History Main / TheRealRemingtonSteele

21st Oct '16 7:50:27 PM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Named for the TV series ''Series/RemingtonSteele'', whose premise had P.I. Laura Holt concoct a fictitious male employer to head her detective agency and thus appease chauvinist expectations of potential customers. After that, an anonymous rogue hijacked the identity (and thus the agency) himself.

to:

Named for the TV series ''Series/RemingtonSteele'', whose premise had P.I. Laura Holt concoct a fictitious male employer to head her detective agency and thus appease chauvinist expectations of potential customers. After that, customers- only for an anonymous rogue hijacked to hijack the identity (and thus the agency) himself.
18th May '16 4:22:42 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Editing created an example of this in the MarvelCinematicUniverse:

to:

* Editing created an example of this in the MarvelCinematicUniverse:Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse:
15th Mar '16 2:16:26 PM margdean56
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* During the "Identity Crisis" storyline, Franchise/SpiderMan adopted ''four'' separate disguises (Dusk, Hornet, Prodigy, and Ricochet) to operate while framed for murder.[[note]]This was actually quite a clever move on Spidey's part; he realized that if he went off the radar and a new costumed hero immediately showed up with similar abilities and body build, people would be suspicious. But if ''four'' such people showed up, it didn't matter if his enemies suspected one of them was a disguised Spider-Man because would could possibly suspect ''all of them''? And it gave him plenty of margin for error, since if one identity was blown he still had others to fall back on. To further the trickery, two of the fake identities (Dusk and Ricochet) were ''supervillains''.[[/note]] After the storyline's resolution, a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] hero who had nothing to do with Spidey obtained the abandoned costumes and gave them to four new characters, who he trained to form the short-lived ''ComicBook/{{Slingers}}''.

to:

* During the "Identity Crisis" storyline, Franchise/SpiderMan adopted ''four'' separate disguises (Dusk, Hornet, Prodigy, and Ricochet) to operate while framed for murder.[[note]]This was actually quite a clever move on Spidey's part; he realized that if he went off the radar and a new costumed hero immediately showed up with similar abilities and body build, people would be suspicious. But if ''four'' such people showed up, it didn't matter if his enemies suspected one of them was a disguised Spider-Man because would who could possibly suspect ''all of them''? And it gave him plenty of margin for error, since if one identity was blown he still had others to fall back on. To further the trickery, two of the fake identities (Dusk and Ricochet) were ''supervillains''.[[/note]] After the storyline's resolution, a [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] hero who had nothing to do with Spidey obtained the abandoned costumes and gave them to four new characters, who he trained to form the short-lived ''ComicBook/{{Slingers}}''.
13th Mar '16 12:22:44 PM Vir
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' had Mr. Krabs attempt to get [=SpongeBob=] to give up the soda drink hat he sold him by claiming that it belonged to someone who is dead now, making up the name of [[OverlyLongName Smitty Werbenjeggermanjenson]]. Later, it turns out that there actually is a fish in Bikini Bottom Cemetery by that name and that the hat did belong to him prior to his death.

to:

* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/SpongebobSquarepants'' ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants'' had Mr. Krabs attempt to get [=SpongeBob=] to give up the soda drink hat he sold him by claiming that it belonged to someone who is dead now, making up the name of [[OverlyLongName Smitty Werbenjeggermanjenson]]. Later, it turns out that there actually is a fish in Bikini Bottom Cemetery by that name and that the hat did belong to him prior to his death.
7th Mar '16 7:37:38 PM moon_custafer
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Daniel Pinkwater’s ''Young Adult Novel'' contains a variant: the Wild Dada Ducks, a group of schoolboys, amuse themselves by writing chapters from an imaginary novel called “Kevin Shapiro, Boy Orphan” (which contains many examples of DeathByNewberryMedal). When they find out their school has a real Kevin Shapiro, they embark on a new project — to make him the most popular kid in school. Shapiro isn’t too happy with their helpful meddling, and concocts plans of his own…



----

to:

----
29th Dec '15 4:38:30 AM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Invincible Man from Marvel Comics. The first person in the costume was the Super Skrull. Not only was he in a full costume, but he was pretending to be Dr. Franklin Storm, father to Susan and Johnny Storm of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. The Skrulls kidnapped Franklin and pretended he had gone mad and given himself super powers while in prison. Reed Richards saw through the deception when he noticed Invincible Man's powers were similar to their own. The second person was Reed himself, who was kidnapped and brainwashed into becoming the Invincible Man to help kidnap the rest of the Fantastic Four. Ultimately, this was a plan created by SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom. Reed's version used technology from the Psycho-Man to play with people's emotions and create hallucinations. The third Invincible Man was Doom himself. Prior to the Secret Wars, he lost his body during the battle between ComicBook/SilverSurfer and Terrax and was forced to body-swap with a random pedestrian before he died, created a makeshift costume and weapons, and attacked the Latverian embassy. Doom's ultimate plan was to get to his resources, including his spare suit of armor, and recreate his body. The story arc ended with Doom getting his body back and leaving the innocent man's body once his mind was transferred by the Beyonder, whom he accidentally called to the scene (due to temporal paradoxes the Doom who fought in the Secret Wars was Doom from THAT point in time, with no knowledge of the Secret Wars).

to:

* The Invincible Man from Marvel Comics. The first person in the costume was the Super Skrull. Not only was he in a full costume, but he was pretending to be Dr. Franklin Storm, father to Susan and Johnny Storm of the ComicBook/FantasticFour. The Skrulls kidnapped Franklin and pretended he had gone mad and given himself super powers while in prison. Reed Richards saw through the deception when he noticed Invincible Man's powers were similar to their own. The second person was Reed himself, who was kidnapped and brainwashed into becoming the Invincible Man to help kidnap the rest of the Fantastic Four. Ultimately, this was a plan created by SelfDemonstrating/DoctorDoom.Doctor Doom. Reed's version used technology from the Psycho-Man to play with people's emotions and create hallucinations. The third Invincible Man was Doom himself. Prior to the Secret Wars, he lost his body during the battle between ComicBook/SilverSurfer and Terrax and was forced to body-swap with a random pedestrian before he died, created a makeshift costume and weapons, and attacked the Latverian embassy. Doom's ultimate plan was to get to his resources, including his spare suit of armor, and recreate his body. The story arc ended with Doom getting his body back and leaving the innocent man's body once his mind was transferred by the Beyonder, whom he accidentally called to the scene (due to temporal paradoxes the Doom who fought in the Secret Wars was Doom from THAT point in time, with no knowledge of the Secret Wars).
18th Oct '15 9:38:43 AM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In the 90s, another storyline saw the return of the Erik the Red identity, who was even {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the text as being someone else we knew in disguise. Later, it turned out that he was SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}}, who has at times gone by the alias of "Erik Lehnsherr".

to:

In the 90s, another storyline saw the return of the Erik the Red identity, who was even {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the text as being someone else we knew in disguise. Later, it turned out that he was SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}}, ComicBook/{{Magneto}}, who has at times gone by the alias of "Erik Lehnsherr".
24th Sep '15 7:32:56 AM AlexHoskins
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Probably one of the most [[WhamEpisode Wham-tastic]] examples of this trope: [[spoiler: Madara Uchiha]] in ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''. In an interesting twist, it's his very ''entrance'' that immediately reveals the previously supposed [[spoiler: Madara]] as a fake.

to:

* Probably one two of the most [[WhamEpisode Wham-tastic]] examples of this trope: [[spoiler: Madara Uchiha]] and [[spoiler:Obito Uchiha]] in ''Manga/{{Naruto}}''. In an interesting twist, it's his the former's very ''entrance'' that immediately reveals the previously supposed [[spoiler: Madara]] as a fake.
11th Sep '15 7:28:27 AM HeraldAlberich
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/HarryPotter'': Mad-Eye Moody, the [[HighTurnoverRate DADA teacher]] in Harry's fourth year, turns out to be an impostor who's been keeping the real Moody alive in his own BagOfHolding. Early into book five, Harry finds himself in the strange position of meeting someone he thought he'd known for a year for the first time.

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'': Mad-Eye Moody, the [[HighTurnoverRate DADA teacher]] in Harry's [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire fourth year, year]], turns out to be an impostor who's been keeping the real Moody alive in his own BagOfHolding. Early into [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix book five, five]], Harry finds himself in the strange position of meeting someone he thought he'd known for a year for the first time.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' turned out to be AllJustADream, but the enemies in it later turned up in non-dream Mario games.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'' turned out to be AllJustADream, but the enemies in it later turned up in non-dream Mario ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' games.
11th Sep '15 7:22:11 AM HeraldAlberich
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->'''Jackson:''' There's somebody who wants to meet you.
-->'''Trevor:''' Do I know him?
-->'''Jackson:''' No, but you took his name and now he wants it back.

to:

-->'''Jackson:''' --->'''Jackson:''' There's somebody who wants to meet you.
-->'''Trevor:'''
you.\\
'''Trevor:'''
Do I know him?
-->'''Jackson:'''
him?\\
'''Jackson:'''
No, but you took his name and now he wants it back.



** Zuko: "[[DidntSeeThatComing I did not see that one coming]]."

to:

** Zuko: "[[DidntSeeThatComing -->'''Zuko:''' [[DidntSeeThatComing I did not see that one coming]]."



* A variation: The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode 'Not Without My Anus' - treated as an in-universe work of fiction - features a journalist/court prosecutor named Scott as a villain. Years later, in 'It's Christmas in Canada' the kids meet a ''real'' Scott. This Scott was introduced with five words: "That's Scott. He's a ''dick''." A later episode sees the debut of a real Ugly Bob, who moved to America because Americans think all Canadians look alike.

to:

* A variation: The ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode 'Not "Not Without My Anus' - treated Anus"--treated as an in-universe work of fiction - features fiction--features a journalist/court prosecutor named Scott as a villain. Years later, in 'It's "It's Christmas in Canada' Canada" the kids meet a ''real'' Scott. This Scott was introduced with five words: "That's Scott. He's a ''dick''." A later episode sees the debut of a real Ugly Bob, who moved to America because Americans think all Canadians look alike.
This list shows the last 10 events of 44. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheRealRemingtonSteele