History Main / TheNothingAfterDeath

4th Aug '16 1:32:05 PM WillKeaton
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* Featured rather ironically ([[spoiler:heaven, purgatory and hell are all identical, except that the TV explaining the situation is increasingly cheaper in the worse afterlives]]) in ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoyxuCVJCwI Fifty Percent Grey]]''.

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* Featured rather ironically ([[spoiler:heaven, purgatory and hell are all identical, except that the TV explaining the situation is increasingly cheaper in the worse afterlives]]) in ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FoyxuCVJCwI Fifty Percent Grey]]''.Grey.]]''
30th Jul '16 6:26:55 PM TheCuza
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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': Season 11 reveals the existence of "the Empty," a void that is implied to be this. In the episode "Form and Void," the Reaper Billie tells Sam that the new Death will not tolerate Sam and Dean repeatedly coming BackFromTheDead, and the next time one of them dies, the Reapers will send their souls to the Empty [[KilledOffForReal to ensure they'll never be resurrected again]].

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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': Season 11 reveals the existence of "the Empty," a void that is implied to be this. In the episode "Form and Void," the Reaper Billie tells Sam that the new Reapers are all fairly pissed that the brothers [[spoiler:killed their boss (a.k.a. ''[[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu Death will himself]]'')]] at the end of the last season, not tolerate Sam and Dean to mention they've been sick of the two of them repeatedly dying and coming BackFromTheDead, and back to life for a good while now, so the next time one of them dies, the Reapers they die, Billie will personally send their souls to the Empty [[KilledOffForReal to ensure they'll never be resurrected able to come back again]].
26th Jul '16 11:59:53 PM PaulA
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* In the ''Literature/EarthseaTrilogy'', the land of death is presented as a dark, dry, unchanging place where the dead keep their names, but not their spirit.

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* In the ''Literature/EarthseaTrilogy'', ''Literature/{{Earthsea}}'' series, the land of death is presented as a dark, dry, unchanging place where the dead keep their names, but not their spirit.
25th Jul '16 3:34:39 PM DarkHunter
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* ''Manga/DeathNote'': The rules of the Death Note states that: "All humans, without exception, will eventually die. When they die, the place they go to is MU (nothingness). Once dead they can never be revived." The problem is that this is a slightly off translation. This is not meant to imply that there is a ''place'' of nothingness where all souls reside after death, but rather that the idea of a "place after death" is a fundamentally flawed assumption[[note]]the word "mu", in this context, basically means "Your assumptions are flawed, thus your question cannot be answered"[[/note]]. WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and other notebook rules make it clear what actually happens upon death is a CessationOfExistence.

to:

* ''Manga/DeathNote'': The rules of the Death Note states that: "All humans, without exception, will eventually die. When they die, the place they go to is MU (nothingness). Once dead they can never be revived." The problem is that this is a slightly off translation. This is not meant to imply that there is a ''place'' of nothingness where all souls reside after death, but rather that the idea of a "place after death" is a fundamentally flawed assumption[[note]]the word "mu", in this context, basically means "Your assumptions are flawed, thus your "your question makes no sense and cannot be answered"[[/note]]. WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and other notebook rules make it clear what actually happens upon death is a CessationOfExistence.
12th Jul '16 6:26:36 AM LondonKdS
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*** Suzie and Owen weren't especially nice people, however, so there is [[{{Hell}} another interpretation]].
3rd Jul '16 12:25:02 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''ReynaldoTheAssassin'': Demons go to "The Abyss" when they die. They are, however, allowed to bring one item with them (possibly even a [[spoiler:Get out of the Abyss Free Card.]]

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* ''ReynaldoTheAssassin'': ''Machinima/ReynaldoTheAssassin'': Demons go to "The Abyss" when they die. They are, however, allowed to bring one item with them (possibly even a [[spoiler:Get out of the Abyss Free Card.]]
8th Jun '16 11:46:45 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''[[DivineComedy The Divine Comedy]]'' this is how Limbo, the first circle of Hell, is described. An utterly dark land of no pain, no harm... and no hope. All you can hear are the sighs of the virtuous non-christians: trapped because they were virtuous enough to avoid Hell, but since they aren't Catholics they can't go to Heaven (or reach Purgatory and get there eventually). Dante "subverts" this with a city in this wasteland, full of the Light of Human Reason, where all the pre-Christian philosophers and scientists have built a home for themselves. However, while it's nice, it's not Heaven nor can the people there hope to reach it because The Light of Human Reason is not a true substitute for God's divine salvation. Most scholars believe he did this because otherwise, he would have had to send every pre-Christian philosopher to one of the deeper levels.

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* In ''[[DivineComedy The Divine Comedy]]'' ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' this is how Limbo, the first circle of Hell, is described. An utterly dark land of no pain, no harm... and no hope. All you can hear are the sighs of the virtuous non-christians: trapped because they were virtuous enough to avoid Hell, but since they aren't Catholics they can't go to Heaven (or reach Purgatory and get there eventually). Dante "subverts" this with a city in this wasteland, full of the Light of Human Reason, where all the pre-Christian philosophers and scientists have built a home for themselves. However, while it's nice, it's not Heaven nor can the people there hope to reach it because The Light of Human Reason is not a true substitute for God's divine salvation. Most scholars believe he did this because otherwise, he would have had to send every pre-Christian philosopher to one of the deeper levels.



* Hell in Creator/CSLewis' ''TheGreatDivorce'' is a borderline version of this--a bleak "city" which has been [[YourMindMakesItReal created by the minds of the people there]], but which is not really substantial. Eventually "night" will fall on the city and even this existence will give way to something still less real. Hell is also "microscopic" compared to heaven--the visitors in heaven are shown to have emerged from a tiny crack in the ground, enlarging as they go.

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* Hell in Creator/CSLewis' ''TheGreatDivorce'' ''Literature/TheGreatDivorce'' is a borderline version of this--a bleak "city" which has been [[YourMindMakesItReal created by the minds of the people there]], but which is not really substantial. Eventually "night" will fall on the city and even this existence will give way to something still less real. Hell is also "microscopic" compared to heaven--the visitors in heaven are shown to have emerged from a tiny crack in the ground, enlarging as they go.



* In ''HisDarkMaterials'', The afterlife is a flat, featureless plane where the only thing that breaks up the monotony is random harpy attacks. Will and Lyra arrange for everyone in there to get oblivion instead, which is a far better (in the protagonists' opinions) fate, as it allows the atoms making up a person's ghost to distribute themselves back into the physical world. Oblivion of consciousness, yes, but a roundabout return to life.

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* In ''HisDarkMaterials'', ''Literature/HisDarkMaterials'', The afterlife is a flat, featureless plane where the only thing that breaks up the monotony is random harpy attacks. Will and Lyra arrange for everyone in there to get oblivion instead, which is a far better (in the protagonists' opinions) fate, as it allows the atoms making up a person's ghost to distribute themselves back into the physical world. Oblivion of consciousness, yes, but a roundabout return to life.



* Creator/PeterFHamilton's ''TheNightsDawnTrilogy'': Science fiction author Peter F. Hamilton wrote his trilogy around this concept. The souls of the dead are trapped in The Beyond where they can see our world but not touch it; the series tells of what happens when they find a means of crossing back into the real world by possessing the bodies of the living. People soon begin to wonder why all those who return from the dead seem to be evil, or at least morally bankrupt and it's revealed toward the end of the third book that [[spoiler: only people who are unwilling to let go of their mortal lives, or believe they are not worthy of an afterlife, are stuck in this non-existence: those who accept the end of their life move on somewhere else.]]
* This concept is explored in Creator/TadWilliams' ''MemorySorrowAndThorn'' series, on several levels. There is a plane of existence between life and death which is absolutely featureless but reflects the thoughts and memories of those trapped there. As a completely spiritual realm, distance and physicality are irrelevant, so it's possible to converse with those with whom you share a metaphysical connection no matter how far away. The realm acts as a gateway to true death, and it's incredibly rare for anyone to return. (That Simon does is a major plot point.) In addition, the Sithi speak of the concept of Unbeing, which is quite literally a force that seeks to unmake reality, and those consumed by it are DeaderThanDead. They fled from it to Osten Ard, but failed to escape its shadow, and the BigBad Storm King ultimately seeks to [[OmnicidalManiac bring Unbeing]] to the entire world in revenge for the destruction of everything he loved in life.
* Though there's no direct textual evidence for this, readers of EdgarAllanPoe sometimes suspect that the narrators are speaking from this vantage point, telling the stories of their lives to themselves to try to, in the words of one critic, "try to persuade themselves that they're not dead."

to:

* Creator/PeterFHamilton's ''TheNightsDawnTrilogy'': ''Literature/TheNightsDawnTrilogy'': Science fiction author Peter F. Hamilton wrote his trilogy around this concept. The souls of the dead are trapped in The Beyond where they can see our world but not touch it; the series tells of what happens when they find a means of crossing back into the real world by possessing the bodies of the living. People soon begin to wonder why all those who return from the dead seem to be evil, or at least morally bankrupt and it's revealed toward the end of the third book that [[spoiler: only people who are unwilling to let go of their mortal lives, or believe they are not worthy of an afterlife, are stuck in this non-existence: those who accept the end of their life move on somewhere else.]]
* This concept is explored in Creator/TadWilliams' ''MemorySorrowAndThorn'' ''Literature/MemorySorrowAndThorn'' series, on several levels. There is a plane of existence between life and death which is absolutely featureless but reflects the thoughts and memories of those trapped there. As a completely spiritual realm, distance and physicality are irrelevant, so it's possible to converse with those with whom you share a metaphysical connection no matter how far away. The realm acts as a gateway to true death, and it's incredibly rare for anyone to return. (That Simon does is a major plot point.) In addition, the Sithi speak of the concept of Unbeing, which is quite literally a force that seeks to unmake reality, and those consumed by it are DeaderThanDead. They fled from it to Osten Ard, but failed to escape its shadow, and the BigBad Storm King ultimately seeks to [[OmnicidalManiac bring Unbeing]] to the entire world in revenge for the destruction of everything he loved in life.
* Though there's no direct textual evidence for this, readers of EdgarAllanPoe Creator/EdgarAllanPoe sometimes suspect that the narrators are speaking from this vantage point, telling the stories of their lives to themselves to try to, in the words of one critic, "try to persuade themselves that they're not dead."



* In AnneRice's ''[[TheVampireChronicles Memnoch the Devil]]'', the eponymous character takes [[LovableRogue Lestat]] on a journey through the ages and shows the truth (his version, at least) behind the creation and everything after. After humans gained souls (through evolution, not through something God did, which freaked the angels out), the dead souls ended up trapped in a metaphysical layer above Earth called Sheol. Behind disembodied entities, there was little they could do. Some managed to get back to Earth and mess with people. This is how we got stories of ghosts and spirits. It wasn't until Memnoch found a group who found peace in forgiving their creator (whereas everyone else was bitter) that he managed to convince God to allow human souls to enter Heaven. The first batch who did instantly transformed it into the garden of Eden everyone assumes it to be. Memnoch's constant disagreements with God about the fate of the humans resulted in his banishment, after which God asked him to contemplate creating Gehenna, Hell. Thus Memnoch turned Sheol into Hell in an effort to prove God that humans can be made to forgive God given sufficient "encouragement". Of course, this is less like the Christian version of Hell, which you can never leave, and more like Purgatory.
* In SergeyLukyanenko's ''Literature/SeekersOfTheSky'', Hell is a frozen wasteland, and you're all alone in there. It's also hinted that the [[ReligionIsMagic Cold]] is actually Hell.

to:

* In AnneRice's ''[[TheVampireChronicles Creator/AnneRice's ''[[Literature/TheVampireChronicles Memnoch the Devil]]'', the eponymous character takes [[LovableRogue Lestat]] on a journey through the ages and shows the truth (his version, at least) behind the creation and everything after. After humans gained souls (through evolution, not through something God did, which freaked the angels out), the dead souls ended up trapped in a metaphysical layer above Earth called Sheol. Behind disembodied entities, there was little they could do. Some managed to get back to Earth and mess with people. This is how we got stories of ghosts and spirits. It wasn't until Memnoch found a group who found peace in forgiving their creator (whereas everyone else was bitter) that he managed to convince God to allow human souls to enter Heaven. The first batch who did instantly transformed it into the garden of Eden everyone assumes it to be. Memnoch's constant disagreements with God about the fate of the humans resulted in his banishment, after which God asked him to contemplate creating Gehenna, Hell. Thus Memnoch turned Sheol into Hell in an effort to prove God that humans can be made to forgive God given sufficient "encouragement". Of course, this is less like the Christian version of Hell, which you can never leave, and more like Purgatory.
* In SergeyLukyanenko's Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''Literature/SeekersOfTheSky'', Hell is a frozen wasteland, and you're all alone in there. It's also hinted that the [[ReligionIsMagic Cold]] is actually Hell.
4th Jun '16 10:03:05 PM DarkHunter
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* ''Manga/DeathNote'': The rules of the Death Note states that: "All humans, without exception, will eventually die. When they die, the place they go to is MU (nothingness). Once dead they can never be revived." The problem is that this is a slightly off translation. This is not meant to imply that there is a ''place'' of nothingness where all souls reside after death, but rather that the idea of a "place after death" is a fundamentally flawed assumption[[note]]the word "mu", in this context, basically means "Your question is invalid, thus there is no answer"[[/note]]. WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and other notebook rules make it clear what actually happens upon death is a CessationOfExistence.

to:

* ''Manga/DeathNote'': The rules of the Death Note states that: "All humans, without exception, will eventually die. When they die, the place they go to is MU (nothingness). Once dead they can never be revived." The problem is that this is a slightly off translation. This is not meant to imply that there is a ''place'' of nothingness where all souls reside after death, but rather that the idea of a "place after death" is a fundamentally flawed assumption[[note]]the word "mu", in this context, basically means "Your assumptions are flawed, thus your question is invalid, thus there is no answer"[[/note]].cannot be answered"[[/note]]. WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and other notebook rules make it clear what actually happens upon death is a CessationOfExistence.
4th Jun '16 9:59:17 PM DarkHunter
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* While some people think this is the ultimate fate of the deceased in ''Manga/DeathNote'', WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and notebook rules make it clear it's actually CessationOfExistence.

to:

* While some people think ''Manga/DeathNote'': The rules of the Death Note states that: "All humans, without exception, will eventually die. When they die, the place they go to is MU (nothingness). Once dead they can never be revived." The problem is that this is a slightly off translation. This is not meant to imply that there is a ''place'' of nothingness where all souls reside after death, but rather that the ultimate fate idea of the deceased a "place after death" is a fundamentally flawed assumption[[note]]the word "mu", in ''Manga/DeathNote'', this context, basically means "Your question is invalid, thus there is no answer"[[/note]]. WordOfGod, comments from Ryuk and Light, and other notebook rules make it clear it's what actually happens upon death is a CessationOfExistence.
21st May '16 9:18:23 AM IHateAlmostEverything
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Added DiffLines:

* Combined with MundaneAfterlife in ''Literature/CrimeAndPunishment'': [[ManipulativeBastard Svidrigaylov]] speculates that afterlife is just a dusty, dark room where you spend all of eternity.
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