History Main / TheNothingAfterDeath

22nd Apr '16 5:23:20 AM Morgenthaler
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* Some {{Near Death Experience}}s are in part or wholly described as such - total sensory deprivation and paralysis, with a loss of ability to perceive the passage of time. This may be related to sleep paralysis, which is believed to be responsible for many claims of AlienAbduction and claims of visitation by otherworldly beings. Other experiences start out as this but transform into more conventional "pleasant" ones later.
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[[folder:Real Life]]
* Some {{Near Death Experience}}s are in part or wholly described as such - total sensory deprivation and paralysis, with a loss of ability to perceive the passage of time. This may be related to sleep paralysis, which is believed to be responsible for many claims of AlienAbduction and claims of visitation by otherworldly beings. Other experiences start out as this but transform into more conventional "pleasant" ones later.
[[/folder]]
12th Apr '16 7:12:57 PM Fireblood
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** {{Discussed}} when Arya and Sandor come across a dying farmer. Wondering why he doesn't kill himself to end the pain, Arya says "Nothing could be worse than this." The farmer replies that maybe nothing ''is'' worse than this. Arya argues it can't, based on nothing being well, ''[[ShapedLikeItself nothing]].'' In the end, [[MercyKill Sandor kills him]].

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** {{Discussed}} when Arya and Sandor come across a dying farmer. Wondering why he doesn't kill himself to end the pain, Arya says "Nothing could be worse than this." The farmer replies that maybe nothing ''is'' worse than this. Arya argues it can't, couldn't be, based on nothing being well, ''[[ShapedLikeItself nothing]].'' In the end, [[MercyKill Sandor kills him]].
12th Apr '16 7:12:11 PM Fireblood
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** {{Discussed}} when Arya and Sandor come across a dying farmer. Wondering why he doesn't kill himself to end the pain, Arya says "Nothing could be worse than this." The farmer replies that maybe nothing ''is'' worse than this. Arya argues it can't, based on nothing being well, ''[[ShapedLikeItself nothing]].'' In the end, [[MercyKill Sandor kills him]].



* Myth/NorseMythology has many places the dead can go after they pass on. All of them have ''something'' happening, whether that's training for the End (i.e. Odin's and Freyja's halls), dining with kin (i.e. Helheim), or being tortured for all eternity (i.e. Nidhog's maw or Niflhel). There's even [[Reincarnation within the family line]]. The Nothing After Death in Norse Mythology comes in one of these alternatives; the dead can reside in their graves if they so choose. Sometimes, this means they roam the Earth, but other times, it means that they literally stay in the ground and do nothing.

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* Myth/NorseMythology has many places the dead can go after they pass on. All of them have ''something'' happening, whether that's training for the End (i.e. Odin's and Freyja's halls), dining with kin (i.e. Helheim), or being tortured for all eternity (i.e. Nidhog's maw or Niflhel). There's even [[Reincarnation {{reincarnation}} within the family line]].line. The Nothing After Death in Norse Mythology comes in one of these alternatives; the dead can reside in their graves if they so choose. Sometimes, this means they roam the Earth, but other times, it means that they literally stay in the ground and do nothing.
14th Mar '16 7:24:08 AM johnnye
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Not to be confused with the idea that there is literally ''nothing'' after death: no darkness, no featureless planes, no conscious awareness, or simply a CessationOfExistence. Some people find that thought comforting; to others, it is worse. This trope is when there ''is'' something after death, and that something is empty space.

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Not to be confused with the idea that there is literally ''nothing'' after death: no darkness, no featureless planes, no conscious awareness, or simply a CessationOfExistence. Some people find that thought comforting; to others, it is worse. This trope is when there ''is'' something after death, and that something is empty space.
4th Mar '16 3:03:53 PM piraml
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** Although more of a scholarly thought experiment and never official doctrine, Catholicism had Limbo, which was the portion of the Afterlife for babies who died before they were baptized, virtuous pagans and atheists, and assorted Old Testament figures. On the idea that they never had a proper chance to convert to Christianity thus didn't merit eternal punishment.
2nd Mar '16 12:01:10 PM olioster
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* A deleted scene from ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'' would have had Ashley asking Shepard about what he experienced while he was dead before Cerberus brought him back. Shepard could have answered with this trope.
15th Feb '16 11:06:12 AM Santon
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The Nothingness is an afterlife where souls go to a bleak, featureless [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence Plane of (Non) Existence]]. Whether or not this 'non-existence' involves the souls's existence and whether or not the souls is consciously aware of the lack of existence around it is DependingOnTheWriter.

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The Nothingness is an afterlife where souls go to a bleak, featureless [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence Plane of (Non) Existence]]. Whether or not this 'non-existence' involves the souls's souls' existence and whether or not the souls is are consciously aware of the lack of existence around it them is DependingOnTheWriter.



Sometimes this used as an IronicHell against a FlatEarthAtheist, but just as frequently, Nothingness does not discriminate and everyone, good and bad, goes there.

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Sometimes this is used as an IronicHell against a FlatEarthAtheist, but just as frequently, Nothingness does not discriminate and everyone, good and bad, goes there.
7th Feb '16 2:32:07 AM Antwan
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--> ''"I have descended to the house of darkness, the dwelling of the goddess Irkalla; to the house, whence he that enters goes out no more; to the road, whose way turns not back; to the house, whose inhabitants are deprived of light; to the place where dust is their sustenance, their food clay."''
-->--Enkidu, ''TheEpicOfGilgamesh''

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--> ''"I ->''"I have descended to the house of darkness, the dwelling of the goddess Irkalla; to the house, whence he that enters goes out no more; to the road, whose way turns not back; to the house, whose inhabitants are deprived of light; to the place where dust is their sustenance, their food clay."''
-->--Enkidu, ''TheEpicOfGilgamesh''
-->--'''Enkidu''', ''Literature/TheEpicOfGilgamesh''



* In ''{{Paprika}}'', death is symbolized as a black hole if you're in the dying person's mind. And due to the MacGuffin's [[spoiler:{{Instrumentality}}]] power, things get worse from there.

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* In ''{{Paprika}}'', ''Literature/{{Paprika}}'', death is symbolized as a black hole if you're in the dying person's mind. And due to the MacGuffin's [[spoiler:{{Instrumentality}}]] power, things get worse from there.



* While some people think this is the ultimate fate of the deceased in Manga/DeathNote, WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and notebook rules make it clear it's actually CessationOfExistence.

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* While some people think this is the ultimate fate of the deceased in Manga/DeathNote, ''Manga/DeathNote'', WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and notebook rules make it clear it's actually CessationOfExistence.



--> '''Ismael''': "What… what happened ? So ''that''[='s=] the afterlife ? An infinite empty darkness ?

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--> '''Ismael''': "What… What… what happened ? So ''that''[='s=] the afterlife ? An infinite empty darkness ?



* Most of the colorful depictions of {{Hell}} are (appropriately) WordOfDante in Christian tradition. One theological position is that Hell is in fact this trope. That the suffering of Hell comes from its utter isolation, emptiness and separation from God after glimpsing His incredible glory. See[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_darkness The Outer Darkness]] for more.

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* Most of the colorful depictions of {{Hell}} are (appropriately) WordOfDante in Christian tradition. One theological position is that Hell is in fact this trope. That the suffering of Hell comes from its utter isolation, emptiness and separation from God after glimpsing His incredible glory. See[[http://en.See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_darkness The Outer Darkness]] for more.



* The Thornton Wilder play ''OurTown'' depicts the afterlife in this manner. There is no Heaven. There is no Hell. Every spirit, good and bad, is stuck together, sitting on their tombstone for all eternity. And even though you are given MentalTimeTravel powers that let you relive any day of your life, all this does is further drive home to you how much of your life was wasted.

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* The Thornton Wilder play ''OurTown'' ''Theatre/OurTown'' depicts the afterlife in this manner. There is no Heaven. There is no Hell. Every spirit, good and bad, is stuck together, sitting on their tombstone for all eternity. And even though you are given MentalTimeTravel powers that let you relive any day of your life, all this does is further drive home to you how much of your life was wasted.



* ''Videogame/{{Portal}}'': [=GLaDOS=] suggests this or worse.
-->([[spoiler:"You're curious about what happens after you die, right? Guess what? I know! You're going to find out first-hand before I can finish telling you, though, so I won't bother. I'll give you a hint: you're going to want to pack as much living as you possibly can into the next couple of minutes."]])
* In ''Videogame/FinalFantasyVI'', if you die during the opening segment, you see Terra on a black screen, as she basically sums up that she's trapped in a cold, dark nothingness, before offering you the opportunity to load your save.

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* ''Videogame/{{Portal}}'': ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}'': [=GLaDOS=] suggests this or worse.
-->([[spoiler:"You're -->[[spoiler:''"You're curious about what happens after you die, right? Guess what? I know! You're going to find out first-hand before I can finish telling you, though, so I won't bother. I'll give you a hint: you're going to want to pack as much living as you possibly can into the next couple of minutes."]])
"'']]
* In ''Videogame/FinalFantasyVI'', ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'', if you die during the opening segment, you see Terra on a black screen, as she basically sums up that she's trapped in a cold, dark nothingness, before offering you the opportunity to load your save.



* ''Videogame/FinalFantasyIX'' [[spoiler: has the infamous [[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere Necron]], who isn't exactly foreshadowed all that well by any account; but as the TrueFinalBoss this seems to be what ''most'' agree that, at best, is what it's supposed to represent.]]
* In this page of the ''Videogame/TeamFortress2'' supplementary comic [[http://www.teamfortress.com/loosecanon/12.html Loose Canon]], Mr. Blutarch Mann knows there's nothing after death because he is hooked up to a machine that revives him daily.

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* ''Videogame/FinalFantasyIX'' ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' [[spoiler: has the infamous [[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere Necron]], who isn't exactly foreshadowed all that well by any account; but as the TrueFinalBoss this seems to be what ''most'' agree that, at best, is what it's supposed to represent.]]
* In this page of the ''Videogame/TeamFortress2'' ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' supplementary comic [[http://www.teamfortress.com/loosecanon/12.html Loose Canon]], Mr. Blutarch Mann knows there's nothing after death because he is hooked up to a machine that revives him daily.



* Invoked in ''Videogame/MassEffect1'': when Matriarch Benezia lies dying, she expects to see light, like the millenia old Asari religion promised her, but instead sees and feels nothing.

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* Invoked in ''Videogame/MassEffect1'': ''VideoGame/MassEffect1'': when Matriarch Benezia lies dying, she expects to see light, like the millenia old Asari religion promised her, but instead sees and feels nothing.



* ''VideoGames/FalloutNewVegas'': Mr.House's dying curse to [[spoiler: the Courier]] if they choose to kill him has him wishing them this.

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* ''VideoGames/FalloutNewVegas'': ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'': Mr.House's dying curse to [[spoiler: the Courier]] if they choose to kill him has him wishing them this.



* In the final episode of ''Videogame/TalesFromTheBorderlands'', [[spoiler:the Jack AI]] begs Rhys not to kill him, stating that he's seen the other side and he is absolutely terrified of going back to the emptiness.

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* In the final episode of ''Videogame/TalesFromTheBorderlands'', ''VideoGame/TalesFromTheBorderlands'', [[spoiler:the Jack AI]] begs Rhys not to kill him, stating that he's seen the other side and he is absolutely terrified of going back to the emptiness.



[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' has the depths of oblivion, a horrible, horrible, horrible place where pieces go when they die. There isn't much information about it, but it is known that [[spoiler: being locked in a small room for thousands and thousands of years until you manage to fix a logic error in your story]] is like jumping off a ten-story building compared to it, which is like jumping off a hundred story building. Erika doesn't seem fazed by it though.
[[/folder]]



* Played for laughs, as with everything else, on {{Uncyclopedia}}'s "You Are Dead" article.
--> Remember how, when you were alive, you wasted hours and hours watching daytime (and probably night-time) television? Well, this is exactly like that, except without the television. And without the day and night. And without time.

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* Played for laughs, as with everything else, on {{Uncyclopedia}}'s Wiki/{{Uncyclopedia}}'s "You Are Dead" article.
--> Remember -->''"Remember how, when you were alive, you wasted hours and hours watching daytime (and probably night-time) television? Well, this is exactly like that, except without the television. And without the day and night. And without time."''






* PlayedForLaughs in an episode of ''{{WesternAnimation/Dilbert}}'', where the title character dies and discovers the afterlife to literally be a single cubicle in the middle of an empty plane. Later on as a result of the episode's particularly strange plot, he dies ''again'' and finds that there are now ''two'' cubicles, one of which is occupied by Wally.

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* PlayedForLaughs in an episode of ''{{WesternAnimation/Dilbert}}'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Dilbert}}'', where the title character dies and discovers the afterlife to literally be a single cubicle in the middle of an empty plane. Later on as a result of the episode's particularly strange plot, he dies ''again'' and finds that there are now ''two'' cubicles, one of which is occupied by Wally.




[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' has the depths of oblivion, a horrible, horrible, horrible place where pieces go when they die. There isn't much information about it, but it is known that [[spoiler: being locked in a small room for thousands and thousands of years until you manage to fix a logic error in your story]] is like jumping off a ten-story building compared to it, which is like jumping off a hundred story building. Erika doesn't seem fazed by it though.
[[/folder]]
4th Feb '16 3:38:07 AM REV6Pilot
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* Anyone who dies in ImmortalitySyndrome and is [[CameBackWrong brought back]] claims this. They usually end up deciding that [[spoiler: life is nothing but pain and misery and the best option is to therefore [[OmnicidalManiac kill everyone everywhere]] to put and end to the torment of existence.]]

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* Anyone who dies in ImmortalitySyndrome ''FanFic/ImmortalitySyndrome'' and is [[CameBackWrong brought back]] claims this. They usually end up deciding that [[spoiler: life is nothing but pain and misery and the best option is to therefore [[OmnicidalManiac kill everyone everywhere]] to put and end to the torment of existence.]]
1st Feb '16 6:23:00 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/PeterFHamilton's ''TheNightsDawnTrilogy'': Science fiction author Peter F. Hamilton wrote his trilogy around this concept. The souls of the dead are trapped in The Beyond where they can see our world but not touch it; the series tells of what happens when they find a means of crossing back into the real world by possessing the bodies of the living. People soon begin to wonder why all those who return from the dead seem to be evil, or at least morally bankrupt and it's revealed toward the end of the third book that [[spoiler: only people who are unwilling to let go of their mortal lives, or believe they are not worthy of an afterlife, are stuck in this non-existance: those who accept the end of their life move on somewhere else.]]
* This concept is explored in TadWilliams' ''MemorySorrowAndThorn'' series, on several levels. There is a plane of existence between life and death which is absolutely featureless but reflects the thoughts and memories of those trapped there. As a completely spiritual realm, distance and physicality are irrelevant, so it's possible to converse with those with whom you share a metaphysical connection no matter how far away. The realm acts as a gateway to true death, and it's incredibly rare for anyone to return. (That Simon does is a major plot point.) In addition, the Sithi speak of the concept of Unbeing, which is quite literally a force that seeks to unmake reality, and those consumed by it are DeaderThanDead. They fled from it to Osten Ard, but failed to escape its shadow, and the BigBad Storm King ultimately seeks to [[OmnicidalManiac bring Unbeing]] to the entire world in revenge for the destruction of everything he loved in life.

to:

* Creator/PeterFHamilton's ''TheNightsDawnTrilogy'': Science fiction author Peter F. Hamilton wrote his trilogy around this concept. The souls of the dead are trapped in The Beyond where they can see our world but not touch it; the series tells of what happens when they find a means of crossing back into the real world by possessing the bodies of the living. People soon begin to wonder why all those who return from the dead seem to be evil, or at least morally bankrupt and it's revealed toward the end of the third book that [[spoiler: only people who are unwilling to let go of their mortal lives, or believe they are not worthy of an afterlife, are stuck in this non-existance: non-existence: those who accept the end of their life move on somewhere else.]]
* This concept is explored in TadWilliams' Creator/TadWilliams' ''MemorySorrowAndThorn'' series, on several levels. There is a plane of existence between life and death which is absolutely featureless but reflects the thoughts and memories of those trapped there. As a completely spiritual realm, distance and physicality are irrelevant, so it's possible to converse with those with whom you share a metaphysical connection no matter how far away. The realm acts as a gateway to true death, and it's incredibly rare for anyone to return. (That Simon does is a major plot point.) In addition, the Sithi speak of the concept of Unbeing, which is quite literally a force that seeks to unmake reality, and those consumed by it are DeaderThanDead. They fled from it to Osten Ard, but failed to escape its shadow, and the BigBad Storm King ultimately seeks to [[OmnicidalManiac bring Unbeing]] to the entire world in revenge for the destruction of everything he loved in life.
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