History Main / TheQueensLatin

11th Feb '16 4:02:57 AM shnen
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The trope about American accents being older than modern British accents (whatever these two terms even mean) does not have much linguistic basis. They have both changed in various different ways, making it very hard to quantify such a thing (e.g. most British accents are non-rhotic, while most American accents are rhotic - though there are outliers for both - but most Americans have merged 'caught' and 'cot', unlike in Britain - which should be counted as a greater change? By how much? What about the fact that for many Americans the 'r' sound has actually changed, though still pronounced - how much should it count for now? The whole thing is rather arbitrary and unscientific, and is not particularly important for the article, and so I am removing it.
Giving the characters non-British accents (American, Australian, Canadian, etc.) ought to be just as acceptable as giving them British ones, but this is usually avoided, because it makes the characters sound "[[RealityIsUnrealistic inauthentic]]". Britain's long history causes British accents to seem somehow "older" -- they are used to suggest a sense of antiquity. This is actually inaccurate from a linguistic perspective; the modern British accents actually represent a more evolved form of English. Older English accents were closer to modern Irish and American accents.
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Giving the characters non-British accents (American, Australian, Canadian, etc.) ought to be just as acceptable as giving them British ones, but this is usually avoided, because it makes the characters sound "[[RealityIsUnrealistic inauthentic]]". Britain's long history causes British accents to seem somehow "older" -- they are used to suggest a sense of antiquity. This is actually inaccurate from a linguistic perspective; the modern British accents actually represent a more evolved form of English. Older English accents were closer to modern Irish and American accents.\n
1st Dec '15 4:12:31 PM trulymadmoves
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* Richard Jeni has a bit where, before he's willing to order lobster in a restaurant that keeps them live in a tank, he has to get drunk first, and that when he gets drunk, he acts like a Roman emperor ordering the lobsters to their deaths. Said Roman emperor's final request to his waiter is to "find out why all the Romans in the movies have English accents."
30th Nov '15 3:15:09 PM trulymadmoves
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* In ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon'', adult Vikings speak in Scottish accents while the teens speak in American accents. This was by the request of Creator/GerardButler, who asked to use his natural voice and to have other Scottish actors brought in. As in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' below, Butler's choice to be a Scottish Viking was subject to some bewilderment, while no one questioned the American Vikings. Indeed, characters from fairytale-style worlds speaking in American accents could be seen as the animated equivalent to this trope.

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** This film serves as a perfect example for how deeply-ingrained this trope is: Creator/GerardButler's choice to use his natural Scottish accent in the role of Leonidas was received with some confusion and amusement from audiences, and yet is it any stranger than Greeks with ''English'' accents?
16th Nov '15 8:28:20 AM FF32
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* Subverted in the Roman section of ''{{Blackadder}} Back and Forth''. The Roman characters start off speaking in TheQueensLatin until an officer arrives who congratulates them on practicing the local (British) language and then continues in actual Latin. RuleOfFunny applies, as the actual local language at this time would be akin to an archaic form of Welsh.
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* Subverted in the Roman section of ''{{Blackadder}} ''Series/{{Blackadder}} Back and Forth''. The Roman characters start off speaking in TheQueensLatin until an officer arrives who congratulates them on practicing the local (British) language and then continues in actual Latin. RuleOfFunny applies, as the actual local language at this time would be akin to an archaic form of Welsh.
5th Nov '15 9:56:28 AM nombretomado
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* In MarvelComics, mythic figures like {{Thor}} and [[ComicBook/TheIncredibleHercules Hercules]] almost always speak in a faux-Shakespearean dialect - using stiltedly formal diction and throwing around words like "forsooth" and "verily," often in a stylized [[ForeignLookingFont font]] - rather than even try to guess at how an ancient Norse god or ancient Greek god would speak. (Of course, being gods and not humans, they'd most likely talk - and [[DivineRaceLift look]] - however the Hel/Hades they wanted.)
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* In MarvelComics, mythic figures like {{Thor}} [[ComicBook/TheMightyThor Thor]] and [[ComicBook/TheIncredibleHercules Hercules]] almost always speak in a faux-Shakespearean dialect - using stiltedly formal diction and throwing around words like "forsooth" and "verily," often in a stylized [[ForeignLookingFont font]] - rather than even try to guess at how an ancient Norse god or ancient Greek god would speak. (Of course, being gods and not humans, they'd most likely talk - and [[DivineRaceLift look]] - however the Hel/Hades they wanted.)
4th Nov '15 4:59:32 PM nombretomado
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* In MarvelComics, mythic figures like {{Thor}} and [[TheIncredibleHercules Hercules]] almost alway speak in a faux-Shakespearean dialect - using stiltedly formal diction and throwing around words like "forsooth" and "verily," often in a stylized [[ForeignLookingFont font]] - rather than even try to guess at how an ancient Norse god or ancient Greek god would speak. (Of course, being gods and not humans, they'd most likely talk - and [[DivineRaceLift look]] - however the Hel/Hades they wanted.)
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* In MarvelComics, mythic figures like {{Thor}} and [[TheIncredibleHercules [[ComicBook/TheIncredibleHercules Hercules]] almost alway always speak in a faux-Shakespearean dialect - using stiltedly formal diction and throwing around words like "forsooth" and "verily," often in a stylized [[ForeignLookingFont font]] - rather than even try to guess at how an ancient Norse god or ancient Greek god would speak. (Of course, being gods and not humans, they'd most likely talk - and [[DivineRaceLift look]] - however the Hel/Hades they wanted.)
23rd Oct '15 6:14:11 AM pinkdalek
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* ''Series/DoctorWho''
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* ''Series/DoctorWho''''Series/DoctorWho'' has a long, long habit of giving characters from every single historical period and place theatrical English accents. ** Lampshaded hilariously in the novelisation of ''Doctor Who and the Invasion of the Dinosaurs'' which describes a pre-Medieval Saxon as speaking in "a strong Midlands accent". ** One official ''Series/DoctorWho'' short story - "The Man Who Wouldn't Give Up" in ''Short Trips: Past Tense'' - suggests the TARDIS [[TranslatorMicrobes Translation Circuits]] have an odd sense of humour, and give people BBC accents because they think it's funny.

** One official ''Series/DoctorWho'' short story - "The Man Who Wouldn't Give Up" in ''Short Trips: Past Tense'' - suggests the TARDIS [[TranslatorMicrobes Translation Circuits]] have an odd sense of humour, and give people BBC accents because they think it's funny.
6th Sep '15 6:04:34 AM Vir
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** Funnily enough, the same company's ''StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' uses British accents to denote the Empire ([[PuttingOnTheReich especially Imperial Intelligence and the Imperial Military]]).
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** Funnily enough, the same company's ''StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' uses British accents to denote the Empire ([[PuttingOnTheReich especially Imperial Intelligence and the Imperial Military]]).
22nd Aug '15 7:44:02 PM karstovich2
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** Rose Tyler asks the Ninth Doctor, "If you're from another planet, why do you sound like you're from the north [of England]?" "Lots of planets have a north!"
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** Rose Tyler asks the Ninth Doctor, "If you're from another planet, why do you sound like you're from the north North [of England]?" "Lots of planets have a north!"North!"
21st Aug '15 1:26:19 PM Fauxlosophe
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* Unusual inversion in the film version of ''The Eagle'': the Roman characters have American accents, while the Briton (as in, ancient Celts) characters are played by British actors speaking in their native accents. For the purposes of the movie, English stands in for Latin while Scots Gaelic stands in for Pictish (an extinct language of which almost nothing is known).
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* Unusual inversion in the film version of ''The Eagle'': the Roman characters have American accents, while the Briton (as in, ancient Celts) characters are played by British actors speaking in their native accents. For the purposes of the movie, English stands in for Latin while Scots Gaelic stands in for Pictish (an extinct language of which almost nothing is known).loosely related to Welsh and Breton).
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