History Main / TheRedStapler

13th Jun '18 6:47:02 AM PaulA
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* A horrifying example: ''Film/{{The Birth of a Nation|1915}}'' singlehandedly revived the Ku Klux Klan after decades of dormancy. The movie was based on a book called ''The Clansman,'' which contained the first example of a man burning a cross. Two weeks after ''The Birth of a Nation'' premiered, someone burned a cross atop Stone Mountain, and an old tradition was invented. Is it any wonder the film's reputation has fallen into oblivion?

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* A horrifying example: ''Film/{{The Birth of a Nation|1915}}'' singlehandedly revived the Ku Klux Klan after decades of dormancy. The movie was based on a book called ''The Clansman,'' which contained the first example of a man burning a cross. Two weeks after ''The Birth of a Nation'' premiered, someone burned a cross atop Stone Mountain, and an old tradition was invented. Is it any wonder the film's reputation has fallen into oblivion?
13th Jun '18 1:47:46 AM LaptopGuy
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* A horrifying example: ''Film/{{The Birth of a Nation|1915}}'' singlehandedly revived the Ku Klux Klan after decades of dormancy. The movie was based on a book called ''The Clansman,'' which contained the first example of a man burning a cross. Two weeks after ''The Birth of a Nation'' premiered, someone burned a cross atop Stone Mountain, and an old tradition was invented.

to:

* A horrifying example: ''Film/{{The Birth of a Nation|1915}}'' singlehandedly revived the Ku Klux Klan after decades of dormancy. The movie was based on a book called ''The Clansman,'' which contained the first example of a man burning a cross. Two weeks after ''The Birth of a Nation'' premiered, someone burned a cross atop Stone Mountain, and an old tradition was invented. Is it any wonder the film's reputation has fallen into oblivion?



* The 1960 teen comedy ''Where the Boys Are'', about a group of college girls who head down to Fort Lauderdale, UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} for spring break, is frequently credited with both popularizing the spring break tradition in the United States and with the emergence of Fort Lauderdale as America's number one spring break destination. The latter lasted until 1985, when a [[WackyFratboyHijinx particularly out-of-control]] spring break sparked [[http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4335&context=etd a massive backlash]] from locals and the mayor that saw the event driven out of the city.

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* The 1960 teen comedy ''Where the Boys Are'', about a group of college girls who head down to Fort Lauderdale, UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} for spring break, is frequently credited with both popularizing the spring break tradition in the United States and States, with the emergence of Fort Lauderdale as America's number one spring break destination.destination, and with helping the Miami area rapidly grow in size. The latter lasted until 1985, when a [[WackyFratboyHijinx particularly out-of-control]] spring break sparked [[http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4335&context=etd a massive backlash]] from locals and the mayor that saw the event driven out of the city.
10th Jun '18 8:17:22 AM XDiakos
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** The makers of Dr. Pepper itself have noticed this, and later launched an [[https://www.famitsu.com/news/201804/25156370.html official collaboration]] with the sequel series ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate0''.
31st May '18 5:10:39 AM jormis29
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* Music/BrooksAndDunn's 1992 hit "Boot Scootin' Boogie", a song about line-dancing, sparked a renewed interest in line-dancing that lasted well into the late 1990s. The craze even inspired another song which lampshaded the sudden increase Shenandoah's "If Bubba Can Dance (I Can Too)", which was inspired by a comment that one of the writers made after seeing a commercial for line-dancing lessons.

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* Music/BrooksAndDunn's 1992 hit "Boot Scootin' Boogie", a song about line-dancing, sparked a renewed interest in line-dancing that lasted well into the late 1990s. The craze even inspired another song which lampshaded the sudden increase Shenandoah's Music/{{Shenandoah}}'s "If Bubba Can Dance (I Can Too)", which was inspired by a comment that one of the writers made after seeing a commercial for line-dancing lessons.
26th May '18 2:22:24 PM Pichu-kun
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If a work increases demand for another work, that's the ColbertBump; if it changes demand for a song, that's RevivalByCommercialization. If it increases demand for a pet, that's PetFadStarter. If a name becomes popular because of a work, that's BabyNameFadStarter. The opposite of this trope is AluminumChristmasTrees, where something real but outlandish is shown in fiction and people think it must be fictional.

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If a work increases demand for another work, that's the ColbertBump; if it changes demand for a song, that's RevivalByCommercialization. If it increases demand for a pet, that's PetFadStarter. If a name becomes popular because of a work, that's BabyNameFadStarter.BabyNameTrendStarter. The opposite of this trope is AluminumChristmasTrees, where something real but outlandish is shown in fiction and people think it must be fictional.
26th May '18 2:21:28 PM Pichu-kun
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If a work increases demand for another work, that's the ColbertBump; if it changes demand for a song, that's RevivalByCommercialization. If it increases demand for a pet, that's PetFadStarter. The opposite of this trope is AluminumChristmasTrees, where something real but outlandish is shown in fiction and people think it must be fictional.

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If a work increases demand for another work, that's the ColbertBump; if it changes demand for a song, that's RevivalByCommercialization. If it increases demand for a pet, that's PetFadStarter. If a name becomes popular because of a work, that's BabyNameFadStarter. The opposite of this trope is AluminumChristmasTrees, where something real but outlandish is shown in fiction and people think it must be fictional.



* Thanks to the popularity of ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', and Elsa in particular, [[http://www.babycentre.co.uk/a25009957/mid-year-results-babycentre-top-20-boys-and-girls-names-of-2014-emily-and-oliver-top-the-chart Elsa's name broke into the Top 100 names for baby girls in the UK]].
** In Japan, the names Anna and Rin (which means cold) [[http://en.rocketnews24.com/2015/11/13/japans-top-baby-names-in-2015-will-naruto-influenced-monickers-still-reign-supreme/ were two of the top 10 baby names for two years in a row]] as a result of this movie. Rin could have also had some ''Franchise/LoveLive'' influence, as one of the most popular characters is Rin Hoshizora.
* The name Riley was one of the top 10 girls' baby names of 2016 thanks to ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'', which was released the year before, having a protagonist with that name.



* There was a huge spike in sales of heart-shaped sunglasses after they were featured in the movie poster for Creator/StanleyKubrick's 1962 adaption of ''Film/{{Lolita}}''. It even had a positive effect on the name "Lolita" itself, which had fallen out of popularity but had a small resurgence following the film's release. In ''Lolita'' itself, the girl is actually named [[MeaningfulName Dolores]], variously nicknamed Dolly, Lo or Lola, and Lolita was the pseudo-intellectual Humbert's "fancy" nickname for her.

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* There was a huge spike in sales of heart-shaped sunglasses after they were featured in the movie poster for Creator/StanleyKubrick's 1962 adaption of ''Film/{{Lolita}}''. It even had a positive effect on the name "Lolita" itself, which had fallen out of popularity but had a small resurgence following the film's release. In ''Lolita'' itself, the girl is actually named [[MeaningfulName Dolores]], variously nicknamed Dolly, Lo or Lola, and Lolita was the pseudo-intellectual Humbert's "fancy" nickname for her.



** "Shirley" was an uncommon and exclusively masculine name until Creator/CharlotteBronte's novel ''Shirley'' was published in 1849. The eponymous character is an independent heiress, and her name is intended to be a TomboyishName, being what her parents would have named a boy had they got one like they wanted. It would stay primarily a (rather rare) boy's name until Shirley Temple became famous. Then it became a popular girl's name, reaching No. 1 in popularity in 1935. Male Shirleys are now thin on the ground.



* "Madison" as a first name was almost nonexistent when the movie ''Film/{{Splash}}'' was made, and was mostly a boy's name when it did appear. Then after the film's mermaid picked up the name, it exploded in popularity as a girl's name, reaching [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ the top ten in girls' names]] in the U.S. in 1997, staying there over a decade and a half, even reaching second for two years, before dropping to eleventh in 2015. (It also reappeared as a boys' name after ''Splash'' was released, but never attained the explosive popularity that it did as a girls' name.) In the film itself, it was a LineOfSightName taken from a street sign; Creator/TomHanks' character's immediate reaction is "That's not a name!"
* After ''Film/TheOmen1976'' came out, the name Damien [[http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/ experienced a slight decline]] in popularity, but it did get a one-day spike among children born on [[NumberOfTheBeast June 6, 2006]] -- which, not coincidentally, was also the release date of [[Film/TheOmen2006 the remake]].
* The name "Emma" jumped ([[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ from thirteenth to fourth place]]) upon the release of ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone]]'' with Creator/EmmaWatson.
* The name "Jennifer" received a boost with the release of ''Film/LoveStory'', becoming the single most common female given name in the United States for the years 1970-1984, where it had previously been relatively uncommon. Then it happened in Spanish. ''Love Story'' (and the many works that followed it) briefly made Jennifer a popular name in Spain, where it didn't exist in ''any'' form, and where before Franco's death, it was extremely discouraged to use non-standard (read: non-Catholic) names.
* While the boy's name Kevin had become quite popular in Germany the years before, it reached its peak as the most common name in 1991 after the release of ''Film/HomeAlone'' and stayed very high in popularity for about 10 more years.



** The names "Isabella", "Edward" and "Jacob" were popular before ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' was published. Still, they saw a significant boost, as did "Renesmee". Despite being invented by Creator/StephenieMeyer, in 2010 ''fifty-five'' baby girls in the US were given that name in real life.



* Millions of baby girls were named Alice after the success of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Literature/AliceInWonderland''.
* J. M. Barrie's ''Literature/PeterPan'' popularized the name Wendy so much after its release, that he is often erroneously credited with ''inventing'' the name. It's really a very obscure nickname for Gwendolyn.
* Since the 1960s, naming your child after a character from Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has been something of a trend for aging hippies, nerds, and passively sadist parents. "Galadriel" has been in the US popular name list since 1969.
* Scottish poet James [=MacPherson=] (173696) [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiona invented the name Fiona.]]



* The name "Pamela" was invented for a book, ''Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded''. This generated one of the first entertainment marketing booms, with ''Pamela'' towels, dishes, playing cards, stationery, etc. ''In 1740.''
* The name "Svetlana" was invented by a Russian poet and popularized by another in the early 1800s. It's still hugely popular today, both in Russia and outside it, and is even used as the Russian translation of a Greek saint's name. "Svetlana" wasn't a nonsense word, though; "svet" means light, and it's a little like naming your daughter "Radiance" or something. The closest English equivalent would be Helen.
* The name Dylan experienced a surge in popularity during the run of ''Series/BeverlyHills90210''.
* The Brazilian SoapOpera ''Escrava Isaura'' was extremely popular in Poland, and caused a number of young girls to be named Isaura.



** The name "Amelia" has experienced a recent surge in popularity, coming as high as #1 in the U.K. and #12 in the U.S. for girls. [[http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2013/03/the-pond-effect-amelia-is-britains-top-baby-name-for-girls/ The reason seems to be one character:]] Amelia Jessica "Amy" Pond.



** Meta example: Thanks to Creator/NichelleNichols, who played Uhura, there were spikes in popularity of the name Nichelle as a baby name.



* In the 1980s, the names Crystal[[note]]in a variety of invented spellings, like the show's own "Krystle"[[/note]], Alexis, and Dominique became popular for girls in the USA thanks to the {{Rich Bitch}}es of ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
* The name "Emma" exploded in popularity after Rachel of ''Series/{{Friends}}'' gave the name to her daughter.
* From ''Series/SexAndTheCity'', Carrie's rugged puppy Aidan seems to have inspired a resurgence in that name (and its variant Aiden).
* ''Series/FamilyTies'' led to "Mallory" being a popular girls' name, even though it was almost completely non-existent prior to the show (and was basically a last name adopted into a first name). Unlike "Madison", which came about under similar circumstances, "Mallory" died out quickly after the show ended.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' made Castiel the fasting growing name for boys in 2010.
* ''Series/TrueBlood'' made Sookie the fastest growing name for girls in 2010.
* The popularity of ''Series/GameOfThrones'' led to many baby girls named "Arya" and "Khaleesi". Funny that the latter is actually a title for Daenerys Targaryen, not a proper name in the series itself.
** The show also heavily boosted tourism in all shooting locations, particularly Spain, Croatia and Northern Ireland

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* In the 1980s, the names Crystal[[note]]in a variety of invented spellings, like the show's own "Krystle"[[/note]], Alexis, and Dominique became popular for girls in the USA thanks to the {{Rich Bitch}}es of ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
* The name "Emma" exploded in popularity after Rachel of ''Series/{{Friends}}'' gave the name to her daughter.
* From ''Series/SexAndTheCity'', Carrie's rugged puppy Aidan seems to have inspired a resurgence in that name (and its variant Aiden).
* ''Series/FamilyTies'' led to "Mallory" being a popular girls' name, even though it was almost completely non-existent prior to the show (and was basically a last name adopted into a first name). Unlike "Madison", which came about under similar circumstances, "Mallory" died out quickly after the show ended.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' made Castiel the fasting growing name for boys in 2010.
* ''Series/TrueBlood'' made Sookie the fastest growing name for girls in 2010.
* The popularity of
''Series/GameOfThrones'' led to many baby girls named "Arya" and "Khaleesi". Funny that the latter is actually a title for Daenerys Targaryen, not a proper name in the series itself.
** The show also
heavily boosted tourism in all shooting locations, particularly Spain, Croatia and Northern Ireland



* The name "Kayleigh" was popularized in the U.K. after it appeared in a 1985 hit single of the same name by the British ProgressiveRock band Music/{{Marillion}}; the name itself was derived from "Kay Lee", an ex-girlfriend of singer Derek "Fish" Dick.
* In 2000, Sonny Sandoval, the frontman of Music/{{POD}} and a born-again Christian, gave his daughter the unusual name of Nevaeh, which is "heaven" [[SdrawkcabName spelled backwards]]. By 2007, Nevaeh had become the 31st most popular name for baby girls in the United States, with most of this popularity coming from evangelical Christian parents. A few years later, more parents, apparently having heard the name but not knowing its derivation, or being appallingly lax in spell-checking birth certificate forms, began naming their daughters "Neveah".
* Baby name databases don't seem to have any data for the name [[http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Tevin Tevin]] before 1990, but it peaks in popularity in 1992 (top 200). In between those two years, an R&B singer named Tevin Campbell had released his debut album and scored several hits off it, and his popularity resulted in many baby boys being given his uncommon first name.
* The Australian singer-songwriter John Williamson created a song about a tomboy whose father nicknamed her Cydy (short for sidekick). It is now an official (if still mostly uncommon) Australian girl name.
* R&B singer {{Music/Aaliyah}} caused the name Aaliyah to suddenly explode in popularity in the mid-90s, along with its many variations. The name had originated in the Middle East (deriving from the Arabic ''`Alīyā[='=]'', which is, roughly, the feminine form of ''`Alī'' and means "elevated," "exalted," or "noble") but became more associated in the African American and Latino communities after the popularity of the singer.
* The ''Music/BackstreetBoys'' popularity in Mexico caused many boys around that time to be named Kevin or Brian (often spelled as "Brayan").



* The name "Jennifer" became hugely popular in the United Kingdom after Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw gave it to the female lead in his 1906 play ''The Doctor's Dilemma''.



* With so many ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', treating every Pokémon equally in regards to official merchandise is nearly impossible. What ends up happening is that sales of a particular Pokémon's merchandise correlates strongly with which ones are showing up in other media, mostly the [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} anime]]. It's not as predictable as you'd think, though; while the super-cute (Pichu, Jigglypuff) and the super-cool (Charizard, Zekrom) have had their runs, even weird Pokémon like [[http://sunyshore.com/electric_fishies_maggyozukan.shtml Stunfisk]] get theirs.

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':
**
With so many ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'', treating every Pokémon equally in regards to official merchandise is nearly impossible. What ends up happening is that sales of a particular Pokémon's merchandise correlates strongly with which ones are showing up in other media, mostly the [[Anime/{{Pokemon}} anime]]. It's not as predictable as you'd think, though; while the super-cute (Pichu, Jigglypuff) and the super-cool (Charizard, Zekrom) have had their runs, even weird Pokémon like [[http://sunyshore.com/electric_fishies_maggyozukan.shtml Stunfisk]] get theirs.



* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'':
** The name "Zelda" had been out of vogue for decades by the time the [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI first game]] came out. Now it's a fairly common name thanks to the perennial popularity of the series.
** The massive success of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' resulted in a massive spike in ocarina sales, specifically potato ocarinas like the one used in the game. Music stores sold out of ocarinas and couldn't keep up with demand. Many kids were disappointed when they asked for an ocarina and got something like [[http://www.grapevineroad.org/images/5%20note%20ocarina-01.jpg this]]. To this day, Renaissance Fairs still sell baby-blue transverse ocarinas, usually with a Triforce-like sign to indicate them. Songbird Ocarinas was the first to do that; they ran ads in ''Magazine/NintendoPower'' for at least ''12 years'' up until its cancellation (from 1999 to 2012).

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* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'':
** The name "Zelda" had been out of vogue for decades by the time the [[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI first game]] came out. Now it's a fairly common name thanks to the perennial popularity of the series.
**
''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'': The massive success of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' resulted in a massive spike in ocarina sales, specifically potato ocarinas like the one used in the game. Music stores sold out of ocarinas and couldn't keep up with demand. Many kids were disappointed when they asked for an ocarina and got something like [[http://www.grapevineroad.org/images/5%20note%20ocarina-01.jpg this]]. To this day, Renaissance Fairs still sell baby-blue transverse ocarinas, usually with a Triforce-like sign to indicate them. Songbird Ocarinas was the first to do that; they ran ads in ''Magazine/NintendoPower'' for at least ''12 years'' up until its cancellation (from 1999 to 2012).



* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' may have been responsible for the name "Patrick" steadily declining in popularity since the early 2000s. It used to be one of the top 50 most popular boys names in the United States--but as of 2017, its only in the top ''200''. Understandably, not many millennial parents want to name their sons after an overweight, dimwitted pink starfish.
** Because of Squidward playing one, more children have been playing clarinets.
* Similarly, the name Peter dropped the most it ever had in history in 2000, the year after the premiere of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. It's had a steady decline since.
* ''WesternAnimation/PawPatrol'': In 2016, the names Chase and Skyler [[note]]often shortened to Skye[[/note]] made the top 100 baby names due to them being the names of two of the show's most popular characters.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' may have been responsible for the name "Patrick" steadily declining in popularity since the early 2000s. It used to be one of the top 50 most popular boys names in the United States--but as of 2017, its only in the top ''200''. Understandably, not many millennial parents want to name their sons after an overweight, dimwitted pink starfish.
**
''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'': Because of Squidward playing one, more children have been playing clarinets.
* Similarly, the name Peter dropped the most it ever had in history in 2000, the year after the premiere of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. It's had a steady decline since.
* ''WesternAnimation/PawPatrol'': In 2016, the names Chase and Skyler [[note]]often shortened to Skye[[/note]] made the top 100 baby names due to them being the names of two of the show's most popular characters.
clarinets.



* The popularity of "Katrina" as a name for baby girls [[http://www.babynamewizard.com/namipedia/girl/katrina increased slightly]] after the 2005 storm, possibly due to the name being endlessly repeated in the media, possibly as a statistical blip. The [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ following years]] saw Katrina fall rapidly in popularity.



* After Barack Obama became President in 2009, bringing his daughters Malia and Sasha into the public eye, the name Maliyah was the [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/07/malia-obama-first-daughte_n_567776.html fastest growing name in popularity in 2009]], and the name Sasha also jumped in popularity.
* Prior to the rise of pop culture, the best way to get people to name your kids after you was to conquer them. As an example, prior to 1066, nearly everyone in England had solid Old English names like Edwin, Edgar or Athelstan. Once William the Conqueror made the aristocracy Norman French, things changed, and soon nearly everyone was called William, Richard, Robert, Henry or Hugh. Ironically, because the Normans were originally Vikings (hence "Nor(se)man") all five of those names are of Germanic origin.
26th May '18 2:32:34 AM RedScharlach
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** Creator/WillSmith helped sales of Ray-Ban RB 2030 - Predator 8 Wrap shades after ''Film/MenInBlack''. Ray-Ban tried to do it again with the anachronistic shades worn by Smith in ''Film/WildWildWest'', but it didn't work nearly as well.

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** Creator/WillSmith helped sales of Ray-Ban RB 2030 - Predator 8 Wrap shades after ''Film/MenInBlack''. Ray-Ban tried to do it again with the anachronistic shades worn by Smith in ''Film/WildWildWest'', but it didn't work nearly as well.



* In 1923, when the Broadway musical ''Runnin' Wild'' started playing a unusual yet lively piano stride number, it started a national sensation. And adding it with energetic dance kicks, TheRoaringTwenties DanceSensation ''Charleston'' was born. The play was then almost forgotten, making it an early example of a BreakawayPopHit.

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* In 1923, when the Broadway musical ''Runnin' Wild'' started playing a an unusual yet lively piano stride number, it started a national sensation. And adding it with energetic dance kicks, TheRoaringTwenties DanceSensation ''Charleston'' was born. The play was then almost forgotten, making it an early example of a BreakawayPopHit.



* A bizarre meta example: In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'', one of the social links involves playing a online MMO themed around the ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series. The character involved in the link mentions that the MMO does not have a lot of players and is dying. Cue the {{Defictionalization}} into ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIMAGINE'', a game based on the ''Shin Megami Tensei'' series where, following a very obscure release and some very bad choices on the developer's part, one of the most frequent complaints until it finally shut down in 2016 was that the game does not have a lot of players and is dying.

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* A bizarre meta example: In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'', one of the social links involves playing a an online MMO themed around the ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series. The character involved in the link mentions that the MMO does not have a lot of players and is dying. Cue the {{Defictionalization}} into ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIMAGINE'', a game based on the ''Shin Megami Tensei'' series where, following a very obscure release and some very bad choices on the developer's part, one of the most frequent complaints until it finally shut down in 2016 was that the game does not have a lot of players and is dying.
17th May '18 11:26:16 AM AndIntroducingALeg
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* In 2006, Britain's already scandal-hit Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott found himself in even bigger trouble when he treated himself to an afternoon off to enjoy a game of croquet. Bad news for him, as it ultimately cost him his grace-and-favour mansion, but good news for manufacturers of croquet sets which suddenly came into greater demand than they had for decades.
15th May '18 9:06:12 PM ZombieAladdin
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* Mention of Wensleydale cheese in each of the ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' caused a spike in sales of that cheese, which at the point of the release of ''WesternAnimation/AGrandDayOut'' had been on the verge of discontinuation due to low sales. So grateful the dairy farmers were for saving Wensleydale cheese that Wallace and Gromit would continue to appear on packaging for Wensleydale cheese well into the early 2010s.
15th May '18 9:05:25 PM ZombieAladdin
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* Mention of Wensleydale cheese in each of the ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' caused a spike in sales of that cheese, which at the point of the release of ''WesternAnimation/AGrandDayOut'' had been on the verge of discontinuation due to low sales. So grateful the dairy farmers were for saving Wensleydale cheese that Wallace and Gromit would continue to appear on packaging for Wensleydale cheese well into the early 2010s.
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