachina plot convenience]]

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* ''VideoGame/{{Ryse Son Of Rome}}'' does this to Ancient Rome, by taking [[ArtisticLicenseHistory wild liberties with History]] such as having Nero's Rome sacked by barbarians - the city also having hydraulic technology In ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'' and its expansion ''Special'', Andy Bogard's stge is set in Italy for lifts way ahead of its time -, as well as Romans fluent in [[TheQueensLatin Queens Latin]], ExplodingBarrels and [[EverythingIsBetterWithExplosions shell shock]], a [[Film/{{Gladiator}} gladiator duel between the Hero and some guy named Commodus]], along with borrowing indiscriminately from Greek reason (he is an American McNinja, after all). The fight takes place on a boat that seems to be running through the channels of Venice, passing by the Coliseum and Roman mythology, which end up playing as [[DeusExMachina plot convenience]]the Leaning Tower of Pisa.



* Any open-world, free-roaming "crime-sim" that isn't ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto''. Any at all.
** The ''SaintsRow'' series milks this trope for all it's worth, and still manages to come out on top.
*** That probably has something to do with Saints Row doing it ''deliberately'', or serving as satire of most crime fiction (at least from the second game on).

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* Any open-world, free-roaming "crime-sim" that isn't ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto''. Any at all.
The ''Franchise/GrandTheftAuto'' games codified the WideOpenSandbox genre and established most of its conventions, forming more or less theme park versions of American cities, theme park versions of American crime movies and TV shows, and theme park versions of popular culture. All its cities (Liberty City, Los Santos, Vice City) are FantasyCounterpartCulture of New York, Los Angeles and Miami respectively but much, much smaller than the real thing, far easier to navigate but with just enough of the general feel and look of the real-world counterparts to give players a facsimile of the real thing.
** The ''SaintsRow'' series milks this trope general gameplay more or less only works with a satirical distorted view that Rockstar submit its portrayal too, since the cities are portrayed to be as corrupt as a BananaRepublic with suspects of multiple felonies buying their way out of murders with a slap on the wrist, an income system that doesn't punish you for all it's worth, losing your health (when American health care is incredibly expensive) and allowing a single individual to somehow learn how to drive multiple vehicles on land, sea and air which in real-life only few individuals ever accumulate the required knowledge to do so, leave alone the proficiency which allows for vehicle stunts as the games invites you to do.
** The games are based on many popular American crime movies and tropes but often the distorted the popular-culture vision rather than the UnbuiltTrope of the original. Brian de Palma's Film/{{Scarface}} starring Creator/AlPacino is an anti-drug story and a tragedy, the SpiritualAdaptation VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoViceCity is a sociopath's gleeful and successful RoaringRampageOfRevenge with none of the qualms and drawbacks of dealing drugs addressed once in the game.
** The later games have a mechanic by which gamers can buy and invest in property and businesses which unlock missions that involve improving and building said works. Actual propety acquisition and businesses is a complex process that involves mortgage, electricity and maintenance which is usually handwaved with a one-time cash payment with no additional expenses incurred on the part of the owner.
** VideoGame/RedDeadRedemption is likewise a theme park version of TheWildWest and TheWestern, greatly misrepresenting and distorting both to facilitate gameplay. The actual West was not as violent as the game makes it out to be, and while it was praised for deconstructing western tropes, said deconstruction has been old hat since Film/{{Stagecoach}} (which deconstructed earlier forgotten westerns) and Film/TheSearchers. Likewise the game pays no attention to environment, heat and other factors that real settlers had to face and while its mechanic does avert AutomatonHorses to some extent it is
still manages to come out a simplified take on top.
*** That probably has something to do with Saints Row doing it ''deliberately'', or serving as satire of most crime fiction (at least from the second game on).
actual cowboy activities.



* In ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'' and its expansion ''Special'', Andy Bogard's stge is set in Italy for some reason (he is an American McNinja, after all). The fight takes place on a boat that seems to be running through the channels of Venice, passing by the Coliseum and the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'' ''VideoGame/{{Ryse Son Of Rome}}'' does this to Ancient Rome, by taking [[ArtisticLicenseHistory wild liberties with History]] such as having Nero's Rome sacked by barbarians - the city also having hydraulic technology for lifts way ahead of its time -, as well as Romans fluent in [[TheQueensLatin Queens Latin]], ExplodingBarrels and its expansion ''Special'', Andy Bogard's stge is set in Italy for [[EverythingIsBetterWithExplosions shell shock]], a [[Film/{{Gladiator}} gladiator duel between the Hero and some reason (he is an American McNinja, after all). The fight takes place on a boat that seems to be running through the channels of Venice, passing by the Coliseum guy named Commodus]], along with borrowing indiscriminately from Greek and the Leaning Tower of Pisa.Roman mythology, which end up playing as [[DeusExMachina plot convenience]]






** Speaking of nerds, many of their favorite archetypes are exactly this. [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot Pirates were really armed thieves who boarded trade vessels to steal, kill and take slaves. Ninjas were poor farmers and peasants who revolted against nobility with weaponized farming implements, Zombies were supposedly drugged and brainwashed people used to do manual labor, and most real robots are just the sort of computerized machines that took grandpa's job at the auto plant]]. [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys Monkeys... well, at least they're pretty spot on about monkeys]].
*** Also, the vikings were extremely brutal and terrorist-like in RealLife, and would do vicious, horrific things to women and children with no remorse. There's a ''reason'' why everyone in Europe feared and hated them.
** SteamPunk (and, to a lesser, degree DieselPunk) fans tends to ignore the [[CrapsackWorld dirt, filth and brutality]] of Western cities in their favorite time period.


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** Speaking of nerds, many of their favorite archetypes are exactly this. [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot Pirates were really either armed thieves who boarded trade vessels to steal, kill and take slaves.slaves or poor out of work sailors carving the little fun and enjoyment they can get from life. Ninjas were poor farmers and peasants who revolted against nobility with weaponized farming implements, Zombies were supposedly drugged and brainwashed people used to do manual labor, and most real robots are just the sort of computerized machines that took grandpa's job at the auto plant]]. [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys Monkeys... well, at least they're pretty spot on about monkeys]].
*** ** Also, the vikings were extremely brutal and terrorist-like in RealLife, and would do vicious, horrific things to women and children with no remorse. There's a ''reason'' why everyone in Europe feared and hated them.
**
them. SteamPunk (and, to a lesser, degree DieselPunk) fans tends to ignore the [[CrapsackWorld dirt, filth and brutality]] of Western cities in their favorite time period.

period and the vicious colonialism and looting that happened in the same time, as well as the impact new technology had on the environment.
** Large franchises also tend to judge works in that franchise to itself or its ExpandedUniverse rather than compare it to other books in other genres and other mediums. This is the main reason why CriticalDissonance exists because critics and other writers do look at the work from different lenses.
11th Jan '17 4:05:45 PM JulianLapostat
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* Psychology. Just as much as biology and history, the version of psychology on shows like ''Series/CriminalMinds'', ''Series/{{Bones}}'' and other shows is extremely simplified, misapplied, out of date, or outright wrong. First year psychology classes is usually enough to dispel most of the myths you'd find on TV, but for anything more than a smattering of the various areas in psychology you'd need to take a higher-level course.

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* Psychology. Just as much as biology and history, the Almost everything taught in school textbooks especially below college level is a theme park version of psychology that subject, geared towards accessibility and simple concepts with very little attention given to how practice of said works happens in the modern day:
** Science and mathematics in particular suffer from this. Entry level science and maths is still classical in formulation, teaching children Euclidean geometry, and Newtonian physics, and basic evolutionary theory (except for some parts of America that is where even ''that'' is not taught) in the hope that those who are a little more curious will read deeper and sign on for the real thing in advanced courses and college graduate level, where more or less they have to unlearn their elementary science's broad assumptions. Stephen Hawking's famous book ''A Brief History of Time'' was written for a lay audience precisely to update them about how their basic ideas about science has changed drastically from Newton to Einstein, and even Hawking's book is a theme park (avoiding any scientific equations other than E=MC squared) reduction of more complex phenomenon.
** Psychology is usually not taught at a school level and barely touched on in high school but unfortunately, it has to compete with Popular Psychology and misrepresentations
on shows like ''Series/CriminalMinds'', ''Series/{{Bones}}'' and other shows media works. The idea of psychology most people derive from such works is extremely simplified, misapplied, out of date, or outright wrong. First year Of course complicating the problem is that [[Analysis/AllPsychologyIsFreudian there are many contending theories and ideas about psychology classes is usually enough and each group tends to dispel insult and denounce the other]], making it harder for people to grapple with the truth. The most of the myths you'd find on TV, but for anything more than a smattering of the various areas in psychology you'd need to take a higher-level course.common and pervasive idea is Freudian Psychology and even that is highly misunderstood and distorted.
11th Jan '17 3:35:13 PM JulianLapostat
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* Nothing quite embodies theme park more than the most commonly known and widely produced World Map. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIID5FDi2JQ The Mercator Projection]] was originally devised for the purposes of navigation and as such it reduced the surface of the earth to a flat rectangle and compressed landmasses to reflect ''shape'' rather than ''size'' so as to make coast lines easier to identify and place in relation to each other. The problem is that the Age of Discovery, Exploration and Colonization instituted the map as a symbol reflective of a distorted Eurocentric worldview, and many on seeing the map, both from Western and non-Western countries, come away thinking that Greenland is truly the size of Africa when Africa is huge (It's big enough to hold China, USA and India and still have some space between) and Greenland while big is tiny (slightly smaller than India). It makes Western Europe bigger than it really is, while making India into a tiny triangle when it is in fact bigger than England, France, Germany and Italy combined. New maps and projections have tried to correct it but the Mercator projection still remains thanks to inertia, PopCulturalOsmosis the "image of the world" for many people. Websites like [[http://thetruesize.com/ the true size]] use the Mercator Map to better inform viewers on the gulf between the apparent size of the Mercator Map and the actual size of the particular landmass.

to:

* Nothing quite embodies theme park more than the most commonly known and widely produced World Map. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIID5FDi2JQ The Mercator Projection]] was originally devised for the purposes of navigation and as such it reduced the surface of the earth to a flat rectangle and compressed landmasses to reflect ''shape'' rather than ''size'' so as to make coast lines easier to identify and place in relation to each other. The problem is that the Age of Discovery, Exploration and Colonization instituted the map as a symbol reflective of a distorted Eurocentric worldview, and many on seeing the map, both from Western and non-Western countries, come away thinking that Greenland is truly the size of Africa when Africa is huge (It's big enough to hold China, USA and India and still have some space between) and Greenland while big is tiny much smaller (slightly smaller than India). It makes Western Europe bigger than it really is, while making India into a tiny triangle when it is in fact bigger than England, France, Germany and Italy combined. New maps and projections have tried to correct it but the Mercator projection still remains thanks to inertia, PopCulturalOsmosis the "image of the world" for many people. Websites like [[http://thetruesize.com/ the true size]] use the Mercator Map to better inform viewers on the gulf between the apparent size of the Mercator Map and the actual size of the particular landmass.
11th Jan '17 3:33:02 PM JulianLapostat
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** In English history, Agincourt and Crecy are taught when mentioning UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar while ignoring that the English ultimately lost that war. The former two were striking victories important for England at the time and propagandized by English monarch and dramatists such as Creator/WilliamShakespeare and comics artists such as Creator/WarrenEllis to emphasize ideas of nationalism and class consciousness, greatly distorting and exaggerating the events out of its actual historical context.

to:

** In English history, Agincourt and Crecy are taught when mentioning UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar while ignoring that the English ultimately lost that war. The former two were striking victories important for England at the time and propagandized by English monarch monarchs and dramatists such as Creator/WilliamShakespeare and comics artists such as Creator/WarrenEllis to emphasize ideas of nationalism and class consciousness, greatly distorting and exaggerating the events out of its actual historical context. context.



[[folder: Real Life: Other]]
* Ride/DisneyThemeParks: In 2004, Walt Disney World opened "Disney's Saratoga Springs", a resort inspired by another tourist hot spot, Saratoga Springs, NY (best known for mineral springs, horse racing, proximity to the Adirondack Mountains, and being the tourist destination for rich Victorians from New York City). The resemblance is...extremely superficial. To demonstrate, compare "High Rock Spring", [[http://www.ownerslocker.com/blog/2009/10/the_kiddie_pool_at_disneys_sar.html the Disney version]] (waterfalls and a pool)...and [[http://www.saratoga.com/business/high-rock-spring-10270/ the real one]] (a rock with a spigot covered by a building).[[note]]If they wanted an impressive water feature to emulate, they could have picked the Geyser Island spring in the park...[[/note]]
** Similar to the aforementioned Window of the World, there is Epcot's World Showcase, which features eleven pavilions, each representing the culture of one different country.
** And then there's Disney's California-themed park...in California. It was not well received.
* A ShapedLikeItself version: Ride/SixFlags St. Louis has an area called "1904 World's Fair" (the real thing ''was'' in St. Louis, after all), made up like an old-time carnival and no doubt lacking the safety or health issues that the original may have had.
* [[http://www.bobbejaanland.be/ Bobbejaanland]] is a Belgian theme park, founded by a Belgian country western singer, which proudly presents his idea of the [[TheWildWest American Wild West]] (with a few [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Viking- and Aztec-themed rides]] thrown in). Visiting it as an actual American is a marvelously surreal experience.
** From the same country comes to you the thing known as [[http://www.minieurope.com/nl Mini Europa]]. Anything of it could easily be the image of the wiki.
* Several of Las Vegas' megaresort hotels offer theme park versions of other popular places and/or eras. [[CityOfEverywhere Where else can you visit New York City (New York-New York), Paris, ancient Egypt (Luxor), ancient Rome (Caesars Palace), Monte Carlo, and Venice (The Venetian) in walking distance of each other?]]
* Many large (and usually nerdy) fandoms can be reduced to this by people outside of them.
** Speaking of nerds, many of their favorite archetypes are exactly this. [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot Pirates were really armed thieves who boarded trade vessels to steal, kill and take slaves. Ninjas were poor farmers and peasants who revolted against nobility with weaponized farming implements, Zombies were supposedly drugged and brainwashed people used to do manual labor, and most real robots are just the sort of computerized machines that took grandpa's job at the auto plant]]. [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys Monkeys... well, at least they're pretty spot on about monkeys]].
*** Also, the vikings were extremely brutal and terrorist-like in RealLife, and would do vicious, horrific things to women and children with no remorse. There's a ''reason'' why everyone in Europe feared and hated them.
** SteamPunk (and, to a lesser, degree DieselPunk) fans tends to ignore the [[CrapsackWorld dirt, filth and brutality]] of Western cities in their favorite time period.

to:

[[folder: Real Life: Life - Other]]
* Actual theme parks are themselves theme park distortions of some real place or experience:
**
Ride/DisneyThemeParks: In 2004, Walt Disney World opened "Disney's Saratoga Springs", a resort inspired by another tourist hot spot, Saratoga Springs, NY (best known for mineral springs, horse racing, proximity to the Adirondack Mountains, and being the tourist destination for rich Victorians from New York City). The resemblance is...extremely superficial. To demonstrate, compare "High Rock Spring", [[http://www.ownerslocker.com/blog/2009/10/the_kiddie_pool_at_disneys_sar.html the Disney version]] (waterfalls and a pool)...and [[http://www.saratoga.com/business/high-rock-spring-10270/ the real one]] (a rock with a spigot covered by a building).[[note]]If they wanted an impressive water feature to emulate, they could have picked the Geyser Island spring in the park...[[/note]]
**
[[/note]] Similar to the aforementioned Window of the World, there is Epcot's World Showcase, which features eleven pavilions, each representing the culture of one different country.
**
country. And then there's Disney's California-themed park...in California. It was not well received.
* ** A ShapedLikeItself version: Ride/SixFlags St. Louis has an area called "1904 World's Fair" (the real thing ''was'' in St. Louis, after all), made up like an old-time carnival and no doubt lacking the safety or health issues that the original may have had.
* ** [[http://www.bobbejaanland.be/ Bobbejaanland]] is a Belgian theme park, founded by a Belgian country western singer, which proudly presents his idea of the [[TheWildWest American Wild West]] (with a few [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Viking- and Aztec-themed rides]] thrown in). Visiting it as an actual American is a marvelously surreal experience.
**
experience. From the same country comes to you the thing known as [[http://www.minieurope.com/nl Mini Europa]]. Anything of it could easily be the image of the wiki.
* Several of Since TheEighties, when Las Vegas' Vegas decided to target families rather than seasoned gambler, several of its megaresort hotels offer theme park versions of other popular places and/or eras. [[CityOfEverywhere Where else can you visit New York City (New York-New York), Paris, ancient Egypt (Luxor), ancient Rome (Caesars Palace), Monte Carlo, and Venice (The Venetian) in walking distance of each other?]]
* Many large (and usually nerdy) fandoms can be reduced to this by people outside of them.
** Speaking of nerds, many of their favorite archetypes are exactly this. [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot Pirates were really armed thieves who boarded trade vessels to steal, kill and take slaves. Ninjas were poor farmers and peasants who revolted against nobility with weaponized farming implements, Zombies were supposedly drugged and brainwashed people used to do manual labor, and most real robots are just the sort of computerized machines that took grandpa's job at the auto plant]]. [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys Monkeys... well, at least they're pretty spot on about monkeys]].
*** Also, the vikings were extremely brutal and terrorist-like in RealLife, and would do vicious, horrific things to women and children with no remorse. There's a ''reason'' why everyone in Europe feared and hated them.
** SteamPunk (and, to a lesser, degree DieselPunk) fans tends to ignore the [[CrapsackWorld dirt, filth and brutality]] of Western cities in their favorite time period.
other?]]



** Or Saint Patrick's Day. Just about everyone's forgotten that it's a ''Catholic'' holiday, not just an Irish one.
** Same with Mardi Gras. Purely Catholic, but most of the people enthused with it nowadays are probably from other religions, if they even are religious at all. Some now refer to Mardi Gras as Fat Tuesday. (To be fair, that's just translating the French. Elsewhere, the holiday is very straightforwardly called "Carnival" -- or "farewell to meat," named because Lent was formerly required to be meatless.)
* Many large cities are frequently accused of attempting to become the theme park version of themselves for a wide variety of reasons. This is often associated with gentrification, which sociologists and historians lament often comes at the expense of more colourful and interesting communities. A good example is Paris since the 1960s, where French Presidents tried to install new buildings. The Centre Georges Pompidou, an art gallery, was built on top of the famous covered market of Les Halles, a historical working class district. The construction of the Olympics for London in 2012, led to the destruction of Hackney, another historical working class area.
* A particularly strong example: UsefulNotes/NewOrleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The wealthier, touristy, photogenic parts of the city bounced back much faster than the poor parts of town. This effect was not totally intentional, but some accusations of sinister intent flew. The chief exhibit would be many people who openly pondered whether the storm wasn't a good excuse to tear down most (or all) public housing. The opposing argument being, of course, that these touristy, photogenic parts of the city were where a huge number of the people who lived in the city ''worked'', and the faster they got back on their feet, the sooner money could start coming into the city again.
* This requires fluency in Japanese to see for yourself, but the [[http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usa Japanese Wikipedia article for the USA]] is basically this trope. Bonus points for focusing on mainly the Reagan years and up. Actually, scratch the fluency part. Just look at the pictures: [[{{Eagleland}} stealth bombers, apple pie, football...]]
** But a bald eagle, aircraft carriers, the Statue of Liberty, the Hollywood sign, as well as the aforementioned apple pie, are featured on the English version of the article...
** [[FridgeLogic Now wait a second]]: if we look at the pictures without reading the text to understand the context, wouldn't that give us The Theme Park Version [[{{Irony}} of that very article]]?
** If you have access to Google Translator you can see they label the last part of their history section as weakening of unipolar domination. Our other wiki calls it contemporary era.

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** Or Then there's Saint Patrick's Day. Just about everyone's forgotten that it's a ''Catholic'' holiday, not just an Irish one.
**
one. Same with Mardi Gras. Purely Catholic, but most of the people enthused with it nowadays are probably from other religions, if they even are religious at all. Some now refer to Mardi Gras as Fat Tuesday. (To be fair, that's just translating the French. Elsewhere, the holiday is very straightforwardly called "Carnival" -- or "farewell to meat," named because Lent was formerly required to be meatless.)
* Many large cities are frequently accused of attempting to become the theme park version of themselves for a wide variety of reasons.themselves. This is often associated with gentrification, which sociologists and historians lament often comes at the expense of more colourful and interesting communities.
**
A good example is Paris UsefulNotes/{{Paris}} since the 1960s, where French Presidents tried to install new buildings. The Centre Georges Pompidou, an art gallery, was built on top of the famous covered market of Les Halles, a historical working class district. The construction of the Olympics for London UsefulNotes/{{London}} in 2012, led to the destruction of Hackney, another historical working class area.
*
area. In the case of New York City, a city that in its TheBigRottenApple phase was lamented for its high crime and urban decay ''and'' celebrated for its art, culture and city life (because the high crime made rents cheap), gentrification has made the rents go up and has made the city a billionaires paradise. There's also a darker angle, since Spike Lee notes that property prices of areas increase when white residents move in formerly poor but respected ghettoes (often because they are attracted to the MeltingPot reputation a locale attracted over time) and [[http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2014/02/spike-lee-amazing-rant-against-gentrification.html what Spike Lee derisively labels the Christopher Columbus Syndrome]] which inevitably transforms a region into a shadow of what it once was for the benefit of new settlers.
**
A particularly strong example: UsefulNotes/NewOrleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The wealthier, touristy, photogenic parts of the city bounced back much faster than the poor parts of town. This effect was not totally intentional, but some accusations of sinister intent flew. The chief exhibit would be many people who openly pondered whether the storm wasn't a good excuse to tear down most (or all) public housing. The opposing argument being, of course, that these touristy, photogenic parts of the city were where a huge number of the people who lived in the city ''worked'', and the faster they got back on their feet, the sooner money could start coming into the city again.
* This requires fluency in Japanese to see for yourself, but the [[http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usa Japanese Wikipedia article for the USA]] is basically this trope. Bonus points for focusing on mainly the Reagan years and up. Actually, scratch the fluency part. Just look at the pictures: [[{{Eagleland}} stealth bombers, apple pie, football...]]
** But a bald eagle, aircraft carriers, the Statue of Liberty, the Hollywood sign, as well as the aforementioned apple pie, are featured on the English version of the article...
** [[FridgeLogic Now wait a second]]: if we look at the pictures without reading the text to understand the context, wouldn't that give us The Theme Park Version [[{{Irony}} of that very article]]?
** If you have access to Google Translator you can see they label the last part of their history section as weakening of unipolar domination. Our other wiki calls it contemporary era.
again.


Added DiffLines:


* Many large (and usually nerdy) fandoms can be reduced to this by people outside of them.
** Speaking of nerds, many of their favorite archetypes are exactly this. [[NinjaPirateZombieRobot Pirates were really armed thieves who boarded trade vessels to steal, kill and take slaves. Ninjas were poor farmers and peasants who revolted against nobility with weaponized farming implements, Zombies were supposedly drugged and brainwashed people used to do manual labor, and most real robots are just the sort of computerized machines that took grandpa's job at the auto plant]]. [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys Monkeys... well, at least they're pretty spot on about monkeys]].
*** Also, the vikings were extremely brutal and terrorist-like in RealLife, and would do vicious, horrific things to women and children with no remorse. There's a ''reason'' why everyone in Europe feared and hated them.
** SteamPunk (and, to a lesser, degree DieselPunk) fans tends to ignore the [[CrapsackWorld dirt, filth and brutality]] of Western cities in their favorite time period.

11th Jan '17 3:17:22 PM JulianLapostat
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution as taught in US public schools. The British villain in ''Film/ThePatriot'' was an {{Expy}} of somebody who is remembered for such lovely habits as [[MoralEventHorizon shooting people who are surrendering to him]], when he's not being politely ignored because the US & the UK are friends now.
** Banastre Tarleton received a HistoricalVillainUpgrade in ''The Patriot'' (the claim about him shooting people as they surrendered is at the very least controversial). Meanwhile, the main character in that film is in part an HistoricalHeroUpgrade of Francis Marion, who was at least as unpleasant.
*** The Expy (Tavington) received the villain upgrade, not Tarleton himself, just to clarify. In ''The Patriot'', Tavington does not survive the war while Tarleton went on to a career in politics, as shown in the film ''Film/AmazingGrace''. The Marion expy seemed to be a combination of a few militia leaders rather than just Marion.
** Moreover, the war is frequently (and wrongly) depicted in starkly [[BlackAndWhiteMorality black and white]] terms as a heroic revolt against tyranny. The colonists were extremely divided on the issue of independence and the reasons for the war were... complex.
** This is averted in High School Advanced Placement courses, which go deeper into the complexities of the causes and results of the war and the attitudes on both sides.
* The Great Depression: The stock market crash did not cause the economy to collapse. At most, it was at the time the latest in a string of worsening economical conditions. Additionally, few if any stock brokers threw themselves from windows to their deaths. We have had stock market crashes, including some rather bad (by some estimations, worse than that of 1929, depending on how you consider the numbers) since then which have come in times of both economic bust and boom.
** The New Deal did not singlehandedly end the Depression, nor did Roosevelt fully follow through on his campaign promises. The government investment in social welfare programs and other institutions had more of a political rather than economic function The exact efficacy of the New Deal legislation is the subject of a great deal of partisan political bickering but even pro-Roosevelt economists like Paul Krugman argue that it was America's entry in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII that really restored the economy.
** While many of the programs brought by Roosevelt have remained, some of them such as the Works Projects Administration, ended during the Depression itself, and since that was concerned to employing theatrical artists and performers, as well as folklorists, this has allowed the era to retain an afterglow as GloryDays of political action. Skeptics like Creator/GoreVidal argue that the New Deal was little more than a BreadAndCircuses attempt so as to assuage fears of communist takeover and that it was post-war legislation like the G. I. Bill that had a bigger impact in restructuring the class system then any of the New Deal programs did.
* These days, many museums and tourist guides inevitably promote real nations, monuments and cultures in this way, often to the exclusion of sub-cultures and counter-cultures. The French critic Creator/RolandBarthes noted that during the era of General UsefulNotes/FranciscoFranco, Spanish tourist brochures never discussed Moorish Spain and the Arab influence on Spanish culture and language. He pointed out that in the age of travel, countries generally tend to promote a one-sided and one-dimensional vision of culture to choose as representative of the complex whole.
* Huis Ten Bosch: a Japanese theme park that recreates The Netherlands.
** And even more so with Madurodam, the Dutch theme park version of The Netherlands (in miniature).
* The Window of the World in Shenzhen, China contains scale models and reconstructions of the world's most famous landmarks and tourist attractions. This makes it the Theme Park Version of global tourism.

to:

[[folder:Real Life]]
* UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution as taught in US public schools. The British villain in ''Film/ThePatriot'' was an {{Expy}} of somebody who is remembered for such lovely habits as [[MoralEventHorizon shooting people who are surrendering to him]], when he's not being politely ignored because the US & the UK are friends now.
** Banastre Tarleton received a HistoricalVillainUpgrade in ''The Patriot'' (the claim about him shooting people as they surrendered is at the very least controversial). Meanwhile, the main character in that film is in part an HistoricalHeroUpgrade of Francis Marion, who was at least as unpleasant.
*** The Expy (Tavington) received the villain upgrade, not Tarleton himself, just to clarify. In ''The Patriot'', Tavington does not survive the war while Tarleton went on to a career in politics, as shown in the film ''Film/AmazingGrace''. The Marion expy seemed to be a combination of a few militia leaders rather than just Marion.
** Moreover, the war is frequently (and wrongly) depicted in starkly [[BlackAndWhiteMorality black and white]] terms as a heroic revolt against tyranny. The colonists were extremely divided on the issue of independence and the reasons for the war were... complex.
** This is averted in High School Advanced Placement courses, which go deeper into the complexities of the causes and results of the war and the attitudes on both sides.
* The Great Depression: The stock market crash did not cause the economy to collapse. At most, it was at the time the latest in a string of worsening economical conditions. Additionally, few if any stock brokers threw themselves from windows to their deaths. We have had stock market crashes, including some rather bad (by some estimations, worse than that of 1929, depending on how you consider the numbers) since then which have come in times of both economic bust and boom.
** The New Deal did not singlehandedly end the Depression, nor did Roosevelt fully follow through on his campaign promises. The government investment in social welfare programs and other institutions had more of a political rather than economic function The exact efficacy of the New Deal legislation is the subject of a great deal of partisan political bickering but even pro-Roosevelt economists like Paul Krugman argue that it was America's entry in UsefulNotes/WorldWarII that really restored the economy.
** While many of the programs brought by Roosevelt have remained, some of them such as the Works Projects Administration, ended during the Depression itself, and since that was concerned to employing theatrical artists and performers, as well as folklorists, this has allowed the era to retain an afterglow as GloryDays of political action. Skeptics like Creator/GoreVidal argue that the New Deal was little more than a BreadAndCircuses attempt so as to assuage fears of communist takeover and that it was post-war legislation like the G. I. Bill that had a bigger impact in restructuring the class system then any of the New Deal programs did.
Life - History]]
* These days, many museums and tourist guides inevitably promote real nations, monuments and cultures in this way, often to the exclusion of sub-cultures and counter-cultures. The French critic Creator/RolandBarthes noted that during the era of General UsefulNotes/FranciscoFranco, Spanish tourist brochures never discussed Moorish Spain and the Arab influence on Spanish culture and language. He pointed out that in the age of travel, countries generally tend to promote a one-sided and one-dimensional vision of culture to choose as representative of the complex whole.
* ** The French critic Creator/RolandBarthes noted in his book ''Mythologies'' that during the era of General UsefulNotes/FranciscoFranco, Spanish tourist brochures never discussed Moorish Spain and the Arab influence on Spanish culture and language. He pointed out that in the age of travel, countries generally tend to promote a one-sided and one-dimensional vision of culture to choose as representative of the complex whole, where thanks to the EiffelTowerEffect nations are reduced to a single slew of overexposed monuments (Eiffel Tower - Paris, Taj Mahal - India, Colosseum - Italy) over other more diverse parts of the nation and that tourists are more or less herded to visit and view only parts of a more complex whole.
** There's also the fact that a lot of the major museums of the world (Louvre, British Museum and others) [[https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2014/nov/04/art-worlds-shame-parthenon-elgin-marbles-british-museums got their artifacts from colonialism]] and imperialist looting. This has the double effect. Citizens of former colonies are unable to truly appreciate much of their past since a lot of their cultural heritage is in some far off land too expensive for them to travel and see in person, while citizens in ex-imperial countries have an image of a more complex inter-related world without all the gray stuff removed.
** A reverse trend is that in some parts of Asian countries to make theme park versions of Europe. There's
Huis Ten Bosch: a Japanese theme park that recreates The Netherlands.
** And even more so with
Netherlands and Madurodam, the Dutch theme park version of The Netherlands (in miniature).
*
miniature). There's also The Window of the World in Shenzhen, China contains scale models and reconstructions of the world's most famous landmarks and tourist attractions. This makes it the Theme Park Version of global tourism.tourism and the Chinese film ''The World'' by Jia Zhangke is set in that park dealing with the poignancy that many of its visitors will only have this facsimile of world history as their reference, since they are too poor to go and see the real thing.
* Nothing quite embodies theme park more than the most commonly known and widely produced World Map. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIID5FDi2JQ The Mercator Projection]] was originally devised for the purposes of navigation and as such it reduced the surface of the earth to a flat rectangle and compressed landmasses to reflect ''shape'' rather than ''size'' so as to make coast lines easier to identify and place in relation to each other. The problem is that the Age of Discovery, Exploration and Colonization instituted the map as a symbol reflective of a distorted Eurocentric worldview, and many on seeing the map, both from Western and non-Western countries, come away thinking that Greenland is truly the size of Africa when Africa is huge (It's big enough to hold China, USA and India and still have some space between) and Greenland while big is tiny (slightly smaller than India). It makes Western Europe bigger than it really is, while making India into a tiny triangle when it is in fact bigger than England, France, Germany and Italy combined. New maps and projections have tried to correct it but the Mercator projection still remains thanks to inertia, PopCulturalOsmosis the "image of the world" for many people. Websites like [[http://thetruesize.com/ the true size]] use the Mercator Map to better inform viewers on the gulf between the apparent size of the Mercator Map and the actual size of the particular landmass.
* Some argue that nationalism as an ideology more or less reduces places, events, and persons to theme park-like simplistic reductions and a tendency to present an [[PropagandaPiece official version]] of national history.
** For example, classes in US history can resemble advertisements for the US conservative movement. Events like UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and the "Founding Fathers" are often invoked in America discourse with very little attention paid to context and background and often reduced and caricatured in popular culture (as in Film/ThePatriot). Some elementary and high school history classes focus on the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations[[note]]This might have something to do with the fact that most teachers came of age during one of these administrations. (Other teachers and curriculam somehow manage to never get past the Eisenhower administration, for similar reasons: there's too much risk of parents and school boards objecting to ''any'' possible discussion of the Vietnam War, Watergate, or the Iran hostage crisis.)[[/note]] while almost little or no attention is paid to 19th Century America except for Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt, and the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar much to critic Creator/GoreVidal's distaste (he wrote several novels to rectify this). Important events in American history like the War of 1812, the Trail of Tears, the UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar (which you would think would be taught with more attention, considering that at the end of it, the present day contiguous United States was formed) are glossed over, forgotten or simply ignored.
** Even the study of "world history" is still governed by a eurocentric bias. '''''Any''''' highschool-back history book you read will passingly mention the Middle East, India, Africa, and Asia while focusing on Europe and its struggles. You don't read 12001800-era Chinese, Arabian, or African authors too often, nor do you discuss non-European empires from those eras. Also, North America didn't exist until 1492. Hence why it's the "New World", regardless of how old it actually is. Can you think of any major events in Native American history before Europeans came over that doesn't have to do with doomsday calendars? Or of major scientific inventions and philosophical innovations outside of Europe that don't have to do with algebra, limestone batteries, or gunpowder? Let's just say that if you respond "There are none," you've successfully proved this trope correct.
* Wars are often taught in a very simplistic fashion. It would take the whole school year to get a non-Theme Park version of one war, especially complex events such as the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar, with proper attention paid to geopolitical tensions and other environmental and sociological changes and military technology and tactics. They are also fought and experienced by LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and feature many HeroOfAnotherStory. In movies, popular consciousness, and even in history classes, they usually devolve into a theme park version of a fight between the forces of [[IncorruptiblePurePureness Good]], with some individual, great leaders, generals and soldiers elevated into heroic roles out of proportion to the level of agency they actually possessed during the conflict. Military history is a separate discipline in and of itself and thanks to the PopCulturalOsmosis paid to tropes like DecisiveBattle [[LifeImitatesArt history tends to highlight the exciting parts over the boring parts]] and the importance or lack thereof of battles and war are not given due accord.
** In English history, Agincourt and Crecy are taught when mentioning UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar while ignoring that the English ultimately lost that war. The former two were striking victories important for England at the time and propagandized by English monarch and dramatists such as Creator/WilliamShakespeare and comics artists such as Creator/WarrenEllis to emphasize ideas of nationalism and class consciousness, greatly distorting and exaggerating the events out of its actual historical context.
** Either one of the World Wars could easily eat up all the time allotted to history secondary education. Each nation participating in said conflict tend to focus or emphasize their part in the conflict over a broadly global perspective, mostly for nationalistic reasons. American students as well as international students on account of EaglelandOsmosis and AmericaWinsTheWar, think that both these conflicts were singularly won by America to the detriment of the involvement of other, non-English speaking, nations. Thanks to the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, this has led to the virtual removal from public consciousness of the contribution of the Soviet Union, when they mounted the largest offensive, fought harder, endured greater casualties and the worst war crimes, than the other sides combined and were the ones who liberated the major extermination camps. It was only since the 80s and 90s, that UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust was mentioned or depicted widely. The depictions of the war are still largely shaped by the Western Front, with its images of the Americans and British liberating their future [=NATO=] allies to the detriment of the East and the Pacific. In the case of the Pacific, the experiences of the Chinese, the Burmese, the Indians during the War get little say compared to the naval war of the US on the Pacific.
** Allied propaganda from World War II on all three sides loved to demonize UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler and UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan. The former was made into LaughablyEvil while the latter were shown with crude racist stereotypes. Propaganda is ''never'' meant to educate, but to influence and to stir up emotions, still it has to be mentioned that the British were a colonial empire during the war, the French Resistance used ''their'' colonies as a base and, technically, no more than a liberal military junta rather than legitimate government (most of which had become LesCollaborateurs). American society and its armed forces were segregated, and as for the Soviets, well they were led by "Uncle Joe" Stalin (so-called during the war), who had a few years back conducted mass purges and incompetent collectivization schemes that led to the deaths of three million and who also invaded Poland and Finland alongside Hitler as part of that "Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact" that got swept under the rug. Still, Hitler was a great deal worse than all of them.
* In American film and literature, many Native Americans suffer from this trope. Pick any nation you like, and if you bother to do the research, you will find a complex society with all the trimmings: a working economy, clearly defined values and morals, a deep religion, a highly developed language, and a well-developed justice system. Yet some authors portray Native Americans as backward, childlike people who all talk like Tonto, and others portray them all as a nature-bonded MagicalNativeAmerican stereotype who are mercilessly slaughtered by the brutish white man. It's difficult at times to ascertain which is more offensive.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Real Life: Other]]



* Most of history, especially what you're taught in high school. It would take the whole school year to get a non-Theme Park version of one war, especially complex events such as the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar. Likewise, certain national histories are often taught in a closed-off hermetic fashion without reference to geopolitical tensions and other environmental and sociological changes, while also giving an impression of continuity between old regimes and modern times. This intersects with the tendency to present an [[PropagandaPiece official version]] of national history; for example, classes in US history can resemble advertisements for the US conservative movement.
* Either one of the World Wars could easily eat up all the time allotted to history secondary education. Likewise, American students as well as international students on account of EaglelandOsmosis and AmericaWinsTheWar, think that both these conflicts were singularly won by America to the detriment of the involvement of other, non-English speaking, nations.
** In the case of the Second World War, thanks to the UsefulNotes/ColdWar, this has led to the virtual removal from public consciousness of the contribution of the Soviet Union, when they mounted the largest offensive, fought harder, endured greater casualties and the worst war crimes, than the other sides combined. Likewise, it was only since the 80s and 90s, that UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust was mentioned or depicted widely. The depictions of the war are still largely shaped by the Western Front, with its images of the Americans and British liberating their future [=NATO=] allies to the detriment of the East and the Pacific. In the case of the Pacific, the experiences of the Chinese, the Burmese, the Indians during the War get little say compared to the naval war of the US on the Pacific.
** Allied propaganda from World War II on all three sides loved to demonize UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler and UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan. The former was made into LaughablyEvil while the latter were shown with crude racist stereotypes. Propaganda is ''never'' meant to educate, but to influence and to stir up emotions, still it has to be mentioned that the British were a colonial empire during the war, the French Resistance used ''their'' colonies as a base and, technically, no more than a liberal military junta rather than legitimate government (most of which had become LesCollaborateurs). American society and its armed forces were segregated, and as for the Soviets, well they were led by "Uncle Joe" Stalin (so-called during the war), who had a few years back conducted mass purges and incompetent collectivization schemes that led to the deaths of three million and who also invaded Poland and Finland alongside Hitler as part of that "Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact" that got swept under the rug. Still, Hitler was a great deal worse than all of them.
* Wars. All of them, especially the World Wars. Wars usually have very complex and multiple political, sociological, economical and historical causes, all the sides have their specific goals, intents, virtues and depravities. They are also fought and experienced by LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters and feature many HeroOfAnotherStory. In movies, popular consciousness, and even in history classes, they usually devolve into a theme park version of a fight between the forces of [[IncorruptiblePurePureness Good]], with some individual, great leaders, generals and soldiers elevated into heroic roles out of proportion to the level of agency they actually possessed during the conflict.
* Some elementary and high school history classes focus on the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations. This might have something to do with the fact that most teachers came of age during one of these administrations. (Other teachers and curriculam somehow manage to never get past the Eisenhower administration, for similar reasons: there's too much risk of parents and school boards objecting to ''any'' possible discussion of the Vietnam War, Watergate, or the Iran hostage crisis.)
** President UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy had an administration of three years before his ConspicuouslyPublicAssassination, but thanks to his charismatic personality and relative youth, he is elevated into a more influential figure than he really was. Historians note that it was his successor and Vice President, Lyndon B. Johnson who passed the crucial Civil Rights Bill, that President Nixon took America off the gold standard and built the [=EPA=] while the most important events in Kennedy's administration were policy disasters like the Bay of Pigs invasion, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Cuban Embargo. Yet Kennedy has a bigger role in the public imagination than his record would otherwise suggest.
* Taking World History as a course has The Theme Park Version written all over it, no matter how high up the classes are. The information has to be reduced so much that it winds up being completely inaccurate. For example, "Japan closed off its borders" will probably be the only indication you get of a complex economic, political and cultural decision that can be traced back hundreds of years before the final event.
* In American film and literature, many Native Americans suffer from this trope. Pick any nation you like, and if you bother to do the research, you will find a complex society with all the trimmings: a working economy, clearly defined values and morals, a deep religion, a highly developed language, and a well-developed justice system. Yet some authors portray Native Americans as backward, childlike people who all talk like Tonto, and others portray them all as a nature-bonded MagicalNativeAmerican stereotype who are mercilessly slaughtered by the brutish white man. It's difficult at times to ascertain which is more offensive.
* Critics of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecological_succession Ecological Succession]] (the idea that agricultural land abandoned, or a forest after a devastating fire, passes through a series of defined stages until it becomes a thick forest again) point out that it was originally formulated in Turn-of-the-Century Western Europe, a place where most native large mammals -- which would otherwise keep forests open and make fires less likely by "mowing the lawn" when eating -- had been long exterminated by humans. In other words, our idea of what a natural, unaltered landscape looks like is barely more natural or unaltered than a farm field. It might have more species diversity, but not as much as it originally had.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris_syndrome Paris syndrome]]. Kinda probably, Japanese tourists often go to Paris with an extreme theme park version of that city in their minds, only to discover to their dismay that [[RealityIsUnrealistic the place is much more complex than that]].
* Mexican History. You are taught some during primary school, only to have everything you believed be crushed once you enter middle school and ''especially'' on high school. Remember that incident about that boy who wrapped himself in the flag to stop the American invaders from taking over it? It never happened. Heck, high-school history teachers mostly compare the real facts with what the "official" history says.
* History, period. Most of it comes from a eurocentric background, so '''''any''''' highschool-back history book you read will passingly mention the Middle East, India, Africa, and Asia while focusing on Europe and its struggles. You don't read 12001800-era Chinese, Arabian, or African authors too often, nor do you discuss non-European empires from those eras. Also, North America didn't exist until 1492. Hence why it's the "New World", regardless of how old it actually is. Can you think of any major events in Native American history before Europeans came over that doesn't have to do with doomsday calendars? Or of major scientific inventions and philosophical innovations outside of Europe that don't have to do with algebra, limestone batteries, or gunpowder? Let's just say that if you respond "There are none," you've successfully proved this trope correct.
* Nothing quite embodies theme park more than the most commonly known and widely produced World Map. The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIID5FDi2JQ Mercator Projection]] was originally devised for the purposes of navigation and as such it reduced the surface of the earth to a flat rectangle and compressed landmasses to reflect ''shape'' rather than ''size'' so as to make coast lines easier to identify and place in relation to each other. The problem is that the Age of Discovery, Exploration and Colonization instituted the map as a symbol reflective of a distorted Eurocentric worldview, and many on seeing the map, both from Western and non-Western countries, come away thinking that Greenland is truly the size of Africa when Africa is huge (It's big enough to hold China, USA and India and still have some space between) and Greenland while big is tiny (slightly smaller than India). It makes Western Europe bigger than it really is, while making India into a tiny triangle when it is in fact bigger than England, France, Germany and Italy combined. New maps and projections have tried to correct it but the Mercator projection still remains thanks to inertia, PopCulturalOsmosis the "image of the world" for many people. Websites like [[http://thetruesize.com/ use the Mercator Map to better inform]] viewers on the gulf between the apparent size of the Mercator Map and the actual size of the particular landmass.
11th Jan '17 2:27:07 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Nothing quite embodies theme park more than the most commonly known and widely produced World Map. The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIID5FDi2JQ Mercator Projection]] was originally devised for the purposes of navigation and as such it reduced the surface of the earth to a flat rectangle and compressed landmasses to reflect ''shape'' rather than ''size'' so as to make coast lines easier to identify and place in relation to each other. The problem is that the Age of Discovery, Exploration and Colonization instituted the map as a symbol reflective of a distorted Eurocentric worldview, and many on seeing the map, both from Western and non-Western countries, come away thinking that Greenland is truly the size of Africa when Africa is huge (It's big enough to hold China, USA and India and still have some space between) and Greenland while big is tiny (slightly smaller than India). It makes Western Europe bigger than it really is, while making India into a tiny triangle when it is in fact bigger than England, France, Germany and Italy combined. New maps and projections have tried to correct it but the Mercator projection still remains thanks to inertia, PopCulturalOsmosis the "image of the world" for many people. Websites like [[http://thetruesize.com/ use the Mercator Map to better inform]] viewers on the gulf between the apparent size of the Mercator Map and the actual size of the particular landmass.
11th Jan '17 2:11:12 PM gaimanite.pkat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* History, period. Most of it comes from a eurocentric background, so '''''any''''' highschool-back history book you read will passingly mention the Middle East, India, Africa, and Asia while focusing on Europe and its struggles. You don't read 12001800-era Chinese, Arabian, or African authors too often, nor do you discuss non-European empires from those eras. Also, North America didn't exist until 1492. Hence why it's the "New World", regardless of how old it actually is. Can you think of any major events in Native American history before Europeans came over that doesn't have to do with doomsday calendars? Or of major scientific inventions and philosophical innovations outside of Europe that don't have to do with algebra, limestone batteries, or gunpowder? Let's just say that if you respond "There are none," you've successfully proved this trope correct, and are probably a white supremacist.

to:

* History, period. Most of it comes from a eurocentric background, so '''''any''''' highschool-back history book you read will passingly mention the Middle East, India, Africa, and Asia while focusing on Europe and its struggles. You don't read 12001800-era Chinese, Arabian, or African authors too often, nor do you discuss non-European empires from those eras. Also, North America didn't exist until 1492. Hence why it's the "New World", regardless of how old it actually is. Can you think of any major events in Native American history before Europeans came over that doesn't have to do with doomsday calendars? Or of major scientific inventions and philosophical innovations outside of Europe that don't have to do with algebra, limestone batteries, or gunpowder? Let's just say that if you respond "There are none," you've successfully proved this trope correct, and are probably a white supremacist.correct.
This list shows the last 10 events of 173. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheThemeparkVersion