History Main / TheQueensLatin

22nd May '16 3:15:35 PM OlmoJV
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* In {{Film/Pompeii}}, Creator/KieferSutherland, a Canadian who works in California, affects a ''ridiculous'' lisping British accent that makes him sound more like Creator/TrumanCapote.

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* In {{Film/Pompeii}}, ''{{Film/Pompeii}}'', Creator/KieferSutherland, a Canadian who works in California, affects a ''ridiculous'' lisping British accent that makes him sound more like Creator/TrumanCapote.
27th Mar '16 8:40:57 AM c4000
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This trope leads many Ancient Roman (Greek, Trojan, etc.) characters to not only sound but also physically look like Anglo-Saxons rather than Romans. Historians have speculated that the average Roman man had tan or olive skin, usually dark hair[[note]]This can be deduced from the fact that when the Empire expanded into Gaul, Germany and Britain, the existence of people with blonde and red hair caused a sensation in Rome as nobody had ever seen this before. When the first blonde slaves were shipped back, people competed to own them, driving up their prices, and Roman women frequently shaved the unfortunate slaves for their hair so as to turn it into wigs. Then they discovered bleaching... [[/note]], and stood about 5-foot-6, much like a modern Italian. The Roman Empire reached northern Europe, but Romans weren't ''all'' northern Europeans. (This particular bit of CreatorProvincialism also leads, even more egregiously, to Biblical characters- ancient people from the Middle East- looking a lot like North Europeans in North European art. Admittedly the artists possibly weren't aware they might have looked rather different, and if they were, the inauthenticity probably wouldn't have troubled artistic sensibilities until fairly recently.)

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This trope leads many Ancient Roman (Greek, Trojan, etc.) characters to not only sound but also physically look like Anglo-Saxons rather than Romans. Historians have speculated that the average Roman man had tan or olive skin, usually dark hair[[note]]This can be deduced from the fact that when the Empire expanded into Gaul, Germany and Britain, the existence of people with blonde and red hair caused a sensation in Rome as nobody had ever seen this before. When the first blonde slaves were shipped back, people competed to own them, driving up their prices, and Roman women frequently shaved the unfortunate slaves for their hair so as to turn it into wigs. Then they discovered bleaching... [[/note]], and stood about 5-foot-6, much like a modern Italian.5-foot-6. The Roman Empire reached northern Europe, but Romans weren't ''all'' northern Europeans. (This particular bit of CreatorProvincialism also leads, even more egregiously, to Biblical characters- ancient people from the Middle East- looking a lot like North Europeans in North European art. Admittedly the artists possibly weren't aware they might have looked rather different, and if they were, the inauthenticity probably wouldn't have troubled artistic sensibilities until fairly recently.)
21st Mar '16 4:27:02 PM nombretomado
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** Amusingly inverted in an episode of ''BoyMeetsWorld'' in which Stewart Minkis is cast as Hamlet. Having read that Elizabethan-era English sounded quite similar to [[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents Appalachian dialects in America]], he attempts to play Hamlet with a 19th-century frontier inflection and ends up sounding like [[TheAndyGriffithShow Gomer Pyle]].

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** Amusingly inverted in an episode of ''BoyMeetsWorld'' ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' in which Stewart Minkis is cast as Hamlet. Having read that Elizabethan-era English sounded quite similar to [[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents Appalachian dialects in America]], he attempts to play Hamlet with a 19th-century frontier inflection and ends up sounding like [[TheAndyGriffithShow [[Series/TheAndyGriffithShow Gomer Pyle]].
18th Mar '16 8:50:07 PM Hossmeister
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27th Feb '16 10:42:48 AM nombretomado
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* Native Australian ChrisHemsworth plays ''Film/{{Thor}}'' in the Marvel Comics films with a rather stylized "classical" English accent (as opposed to, say, a Scandinavian one). Though, granted, this ''is'' true to the source material (see the Comic Books section above). In ''Film/TheAvengers'' this is PlayedForLaughs when Tony Stark refers to one of Thor's speeches as "Shakespeare in the Park" and proceeds to imitate him.

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* Native Australian ChrisHemsworth plays ''Film/{{Thor}}'' in the Marvel Comics films with a rather stylized "classical" English accent (as opposed to, say, a Scandinavian one). Though, granted, this ''is'' true to the source material (see the Comic Books section above). In ''Film/TheAvengers'' ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' this is PlayedForLaughs when Tony Stark refers to one of Thor's speeches as "Shakespeare in the Park" and proceeds to imitate him.
24th Feb '16 11:40:25 PM Chabal2
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* Very downplayed in ''{{Series/Kaamelott}}'' (a French series), where the only noticeable accent-representing-class is on one of the peasants (thanks to the actor's usual roles being salt-of-the-earth types which his native accent is associated with). Of course, the fact that very few people in the series have anything remotely resembling class (including the actual Romans) might have something to do with it...
24th Feb '16 3:26:46 PM BlazTorch314
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* CraigFerguson in his Netflix comedy special "I'm Here to Help" states that this trope is especially weird and distracting for him, as he grew up watching a lot of [[Film/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus Monty Python]] and now can't watch a movie like, say ''Film/ThreeHundred'', without thinking something weird's about to happen.
--> '''Craig (as Leonidas)''': [[RousingSpeech "Tonight, we dine in Hell!"]]
--> '''(as a soldier with a Cockney accent)''': [[ComicallyMissingThePoint "What are we having?"]]
11th Feb '16 4:02:57 AM shnen
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Giving the characters non-British accents (American, Australian, Canadian, etc.) ought to be just as acceptable as giving them British ones, but this is usually avoided, because it makes the characters sound "[[RealityIsUnrealistic inauthentic]]". Britain's long history causes British accents to seem somehow "older" -- they are used to suggest a sense of antiquity. This is actually inaccurate from a linguistic perspective; the modern British accents actually represent a more evolved form of English. Older English accents were closer to modern Irish and American accents.

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Giving the characters non-British accents (American, Australian, Canadian, etc.) ought to be just as acceptable as giving them British ones, but this is usually avoided, because it makes the characters sound "[[RealityIsUnrealistic inauthentic]]". Britain's long history causes British accents to seem somehow "older" -- they are used to suggest a sense of antiquity. This is actually inaccurate from a linguistic perspective; the modern British accents actually represent a more evolved form of English. Older English accents were closer to modern Irish and American accents.\n
1st Dec '15 4:12:31 PM trulymadmoves
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* Richard Jeni has a bit where, before he's willing to order lobster in a restaurant that keeps them live in a tank, he has to get drunk first, and that when he gets drunk, he acts like a Roman emperor ordering the lobsters to their deaths. Said Roman emperor's final request to his waiter is to "find out why all the Romans in the movies have English accents."
30th Nov '15 3:15:09 PM trulymadmoves
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* In ''WesternAnimation/HowToTrainYourDragon'', adult Vikings speak in Scottish accents while the teens speak in American accents. This was by the request of Creator/GerardButler, who asked to use his natural voice and to have other Scottish actors brought in. As in ''Film/ThreeHundred'' below, Butler's choice to be a Scottish Viking was subject to some bewilderment, while no one questioned the American Vikings. Indeed, characters from fairytale-style worlds speaking in American accents could be seen as the animated equivalent to this trope.


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** This film serves as a perfect example for how deeply-ingrained this trope is: Creator/GerardButler's choice to use his natural Scottish accent in the role of Leonidas was received with some confusion and amusement from audiences, and yet is it any stranger than Greeks with ''English'' accents?
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