History Main / TheRealRemingtonSteele

18th May '16 4:22:42 PM nombretomado
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* Editing created an example of this in the MarvelCinematicUniverse:

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* Editing created an example of this in the MarvelCinematicUniverse:Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse:
15th Mar '16 2:16:26 PM margdean56
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* During the "Identity Crisis" storyline, Franchise/SpiderMan adopted ''four'' separate disguises (Dusk, Hornet, Prodigy, and Ricochet) to operate while framed for murder.[[note]]This was actually quite a clever move on Spidey's part; he realized that if he went off the radar and a new costumed hero immediately showed up with similar abilities and body build, people would be suspicious. But if ''four'' such people showed up, it didn't matter if his enemies suspected one of them was a disguised Spider-Man because would could possibly suspect ''all of them''? And it gave him plenty of margin for error, since if one identity was blown he still had others to fall back on. To further the trickery, two of the fake identities (Dusk and Ricochet) were ''supervillains''.[[/note]] After the storyline's resolution, a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] hero who had nothing to do with Spidey obtained the abandoned costumes and gave them to four new characters, who he trained to form the short-lived ''ComicBook/{{Slingers}}''.

to:

* During the "Identity Crisis" storyline, Franchise/SpiderMan adopted ''four'' separate disguises (Dusk, Hornet, Prodigy, and Ricochet) to operate while framed for murder.[[note]]This was actually quite a clever move on Spidey's part; he realized that if he went off the radar and a new costumed hero immediately showed up with similar abilities and body build, people would be suspicious. But if ''four'' such people showed up, it didn't matter if his enemies suspected one of them was a disguised Spider-Man because would who could possibly suspect ''all of them''? And it gave him plenty of margin for error, since if one identity was blown he still had others to fall back on. To further the trickery, two of the fake identities (Dusk and Ricochet) were ''supervillains''.[[/note]] After the storyline's resolution, a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] hero who had nothing to do with Spidey obtained the abandoned costumes and gave them to four new characters, who he trained to form the short-lived ''ComicBook/{{Slingers}}''.
13th Mar '16 12:22:44 PM Vir
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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' had Mr. Krabs attempt to get [=SpongeBob=] to give up the soda drink hat he sold him by claiming that it belonged to someone who is dead now, making up the name of [[OverlyLongName Smitty Werbenjeggermanjenson]]. Later, it turns out that there actually is a fish in Bikini Bottom Cemetery by that name and that the hat did belong to him prior to his death.

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' had Mr. Krabs attempt to get [=SpongeBob=] to give up the soda drink hat he sold him by claiming that it belonged to someone who is dead now, making up the name of [[OverlyLongName Smitty Werbenjeggermanjenson]]. Later, it turns out that there actually is a fish in Bikini Bottom Cemetery by that name and that the hat did belong to him prior to his death.
7th Mar '16 7:37:38 PM moon_custafer
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* Daniel Pinkwater’s ''Young Adult Novel'' contains a variant: the Wild Dada Ducks, a group of schoolboys, amuse themselves by writing chapters from an imaginary novel called “Kevin Shapiro, Boy Orphan” (which contains many examples of DeathByNewberryMedal). When they find out their school has a real Kevin Shapiro, they embark on a new project — to make him the most popular kid in school. Shapiro isn’t too happy with their helpful meddling, and concocts plans of his own…



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29th Dec '15 4:38:30 AM Anddrix
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* The Invincible Man from Marvel Comics. The first person in the costume was the Super Skrull. Not only was he in a full costume, but he was pretending to be Dr. Franklin Storm, father to Susan and Johnny Storm of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. The Skrulls kidnapped Franklin and pretended he had gone mad and given himself super powers while in prison. Reed Richards saw through the deception when he noticed Invincible Man's powers were similar to their own. The second person was Reed himself, who was kidnapped and brainwashed into becoming the Invincible Man to help kidnap the rest of the Fantastic Four. Ultimately, this was a plan created by SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom. Reed's version used technology from the Psycho-Man to play with people's emotions and create hallucinations. The third Invincible Man was Doom himself. Prior to the Secret Wars, he lost his body during the battle between ComicBook/SilverSurfer and Terrax and was forced to body-swap with a random pedestrian before he died, created a makeshift costume and weapons, and attacked the Latverian embassy. Doom's ultimate plan was to get to his resources, including his spare suit of armor, and recreate his body. The story arc ended with Doom getting his body back and leaving the innocent man's body once his mind was transferred by the Beyonder, whom he accidentally called to the scene (due to temporal paradoxes the Doom who fought in the Secret Wars was Doom from THAT point in time, with no knowledge of the Secret Wars).

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* The Invincible Man from Marvel Comics. The first person in the costume was the Super Skrull. Not only was he in a full costume, but he was pretending to be Dr. Franklin Storm, father to Susan and Johnny Storm of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. The Skrulls kidnapped Franklin and pretended he had gone mad and given himself super powers while in prison. Reed Richards saw through the deception when he noticed Invincible Man's powers were similar to their own. The second person was Reed himself, who was kidnapped and brainwashed into becoming the Invincible Man to help kidnap the rest of the Fantastic Four. Ultimately, this was a plan created by SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom.Doctor Doom. Reed's version used technology from the Psycho-Man to play with people's emotions and create hallucinations. The third Invincible Man was Doom himself. Prior to the Secret Wars, he lost his body during the battle between ComicBook/SilverSurfer and Terrax and was forced to body-swap with a random pedestrian before he died, created a makeshift costume and weapons, and attacked the Latverian embassy. Doom's ultimate plan was to get to his resources, including his spare suit of armor, and recreate his body. The story arc ended with Doom getting his body back and leaving the innocent man's body once his mind was transferred by the Beyonder, whom he accidentally called to the scene (due to temporal paradoxes the Doom who fought in the Secret Wars was Doom from THAT point in time, with no knowledge of the Secret Wars).
18th Oct '15 9:38:43 AM Anddrix
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In the 90s, another storyline saw the return of the Erik the Red identity, who was even {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the text as being someone else we knew in disguise. Later, it turned out that he was SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}}, who has at times gone by the alias of "Erik Lehnsherr".

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In the 90s, another storyline saw the return of the Erik the Red identity, who was even {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the text as being someone else we knew in disguise. Later, it turned out that he was SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}}, ComicBook/{{Magneto}}, who has at times gone by the alias of "Erik Lehnsherr".
24th Sep '15 7:32:56 AM AlexHoskins
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* Probably one of the most [[WhamEpisode Wham-tastic]] examples of this trope: [[spoiler: Madara Uchiha]] in ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''. In an interesting twist, it's his very ''entrance'' that immediately reveals the previously supposed [[spoiler: Madara]] as a fake.

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* Probably one two of the most [[WhamEpisode Wham-tastic]] examples of this trope: [[spoiler: Madara Uchiha]] and [[spoiler:Obito Uchiha]] in ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''. In an interesting twist, it's his the former's very ''entrance'' that immediately reveals the previously supposed [[spoiler: Madara]] as a fake.
11th Sep '15 7:28:27 AM HeraldAlberich
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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'': Mad-Eye Moody, the [[HighTurnoverRate DADA teacher]] in Harry's fourth year, turns out to be an impostor who's been keeping the real Moody alive in his own BagOfHolding. Early into book five, Harry finds himself in the strange position of meeting someone he thought he'd known for a year for the first time.

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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'': Mad-Eye Moody, the [[HighTurnoverRate DADA teacher]] in Harry's [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire fourth year, year]], turns out to be an impostor who's been keeping the real Moody alive in his own BagOfHolding. Early into [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix book five, five]], Harry finds himself in the strange position of meeting someone he thought he'd known for a year for the first time.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' turned out to be AllJustADream, but the enemies in it later turned up in non-dream Mario games.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' turned out to be AllJustADream, but the enemies in it later turned up in non-dream Mario ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' games.
11th Sep '15 7:22:11 AM HeraldAlberich
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-->'''Jackson:''' There's somebody who wants to meet you.
-->'''Trevor:''' Do I know him?
-->'''Jackson:''' No, but you took his name and now he wants it back.

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-->'''Jackson:''' --->'''Jackson:''' There's somebody who wants to meet you.
-->'''Trevor:'''
you.\\
'''Trevor:'''
Do I know him?
-->'''Jackson:'''
him?\\
'''Jackson:'''
No, but you took his name and now he wants it back.



** Zuko: "[[DidntSeeThatComing I did not see that one coming]]."

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** Zuko: "[[DidntSeeThatComing -->'''Zuko:''' [[DidntSeeThatComing I did not see that one coming]]."



* A variation: The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode 'Not Without My Anus' - treated as an in-universe work of fiction - features a journalist/court prosecutor named Scott as a villain. Years later, in 'It's Christmas in Canada' the kids meet a ''real'' Scott. This Scott was introduced with five words: "That's Scott. He's a ''dick''." A later episode sees the debut of a real Ugly Bob, who moved to America because Americans think all Canadians look alike.

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* A variation: The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode 'Not "Not Without My Anus' - treated Anus"--treated as an in-universe work of fiction - features fiction--features a journalist/court prosecutor named Scott as a villain. Years later, in 'It's "It's Christmas in Canada' Canada" the kids meet a ''real'' Scott. This Scott was introduced with five words: "That's Scott. He's a ''dick''." A later episode sees the debut of a real Ugly Bob, who moved to America because Americans think all Canadians look alike.
15th Jul '15 5:51:09 PM merotoker
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* In ''Manga/IkkiTousen Great Guardians''... [[spoiler:The "Saji Genpou" we know is actually Ouin Shishi (Wang Yun); the big bad of ''Great Guardians'' is the Fighter with the real magatama of Zuo Ci, a LittleMissBadass young woman who is the ''true'' Saji Genpou as well as the local DarkMagicalGirl, ''and'' the "other" Saji might be in love with her or at elast care sincerely for her.]]

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* In ''Manga/IkkiTousen Great Guardians''... [[spoiler:The "Saji Genpou" we know is actually Ouin Shishi (Wang Yun); the big bad of ''Great Guardians'' is the Fighter with the real magatama of Zuo Ci, a LittleMissBadass young woman who is the ''true'' Saji Genpou as well as the local DarkMagicalGirl, ''and'' the "other" Saji might be in love with her or at elast least care sincerely for her.]]



* ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}''
** In the 1960s, Cyclops adopted the identity of "Erik the Red" to infiltrate a villain's confidence. In the 1970s, a new Erik the Red appeared, this time an alien agent named Davan Shakari with no connection to the original plot and no particular reason to use the identity (or for that matter, any reason to not use his real name; it's not like he had a civilian life on Earth to conceal). Cyclops actually expressed his confusion at this, pointing out that "Erik the Red" was simply his own disguise.\\

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* ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}''
''Comicbook/XMen''
** In the 1960s, Cyclops ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} adopted the identity of "Erik the Red" to infiltrate a villain's confidence. In the 1970s, a new Erik the Red appeared, this time an alien agent named Davan Shakari with no connection to the original plot and no particular reason to use the identity (or for that matter, any reason to not use his real name; it's not like he had a civilian life on Earth to conceal). Cyclops actually expressed his confusion at this, pointing out that "Erik the Red" was simply his own disguise.\\



In the 90s, another storyline saw the return of the Erik the Red identity, who was even {{lampshaded}} in the text as being someone else we knew in disguise. Later, it turned out that he was Magneto, who has at times gone by the alias of "Erik Lehnsherr".
** In 2001, writer Grant Morrison added a character named Xorn to the X-Men, a Chinese dissident sealed behind a skull-like metal mask to contain his powers. In 2003, Xorn [[TheReveal unmasked himself]] as a disguise for Magneto. But [[ExecutiveMeddling the editors]] didn't like the idea of Magneto (and Xorn, technically) being KilledOffForReal at the end of the arc (nor did they care much for the way Magneto's character was portrayed despite Morrison's rationalizations), and asked incoming writer Chuck Austen to handle the situation. Under Austen's changes, it was now the '''real''' Xorn who had pretended to be Magneto, who had pretended to be his identically masked twin brother, also named Xorn, who joined the team.\\

to:

In the 90s, another storyline saw the return of the Erik the Red identity, who was even {{lampshaded}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the text as being someone else we knew in disguise. Later, it turned out that he was Magneto, SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}}, who has at times gone by the alias of "Erik Lehnsherr".
** In 2001, writer Grant Morrison Creator/GrantMorrison added a character named Xorn to the X-Men, a Chinese dissident sealed behind a skull-like metal mask to contain his powers. In 2003, Xorn [[TheReveal unmasked himself]] as a disguise for Magneto. But [[ExecutiveMeddling the editors]] didn't like the idea of Magneto (and Xorn, technically) being KilledOffForReal at the end of the arc (nor did they care much for the way Magneto's character was portrayed despite Morrison's rationalizations), and asked incoming writer Chuck Austen to handle the situation. Under Austen's changes, it was now the '''real''' Xorn who had pretended to be Magneto, who had pretended to be his identically masked twin brother, also named Xorn, who joined the team.\\



''That'' Xorn has since turned up: turns out he was just misguided, and has since decided the world needs the real Magneto again, repowering him after his depowerment in ''House of M''. Some fans are angry, others are just confused.
* During the "Identity Crisis" storyline, [[Comicbook/SpiderMan Spider-Man]] adopted ''four'' separate disguises (Dusk, Hornet, Prodigy, and Ricochet) to operate while framed for murder.[[note]]This was actually quite a clever move on Spidey's part; he realized that if he went off the radar and a new costumed hero immediately showed up with similar abilities and body build, people would be suspicious. But if ''four'' such people showed up, it didn't matter if his enemies suspected one of them was a disguised Spider-Man because would could possibly suspect ''all of them''? And it gave him plenty of margin for error, since if one identity was blown he still had others to fall back on. To further the trickery, two of the fake identities (Dusk and Ricochet) were ''supervillains''.[[/note]] After the storyline's resolution, a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] hero who had nothing to do with Spidey obtained the abandoned costumes and gave them to four new characters, who he trained to form the short-lived ''ComicBook/{{Slingers}}''.
* JusticeLeagueOfAmerica: An apparent sorcerer named Bloodwynd joined the Justice League in the early 1990s. Eventually this turned out to be the Martian Manhunter, forced to ''impersonate'' the real Bloodwynd, who was trapped inside the magic gem the Manhunter had been wearing during the impersonation. This sometimes got really screwed up when Martian Manhunter [[CoversAlwaysLie appeared on the cover]] at the same time...
* In TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, Comicbook/{{Superman}} and Jimmy Olsen occasionally adventured inside the shrunken Kryptonian city of Kandor where Superman's powers didn't function, and adopted the Batman-and-Robin-inspired identities of Nightwing and Flamebird. They were later replaced by Kandorian scientist Van-Zee (Superman's IdenticalStranger) and his lab assistant Ak-Var. Then Nightwing became Dick Grayson's post-Robin identity; Flamebird has also been used by established characters PostCrisis (including, ironically enough, Betty Kane, who in the original continuity was the overly feminine Batgirl who fought crime with ''cosmetics''). And now all of the Kandorians have been set loose. There was also a brief period when {{Supergirl}} and PowerGirl assumed the identities of Flamebird and Nightwing while operating inside Kandor.
* The character of "WonderGirl" originally appeared as the teenaged incarnation of WonderWoman (just as the original Superboy was the youthful identity of Comicbook/{{Superman}}). When the Comicbook/TeenTitans were created in the 1960s, Wonder Girl was added to the team...but the Titans were contemporaries of the JusticeLeagueOfAmerica, [[SeriesContinuityError and by extension of Wonder Woman]]. Thus the real Wonder Girl was explained four years later to be Donna Troy, an orphan rescued by Wonder Woman and raised among the Amazons. (This explanation would be subjected to repeated [[{{Retcon}} further revisions]] due to the [[TheDCU DC Universe]]'s constant reboots and retoolings, with the result being that Donna has an impossibly convoluted history even for a comic book character.)

to:

''That'' Xorn has since turned up: turns out he was just misguided, and has since decided the world needs the real Magneto again, repowering him after his depowerment in ''House of M''.''ComicBook/HouseOfM''. Some fans are angry, others are just confused.
* During the "Identity Crisis" storyline, [[Comicbook/SpiderMan Spider-Man]] Franchise/SpiderMan adopted ''four'' separate disguises (Dusk, Hornet, Prodigy, and Ricochet) to operate while framed for murder.[[note]]This was actually quite a clever move on Spidey's part; he realized that if he went off the radar and a new costumed hero immediately showed up with similar abilities and body build, people would be suspicious. But if ''four'' such people showed up, it didn't matter if his enemies suspected one of them was a disguised Spider-Man because would could possibly suspect ''all of them''? And it gave him plenty of margin for error, since if one identity was blown he still had others to fall back on. To further the trickery, two of the fake identities (Dusk and Ricochet) were ''supervillains''.[[/note]] After the storyline's resolution, a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] hero who had nothing to do with Spidey obtained the abandoned costumes and gave them to four new characters, who he trained to form the short-lived ''ComicBook/{{Slingers}}''.
* JusticeLeagueOfAmerica: Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica: An apparent sorcerer named Bloodwynd joined the Justice League in the early 1990s. Eventually this turned out to be the Martian Manhunter, ComicBook/MartianManhunter, forced to ''impersonate'' the real Bloodwynd, who was trapped inside the magic gem the Manhunter had been wearing during the impersonation. This sometimes got really screwed up when Martian Manhunter [[CoversAlwaysLie appeared on the cover]] at the same time...
* In TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, Comicbook/{{Superman}} UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks, Franchise/{{Superman}} and Jimmy Olsen ComicBook/JimmyOlsen occasionally adventured inside the shrunken Kryptonian city of Kandor where Superman's powers didn't function, and adopted the Batman-and-Robin-inspired identities of Nightwing and Flamebird. They were later replaced by Kandorian scientist Van-Zee (Superman's IdenticalStranger) and his lab assistant Ak-Var. Then Nightwing became Dick Grayson's post-Robin identity; Flamebird has also been used by established characters PostCrisis ComicBook/PostCrisis (including, ironically enough, Betty Kane, who in the original continuity was the overly feminine Batgirl who fought crime with ''cosmetics''). And now all of the Kandorians have been set loose. There was also a brief period when {{Supergirl}} ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} and PowerGirl ComicBook/PowerGirl assumed the identities of Flamebird and Nightwing while operating inside Kandor.
* The character of "WonderGirl" "ComicBook/WonderGirl" originally appeared as the teenaged incarnation of WonderWoman Franchise/WonderWoman (just as the original Superboy was the youthful identity of Comicbook/{{Superman}}).Franchise/{{Superman}}). When the Comicbook/TeenTitans were created in the 1960s, Wonder Girl was added to the team...but the Titans were contemporaries of the JusticeLeagueOfAmerica, Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica, [[SeriesContinuityError and by extension of Wonder Woman]]. Thus the real Wonder Girl was explained four years later to be Donna Troy, an orphan rescued by Wonder Woman and raised among the Amazons. (This explanation would be subjected to repeated [[{{Retcon}} further revisions]] due to the [[TheDCU DC Universe]]'s Franchise/TheDCU's constant reboots and retoolings, with [[ContinuitySnarl the result being that Donna has an impossibly convoluted history even for a comic book character.character]].)



* SquadronSupreme started as JLA supervillain Expies, but later it was retconned that they're evil duplicates of alternate universe heroes.
* In {{Deadpool}}, Deadpool himself is convinced he's Wade Wilson (he isn't), and though Agent X claims to be the real deal, doubt has been cast on the assertion. It isn't helped that T-Ray ''also'' claims to be the real Wade Wilson.\\

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* SquadronSupreme ComicBook/SquadronSupreme started as JLA supervillain Expies, but later it was retconned that they're evil duplicates of alternate universe heroes.
* In {{Deadpool}}, SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}}, Deadpool himself is convinced he's Wade Wilson (he isn't), and though Agent X claims to be the real deal, doubt has been cast on the assertion. It isn't helped that T-Ray ''also'' claims to be the real Wade Wilson.\\



* "Ronin" seems to be the current go-to identity at the moment for ''Comicbook/TheAvengers''. It was first used by Echo (though original plans meant for it to be Daredevil), and now Hawkeye is using it. And when a "Ronin" shows up in ''ComicBook/UltimateSpiderMan'' (an AlternateUniverse), it turns out to be Moon Knight.
* Speaking of UltimateMarvel, the Ultimate version of Black Panther turns out to be Captain America, covering for the real Panther.
* Shortly after the Watergate scandal and resignation of [[RichardNixon President Richard Nixon]], Steve Rogers abandoned the identity of CaptainAmerica and adopted the new identity of Nomad, the man without a country. After a few months, Rogers returned to fighting crime as CaptainAmerica. Years later, Jack Monroe (aka Bucky), formerly the {{sidekick}} of the Captain America of the 1950's, took up the mantle of Nomad.
** Played with in a later storyline, when the U.S. government attempts to assert control over Captain America. Steve Rogers allows them to take the name, costume and shield away from him rather than become a government lapdog, only to don a [[PaletteSwap Palette Swapped]] costume and fight crime as "The Captain". When Rogers eventually reclaims the Captain America identity, the individual the government had placed as Captain America was given the "Captain" uniform, but was re-dubbed "The U.S. Agent".
* {{Spider-Man}} recently introduced a new heroine called Jackpot, who is probably best known so far for maybe possibly potentially being Mary Jane Watson. It wasn't, but no sooner did we find that out than the girl was killed. This girl is intended to be the "Uncle Ben" for the original Jackpot, who came up with the identity but passed it off to someone else as she didn't want the [[ComesGreatResponsibility Great Responsibility]].
** The "original" Jackpot (Sara Ehret) then receives an epic chewing out by Spidey for her RefusalOfTheCall resulting in an innocent's death which prompts her to take the identity for real...and shortly afterwards a villain learns her true identity (by utter coincidence) and sends a thug to kill her husband in front of their daughter, forcing both to go into hiding under false identities. Man, Spidey's rotten luck really is contagious, huh?
* ''{{Thunderbolts}}'': In the original version, Baron Zemo was disguised as "Citizen V", a LegacyCharacter for an obscure patriotic hero who fought alongside LaResistance during WorldWarII. After the betrayed TheCommissionerGordon character Dallas Riordan assumes the identity, and much other [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity Ensuing]], a disembodied Zemo finds himself [[GrandTheftMe in posession]] of the body of a ''real'' descendant of the original Citizen V.
* Inversion: one of the hinted identities for the ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' villain Hush was his dead sidekick Jason Todd, the second Robin. While this turned out to not be the case, the writers at DC Comics decided to bring back Jason Todd for real in a later story arc.
* ''ArchiesSonicTheHedgehog'': Fiona Fox was originally introduced as a robot created by [[BigBad Dr. Robotnik]] to seduce Tails and ultimately roboticize him, but ended up being destroyed. A few years later, we find out that the robot was based on the real Fiona, who had been Robotnik's prisoner. The real Fiona became a recurring character, and ultimately, recurring villain, as she ended up pulling a FaceHeelTurn to be [[EvilTwin Scourge's]] girlfriend.
* One arc in the Franchise/{{Batman}} comics explained how Batman had appropriated the identity of dead criminal 'Matches' Malone as cover for infiltrating the underworld. However, it turns out the real 'Matches' is not dead and he comes back, wanting to know who has been impersonating him.
** And while we're on the subject, [[Comicbook/{{Batgirl}} Cassandra]] [[Comicbook/{{Batgirl2000}} Cain]] might have been created simply to have someone wearing the costume of the new Batgirl introduced in the BatFamilyCrossover ''ComicBook/BatmanNoMansLand''. That new Batgirl was introduced near the beginning the story, while Cassandra was introduced several months later. After her two-part introduction, Cassandra's next appearance was in an issue that revealed the new Batgirl's identity as existing character ComicBook/{{Huntress}}. In that issue Huntress was then forced to abandon the costume, which was promptly given to the just-introduced Cassandra. (There may or may not be an AbortedArc involved).
* A double example from the Wildstorm universe, the android [[WildCATS Spartan/Yon Kohl/John Colt]] [[RetCon turned out to be]] imprinted with the mind of the original Yon Kohl/John Colt, who had died in the sixties. Later, it was revealed that Colt was NotQuiteDead and had created the identity of Kaizen Gamorra, an [[FaceHeelTurn insane dictator]]. After he was killed again (by the same guy, in the same way, but this time he's [[DeathIsCheap definitely, totally, for real dead. Probably.]]) Then we discover that there was a real Kaizen Gamorra who's not happy that Colt imprisoned him and stole his identity.
* The Invincible Man from Marvel Comics. The first person in the costume was the Super Skrull. Not only was he in a full costume, but he was pretending to be Dr. Franklin Storm, father to Susan and Johnny Storm of the Fantastic Four. The Skrulls kidnapped Franklin and pretended he had gone mad and given himself super powers while in prison. Reed Richards saw through the deception when he noticed Invincible Man's powers were similar to their own.
** The second person was Reed himself, who was kidnapped and brainwashed into becoming the Invincible Man to help kidnap the rest of the Fantastic Four. Ultimately, this was a plan created by Doctor Doom. Reed's version used technology from the Psycho-Man to play with people's emotions and create hallucinations.
** The third Invincible Man was Doom himself. Prior to the Secret Wars, he lost his body during the battle between Silver Surfer and Terrax and was forced to body-swap with a random pedestrian before he died, created a makeshift costume and weapons, and attacked the Latverian embassy. Doom's ultimate plan was to get to his resources, including his spare suit of armor, and recreate his body. The story arc ended with Doom getting his body back and leaving the innocent man's body once his mind was transferred by the Beyonder, whom he accidentally called to the scene (due to temporal paradoxes the Doom who fought in the Secret Wars was Doom from THAT point in time, with no knowledge of the Secret Wars).

to:

* "Ronin" seems to be the current go-to identity at the moment for ''Comicbook/TheAvengers''. It was first used by Echo (though original plans meant for it to be Daredevil), and now Hawkeye is using then ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} used it. And when a "Ronin" shows up in ''ComicBook/UltimateSpiderMan'' (an AlternateUniverse), it turns out to be Moon Knight.
ComicBook/MoonKnight.
* Speaking of UltimateMarvel, ComicBook/UltimateMarvel, the Ultimate version of Black Panther turns out to be Captain America, covering for the real Panther.
* Shortly after the Watergate scandal and resignation of [[RichardNixon [[UsefulNotes/RichardNixon President Richard Nixon]], Steve Rogers abandoned the identity of CaptainAmerica ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and adopted the new identity of Nomad, the man without a country. After a few months, Rogers returned to fighting crime as CaptainAmerica. ComicBook/CaptainAmerica. Years later, Jack Monroe (aka Bucky), ComicBook/{{Bucky|Barnes}}), formerly the {{sidekick}} of the Captain America of the 1950's, took up the mantle of Nomad.
**
Nomad. Played with in a later storyline, when the U.S. government attempts to assert control over Captain America. Steve Rogers allows them to take the name, costume and shield away from him rather than become a government lapdog, only to don a [[PaletteSwap Palette Swapped]] {{Palette Swap}}ped costume and fight crime as "The Captain". When Rogers eventually reclaims the Captain America identity, the individual the government had placed as Captain America was given the "Captain" uniform, but was re-dubbed "The U.S. Agent".
* {{Spider-Man}} recently Franchise/SpiderMan introduced a new heroine called Jackpot, who is probably best known so far for maybe possibly potentially being Mary Jane Watson. It wasn't, but no sooner did we find that out than the girl was killed. This girl is intended to be the "Uncle Ben" for the original Jackpot, who came up with the identity but passed it off to someone else as she didn't want the [[ComesGreatResponsibility Great Responsibility]].
**
Responsibility]]. The "original" Jackpot (Sara Ehret) then receives an epic chewing out by Spidey for her RefusalOfTheCall resulting in an innocent's death which prompts her to take the identity for real...and shortly afterwards a villain learns her true identity (by utter coincidence) and sends a thug to kill her husband in front of their daughter, forcing both to go into hiding under false identities. Man, Spidey's rotten luck really is contagious, huh?
* ''{{Thunderbolts}}'': ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'': In the original version, Baron Zemo was disguised as "Citizen V", a LegacyCharacter for an obscure patriotic hero who fought alongside LaResistance during WorldWarII. UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. After the betrayed TheCommissionerGordon character Dallas Riordan assumes the identity, and much other [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity Ensuing]], a disembodied Zemo finds himself [[GrandTheftMe in posession]] possession]] of the body of a ''real'' descendant of the original Citizen V.
* Inversion: one of the hinted identities for the ''Franchise/{{Batman}}'' villain Hush was his dead sidekick Jason Todd, the second Robin. While this turned out to not be the case, the writers at DC Comics decided to bring back Jason Todd for real in a later story arc.
* ''ArchiesSonicTheHedgehog'':
'' ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'': Fiona Fox was originally introduced as a robot created by [[BigBad Dr. Robotnik]] to seduce Tails and ultimately roboticize him, but ended up being destroyed. A few years later, we find out that the robot was based on the real Fiona, who had been Robotnik's prisoner. The real Fiona became a recurring character, and ultimately, recurring villain, as she ended up pulling a FaceHeelTurn to be [[EvilTwin Scourge's]] girlfriend.
* * ''Franchise/{{Batman}}''
** Inversion: one of the hinted identities for the villain Hush was Batman's dead sidekick Jason Todd, the second Robin. While this turned out to not be the case, the writers at DC Comics decided to bring back Jason Todd for real in a later story arc.
**
One arc in the Franchise/{{Batman}} comics explained how Batman had appropriated the identity of dead criminal 'Matches' Malone as cover for infiltrating the underworld. However, it turns out the real 'Matches' is not dead and he comes back, wanting to know who has been impersonating him.
** And while we're on the subject, [[Comicbook/{{Batgirl}} Cassandra]] [[Comicbook/{{Batgirl2000}} Cain]] might have been created simply to have someone wearing the costume of the new Batgirl introduced in the BatFamilyCrossover ''ComicBook/BatmanNoMansLand''. That new Batgirl was introduced near the beginning of the story, while Cassandra was introduced several months later. After her two-part introduction, Cassandra's next appearance was in an issue that revealed the new Batgirl's identity as existing character ComicBook/{{Huntress}}. In that issue Huntress was then forced to abandon the costume, which was promptly given to the just-introduced Cassandra. (There may or may not be an AbortedArc involved).
* A double example from the Wildstorm Creator/{{Wildstorm}} universe, the android [[WildCATS [[ComicBook/WildCATS Spartan/Yon Kohl/John Colt]] [[RetCon turned out to be]] imprinted with the mind of the original Yon Kohl/John Colt, who had died in the sixties. Later, it was revealed that Colt was NotQuiteDead and had created the identity of Kaizen Gamorra, an [[FaceHeelTurn insane dictator]]. After he was killed again (by the same guy, in the same way, but this time he's [[DeathIsCheap definitely, totally, for real dead. Probably.]]) Then we discover that there was a real Kaizen Gamorra who's not happy that Colt imprisoned him and stole his identity.
* The Invincible Man from Marvel Comics. The first person in the costume was the Super Skrull. Not only was he in a full costume, but he was pretending to be Dr. Franklin Storm, father to Susan and Johnny Storm of the Fantastic Four.ComicBook/FantasticFour. The Skrulls kidnapped Franklin and pretended he had gone mad and given himself super powers while in prison. Reed Richards saw through the deception when he noticed Invincible Man's powers were similar to their own. \n** The second person was Reed himself, who was kidnapped and brainwashed into becoming the Invincible Man to help kidnap the rest of the Fantastic Four. Ultimately, this was a plan created by Doctor Doom.SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom. Reed's version used technology from the Psycho-Man to play with people's emotions and create hallucinations. \n** The third Invincible Man was Doom himself. Prior to the Secret Wars, he lost his body during the battle between Silver Surfer ComicBook/SilverSurfer and Terrax and was forced to body-swap with a random pedestrian before he died, created a makeshift costume and weapons, and attacked the Latverian embassy. Doom's ultimate plan was to get to his resources, including his spare suit of armor, and recreate his body. The story arc ended with Doom getting his body back and leaving the innocent man's body once his mind was transferred by the Beyonder, whom he accidentally called to the scene (due to temporal paradoxes the Doom who fought in the Secret Wars was Doom from THAT point in time, with no knowledge of the Secret Wars).



* ''TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest'' sees a character pretending to be his own fictitious younger brother called [[InventedIndividual Ernest]] only to have a woman fall in love with his Ernest persona and also have someone else turn up pretending to be [[InventedIndividual Ernest]].

to:

* ''TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest'' ''Theatre/TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest'' sees a character pretending to be his own fictitious younger brother called [[InventedIndividual Ernest]] only to have a woman fall in love with his Ernest persona and also have someone else turn up pretending to be [[InventedIndividual Ernest]].



** ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail the King]]'', which sets the record straight: The Mandarin is a [[LegacyCharacter historical legacy]], he's [[RealAfterAll real,]] [[OhCrap and active,]] and, well:

to:

** ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail the King]]'', which sets the record straight: The Mandarin is a [[LegacyCharacter historical legacy]], he's [[RealAfterAll real,]] {{real|AfterAll}}, [[OhCrap and active,]] and, well:



* ''FamilyMatters'': The "Stefan" character started out as a chemically-induced, temporary transformation of [[ExtravertedNerd Urkel]]. Eventually, Steve was cloned, and the clone decided to permanently become Stefan. This one was a case of RealLifeWritesThePlot, as Jaleel White had become so fed up with the Urkel character that he wanted a chance to play someone more normal, and this was his chance to do so. Reportedly one of White's favorite roles to play was the BruceLeeClone, who was neither Steve or Stefan and in many ways was more ridiculous than both of them could ever be.

to:

* ''FamilyMatters'': ''Series/FamilyMatters'': The "Stefan" character started out as a chemically-induced, temporary transformation of [[ExtravertedNerd Urkel]]. Eventually, Steve was cloned, and the clone decided to permanently become Stefan. This one was a case of RealLifeWritesThePlot, as Jaleel White had become so fed up with the Urkel character that he wanted a chance to play someone more normal, and this was his chance to do so. Reportedly one of White's favorite roles to play was the BruceLeeClone, who was neither Steve or Stefan and in many ways was more ridiculous than both of them could ever be.



* ''{{Luann}}'': A plotline culminated in the revelation that the Gunther she'd been talking to for several weeks was actually her longtime crush Aaron Hill in an elaborate costume, trying to make some kind of point.

to:

* ''{{Luann}}'': ''ComicStrip/{{Luann}}'': A plotline culminated in the revelation that the Gunther she'd been talking to for several weeks was actually her longtime crush Aaron Hill in an elaborate costume, trying to make some kind of point.



* ''PlanescapeTorment'': The nameless protagonist has the option to tell almost everyone he meets that his name is "Adahn". Since the game is set in the [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve belief-shaped Outer Planes]], if he does this enough, a "real" Adahn will appear.
* VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2 turned out to be AllJustADream, but the enemies in it later turned up in non-dream Mario games.

to:

* ''PlanescapeTorment'': ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'': The nameless protagonist has the option to tell almost everyone he meets that his name is "Adahn". Since the game is set in the [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve belief-shaped Outer Planes]], if he does this enough, a "real" Adahn will appear.
* VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2 ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' turned out to be AllJustADream, but the enemies in it later turned up in non-dream Mario games.



* ''ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage'': [[spoiler: Don Paolo disguises himself as the well-known [[InspectorLestrade Inspector Chelmey.]]]] The real [[spoiler: Chelmey]] turns up in the second game.

to:

* ''ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage'': ''VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage'': [[spoiler: Don Paolo disguises himself as the well-known [[InspectorLestrade Inspector Chelmey.]]]] The real [[spoiler: Chelmey]] turns up in the second game.



* ''BuzzLightyearOfStarCommand'' featured the character Shiv Katall, a bounty hunter hired by Zurg to hunt down defectors from his organization. Unknown to him, Katall was actually Buzz in disguise (and before him, Commander Nebula), who used the identity to aid the defectors. Unfortunately the ruse was inadvertently exposed by Buzz's team. Some time after this however, Shiv Katall mysteriously reappears, his identity taken by [[spoiler:[[MirrorUniverse Evil Buzz Lightyear]]]].
* A variation: The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode 'Not Without My Anus' - treated as a an in-universe work of fiction - features a journalist/court prosecutor named Scott as a villain. Years later, in 'It's Christmas in Canada' the kids meet a ''real'' Scott. This Scott was introduced with five words: "That's Scott. He's a ''dick''."
** A later episode sees the debut of a real Ugly Bob, who moved to America because Americans think all Canadians look alike.

to:

* ''BuzzLightyearOfStarCommand'' ''WesternAnimation/BuzzLightyearOfStarCommand'' featured the character Shiv Katall, a bounty hunter hired by Zurg to hunt down defectors from his organization. Unknown to him, Katall was actually Buzz in disguise (and before him, Commander Nebula), who used the identity to aid the defectors. Unfortunately the ruse was inadvertently exposed by Buzz's team. Some time after this however, Shiv Katall mysteriously reappears, his identity taken by [[spoiler:[[MirrorUniverse Evil Buzz Lightyear]]]].
* A variation: The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode 'Not Without My Anus' - treated as a an in-universe work of fiction - features a journalist/court prosecutor named Scott as a villain. Years later, in 'It's Christmas in Canada' the kids meet a ''real'' Scott. This Scott was introduced with five words: "That's Scott. He's a ''dick''."
**
" A later episode sees the debut of a real Ugly Bob, who moved to America because Americans think all Canadians look alike.



* An episode of SpongeBobSquarePants had Mr. Krabs attempt to get [=SpongeBob=] to give up the soda drink hat he sold him by claiming that it belonged to someone who is dead now, making up the name of [[OverlyLongName Smitty Werbenjeggermanjenson]]. Later, it turns out that there actually is a fish in Bikini Bottom Cemetery by that name and that the hat did belong to him prior to his death.

to:

* An episode of SpongeBobSquarePants ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' had Mr. Krabs attempt to get [=SpongeBob=] to give up the soda drink hat he sold him by claiming that it belonged to someone who is dead now, making up the name of [[OverlyLongName Smitty Werbenjeggermanjenson]]. Later, it turns out that there actually is a fish in Bikini Bottom Cemetery by that name and that the hat did belong to him prior to his death.



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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheRealRemingtonSteele