History Main / TheRoaringTwenties

7th Apr '17 3:59:45 PM nombretomado
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One should also note that while things were just swell in America, Britain and (to a lesser extent) much of Western Europe (where it was dubbed TheGoldenTwenties across ThePond), if you were in an area hard hit by UsefulNotes/WorldWarI (say, [[WeimarRepublic Germany]], [[UsefulNotes/FascistItaly Italy]], Russia, Turkey or the entire Caucasus Mountains region... before the Soviets annexed it) this was ''not'' a fun time. However, it doesn't mean that they didn't try, once they were able to pull themselves together again. But in Germany, there are rightwing paramilitary groups who have some very grand ambitions and there will be a few people who get a chilling feeling that [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler one loudmouth Austrian with a toothbrush mustache]] is going to be very big trouble.

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One should also note that while things were just swell in America, Britain and (to a lesser extent) much of Western Europe (where it was dubbed TheGoldenTwenties across ThePond), UsefulNotes/ThePond), if you were in an area hard hit by UsefulNotes/WorldWarI (say, [[WeimarRepublic [[UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic Germany]], [[UsefulNotes/FascistItaly Italy]], Russia, Turkey or the entire Caucasus Mountains region... before the Soviets annexed it) this was ''not'' a fun time. However, it doesn't mean that they didn't try, once they were able to pull themselves together again. But in Germany, there are rightwing paramilitary groups who have some very grand ambitions and there will be a few people who get a chilling feeling that [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler one loudmouth Austrian with a toothbrush mustache]] is going to be very big trouble.
6th Feb '17 9:15:36 AM alnair20aug93
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* "[[TheFlapper Flapper]]" and her "Dapper" - a girl and her dad.

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* "[[TheFlapper Flapper]]" "Flapper" and her "Dapper" - a girl young woman and her dad.


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** OdessaSteps: While the mass shooting during the Russian Revolution of 1905 [[ArtisticLicense never happened]], this was the SignatureScene for ''Film/TheBattleshipPotemkin'' , and it had been paid homage ever since.
17th Jan '17 4:14:41 AM thewhitefairy
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* ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''
14th Jan '17 3:46:44 PM jormis29
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* ''Film/LiveByNight''


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* ''Literature/LiveByNight'' (pub. 2012)
1st Jan '17 4:00:21 PM RAraya
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For more information about the decade see the [[UsefulNotes/TheRoaringTwenties Useful Notes]] page.
11th Dec '16 10:48:44 AM RAraya
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Dresses are short and so is ladies' hair. Bobbed hair had actually emerged earlier, around 1915, and was popularized during the late 1910s out of convenience during [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI the war]], as well as through the earlier 1920s. Hemlines gradually rose from ankle to calf-length during the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI First World War]] and to knee-length by 1925. Hosiery and high heels were on display, and younger women sometimes rolled down the tops of their stockings and applied rouge to their knees. Despite those costumes you buy these days, most dresses were not fringed or figure-hugging, and above-the-knee hemlines were nonexistent for grown women at any time. Dresses had boxy and boyish silhouettes, dropped waists and were minimally or highly decorated depending on the occasion. Women's hat styles included a head-hugging shape called a cloche (after the French word for "bell").

to:

Dresses are short and so is ladies' hair. Bobbed hair had actually emerged earlier, around 1915, and was popularized during the late 1910s out of convenience during [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI the war]], as well as through the earlier 1920s. Hemlines gradually rose from ankle to calf-length during the [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI First World War]] and to knee-length by 1925. Hosiery and high heels were on display, and younger women sometimes rolled down the tops of their stockings and applied rouge to their knees. Despite those costumes you buy these days, most dresses were not fringed or figure-hugging, and above-the-knee hemlines were nonexistent for grown women at any time. Dresses had boxy and boyish silhouettes, dropped waists and were minimally or highly decorated depending on the occasion. Women's hat styles included a head-hugging shape called a cloche ''cloché'' (after the French word for "bell").



Meanwhile, the African American community started to finally gain its voice in American culture. Many black Southerners moved to Northern cities during the 1910's and the early part of this decade, leading to the emergence of a black middle class. Harlem, a neighborhood in New York City, was the most famous African American community, and so many of the most famous African American writers, artists, and musicians were based there that many historians call this period the Harlem Renaissance. Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and other famous authors wrote stories that captured the African American experience and were read by millions, and {{Jazz}} started to spread throughout the country when white people realized that Music/LouisArmstrong and Music/DukeEllington and the others sounded really awesome. This trend would continue in the 1930s, leading to Big Band and Swing music. Such progress had its limits, though: lynchings continued, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) enjoyed a peak in membership, and while African-American Creator/JosephineBaker became a big star in Paris, she faced racial hostility in America. Meanwhile, intellectuals of the community, such as W. E. B. Du Bois, planted the seeds of what would eventually become the CivilRightsMovement.

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Meanwhile, the African American community started to finally gain its voice in American culture. Many black Southerners moved to Northern cities during the 1910's and the early part of this decade, leading to the emergence of a black middle class. Harlem, a neighborhood in New York City, was the most famous African American community, and so many of the most famous African American writers, artists, and musicians were based there that many historians call this period the Harlem Renaissance. Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and other famous authors wrote stories that captured the African American experience and were read by millions, and {{Jazz}} started to spread throughout the country when white people realized that Music/LouisArmstrong and Music/DukeEllington and the others sounded really awesome. This trend would continue in the 1930s, leading to Big Band and Swing music. Such progress had its limits, though: lynchings continued, the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) enjoyed a resurgence beginning in 1915, reaching a peak in membership, membership in 1925 before a fast decline, and while African-American Creator/JosephineBaker became a big star in Paris, she faced racial hostility in America. Meanwhile, intellectuals of the community, such as W. E. B. Du Bois, [=DuBois=], planted the seeds of what would eventually become the CivilRightsMovement.



[[UsefulNotes/TheSilentAgeOfHollywood Silent films]] became an art medium of their own with classic films like ''Film/TheWind'' and ''Film/{{Metropolis}}'' setting new heights for screen drama and the great silent comedians like Creator/CharlieChaplin, Creator/HaroldLloyd and Creator/BusterKeaton gaining enormous popularity, along with fellow film stars Creator/ClaraBow, Creator/RudolphValentino and child actors Creator/BabyPeggy and Creator/JackieCoogan. The fact that they didn't have sound meant that movies still hadn't killed off {{Vaudeville}} or MinstrelShows just yet, but the advent of talkies late in the decade finished the job, however. Radio progressed quickly through the last of its experimental phases and was firmly established as a mass-market medium by the end of the decade (including radios in cars, brought to you by some lowly company called Motorola), also establishing what is now known as "popular music" in the process. Sports became items of true passion with star slugger Babe Ruth, portentous pugilist Jack Dempsey, pigskin powerhouse Red Grange, golfing great Bobby Jones and others became heroes for the common man. Basketball, golf, pool and hockey also gained popularity, and bowling became a popular informal sport decades before becoming a [[BowlingForRatings sitcom staple]].

Magazines and newspapers enjoyed a booming circulation, including plenty of tabloids (New York had the ''Daily News'', the ''Mirror'' and the ''[[LuridTalesOfDoom Evening Graphic]]'', not that the broadsheets like the ''World'', the ''American'' or the ''Evening Journal'' were too objective) to fill everybody in on sensational trials in New York, graphic pictures of shootouts in Chicago, the scandalous doings of celebrities in Hollywood, and the typical tales of daring people sitting in poles for several hours. Magazines were subject to new ideas such as investigative reporting and the digesting of articles of different magazines into a single publication. Lurid "dime novels" printed on pulp were also very popular. Meanwhile, ultra-low-def mechanical television had brief success with early adopters (essentially beta-testing it) before TheGreatDepression killed it off by the mid-'30s. The advent of (relatively) high-definition all-electronic TV would have to wait until [[TheForties another postwar]] [[TheFifties prosperity boom]].

During all this, of course, the relics of TheGayNineties and TheEdwardianEra, now doughty dowagers and grumpy old Colonels, look on disapprovingly, condemning everything from [[DangerouslyShortSkirt short skirts]] and [[TwentiesBobHaircut hair]], to [[UncannyValleyMakeUp make-up]] and [[BarelyThereSwimwear swimming]] [[RhymesOnADime wear]]. Of course, the "Bright Young Things" weren't really listening, and since those killjoys were among the ones who thought Prohibition and [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI that not-so-great Great War]] were such good ideas, who could blame them? The new-fangled movies took a lot of the heat, as much for the off-screen antics of the stars [[Creator/FattyArbuckle (paging Mr. Arbuckle)]] as for the films' content. That said, resentments against immigrants (most prominently towards Jews and Catholics) played a part in a time when the Irish-Catholic Al Smith faced bigoted attacks on his religion during his failed bid for the U.S. presidency in 1928[[note]]Herbert Hoover got the biggest landslide ever in that election (Washington and Monroe ran without opposition)[[/note]]. Many studio execs were immigrants, Jewish/Catholic, ''[[BreadEggsBreadedEggs or both]]'', and critics charged they were intentionally corrupting America's youth with their films. [[MoralGuardians Local censorship boards]] threatened to make life impossible for the studio bosses, who started thinking [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode that guy who ran the Post Office]] might be able to help.

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[[UsefulNotes/TheSilentAgeOfHollywood Silent films]] became an art medium of their own with classic films like ''Film/TheWind'' and ''Film/{{Metropolis}}'' setting new heights for screen drama and the great silent comedians like Creator/CharlieChaplin, Creator/HaroldLloyd and Creator/BusterKeaton gaining enormous popularity, along with fellow film stars Creator/ClaraBow, Creator/RudolphValentino and child actors Creator/BabyPeggy and Creator/JackieCoogan. The fact that they didn't have sound meant that movies still hadn't killed off {{Vaudeville}} or MinstrelShows just yet, but the advent of talkies late in the decade beginning with ''Film/TheJazzSinger'' finished the job, however.however, as well as it killed the careers of many silent actors. Radio progressed quickly through the last of its experimental phases and was firmly established as a mass-market medium by the end of the decade (including radios in cars, brought to you by some lowly company called Motorola), also establishing what is now known as "popular music" in the process. Sports became items of true passion with star slugger Babe Ruth, portentous pugilist Jack Dempsey, pigskin powerhouse Red Grange, golfing great Bobby Jones and others became heroes for the common man. Basketball, golf, pool and hockey also gained popularity, and bowling became a popular informal sport decades before becoming a [[BowlingForRatings sitcom staple]].

Magazines and newspapers enjoyed a booming circulation, including plenty of tabloids (New York had the ''Daily News'', the ''Mirror'' and the ''[[LuridTalesOfDoom Evening Graphic]]'', not that the broadsheets like the ''World'', the ''American'' or the ''Evening Journal'' were too objective) to fill everybody in on sensational divorce trials in New York, graphic pictures of shootouts in Chicago, the scandalous doings of celebrities in Hollywood, and the typical tales of daring people sitting in poles for several hours. Magazines were subject to new ideas such as investigative reporting and the digesting of articles of different magazines into a single publication. Lurid "dime novels" printed on pulp were also very popular. Meanwhile, ultra-low-def mechanical television had brief success with early adopters (essentially beta-testing it) before TheGreatDepression killed it off by the mid-'30s. The advent of (relatively) high-definition all-electronic TV would have to wait until [[TheForties another postwar]] [[TheFifties prosperity boom]].

During all this, This came at a time when the progressivism of TheGildedAge embodied by UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt and UsefulNotes/WoodrowWilson was replaced by a new conservative order led by Republican Presidents UsefulNotes/WarrenGHarding (1921-23), UsefulNotes/CalvinCoolidge (1923-29) and UsefulNotes/HerbertHoover (1929-33), while the Democratic party became dominated by Southern conservatives. There were fears Bolshevism would take over the world if the League of Nations consolidated or if those impish immigrants, those undesirable unions or that pesky Pope with the protocols would undermine the free enterprise system among other American values.

Of
course, the relics of TheGayNineties and TheEdwardianEra, now doughty dowagers and grumpy old Colonels, look on disapprovingly, condemning everything from [[DangerouslyShortSkirt short skirts]] and [[TwentiesBobHaircut hair]], to [[UncannyValleyMakeUp make-up]] and [[BarelyThereSwimwear swimming]] [[RhymesOnADime wear]]. Of course, the "Bright Young Things" weren't really listening, and since those killjoys were among the ones who thought Prohibition and [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI that not-so-great Great War]] were such good ideas, who could blame them? The new-fangled movies took a lot of the heat, as much for the off-screen antics of the stars [[Creator/FattyArbuckle (paging Mr. Arbuckle)]] as for the films' content. That said, resentments against immigrants (most prominently towards Jews and Catholics) played a part in a time when the Irish-Catholic Al Smith faced bigoted attacks on his religion during his failed bid for the U.S. presidency in 1928[[note]]Herbert Hoover got the biggest landslide ever in that election (Washington and Monroe ran without opposition)[[/note]].

Many studio execs were immigrants, Jewish/Catholic, ''[[BreadEggsBreadedEggs or both]]'', and critics charged they were intentionally corrupting America's youth with their films. [[MoralGuardians Local censorship boards]] threatened to make life impossible for the studio bosses, who started thinking [[UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode that guy who ran the Post Office]] might be able to help.



** The first {{Exploitation Film}}s also came out around this time, presented as "educational" fare. However many of them were just excuses to [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar display more explicit content (namely nudity)]] than the major studios yet allowed at the time (this being the pre-Code era).

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** The first {{Exploitation Film}}s also came out around this time, presented as "educational" fare.fare, often presented by a "Professor" or a [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate "Doctor"]]. However many of them were just excuses to [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar display more explicit content (namely nudity)]] than the major studios yet allowed at the time (this being the pre-Code era).
20th Nov '16 2:24:36 PM contrafanxxx
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* ''VideoGame/ElViento''
16th Oct '16 8:27:15 PM rmctagg09
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* ''LightNovel/TaishoBaseballGirls''

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* ''LightNovel/TaishoBaseballGirls''''LightNovel/TaishoBaseballGirls'' - Takes place in 1925
7th Oct '16 7:33:39 PM Twiddler
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* ''VisualNovel/SpeakeasyTonight''
30th Sep '16 11:13:20 PM Cinereous
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* ''Anime/NinetyOneDays''

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* ''Anime/NinetyOneDays''''Anime/NinetyOneDays'' - Opens in 1921, and the main story takes place in 1928.
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