History Main / TheRedStapler

11th Dec '17 3:57:32 AM flaktrooper
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* ''VideoGame/KantaiCollection'' has also increased the sales of ship model kits in addition to its own action figures. Previously, there were not many buyers for less well known ship models; most collectors will only get famous ones like Yamato. Demands of less known ship models rose significantly as the game increase in popularity with many collectors looking for model kits of cruisers and destroyers as well instead of just the famous ones. Even more so now with other games like ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarships'' in tow.
5th Dec '17 1:34:10 PM Kadorhal
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** Big name [=LPers=] are able to bring spikes in popularity to otherwise unknown franchises. LetsPlay/{{Chuggaaconroy}}, for example, has helped the popularity of relatively unknown games like ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}''[[note]]At the time he began his Let's Plays of the game, at any rate.[[/note]]
** Indie developers have lately begun exploiting this by giving well-known Internet personalities permission to LP their games shortly after their initial release. Website/SomethingAwful, the place Let's Play began at, even had to remove its rule about not LP'ing a game until three months after it came out because of the number of indie/early access titles people wanted to show off.

to:

** Big name [=LPers=] are able to bring spikes in popularity to otherwise unknown franchises. LetsPlay/{{Chuggaaconroy}}, for example, has helped the popularity of what were at the time relatively unknown games like ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}''[[note]]At the time he began his Let's Plays of the game, at any rate.[[/note]]
''VideoGame/{{Xenoblade}}''.
** Indie developers have lately begun exploiting this by giving well-known Internet personalities permission to LP their games shortly after their initial release. Website/SomethingAwful, the place Let's Play began at, even had to remove its rule about not LP'ing a game until three months after it came out because of the number of indie/early access titles people wanted to and were being given early permission to show off.
3rd Dec '17 9:20:19 PM PaulA
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* French SpaceOpera comic-book ''ComicBook/{{Valerian}}'' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valérian_and_Laureline#Laureline invented the name Laureline]] for the female protagonist. It is not an unheard name for French women today.



[[folder:Comics]]
* French SpaceOpera comic-book ''ComicBook/{{Valerian}}'' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valérian_and_Laureline#Laureline invented the name Laureline]] for the female protagonist. It is not an unheard name for French women today.
[[/folder]]
3rd Dec '17 9:19:39 PM PaulA
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[[folder:Baby Names]]
One of the most common manifestations of this trope is for baby names; prospective parents will often get ideas from works that are popular around that time. But because this trope relies so much on trends, this runs the risk of the kid's name becoming [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece embarrassingly dated]]. And sometimes, the opposite happens, when [[OneMarioLimit an already common baby name's popularity drops due to being associated with a character in the media]].
* "Madison" as a first name was almost nonexistent when the movie ''Film/{{Splash}}'' was made, and was mostly a boy's name when it did appear. Then after the film's mermaid picked up the name, it exploded in popularity as a girl's name, reaching [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ the top ten in girls' names]] in the U.S. in 1997, staying there over a decade and a half, even reaching second for two years. (It dropped to eleventh in 2015.) But what's particularly HilariousInHindsight is that in the film itself, it was a LineOfSightName taken from a street sign; Creator/TomHanks' character's immediate reaction is "That's not a name!"
** See [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Madison the Urban Dictionary's characterization of a "Madison"]] as a surprising secondary consequence of the name's popularity.
** Madison was in the top 1000 boys' names during the first half of the 20th Century, before vanishing from the radar. It reappeared as a boys' name after ''Splash'' was released, and even reached its prior levels of popularity, before vanishing again from the radar at the turn of the millennium. As a boys' name, it never attained the explosive popularity that it did as a girls' name.
* The name "Kayleigh" was popularized in the U.K. after it appeared in a 1985 hit single of the same name by the British ProgressiveRock band Music/{{Marillion}}; the name itself was derived from "Kay Lee", an ex-girlfriend of singer Derek "Fish" Dick.
* Millions of baby girls were named Alice after the success of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Literature/AliceInWonderland''.
* J. M. Barrie's ''Literature/PeterPan'' popularized the name Wendy so much after its release, that he is often erroneously credited with ''inventing'' the name. It's really a very obscure nickname for Gwendolyn.
* Since the 1960s, naming your child after a character from J.R.R.Tolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has been something of a trend for aging hippies, nerds, and passively sadist parents. "Galadriel" has been in the US popular name list since 1969.
* Scottish poet James [=MacPherson=] (1736–96) [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiona invented the name Fiona.]]
* The Polish/Lithuanian name "Grażyna" was invented by the poet Adam Mickiewicz for his narrative poem ''Grażyna, A Lithuanian story''. It's derived from the Lithuanian word ''graži'', meaning "beautiful", and it was widespread in Poland up until around the 1980s.
* "Shirley" was an uncommon and exclusively masculine name until Creator/CharlotteBronte's novel ''Shirley'' was published in 1849. The eponymous character is an independent heiress, and her name is intended to be a TomboyishName, being what her parents would have named a boy had they got one like they wanted. It would stay primarily a (rather rare) boy's name until Shirley Temple became famous. Then it became a popular girl's name, reaching No. 1 in popularity in 1935. Male Shirleys are now thin on the ground. Indeed, one of the most iconic jokes in the film ''Airplane'' — "don't call me Shirley" — is entirely dependent on Shirley being a female name.
* The name "Pamela" was invented for a book, ''Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded''. This generated one of the first entertainment marketing booms, with ''Pamela'' towels, dishes, playing cards, stationery, etc. ''In 1740.''
* "Adolf/Adolph" was already a respectable and popular boy's name when it became big in the thirties, when most Germans still liked UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler. Then after [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII the war]], it rapidly [[OneMarioLimit fell into decline]] (along with his [[GoodHairEvilHair trademark facial hair]]). Many little Adolphs born around then would have rough childhoods, and Germany even allowed people named Adolph to circumvent otherwise tight regulation and change their names if they wanted. One famous "Adolf" born in this period was Adolf Dassler, who spun his name into the name of his company, Adidas.
* The popularity of "Katrina" as a name for baby girls [[http://www.babynamewizard.com/namipedia/girl/katrina increased slightly]] after the 2005 storm, possibly due to the name being endlessly repeated in the media, possibly as a statistical blip. The [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ following years]] saw Katrina fall rapidly in popularity.
* In 2000, Sonny Sandoval, the frontman of Music/{{POD}} and a born-again Christian, gave his daughter the unusual name of Nevaeh, which is "heaven" [[SdrawkcabName spelled backwards]]. By 2007, Nevaeh had become the 31st most popular name for baby girls in the United States, with most of this popularity coming from evangelical Christian parents. A few years later, more parents, apparently having heard the name but not knowing its derivation, or being appallingly lax in spell-checking birth certificate forms, began naming their daughters "Neveah".
* After ''Film/TheOmen1976'' came out, the name Damien [[http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/ experienced a slight decline]] in popularity, but it did get a one-day spike among children born on [[NumberOfTheBeast June 6, 2006]] -- which, not coincidentally, was also the release date of [[Film/TheOmen2006 the remake]].
* In 1918, Italian general Armando Diaz signed the Victory Address, a short document meant to inform the population of the victory against Austria in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. It was shown in schools, barracks, and town halls, and many children were required to memorize it. The Address ended with the words "firmato: Diaz" (signed: Diaz), which led many to think that "firmato" ("signed") was his name. In the following years, many children were baptized with that name.

to:

[[folder:Baby Names]]
One of
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* The German comic ''ComicBook/{{Werner}}'' heavily [[ProductPlacement featured]]
the most common manifestations of this trope is for baby names; prospective parents will often get ideas beer from works that are popular around that time. But because this trope relies so much on trends, this runs the risk of the kid's name becoming [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece embarrassingly dated]]. And sometimes, the opposite happens, when [[OneMarioLimit an already common baby name's popularity drops due to then-small Flensburger brewery, which was obscure even in its home in northern Germany. It was known for being associated with a character in among the media]].
* "Madison" as a first name was almost nonexistent
last few German beer brands sold in swing-top bottles. Then, when the movie ''Film/{{Splash}}'' was made, and was mostly a boy's name when it did appear. Then after the film's mermaid picked up the name, it exploded in popularity as a girl's name, reaching [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ the top ten in girls' names]] in the U.S. in 1997, staying there over a decade and a half, even reaching second for two years. (It dropped to eleventh in 2015.) But what's particularly HilariousInHindsight is that in the film itself, it was a LineOfSightName taken from a street sign; Creator/TomHanks' character's immediate reaction is "That's not a name!"
** See [[http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Madison the Urban Dictionary's characterization of a "Madison"]] as a surprising secondary consequence of the name's popularity.
** Madison was in the top 1000 boys' names during the first half of the 20th Century, before vanishing from the radar. It reappeared as a boys' name after ''Splash'' was released, and even reached its prior levels of popularity, before vanishing again from the radar at the turn of the millennium. As a boys' name, it never attained the explosive popularity that it did as a girls' name.
* The name "Kayleigh" was popularized in the U.K. after it appeared in a 1985 hit single of the same name by the British ProgressiveRock band Music/{{Marillion}}; the name itself was derived from "Kay Lee", an ex-girlfriend of singer Derek "Fish" Dick.
* Millions of baby girls were named Alice after the success of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Literature/AliceInWonderland''.
* J. M. Barrie's ''Literature/PeterPan''
comic popularized the brand, it got so popular in Germany that the brewery had trouble keeping up demand. Then Werner made his own beer in the sixth book, which would be {{Defictionaliz|ation}}ed (and stopped the free advertising for Flensburger).
* Admit it, you've wanted a "Fuck Communism" Zippo ever since you saw on in ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}.'' Well, it may not be licensed, but [[http://www.cellphoneflasks.com/fuck-communism-zippo-lighter.html here you go]].
* The ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' Wiki calls it the Bludgeon Effect: the franchise has many more toys created than there are characters in the TV show, so that means the ExpandedUniverse has a ''big'' source of new characters that still feel authentic. The
name Wendy so refers to Bludgeon, a relatively minor character who became Decepticon leader late in the Marvel Comics run and stayed a prominent character in subsequent series -- much after its release, that he is often erroneously credited with ''inventing'' more so than his unpopular toy line would even have indicated. This most commonly happens to characters [[ComicBook/TheTransformersIDW the name. It's really a very obscure nickname for Gwendolyn.
* Since the 1960s, naming your child after
IDW comics]] use to good effect; their toys' value online will skyrocket. The biggest beneficiary of this was not Bludgeon, but Ironfist, a character from J.R.R.Tolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has who had never been something of used in a trend story until a single appearance in an IDW comic and a Fun Publications comic. Good luck getting your hands on an intact version [[CrackIsCheaper for aging hippies, nerds, and passively sadist parents. "Galadriel" has been in the US popular name list since 1969.
* Scottish poet James [=MacPherson=] (1736–96) [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiona invented the name Fiona.
less than $100.]]
* The Polish/Lithuanian name "Grażyna" was invented by the poet Adam Mickiewicz for his narrative poem ''Grażyna, A Lithuanian story''. It's derived from the Lithuanian word ''graži'', meaning "beautiful", and it was widespread in Poland up until around the 1980s.
* "Shirley" was an uncommon and exclusively masculine name until Creator/CharlotteBronte's novel ''Shirley'' was published in 1849. The eponymous character is an independent heiress, and her name is intended to be a TomboyishName, being what her parents would have named a boy had they got one like they wanted. It would stay primarily a (rather rare) boy's name until Shirley Temple became famous. Then it became a popular girl's name, reaching No. 1 in popularity in 1935. Male Shirleys are now thin on the ground. Indeed, one of the most iconic jokes in the film ''Airplane'' — "don't call me Shirley" — is entirely dependent on Shirley being a female name.
* The name "Pamela" was invented for a book, ''Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded''. This generated one of the first entertainment marketing booms, with ''Pamela'' towels, dishes, playing cards, stationery, etc. ''In 1740.''
* "Adolf/Adolph" was already a respectable and popular boy's name when it became big in the thirties, when most Germans still liked UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler. Then after [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII the war]], it rapidly [[OneMarioLimit fell into decline]] (along with his [[GoodHairEvilHair trademark facial hair]]). Many little Adolphs born around then would have rough childhoods, and Germany even allowed people named Adolph to circumvent otherwise tight regulation and change their names if they wanted. One famous "Adolf" born in this period was Adolf Dassler, who spun his name into the name of his company, Adidas.
* The popularity of "Katrina" as a name for baby girls [[http://www.babynamewizard.com/namipedia/girl/katrina increased slightly]] after the 2005 storm, possibly due to the name being endlessly repeated in the media, possibly as a statistical blip. The [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ following years]] saw Katrina fall rapidly in popularity.
* In 2000, Sonny Sandoval, the frontman of Music/{{POD}} and a born-again Christian, gave his daughter the unusual name of Nevaeh, which is "heaven" [[SdrawkcabName spelled backwards]]. By 2007, Nevaeh had become the 31st most popular name for baby girls in the United States, with most of this popularity coming from evangelical Christian parents. A few years later, more parents, apparently having heard the name but not knowing its derivation, or being appallingly lax in spell-checking birth certificate forms, began naming their daughters "Neveah".
* After ''Film/TheOmen1976'' came out, the name Damien [[http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/ experienced a slight decline]] in popularity, but it did get a one-day spike among children born on [[NumberOfTheBeast June 6, 2006]] -- which, not coincidentally, was also the release date of [[Film/TheOmen2006 the remake]].
* In 1918, Italian general Armando Diaz signed the Victory Address, a short document meant to inform the population of the victory against Austria in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. It was shown in schools, barracks, and town halls, and many children were required to memorize it. The Address ended with the words "firmato: Diaz" (signed: Diaz), which led many to think that "firmato" ("signed") was his name. In the following years, many children were baptized with that name.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comics]]



* The names "Isabella", "Edward" and "Jacob" were popular before ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' was published. Still, they saw a significant boost, as did "Renesmee". Despite being invented by Creator/StephenieMeyer, in 2010 ''fifty-five'' baby girls in the US were given that name in real life. As a Podcast/RiffTrax Live! event once put it: "The most popular baby names for 2009 were Bella and Jacob. [[TakeThat For Shame.]]"
* In the 1980s, the names Crystal[[note]]in a variety of invented spellings, like the show's own "Krystle"[[/note]], Alexis, and Dominique[[note]]in America at least, as it has long been common in France[[/note]] became popular for girls thanks to the {{Rich Bitch}}es of ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
* The name "Emma" exploded in popularity after Rachel of ''Series/{{Friends}}'' gave the name to her daughter. It also jumped ([[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ from thirteenth to fourth place]]) upon the release of ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone]]'' with Creator/EmmaWatson.
* From ''Series/SexAndTheCity'', Carrie's rugged puppy Aidan seems to have inspired a resurgence in that name (and its variant Aiden).
* ''Series/FamilyTies'' led to "Mallory" being a popular girls' name, even though it was almost completely non-existent prior to the show (and was basically a last name adopted into a first name). Unlike "Madison", which came about under similar circumstances, "Mallory" died out quickly after the show ended.
* Zig-zagged with "Mercedes", for English-speaking countries. It was a girl's name first, a Spanish title for the Virgin Mary, "Our Lady of Mercy". The luxury car manufacturer was named after the eldest daughter of one of its dealers/directors, Emil Jellinek. However, its use nowadays is more likely to be inspired by the glamorous connotations from the car company rather than the religious figure.
* "Jennifer":
** The name was originally an obscure Cornish variant of "Guinevere", but it became hugely popular in the United Kingdom after Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw gave it to the female lead in his 1906 play ''The Doctor's Dilemma''. It received a further boost with the release of ''Film/LoveStory'', becoming the single most common female given name in the United States for the years 1970-1984, where it had previously been relatively uncommon.
** Then it happened in Spanish. ''Love Story'' (and the many works that followed it) briefly made Jennifer a popular name in Spain, where it didn't exist in ''any'' form, and where before Franco's death, it was extremely discouraged to use non-standard (read: non-Catholic) names. It got so prevalent that for a while the easiest way to depict a woman as the Spanish equivalent of [[LowerClassLout trailer trash]] was to have her calling her daughter "Jennifer" in a loud and heavily accented voice ("CHÉNIFEEEEEEE").
* [[Series/{{Supernatural}} Castiel]] was the fasting growing name for boys in 2010. [[Series/TrueBlood Sookie]] was for the girls.
* The Obamas caused this in 2009. The name Maliyah (Malia is Obama's daughter's name) was the [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/07/malia-obama-first-daughte_n_567776.html fastest growing name in popularity in 2009]], and the name Sasha (his other daughter's name) also jumped in popularity.
* While the boy's name Kevin had become quite popular in Germany the years before, it reached its peak as the most common name in 1991 after the release of ''Film/HomeAlone'' and stayed very high in popularity for about 10 more years. Unfortunately the popularity was mostly restricted to the ''Unterschicht'', which is the German equivalent of white trash, and the name became the stereotypical name for all kids of such a background. The exact same thing happened in France. This is an awkward case of ValuesDissonance, since in the Anglosphere it's just an ordinary name with no connotations one way or the other.
* Baby name databases don't seem to have any data for the name [[http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Tevin Tevin]] before 1990, but it peaks in popularity in 1992 (top 200). In between those two years, an R&B singer named Tevin Campbell had released his debut album and scored several hits off it, and his popularity resulted in many baby boys being given his uncommon first name.
* The name "Svetlana" was invented by a Russian poet and popularized by another in the early 1800s. It's still hugely popular today, both in Russia and outside it, and is even used as the Russian translation of a Greek saint's name. "Svetlana" wasn't a nonsense word, though; "svet" means light, and it's a little like naming your daughter "Radiance" or something. The closest English equivalent would be Helen.
* The Australian singer/guitar player John Williamson created a song about a tomboy whose father nicknamed her Cydy (short for sidekick). It is now an official (if still mostly uncommon) Australian girl name.
* The name "Osama" became very popular in some parts of the Muslim world in late 2001 and for several years thereafter. In other parts, its popularity went down. And in still other parts nothing changed, because "Osama" is actually a pretty common name in many Muslim countries -- it's traditional and has a long history (it's one of several Arabic names meaning "lion").
* The name "Amelia" has experienced a recent surge in popularity, coming as high as #1 in the U.K. and #12 in the U.S. for girls. [[http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2013/03/the-pond-effect-amelia-is-britains-top-baby-name-for-girls/ The reason seems to be one character:]] ''Series/DoctorWho'''s Amelia Jessica "Amy" Pond.
* The popularity of the series ''Series/GameOfThrones'' led to many baby girls named "Arya" and "Khaleesi". Funny that the latter is actually a title for Daenerys Targaryen, not a proper name in the series itself.
* Prior to the rise of pop culture, the best way to get people to name your kids after you was to conquer them. As an example, prior to 1066, nearly everyone in England had solid Old English names like Edwin, Edgar or Athelstan. Once William the Conqueror made the aristocracy Norman French, things changed, and soon nearly everyone was called William, Richard, Robert, Henry or Hugh. Ironically, because the Normans were originally Vikings (hence "Nor(se)man") all five of those names are of Germanic origin.

to:

[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* The names "Isabella", "Edward" and "Jacob" were popular before ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' was published. Still, they saw ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' movies created a significant boost, as did "Renesmee". Despite being invented by Creator/StephenieMeyer, in 2010 ''fifty-five'' baby girls in huge demand for many of the US were given toys it featured.
** It raised demand for simple plastic green army men so much
that name several companies started cashing in real life. As a Podcast/RiffTrax Live! event once put it: "The most popular baby names for 2009 were Bella on it with [[VideoGame/ArmyMen video games]] and Jacob. [[TakeThat For Shame.]]"
* In the 1980s, the names Crystal[[note]]in a variety of invented spellings, like the show's own "Krystle"[[/note]], Alexis, and Dominique[[note]]in America at least, as it has long been common in France[[/note]] became popular for girls thanks to the {{Rich Bitch}}es of ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
* The name "Emma" exploded in popularity after Rachel of ''Series/{{Friends}}'' gave the name to her daughter. It
such.
** {{Franchise/Barbie}} dolls
also jumped ([[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ from thirteenth to fourth place]]) upon the release of ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone]]'' with Creator/EmmaWatson.
* From ''Series/SexAndTheCity'', Carrie's rugged puppy Aidan seems to have inspired
got a resurgence in that name (and its variant Aiden).
* ''Series/FamilyTies'' led to "Mallory" being a popular girls' name, even though it was almost completely non-existent prior to the show (and was basically a last name adopted into a first name). Unlike "Madison", which came about under similar circumstances, "Mallory" died out quickly after the show ended.
* Zig-zagged with "Mercedes", for English-speaking countries. It was a girl's name first, a Spanish title for the Virgin Mary, "Our Lady of Mercy". The luxury car manufacturer was named after the eldest daughter of one of its dealers/directors, Emil Jellinek. However, its use nowadays is more likely to be inspired by the glamorous connotations
boost from the car second film, although Mattel's paranoia almost prevented this from happening. Creator/{{Pixar}} had wanted to use Barbie in the first movie, but Mattel said no, objecting to her being used as a [[Franchise/{{Terminator}} Sarah Connor]]-esque badass. Then Mattel saw how the toys the movie ''did'' feature got a sales boost (particularly Mr. Potato Head), and they were only too happy to see Barbie used in the second and third movies (with something of a compromise in personality).
** The Slinky
company rather than the religious figure.
* "Jennifer":
** The name was originally an obscure Cornish variant of "Guinevere", but it became hugely popular in the United Kingdom after Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw gave it to the female lead in his 1906 play ''The Doctor's Dilemma''. It received a further boost with the release of ''Film/LoveStory'', becoming the single most common female given name in the United States for the years 1970-1984, where it
had previously been relatively uncommon.
** Then it happened in Spanish. ''Love Story'' (and
taken the many works that followed it) briefly made Jennifer a popular name in Spain, where it didn't exist in ''any'' form, and where Slinky Dog off the market years before Franco's death, ''Toy Story''. They brought it was extremely discouraged to use non-standard (read: non-Catholic) names. It got so prevalent that for a while the easiest way to depict a woman as the Spanish equivalent of [[LowerClassLout trailer trash]] was to have her calling her daughter "Jennifer" back in a loud and heavily accented voice ("CHÉNIFEEEEEEE").
* [[Series/{{Supernatural}} Castiel]] was
modified version because of the fasting growing name for boys in 2010. [[Series/TrueBlood Sookie]] was for the girls.
* The Obamas caused this in 2009. The name Maliyah (Malia is Obama's daughter's name) was the [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/07/malia-obama-first-daughte_n_567776.html fastest growing name in popularity in 2009]], and the name Sasha (his other daughter's name) also jumped in popularity.
movie.
* While declining sales caused the boy's name Kevin had become quite popular in Germany last of the years before, it reached its peak as the most common name in 1991 after the release of ''Film/HomeAlone'' and stayed very high in popularity for about 10 more years. Unfortunately the popularity was mostly restricted to the ''Unterschicht'', creameries which is manufacture the German equivalent of white trash, and centuries-old Wensleydale cheese to teeter on the name became the stereotypical name for all kids edge of such a background. The exact same thing happened in France. This is an awkward case of ValuesDissonance, since in the Anglosphere it's just an ordinary name with no connotations one way or the other.
* Baby name databases don't seem to have any data for the name [[http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Tevin Tevin]] before 1990, but it peaks in popularity in 1992 (top 200). In between those two years, an R&B singer named Tevin Campbell had released his debut album and scored several hits off it, and his popularity resulted in many baby boys being given his uncommon first name.
* The name "Svetlana" was invented by a Russian poet and popularized by another
closure in the early 1800s. It's still hugely '90s, Wensleydale received a chance mention in the popular today, both in Russia and outside it, and is even used as ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' shorts. Noticing the Russian translation increased interest, the creamery persuaded Creator/AardmanAnimations to endorse a ''Wallace & Gromit''-branded cheese, which worked to rebuild Wensleydale into a thriving product worldwide. The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinking_Bishop_cheese Stinking Bishop cheese]] is also featured in a plot-critical moment in ''WesternAnimation/TheCurseOfTheWereRabbit''; sales of this niche culinary product rose by 500% after the film was released.
* Ever since ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' came out, real life carnival booths stocking real life Fluffy Unicorns have become
a Greek saint's name. "Svetlana" wasn't common sight.
** More kids have been eating bananas as
a nonsense word, though; "svet" means light, and snack since it's a little like naming your daughter "Radiance" or something. The closest English equivalent would be Helen.
* The Australian singer/guitar player John Williamson created a song about a tomboy whose father nicknamed her Cydy (short for sidekick). It is now an official (if still mostly uncommon) Australian girl name.
* The name "Osama" became very popular in some parts of
the Muslim world in late 2001 and for several years thereafter. In other parts, its popularity went down. And in still other parts nothing changed, because "Osama" is actually a pretty common name in many Muslim countries -- it's traditional and has a long history (it's one of several Arabic names meaning "lion").
* The name "Amelia" has experienced a recent surge in popularity, coming as high as #1 in the U.K. and #12 in the U.S. for girls. [[http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2013/03/the-pond-effect-amelia-is-britains-top-baby-name-for-girls/ The reason seems to be one character:]] ''Series/DoctorWho'''s Amelia Jessica "Amy" Pond.
* The popularity of the series ''Series/GameOfThrones'' led to many baby girls named "Arya" and "Khaleesi". Funny that the latter is actually a title for Daenerys Targaryen, not a proper name in the series itself.
* Prior to the rise of pop culture, the best way to get people to name your kids after you was to conquer them. As an example, prior to 1066, nearly everyone in England had solid Old English names like Edwin, Edgar or Athelstan. Once William the Conqueror made the aristocracy Norman French, things changed, and soon nearly everyone was called William, Richard, Robert, Henry or Hugh. Ironically, because the Normans were originally Vikings (hence "Nor(se)man") all five of those names are of Germanic origin.
Minions' TrademarkFavoriteFood.



* The name Dylan experienced a surge in popularity during the run of ''Series/BeverlyHills90210''.
* The Brazilian SoapOpera ''Escrava Isaura'' was extremely popular in Poland, and caused a number of young girls to be named Isaura.
* The book and films of ''Literature/{{Lolita}}'' allegedly killed Lolita as a first name. While that may have ultimately been the case two decades after the novel's publication, Lolita was already [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ at its depths of popularity]] at the time of publication. The 1962 Creater/StanleyKubrick film coincided with a burst in popularity of the name to levels never before attained, although not very high. In ''Lolita'' itself, the girl is actually named [[MeaningfulName Dolores]], variously nicknamed Dolly, Lo or Lola, and Lolita was Humbert's (who was Nabokov's idea of the complete pseudo-intellectual) "fancy" nickname for her. Because of the MeaningfulName, it's still popular in Spanish.
* Downplayed by the name Cordelia but Creator/CharismaCarpenter - who played Cordelia Chase in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' and ''{{Series/Angel}}'' - has said that numerous fans tell her they named their daughters Cordelia after her. The name had declined in popularity after the 1800s, and the show gave it a small resurgence.
* R&B singer {{Music/Aaliyah}} caused the name Aaliyah to suddenly explode in popularity in the mid-90s - along with its many variations. The name had originated in the Middle East (deriving from the Arabic ''`Alīyā[='=]'', which is, roughly, the feminine form of ''`Alī'' and means "elevated," "exalted," or "noble"[[note]]Meaning that you could legitimately translate the name "Aaliyah" as "Augusta," but let's not get ahead of ourselves...[[/note]]) but became more associated in the African American and Latino communities after the popularity of the singer.
* The ''Music/BackstreetBoys'' popularity in Mexico caused many boys around that time to be named Kevin or Brian (often spelled as "Brayan"). Nowdays, those names in Mexico are often associated with lower-class and trashy people whose American names are completely unfitting.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' may have been responsible for the name "Patrick" steadily declining in popularity since the early 2000s. It used to be one of the top 50 most popular boy’s names in the United States--but as of 2017, it’s only in the top ''200''. Understandably, not many Snake Person parents want to name their sons after an overweight, dimwitted pink starfish.
** Similarly, the name Peter dropped the most it ever had in history in 2000, the year after the premiere of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. It's had a steady decline since.
** The name Barney also had this happen after the premiere of ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'', thanks in part to the PeripheryHatedom for the show.



[[folder:Comic Books]]
* The German comic ''ComicBook/{{Werner}}'' heavily [[ProductPlacement featured]] the beer from the then-small Flensburger brewery, which was obscure even in its home in northern Germany. It was known for being among the last few German beer brands sold in swing-top bottles. Then, when the comic popularized the brand, it got so popular in Germany that the brewery had trouble keeping up demand. Then Werner made his own beer in the sixth book, which would be {{Defictionaliz|ation}}ed (and stopped the free advertising for Flensburger).
* Admit it, you've wanted a "Fuck Communism" Zippo ever since you saw on in ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}.'' Well, it may not be licensed, but [[http://www.cellphoneflasks.com/fuck-communism-zippo-lighter.html here you go]].
* The ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' Wiki calls it the Bludgeon Effect: the franchise has many more toys created than there are characters in the TV show, so that means the ExpandedUniverse has a ''big'' source of new characters that still feel authentic. The name refers to Bludgeon, a relatively minor character who became Decepticon leader late in the Marvel Comics run and stayed a prominent character in subsequent series -- much more so than his unpopular toy line would even have indicated. This most commonly happens to characters [[ComicBook/TheTransformersIDW the IDW comics]] use to good effect; their toys' value online will skyrocket. The biggest beneficiary of this was not Bludgeon, but Ironfist, a character who had never been used in a story until a single appearance in an IDW comic and a Fun Publications comic. Good luck getting your hands on an intact version [[CrackIsCheaper for less than $100.]]
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* The ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'' movies created a huge demand for many of the toys it featured.
** It raised demand for simple plastic green army men so much that several companies started cashing in on it with [[VideoGame/ArmyMen video games]] and such.
** {{Franchise/Barbie}} dolls also got a boost from the second film, although Mattel's paranoia almost prevented this from happening. Creator/{{Pixar}} had wanted to use Barbie in the first movie, but Mattel said no, objecting to her being used as a [[Franchise/{{Terminator}} Sarah Connor]]-esque badass. Then Mattel saw how the toys the movie ''did'' feature got a sales boost (particularly Mr. Potato Head), and they were only too happy to see Barbie used in the second and third movies (with something of a compromise in personality).
** The Slinky company had previously taken the Slinky Dog off the market years before ''Toy Story''. They brought it back in a modified version because of the movie.
* While declining sales caused the last of the creameries which manufacture the centuries-old Wensleydale cheese to teeter on the edge of closure in the early '90s, Wensleydale received a chance mention in the popular ''Franchise/WallaceAndGromit'' shorts. Noticing the increased interest, the creamery persuaded Creator/AardmanAnimations to endorse a ''Wallace & Gromit''-branded cheese, which worked to rebuild Wensleydale into a thriving product worldwide. The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinking_Bishop_cheese Stinking Bishop cheese]] is also featured in a plot-critical moment in ''WesternAnimation/TheCurseOfTheWereRabbit''; sales of this niche culinary product rose by 500% after the film was released.
* Ever since ''WesternAnimation/DespicableMe'' came out, real life carnival booths stocking real life Fluffy Unicorns have become a common sight.
** More kids have been eating bananas as a snack since it's the Minions' TrademarkFavoriteFood.
[[/folder]]



* There was a huge spike in sales of heart-shaped sunglasses after they were featured in the movie poster for Creator/StanleyKubrick's 1962 adaption of ''Film/{{Lolita}}''. It even had a positive effect on the name "Lolita" itself (as shown above).

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* There was a huge spike in sales of heart-shaped sunglasses after they were featured in the movie poster for Creator/StanleyKubrick's 1962 adaption of ''Film/{{Lolita}}''. It even had a positive effect on the name "Lolita" itself (as shown above).itself, which had fallen out of popularity but had a small resurgence following the film's release. In ''Lolita'' itself, the girl is actually named [[MeaningfulName Dolores]], variously nicknamed Dolly, Lo or Lola, and Lolita was the pseudo-intellectual Humbert's "fancy" nickname for her.



* Creator/ShirleyTemple set several trends for girls. The curls obviously were a fad. She also wore a [[PrettyInMink white rabbit coat]] in one film and the popularity of such coats exploded for upper class girls.

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* Creator/ShirleyTemple set several trends for girls. girls.
**
The curls obviously were a fad. fad.
**
She also wore a [[PrettyInMink white rabbit coat]] in one film and the popularity of such coats exploded for upper class girls.girls.
** "Shirley" was an uncommon and exclusively masculine name until Creator/CharlotteBronte's novel ''Shirley'' was published in 1849. The eponymous character is an independent heiress, and her name is intended to be a TomboyishName, being what her parents would have named a boy had they got one like they wanted. It would stay primarily a (rather rare) boy's name until Shirley Temple became famous. Then it became a popular girl's name, reaching No. 1 in popularity in 1935. Male Shirleys are now thin on the ground.



* "Madison" as a first name was almost nonexistent when the movie ''Film/{{Splash}}'' was made, and was mostly a boy's name when it did appear. Then after the film's mermaid picked up the name, it exploded in popularity as a girl's name, reaching [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ the top ten in girls' names]] in the U.S. in 1997, staying there over a decade and a half, even reaching second for two years, before dropping to eleventh in 2015. (It also reappeared as a boys' name after ''Splash'' was released, but never attained the explosive popularity that it did as a girls' name.) In the film itself, it was a LineOfSightName taken from a street sign; Creator/TomHanks' character's immediate reaction is "That's not a name!"
* After ''Film/TheOmen1976'' came out, the name Damien [[http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/ experienced a slight decline]] in popularity, but it did get a one-day spike among children born on [[NumberOfTheBeast June 6, 2006]] -- which, not coincidentally, was also the release date of [[Film/TheOmen2006 the remake]].
* The name "Emma" jumped ([[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ from thirteenth to fourth place]]) upon the release of ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone]]'' with Creator/EmmaWatson.
* The name "Jennifer" received a boost with the release of ''Film/LoveStory'', becoming the single most common female given name in the United States for the years 1970-1984, where it had previously been relatively uncommon. Then it happened in Spanish. ''Love Story'' (and the many works that followed it) briefly made Jennifer a popular name in Spain, where it didn't exist in ''any'' form, and where before Franco's death, it was extremely discouraged to use non-standard (read: non-Catholic) names.
* While the boy's name Kevin had become quite popular in Germany the years before, it reached its peak as the most common name in 1991 after the release of ''Film/HomeAlone'' and stayed very high in popularity for about 10 more years.



%% The popularity of using Twilight as inspiration for baby names is already listed above.

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%% ** The popularity of using Twilight as inspiration for baby names is already listed above."Isabella", "Edward" and "Jacob" were popular before ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' was published. Still, they saw a significant boost, as did "Renesmee". Despite being invented by Creator/StephenieMeyer, in 2010 ''fifty-five'' baby girls in the US were given that name in real life.



* Millions of baby girls were named Alice after the success of Creator/LewisCarroll's ''Literature/AliceInWonderland''.
* J. M. Barrie's ''Literature/PeterPan'' popularized the name Wendy so much after its release, that he is often erroneously credited with ''inventing'' the name. It's really a very obscure nickname for Gwendolyn.
* Since the 1960s, naming your child after a character from Creator/JRRTolkien's ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' has been something of a trend for aging hippies, nerds, and passively sadist parents. "Galadriel" has been in the US popular name list since 1969.
* Scottish poet James [=MacPherson=] (1736–96) [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiona invented the name Fiona.]]
* The Polish/Lithuanian name "Grażyna" was invented by the poet Adam Mickiewicz for his narrative poem ''Grażyna, A Lithuanian story''. It's derived from the Lithuanian word ''graži'', meaning "beautiful", and it was widespread in Poland up until around the 1980s.
* The name "Pamela" was invented for a book, ''Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded''. This generated one of the first entertainment marketing booms, with ''Pamela'' towels, dishes, playing cards, stationery, etc. ''In 1740.''
* The name "Svetlana" was invented by a Russian poet and popularized by another in the early 1800s. It's still hugely popular today, both in Russia and outside it, and is even used as the Russian translation of a Greek saint's name. "Svetlana" wasn't a nonsense word, though; "svet" means light, and it's a little like naming your daughter "Radiance" or something. The closest English equivalent would be Helen.
* The name Dylan experienced a surge in popularity during the run of ''Series/BeverlyHills90210''.
* The Brazilian SoapOpera ''Escrava Isaura'' was extremely popular in Poland, and caused a number of young girls to be named Isaura.



** The name "Amelia" has experienced a recent surge in popularity, coming as high as #1 in the U.K. and #12 in the U.S. for girls. [[http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2013/03/the-pond-effect-amelia-is-britains-top-baby-name-for-girls/ The reason seems to be one character:]] Amelia Jessica "Amy" Pond.



* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': In "Surprise," Angel gives Buffy a claddagh ring for her 17th birthday, explaining the different meanings in how you wear it, with obvious romantic overtones. The scene caused a boost in popularity for claddagh rings.

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* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'': ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
**
In "Surprise," Angel gives Buffy a claddagh ring for her 17th birthday, explaining the different meanings in how you wear it, with obvious romantic overtones. The scene caused a boost in popularity for claddagh rings.rings.
** Creator/CharismaCarpenter -- who played Cordelia Chase in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' and ''{{Series/Angel}}'' -- has said that numerous fans tell her they named their daughters Cordelia after her. The name had declined in popularity after the 1800s, and the show gave it a small resurgence.


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* In the 1980s, the names Crystal[[note]]in a variety of invented spellings, like the show's own "Krystle"[[/note]], Alexis, and Dominique became popular for girls in the USA thanks to the {{Rich Bitch}}es of ''Series/{{Dynasty}}''.
* The name "Emma" exploded in popularity after Rachel of ''Series/{{Friends}}'' gave the name to her daughter.
* From ''Series/SexAndTheCity'', Carrie's rugged puppy Aidan seems to have inspired a resurgence in that name (and its variant Aiden).
* ''Series/FamilyTies'' led to "Mallory" being a popular girls' name, even though it was almost completely non-existent prior to the show (and was basically a last name adopted into a first name). Unlike "Madison", which came about under similar circumstances, "Mallory" died out quickly after the show ended.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' made Castiel the fasting growing name for boys in 2010.
* ''Series/TrueBlood'' made Sookie the fastest growing name for girls in 2010.
* The popularity of ''Series/GameOfThrones'' led to many baby girls named "Arya" and "Khaleesi". Funny that the latter is actually a title for Daenerys Targaryen, not a proper name in the series itself.


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* The name "Kayleigh" was popularized in the U.K. after it appeared in a 1985 hit single of the same name by the British ProgressiveRock band Music/{{Marillion}}; the name itself was derived from "Kay Lee", an ex-girlfriend of singer Derek "Fish" Dick.
* In 2000, Sonny Sandoval, the frontman of Music/{{POD}} and a born-again Christian, gave his daughter the unusual name of Nevaeh, which is "heaven" [[SdrawkcabName spelled backwards]]. By 2007, Nevaeh had become the 31st most popular name for baby girls in the United States, with most of this popularity coming from evangelical Christian parents. A few years later, more parents, apparently having heard the name but not knowing its derivation, or being appallingly lax in spell-checking birth certificate forms, began naming their daughters "Neveah".
* Baby name databases don't seem to have any data for the name [[http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/1/Tevin Tevin]] before 1990, but it peaks in popularity in 1992 (top 200). In between those two years, an R&B singer named Tevin Campbell had released his debut album and scored several hits off it, and his popularity resulted in many baby boys being given his uncommon first name.
* The Australian singer-songwriter John Williamson created a song about a tomboy whose father nicknamed her Cydy (short for sidekick). It is now an official (if still mostly uncommon) Australian girl name.
* R&B singer {{Music/Aaliyah}} caused the name Aaliyah to suddenly explode in popularity in the mid-90s, along with its many variations. The name had originated in the Middle East (deriving from the Arabic ''`Alīyā[='=]'', which is, roughly, the feminine form of ''`Alī'' and means "elevated," "exalted," or "noble") but became more associated in the African American and Latino communities after the popularity of the singer.
* The ''Music/BackstreetBoys'' popularity in Mexico caused many boys around that time to be named Kevin or Brian (often spelled as "Brayan").


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* The name "Jennifer" became hugely popular in the United Kingdom after Creator/GeorgeBernardShaw gave it to the female lead in his 1906 play ''The Doctor's Dilemma''.


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* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' may have been responsible for the name "Patrick" steadily declining in popularity since the early 2000s. It used to be one of the top 50 most popular boy’s names in the United States--but as of 2017, it’s only in the top ''200''. Understandably, not many Snake Person parents want to name their sons after an overweight, dimwitted pink starfish.
* Similarly, the name Peter dropped the most it ever had in history in 2000, the year after the premiere of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. It's had a steady decline since.


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* The popularity of "Katrina" as a name for baby girls [[http://www.babynamewizard.com/namipedia/girl/katrina increased slightly]] after the 2005 storm, possibly due to the name being endlessly repeated in the media, possibly as a statistical blip. The [[https://www.ssa.gov/oact/babynames/ following years]] saw Katrina fall rapidly in popularity.
* In 1918, Italian general Armando Diaz signed the Victory Address, a short document meant to inform the population of the victory against Austria in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. It was shown in schools, barracks, and town halls, and many children were required to memorize it. The Address ended with the words "firmato: Diaz" (signed: Diaz), which led many to think that "firmato" ("signed") was his name. In the following years, many children were baptized with that name.
* After Barack Obama became President in 2009, bringing his daughters Malia and Sasha into the public eye, the name Maliyah was the [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/07/malia-obama-first-daughte_n_567776.html fastest growing name in popularity in 2009]], and the name Sasha also jumped in popularity.
* Prior to the rise of pop culture, the best way to get people to name your kids after you was to conquer them. As an example, prior to 1066, nearly everyone in England had solid Old English names like Edwin, Edgar or Athelstan. Once William the Conqueror made the aristocracy Norman French, things changed, and soon nearly everyone was called William, Richard, Robert, Henry or Hugh. Ironically, because the Normans were originally Vikings (hence "Nor(se)man") all five of those names are of Germanic origin.
3rd Dec '17 9:02:00 PM PaulA
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%% Want to mention owls as pets here? See the Pets section instead.



%% Naked mole rat goes in the "Pets" section.
3rd Dec '17 8:45:22 PM PaulA
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* Take any TV series built around people who practice a certain profession. A lot of viewers will take interest joining college to learn the job, only to have most of them drop out when they discover it's not as exciting as the show makes it out to be. {{Police procedural}}s are especially guilty of this.
3rd Dec '17 8:45:01 PM PaulA
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** ''Anime/Saki'' did this for Reach Mahjong (Japanese Mahjong).

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** ''Anime/Saki'' ''Anime/{{Saki}}'' did this for Reach Mahjong (Japanese Mahjong).



* This trope also has its' dark side: An increase in prostitution was reported after the release of ''Film/PrettyWoman''.

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* This trope also has its' its dark side: An increase in prostitution was reported after the release of ''Film/PrettyWoman''.



* ''ComicStrip/{{Popeye}}'' and its use of spinach as a PowerUpFood led to people eating more spinach. Crystal City, TX has a statue of Popeye in thanks, as spinach is the city's staple cash crop. The irony is that, despite it's other vitamins, [[http://www.cracked.com/article_18517_the-7-most-disastrous-typos-all-time.html spinach isn't even that good for you.]]

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* ''ComicStrip/{{Popeye}}'' and its use of spinach as a PowerUpFood led to people eating more spinach. Crystal City, TX has a statue of Popeye in thanks, as spinach is the city's staple cash crop. The irony is that, despite it's its other vitamins, [[http://www.cracked.com/article_18517_the-7-most-disastrous-typos-all-time.html spinach isn't even that good for you.]]
3rd Dec '17 8:43:53 PM PaulA
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If a work increases demand for another work, that's the ColbertBump; if it changes demand for a song, that's RevivalByCommercialization. The opposite of this trope is AluminumChristmasTrees, where something real but outlandish is shown in fiction and people think it must be fictional.

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If a work increases demand for another work, that's the ColbertBump; if it changes demand for a song, that's RevivalByCommercialization. If it increases demand for a pet, that's PetFadStarter. The opposite of this trope is AluminumChristmasTrees, where something real but outlandish is shown in fiction and people think it must be fictional.



* Paint brand Dulux started using the Old English Sheepdog as its mascot in the 1960's. Right up to the present day, the adverts have done at least as much for sales of the dogs as it has the paint.



* The popularity of the 1977 anime ''Rascal the Raccoon'' was single-handedly responsible for the introduction of feral raccoons in Japan. Up to 1500 raccoons were imported as pets, but now the descendants of abandoned or escaped raccoons live wild in 42 of Japan's 47 prefectures.



* Similarly, ''Anime/HeidiGirlOfTheAlps'' has drawn thousands of Japanese pilgrims to the Swiss Alps. St. Bernard dogs, in particular, are very popular because of the dog Joseph, who doesn't appear [[Literature/{{Heidi}} in the original novel]].

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* Similarly, ''Anime/HeidiGirlOfTheAlps'' has drawn thousands of Japanese pilgrims to the Swiss Alps. St. Bernard dogs, in particular, are very popular because of the dog Joseph, who doesn't appear [[Literature/{{Heidi}} in the original novel]].



* ''Anime/{{Hamtaro}}'' made kids want to get a pet hamster of their own.



* The 1970s series ''Baretta'', with Robert Blake as a plainclothes police detective, caused a surge in the popularity of sulphur-crested cockatoos as pets (on the show, Tony Baretta has one named Fred). Unfortunately, a lot of people undoubtedly regretted the decision to purchase one, as the birds can be troublesome, loud, demanding pets who chew on just about any solid material they can get their beaks on.



[[folder:Media]]
* An odd example in that the ''news'' is responsible, and a rather tragic one at that: All of the news stories regarding pit bull attacks and dog fighting rings has solidified their image as vicious attack dogs (which isn't accurate), leading to a rise in their popularity amongst unscrupulous owners who just want a tough-looking dog to show off, or, worse yet, to fight against other dogs. Many of these dogs will end up being abused or left tied up in backyards, which causes them to develop behavioral issues (as any dog, not just a pit bull, would in that scenario), and eventually leads to yet another incident of a pit bull attack, and the subsequent news story, and the cycle continues. Dobermans and Rottweilers also suffer from this, to a much lesser extent, but the pit bull breeds tend to get the worst of it. You can, of course, also blame the jerks who run dog-fighting rings for this problem.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Pets]]
If a popular children's movie or cartoon features animals, it ''will'' influence the pet demands of many a {{Spoiled Brat}}. This is easily the worst type of Red Stapler, with many of these animals inevitably ending up in shelters or rescue centers, being released into the wild, or simply dying as a result of people being ignorant of how to correctly care for them. ''Website/TheOnion'' sums up the phenomenon perfectly [[http://www.theonion.com/articles/study-dog-movies-spur-adoption-for-up-to-10-years,37841/ here.]]
* The trope EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys encourages people to seek out primates as pets, thinking that they will be charming and fun companions. Unfortunately, all primates make terrible pets, in just about every way possible. They are very noisy, destructive, require specialized diets, and a ''lot'' of open space - most are also very social animals who will suffer immensely without the company of their own kind, and typically grow up to be very unruly and aggressive, particularly when raised in such an unnatural environment. Adult primates are strong, agile, with powerful teeth and jaws, as well as razor sharp nails that can inflict serious injury - and they can infect humans with a myriad of very lethal diseases. Most primates end up being disposed of when people realize this, which is a serious issue due to the scarcity of reputable primate sanctuaries.
* This happens to fish a lot, especially with such works as ''WesternAnimation/FindingNemo''.
** Many exotic fish, like the clownfish and other species shown in ''Finding Nemo'', are surprisingly hard to care for; most parents think that all a fish needs is a tank and some food every now and then. Also, wild-caught tropical fish tend to do very poorly in home aquariums, dying after only a few days. The demand for such exotic fish has grown enough that it's having a noticeable effect on their ecosystem, as the fish are caught en-masse from reefs in the Pacific. It's especially ridiculous because works like ''Finding Nemo'' will often point out that fish aren't ''supposed'' to be living in a tank in your house.
*** The demand for clownfish post-''Finding Nemo'' was so great that it has led to their near-extinction in some countries. On top of that, unscrupulous "fishermen" anaesthetised them with cyanide, which in turn proceeded to devastate the surrounding environment. This is doubly tragic as clownfish are breedable in captivity.
** The reverse, though, wasn't any better. Many children tried to flush their fish down the toilet, hoping they would be reunited with their families in the ocean like Nemo was. But sewer systems don't work that way; they're all miles-long systems of pipes and pumping stations that eventually lead to a treatment plant. (The alternative is to dump raw sewage, something the EPA takes a very dim view of.) Even if the fish survive the ride to the plant, the entire point of the plant is to kill infectious microorganisms -- and it does a fine job on killing anything bigger, as well. One sewage engineer noted that the first step at the plant is to reduce any large chunks into a fine purée, usually with something like [[http://www.jwce.com/products/muffin-monster-model-30000/ this]]; he [[http://www.foxnews.com/story/2003/06/06/company-warns-grinding-nemo/ dubbed the result "Grinding Nemo".]]
** This was not helped at all by major aquarium supply company [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetra_Company#Criticisms Tetra]] trying using this trope to cash in on this trend by "demonstrating" (read: "advertising") the "ease" of keeping small saltwater tanks with clownfish, blue tangs, and seahorses on CBS's morning news program, and producing a tie-in aquarium kit which was prominently displayed in larger pet store chains. The blatant inaccuracy of their advice, and ridiculous inadequacy of the aquarium kits, effectively guaranteed dead fish within a very short time. It sparked a huge backlash against, and boycott of, Tetra products.
** {{Defied|Trope}} with the sequel ''WesternAnimation/FindingDory''. [[http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/001/132/060/c09.jpg Signs]] were put in pet stores advising against adopting saltwater fish like Dory for beginner aquarium owners, by pointing out how expensive and difficult taking care of them is.
* [[http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1716013.stm Owls]] after ''Film/HarryPotter'', which do ''not'' make good pets, as [[http://web.archive.org/web/20110623034956/http://www.jkrowling.com/textonly/en/extrastuff_view.cfm?id=20 J.K. Rowling herself has felt obliged to point out]]. This has caused a big increase in unintentional neglect of owls by owners who don't have a clue how to actually care for a predatory bird. Being loners in the wild, owls are not very friendly (usually they will only bond to one person, and will likely attack anyone else on sight), dislike being handled (as is the case with all predatory birds), and being designed for tearing up carcasses, owl beaks and talons are ''extremely'' sharp and can cause serious injuries. In addition, owls are difficult to house, as they need a very large open space to get adequate exercise, and tend to be very destructive, noisy, smelly, and dirty (they require a strict diet of whole animal carcasses, and will frequently vomit the fur and bones of their recent meals). Overall, owls are very high maintenance animals that need a ''lot'' of time, care and attention that most people would never be able to provide. For this reason, many places require you to be trained and have a license to own an exotic pet like an owl. This was addressed in the "Care of Magical Creatures" featurette on the DVD of [[Film/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban the third movie]], with one of the movie's animal trainers telling us:
-->"A lot of people, they see the ''Harry Potter'' films and they think that these animals make great pets and they ''really'' don't. They're not domesticated; they're totally wild animals. It seems so simple when you see it in a movie and easy, but in real life it's a constant eight to twelve hour day taking care of these animals."
* Many, ''many'' breeds of dog. This causes problems when a burst of demand for a specific breed leads to breeders replicating dogs who are outside of breed standards, or have genetic diseases like hip dysplasia. Also, many people who buy a dog because of a film appearance don't have any prior experience with dogs, and the breeds featured in media are not always easy and unpretentious.
** ''Film/OneHundredAndOneDalmatians'' sparked a rise in the sales of dalmatian puppies. The dalmatian looks funny but is an extremely high-maintenance dog, and any child who thinks that this would be a good dog to own without the sort of dedication children are well known for being incapable of should be set straight rather than obliged in their request.
** And as the film had a sequel, so did the phenomenon: the release of ''Film/OneHundredAndTwoDalmatians'', with a blue-eyed white puppy named Oddball, triggered a run on blue-eyed white Dalmatian puppies from parents who didn't realize that the blue-eyes gene is strongly associated with deafness. (You thought a hearing dalmatian was high maintenance? Try a deaf one.) Blue-eyed white dalmatians (and indeed, dalmatians in general) were bred at such a rate that puppy mills would inbreed lines with extreme prejudice if they could get away with it. They usually did, and caused enormous damage to the breed in general, with congenital defects ranging anywhere from extra dewclaws to clubbed limbs to clinical insanity.
** ''Film/{{Cujo}}'' caused a decline in the sales of St Bernard dogs, which later ended up fixed by the release of ''Film/{{Beethoven}}'' anyway.
** ''Film/MarleyAndMe'' probably averted this. Marley was certainly portrayed as cute and lovable, but he wasn't really portrayed as a low maintenance/easy to train pet. [[spoiler:The TearJerker ending probably had something to do with it as well.]] It helps that Labrador Retrievers are already the most common breed of dog in the English-speaking world (about half of all mixed-breed dogs in the US and Canada have some Lab in them), and tend to make excellent pets.
** ''Film/{{Marmaduke}}'' also averted this, as the eponymous Great Dane is portrayed as being very high-maintenance to say the least. Certain animal welfare groups were concerned about this trope, but it doesn't appear that the film has done much to increase or decrease the popularity of Danes -- likely because [[BoxOfficeBomb nobody saw it]]; the film was an abject failure at the box office.
** The ''Franchise/{{Lassie}}'' and ''Lad A Dog'' movies (as well as the ''Series/{{Lassie}}'' TV show) spawned such a demand for collies that pet breeders nearly managed to ruin what had been a really good breed. Even today, there are tons of badly-bred collies with poor health and the brains of an ice cube.
** Shetland Sheepdogs were erroneously perceived as "miniature collies" and were in high demand on the erroneous assumption that a smaller dog is lower maintenance. Shelties are people-oriented and tend to be anxious, and the high demand brought these traits out considerably.
** ''Disney/LadyAndTheTramp'' wreaked similar havoc on American Cocker Spaniels decades ago, and the breed is ''still'' notorious today for physical and mental health problems. This compounds the problems the breed ''already'' had, as they were already prone to obesity, spinal stress, heart problems, and severe ear infection. Cocker Spaniels are highly aggressive toward humans, much more so than other breeds that are considered dangerous, like Dobermans, but Cockers rarely cause much damage because of their size, so they don't get much press.
** ''Film/SnowDogs'' made Huskies popular for a bit. They're wonderful dogs, but definitely ''not'' for first-time owners, as they can be quite a handful.
** Pit bulls have had a significant issue of this sort since the late '70s and in particular the early '80s. The term actually refers to several breeds, but most commonly the American Pit Bull Terrier and American Staffordshire Terrier. They are commonly portrayed in films as tough guard dogs or fighting dogs (the are one of the most common for pit fighting), which tends to attract the wrong kind of owner to the breed. Raised properly by a capable owner, they can be wonderful, loving pets. It's not the first time, either; pit bulls were historically bred as large game-hunting dogs, making them very popular for blood sports like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bear-baiting bear-baiting]] and pit fighting and quickly developing a reputation for fierceness and aggression.
*** From the 1920s to the 1950s, though, they were popular pets for entirely different reasons -- their intelligence and personable, strongly loyal nature -- thanks in large part to Pete the Pup from the ''Our Gang'' (a.k.a. ''Film/TheLittleRascals'') series of short films (who was alternately portrayed by both Pit Bull Terriers and Staffordshire Terriers).
*** Averted, at least somewhat in the 2010's, with Bull Terriers because of Bullseye, the mascot of department store chain Target, which is always depicted as loving, happy, and affectionate.
** Similarly, the vicious and aggressive portrayal of the Doberman breed in the media led to a surge in popularity in the 1970s, though it soon dropped significantly within a few years. As a result, Dobermans are considerably rarer today.
** ''WesternAnimation/AllDogsGoToHeaven'' increased demand for German Shepherds. Of course, German Shepherds have always been highly popular, and are an easy-going and ''relatively'' low maintenance breed. ''Literature/IAmLegend'' likely helped as well.
** Chihuahuas have also suffered from this. Unfortunately the "purse dog" fad is still going at top volume. They're not a particularly friendly breed either, as owners eventually find out. It was popularized by such works as the ''Film/LegallyBlonde'' movies, Creator/ParisHilton and ''Series/TheSimpleLife'', and the dog from the "Yo quiero Taco Bell" ad campaign. ''Film/BeverlyHillsChihuahua'' was made at least partly in response to that (and seems to have averted the trend itself).
** Shiba Inus have experienced a spike in popularity thanks to "Doge" the [[MemeticMutation Internet meme]], [[http://www.theverge.com/2013/12/31/5248762/doge-meme-rescue-dog-wow according to the experiences]] of Jonathan Fleming, the photograph of the picture that would become the "hipster doge." Wow. Much boost. While not bad pets by any means, shibas are quite a stubborn breed and could be hard to handle for inexperienced owners, so be careful before getting your own doge.
** The only reason pretty much anyone outside of Africa has even ''heard'' of the basenji is the 1950s novel and film ''Goodbye My Lady''.
** Another relatively obscure dog breed, the Weimaraner, has gained popularity through William Wegman's photos and videos featuring this breed.
** Most people who saw ''Film/TurnerAndHooch'' probably couldn't have named Hooch's breed to save their lives. Demand for the French mastiff didn't explode by any means, but that movie and other appearances in media have definitely invoked this trope, since it's a massive, high-maintenance dog that, as the vet herself said, "Not many people [have room for]." Or time for, or money for. And that's with the movie actually playing it fairly straight in terms of how high-maintenance Hooch was.
** Because of the badass direwolves of ''Series/GameOfThrones'', wolf-like breeds such as the Siberian Husky have become increasingly popular. Some have even sought out dogs that are part-wolf, even though wolfdogs are restricted or even illegal in many areas and have a ''very'' different temperament from a normal dog. Of course, like with any canine Red Stapler, many of these dogs wound up with owners who had neither the appropriate housing nor the necessary time and experience for keeping them.
** The famous true story of the Akita Inu ''UsefulNotes/{{Hachiko}}'' and his two movies (one Japanese and one American), or the anime ''Anime/GingaNagareboshiGin'' where the breed is portrayed as nothing but a kind and heroic dog might easily lead some viewers on in wanting their own Akita puppy. While the breed is indeed known for their bravery and loyalty, the Akita should only be cared for by an experienced owner as they can be challenging to train and are actually prone to aggression.
* Turtles have been a popular pet for children since the late 80's thanks to the recurring popularity of the Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles. However, many parents underestimate how long they live and what kind of care they require. A healthy turtle of a smaller species can live for 50-70 years, which is usually much longer than a kid will be interested in them. And a turtle that swims will require about 10 gallons of space ''per inch of shell length'', meaning the average adult will need at least a 50 gallon tank of the right kind (regular aquariums are too narrow). And their diet varies by species and ''will'' be more than the dry pellets sold in pet stores. However, some species make easier pets than others. Tortoises[[note]]Namely smaller ones like Russians and Hermanns that are commonly found in the pet trade[[/note]] and box turtles don't swim and have simpler requirements than aquatic turtles, making them much more reasonable for a child to care for. But they will still live for several decades, so a would-be owner must be prepared for a lifelong commitment. But regardless of species, you would ''not'' want to house multiple males in the same space (as was the case for the Ninja Turtles pre-mutation), since they would constantly fight over territory. Multiple females can get along, but mixing the sexes is obviously undesirable unless you're breeding them. Hell, you can have ''one'' just fine since most reptiles don't get lonely.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}}'' led quite a few kids to want pet rats. This actually may have been more of a sensible choice than the previously mentioned animals, as domestic rats make good pets: they're fairly low-maintenance, they're friendlier than their more popular cousins (mice and hamsters), they can be litter-trained, they don't particularly smell, and you can train them to [[ParrotPetPosition sit on your shoulder]]. It's recommended you buy at least two (preferably of the same gender, because opposite sexes [[SlapSlapKiss fight unless they're in heat]], when they do a different kind of wrestling) if you're not going to be around all the time, because they're quite social and get lonely. The only problem was that kids really wanted a ''blue'' rat, and they would dump their fancy rats when they realized they weren't like in the movie.
* Oh-so-thankfully averted with ''WesternAnimation/{{Rio}}''. When it came out, there was some concern that like with other films, the movie would lead to a higher demand for parrots. This would've been ''very'' bad; parrots, especially larger ones, tend to be ''extremely'' high maintenance animals. They're loud, highly intelligent, and require constant attention, play, and stimulation. They're basically like human toddlers, and people already make the mistake of buying parrots without realizing the care they require. Without stimulation they get bored and stressed, which leads to the bird developing bad habits like feather plucking or worse. They can literally go insane, and while "insane asylums" for birds exist, there are far too few of them. Thankfully it didn't happen with ''WesternAnimation/{{Rio}}'', but that was likely because parrots tend to cost a lot of money, so people are less likely to buy them on impulse. The actual species of parrot in the film, Spix's macaw, is virtually impossible to acquire anyway.
* ''Film/JurassicPark'' increased the demand for frilled lizards as pets, due to them looking like [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology the portrayal of the dilophosaurus]] in the film. It was like getting a {{Slurpasaur}}.
* Demand for guinea pigs went up significantly for about a year after ''Film/GForce'' came out. On one hand, guinea pigs aren't especially difficult to keep compared to many other animals. On the other, they still require more care, space, and companionship than most people realize. As with many rodents, they also shouldn't be kept alone, which many people tend to neglect.
* ''Anime/{{Hamtaro}}'' made many people want hamsters, and in some places it was a true boom. It faded some years after, however.
* Dan Povenmire and Jeff "Swampy" Marsh were apparently GenreSavvy enough to be aware of this trope when they developed ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'', which is why they deliberately gave their protagonists a pet platypus, an animal that kids could not "pick out at a pet store and beg [their parents] for."
* Thanks to ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'''s huge popularity in China, [[http://english.eastday.com/auto/n917360/u1ai8538881.html demand for red fox and fennec fox pets increased]]. Not surprisingly, wildlife experts express concerns for this trend since most foxes found on the pet market "are not commercially domesticated, often not vaccinated and can be dangerous".
* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Ron Stoppable's sidekick/pet naked mole rat has led to kids wanting one for their very own. Common sense provides it's not really a SpeechImpairedAnimal in real life, but what even parents might not know is that the naked mole rat is basically blind, anti-cute, and one of the only mammals that are eusocial -- like bees -- and so can only survive in an underground colony with hundreds of other mole rats. Also, ''[[http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t251/beeftony/nakedmolerat.jpg they look like this]]''.
* Demand for Portuguese Water Dogs went up 50% after the Obama family adopted one so that the allergic daughters could have a puppy.
* While hedgehogs aren't exactly popular choices for pets, if a kid does have a pet hedgehog, there's a very good chance that it will be named [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Sonic]].
** Also, hedgehogs used to be banned in the city of Lawrence, Kansas. Thanks to one kid and his love of the franchise, the city lifted the ban.
* Interestingily, even legislature can have an effect on pet, especially dog breed, popularity. This was noted in Finland when docking (amputation) of tails and ears of dogs was forbidden. Many dog owners feared guardian breeds as Rottweilers and Dobermanns would suffer on popularity. Actually the effect was ''inverse'': as many Finns saw, for the first time, a natural Rottweiler and Dobermann with full tail and ears, they perceived them as less aggressive and hostile and more suitable as pets and companions, and their popularity actually increased in Finland. A natural Dobermann has a beautiful, naturally curling, tail not unlike a Saluki.
[[/folder]]
1st Dec '17 7:24:30 AM JBsteeple
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Added DiffLines:

** Actually because of the demand Adidas eventually did produce an official version in VERY limited quantities. They were released at the We Love Green festival in France in 2017, where Seu Jorge was performing. They were limited and numbered, and sold out very quickly.
29th Nov '17 8:44:24 AM mimitchi33
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** In Japan, the names Anna and Rin (which means cold) [[http://en.rocketnews24.com/2015/11/13/japans-top-baby-names-in-2015-will-naruto-influenced-monickers-still-reign-supreme/ were two of the top 10 baby names for two years in a row]] as a result of this movie.

to:

** In Japan, the names Anna and Rin (which means cold) [[http://en.rocketnews24.com/2015/11/13/japans-top-baby-names-in-2015-will-naruto-influenced-monickers-still-reign-supreme/ were two of the top 10 baby names for two years in a row]] as a result of this movie. Rin could have also had some ''Franchise/LoveLive'' influence, as one of the most popular characters is Rin Hoshizora.



** Similarly, the name Peter dropped the most it ever had in history in 2000, the year after the premier of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. It's had a steady decline since.

to:

** Similarly, the name Peter dropped the most it ever had in history in 2000, the year after the premier premiere of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''. It's had a steady decline since.since.
** The name Barney also had this happen after the premiere of ''Series/BarneyAndFriends'', thanks in part to the PeripheryHatedom for the show.



* When Creator/TheBBC began a re-run of ''Series/{{Thunderbirds}}'' in 1992 (the first time it had ever been simulcast nationally), demand for Tracy Island toys outstripped supply. ''Series/BluePeter'' helpfully gave instructions for building a home-made version, the video release of which ran out in minutes. Hell, forget the video, demand was such that there was a huge lead time in receiving a ''paper'' copy of the instructions from the BBC (bear in mind, this was before Internet access was widespread).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheRedStapler