History Main / TheQueensLatin

19th Sep '16 5:28:13 AM C2
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19th Sep '16 1:42:05 AM LlamaRamaDingDong
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** All of the Asgardian characters at least attempt an RP accent. American Jamie Alexander said they used TomHiddleston (who went to Cambridge and is the only one who didn't need to fake it) as their goal reference.
10th Sep '16 9:19:44 AM erforce
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* ''Film/BenHur'' had all of its Romans played by Brits, its Hebrews played by Americans, and its one Arab guy played by... a Welshman with a generic Arabian accent.

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* ''Film/BenHur'' ''Film/BenHur1959'' had all of its Romans played by Brits, its Hebrews played by Americans, and its one Arab guy played by... a Welshman with a generic Arabian accent.



* Simmons also turns up as the gentle tavern maid in ''TheEgyptian''. If you were a strong warrior type or a rough customer in that picture you were played by an American; if you were a noble, elegant or sensitive creature, you were played by a Brit. And that includes Qaptah the thief -- after all, he'd ''tell'' you that he was a noble, elegant and sensitive creature.

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* Simmons also turns up as the gentle tavern maid in ''TheEgyptian''.''Film/TheEgyptian''. If you were a strong warrior type or a rough customer in that picture you were played by an American; if you were a noble, elegant or sensitive creature, you were played by a Brit. And that includes Qaptah the thief -- after all, he'd ''tell'' you that he was a noble, elegant and sensitive creature.



* In ''Literature/DangerousLiaisons'' the upper-class characters played by John Malkovich, Uma Thurman and Glenn Close speak plain American English, while the servants have broad Cockney accents.

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* In ''Literature/DangerousLiaisons'' ''Film/DangerousLiaisons'' the upper-class characters played by John Malkovich, Uma Thurman and Glenn Close speak plain American English, while the servants have broad Cockney accents.
7th Sep '16 9:35:16 AM thisissostupid
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* Tony Curtis has a persistent quote following him for decades - a 1950's gossip columnist mocked him, claiming that in one of his SwordAndSandal films he pronounced "Yonder lies the castle of my father" with a distinct Bronx accent, as "Yondah lies the castle of my foddah". The line itself is [[BeamMeUpScotty fairly mangled]], but Tony was still "baffled" as to why a Jewish New York accent is considered more inappropriate for a fantasy character than [[Creator/LaurenceOlivier Sir Laurence Oliver's]] dulcet British tones.
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6th Sep '16 11:26:51 AM AgProv
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* It was once humorously noted in ''{{Time}}'' magazine that there is a radio dramatization of the Koran that is read by a British person. So even God has a British accent!

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* It was once humorously noted in ''{{Time}}'' magazine that there is a radio dramatization of the Koran that is read by a British person. So even God even Allah has a British accent!
5th Sep '16 10:33:20 AM erforce
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* 2007's ''Film/{{Beowulf}}'' does something like this: although the Zealanders speak in fake, but at least subtle, Danish accents -- Grendel even speaks [[HistoryOfEnglish Old English]] -- the Geats speak in the actors' natural accents, which means that the title character, since he's played by Ray Winstone, is a Cockney ("I'm 'ere to kiw your monstah."), and Wiglaf speaks in an attempt at a Welsh accent.

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* 2007's ''Film/{{Beowulf}}'' ''Film/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' does something like this: although the Zealanders speak in fake, but at least subtle, Danish accents -- Grendel even speaks [[HistoryOfEnglish Old English]] -- the Geats speak in the actors' natural accents, which means that the title character, since he's played by Ray Winstone, is a Cockney ("I'm 'ere to kiw your monstah."), and Wiglaf speaks in an attempt at a Welsh accent.
31st Aug '16 9:44:28 AM erforce
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* In ''Film/TheMaskOfZorro'', both Don Diego and Don Rafael (the first Zorro and his archnemesis) speak with British accents despite being Mexican, partly because they are of the nobility, partly because they're played by British actors AnthonyHopkins and Stuart Wilson. The other Dons all have Hispanic accents, however.

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* In ''Film/TheMaskOfZorro'', both Don Diego and Don Rafael (the first Zorro and his archnemesis) speak with British accents despite being Mexican, partly because they are of the nobility, partly because they're played by British actors AnthonyHopkins Creator/AnthonyHopkins and Stuart Wilson. The other Dons all have Hispanic accents, however.
22nd May '16 3:15:35 PM OlmoJV
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* In {{Film/Pompeii}}, Creator/KieferSutherland, a Canadian who works in California, affects a ''ridiculous'' lisping British accent that makes him sound more like Creator/TrumanCapote.

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* In {{Film/Pompeii}}, ''{{Film/Pompeii}}'', Creator/KieferSutherland, a Canadian who works in California, affects a ''ridiculous'' lisping British accent that makes him sound more like Creator/TrumanCapote.
27th Mar '16 8:40:57 AM c4000
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This trope leads many Ancient Roman (Greek, Trojan, etc.) characters to not only sound but also physically look like Anglo-Saxons rather than Romans. Historians have speculated that the average Roman man had tan or olive skin, usually dark hair[[note]]This can be deduced from the fact that when the Empire expanded into Gaul, Germany and Britain, the existence of people with blonde and red hair caused a sensation in Rome as nobody had ever seen this before. When the first blonde slaves were shipped back, people competed to own them, driving up their prices, and Roman women frequently shaved the unfortunate slaves for their hair so as to turn it into wigs. Then they discovered bleaching... [[/note]], and stood about 5-foot-6, much like a modern Italian. The Roman Empire reached northern Europe, but Romans weren't ''all'' northern Europeans. (This particular bit of CreatorProvincialism also leads, even more egregiously, to Biblical characters- ancient people from the Middle East- looking a lot like North Europeans in North European art. Admittedly the artists possibly weren't aware they might have looked rather different, and if they were, the inauthenticity probably wouldn't have troubled artistic sensibilities until fairly recently.)

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This trope leads many Ancient Roman (Greek, Trojan, etc.) characters to not only sound but also physically look like Anglo-Saxons rather than Romans. Historians have speculated that the average Roman man had tan or olive skin, usually dark hair[[note]]This can be deduced from the fact that when the Empire expanded into Gaul, Germany and Britain, the existence of people with blonde and red hair caused a sensation in Rome as nobody had ever seen this before. When the first blonde slaves were shipped back, people competed to own them, driving up their prices, and Roman women frequently shaved the unfortunate slaves for their hair so as to turn it into wigs. Then they discovered bleaching... [[/note]], and stood about 5-foot-6, much like a modern Italian.5-foot-6. The Roman Empire reached northern Europe, but Romans weren't ''all'' northern Europeans. (This particular bit of CreatorProvincialism also leads, even more egregiously, to Biblical characters- ancient people from the Middle East- looking a lot like North Europeans in North European art. Admittedly the artists possibly weren't aware they might have looked rather different, and if they were, the inauthenticity probably wouldn't have troubled artistic sensibilities until fairly recently.)
21st Mar '16 4:27:02 PM nombretomado
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** Amusingly inverted in an episode of ''BoyMeetsWorld'' in which Stewart Minkis is cast as Hamlet. Having read that Elizabethan-era English sounded quite similar to [[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents Appalachian dialects in America]], he attempts to play Hamlet with a 19th-century frontier inflection and ends up sounding like [[TheAndyGriffithShow Gomer Pyle]].

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** Amusingly inverted in an episode of ''BoyMeetsWorld'' ''Series/BoyMeetsWorld'' in which Stewart Minkis is cast as Hamlet. Having read that Elizabethan-era English sounded quite similar to [[UsefulNotes/AmericanAccents Appalachian dialects in America]], he attempts to play Hamlet with a 19th-century frontier inflection and ends up sounding like [[TheAndyGriffithShow [[Series/TheAndyGriffithShow Gomer Pyle]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheQueensLatin