History Main / TheNThDoctor

25th Aug '16 10:07:47 AM CoolTom1337
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', when [[BadassGrandpa Heihachi Mishima's]] [[Creator/DaisukeGori old voice actor]] died and was replaced with [[Creator/UnshoIshizuka a new one]], they justified it in-universe by having Heihachi reverse his age with an experimental drug. This plot point is introduced in Tekken Tag Tournament 2 and re-iterated in VideoGame/PlaystationAllStarsBattleRoyale and VideoGame/ProjectXZone for those out of the loop. It then seems strange to have elderly Heihachi with his new voice in VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', when [[BadassGrandpa Heihachi Mishima's]] [[Creator/DaisukeGori old voice actor]] died and was replaced with [[Creator/UnshoIshizuka a new one]], they justified it in-universe by having Heihachi reverse his age with an experimental drug. This plot point is introduced in Tekken Tag Tournament 2 and re-iterated in VideoGame/PlaystationAllStarsBattleRoyale and VideoGame/ProjectXZone for those out of the loop. It then seems strange to have elderly Heihachi with his new voice in VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken.''VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken'' and ''Tekken 7''.
17th Jun '16 7:54:07 AM ChronoLegion
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* A tie-in comic released after ''StarTrekIntoDarkness'' shows [[spoiler:Khan]] getting MagicPlasticSurgery to explain why he [[RaceLift used to look indian]] but is now white.

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* A tie-in comic released after ''StarTrekIntoDarkness'' shows [[spoiler:Khan]] getting MagicPlasticSurgery to explain why he [[RaceLift used to look indian]] Indian]] (well, [[FakeNationality Mexican]]) but is now white.
1st Jun '16 5:16:46 AM VVK
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** Blofeld, arch-nemesis of James Bond, is a villainous example. He was played by several actors over the years, with his changes of appearance being explained by plastic surgery. Somewhat justified in that if anyone has the money to be able to employ a [[MagicPlasticSurgery magic plastic surgeon]] it's Blofeld. His portrayal in ''Film/{{Spectre}}'', played by [[spoiler: Creator/ChristophWaltz]], needs no such justification because there was a ContinuityReboot in ''Film/CasionRoyale2006''.

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** Blofeld, arch-nemesis of James Bond, is a villainous example. He was played by several actors over the years, with his changes of appearance being explained by plastic surgery. Somewhat justified in that if anyone has the money to be able to employ a [[MagicPlasticSurgery magic plastic surgeon]] it's Blofeld. His portrayal in ''Film/{{Spectre}}'', played by [[spoiler: Creator/ChristophWaltz]], needs no such justification because there was a ContinuityReboot in ''Film/CasionRoyale2006''.''Film/CasinoRoyale2006''.
1st Jun '16 5:14:00 AM VVK
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** Blofeld, arch-nemesis of James Bond, is a villainous example. He was played by several actors over the years, with his changes of appearance being explained by plastic surgery. Somewhat justified in that if anyone has the money to be able to employ a [[MagicPlasticSurgery magic plastic surgeon]] it's Blofeld. His portrayal in ''Film/{{Spectre}}'', played by [[spoiler: Creator/ChristophWaltz]], is different because even compared to the weird ComicBookTime continuity in the earlier movies, Creator/DanielCraig's Bond is clearly separated in its own {{continuity}}; his career starts with ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'' and goes through a few movies until it seems to end in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''.

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** Blofeld, arch-nemesis of James Bond, is a villainous example. He was played by several actors over the years, with his changes of appearance being explained by plastic surgery. Somewhat justified in that if anyone has the money to be able to employ a [[MagicPlasticSurgery magic plastic surgeon]] it's Blofeld. His portrayal in ''Film/{{Spectre}}'', played by [[spoiler: Creator/ChristophWaltz]], is different needs no such justification because even compared to the weird ComicBookTime continuity there was a ContinuityReboot in the earlier movies, Creator/DanielCraig's Bond is clearly separated in its own {{continuity}}; his career starts with ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'' and goes through a few movies until it seems to end in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''.''Film/CasionRoyale2006''.
1st Jun '16 5:06:43 AM VVK
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** Blofeld, arch-nemesis of James Bond, is a villainous example. He was played by several actors over the years, with his changes of appearance being explained by plastic surgery. Somewhat justified in that if anyone has the money to be able to employ a [[MagicPlasticSurgery magic plastic surgeon]] it's Blofeld. His most recent portrayal to date, played by [[spoiler: Creator/ChristophWaltz]] in [[spoiler: ''Film/{{Spectre}}'']], actually explains the reveal in-universe. [[spoiler:He resented his father, so he took his mother's last name as a pseudonym. Whether that makes him the same Blofeld as the previous films or not is never really explained.]]

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** Blofeld, arch-nemesis of James Bond, is a villainous example. He was played by several actors over the years, with his changes of appearance being explained by plastic surgery. Somewhat justified in that if anyone has the money to be able to employ a [[MagicPlasticSurgery magic plastic surgeon]] it's Blofeld. His most recent portrayal to date, in ''Film/{{Spectre}}'', played by [[spoiler: Creator/ChristophWaltz]] in [[spoiler: ''Film/{{Spectre}}'']], actually explains Creator/ChristophWaltz]], is different because even compared to the reveal in-universe. [[spoiler:He resented weird ComicBookTime continuity in the earlier movies, Creator/DanielCraig's Bond is clearly separated in its own {{continuity}}; his father, so he took his mother's last name as career starts with ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'' and goes through a pseudonym. Whether that makes him the same Blofeld as the previous films or not is never really explained.]]few movies until it seems to end in ''Film/{{Spectre}}''.



* Manga/{{Tomie}} from the live-action adaptations of Creator/JunjiIto's comic of the same name is this. Due to cloning and regeneration no two Tomie's look alike.

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* Manga/{{Tomie}} from the live-action adaptations of Creator/JunjiIto's comic of the same name is this. Due to cloning and regeneration no two Tomie's Tomies look alike.
25th May '16 2:36:05 AM Bosco13
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Added DiffLines:

* A tie-in comic released after ''StarTrekIntoDarkness'' shows [[spoiler:Khan]] getting MagicPlasticSurgery to explain why he [[RaceLift used to look indian]] but is now white.
11th May '16 10:57:29 AM erforce
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[[quoteright:350:[[Series/TheSarahConnorChronicles http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cromartie-transformation-edit-border-fixed_1047.png]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[Series/TheSarahConnorChronicles [[quoteright:350:[[Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/cromartie-transformation-edit-border-fixed_1047.png]]]]
7th Apr '16 8:29:18 AM Doug86
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* Creator/HeathLedger's [[AuthorExistenceFailure death]] was dealt with in his unfinished movie ''Film/TheImaginariumOfDoctorParnassus'' this way. JohnnyDepp, Jude Law, and Colin Farrell played his character in different dimensions.

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* Creator/HeathLedger's [[AuthorExistenceFailure death]] was dealt with in his unfinished movie ''Film/TheImaginariumOfDoctorParnassus'' this way. JohnnyDepp, Creator/JohnnyDepp, Jude Law, and Colin Farrell played his character in different dimensions.



* British children's comedy ''MikeAndAngelo'' had Angelo - an alien - go through a regeneration process into another actor that was a direct reference to ''Series/DoctorWho''.
* In [[Series/BlakesSeven Blake's 7]], the character of Travis (first played by Stephen Greif in the first season, then replaced by Brian Croucher in season 2) was given a combination of plastic surgery and psychological re-conditioning.

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* British children's comedy ''MikeAndAngelo'' ''Series/MikeAndAngelo'' had Angelo - an alien - go through a regeneration process into another actor that was a direct reference to ''Series/DoctorWho''.
* In [[Series/BlakesSeven Blake's 7]], ''Series/BlakesSeven'', the character of Travis (first played by Stephen Greif in the first season, then replaced by Brian Croucher in season 2) was given a combination of plastic surgery and psychological re-conditioning.



* Subverted in a HUGE way by the Australian lifestyle show parody ''Series/LifeSupport''. In Season 3, Doctor Rudi changed actors, from Simon Van Der Stap to Jack Finsterer. However, it turned out that this new Dr Rudi, who had allegedly had MagicPlasticSurgery, was actually an impostor, and the old Dr Rudi was out for revenge. it culminated in [[spoiler:a fist-fight between the Rudis at the new Dr Rudi and Sigourney's wedding.]]

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* Subverted in a HUGE way by the Australian lifestyle show parody ''Series/LifeSupport''. In Season 3, Doctor Rudi changed actors, from Simon Van Der Stap to Jack Finsterer. However, it turned out that this new Dr Dr. Rudi, who had allegedly had MagicPlasticSurgery, was actually an impostor, and the old Dr Rudi was out for revenge. it culminated in [[spoiler:a fist-fight between the Rudis at the new Dr Dr. Rudi and Sigourney's wedding.]]



** It also occurred with villains Azazel and Alastair, and the possibility exists for this to happen with the angels as well. However, it's explicitly avoided with the character of Anna, whose human body was destroyed when she became an angel again, but replaced with an identical one as she'd become attached to it and and arranged for it to be remade.

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** It also occurred with villains Azazel and Alastair, and the possibility exists for this to happen with the angels as well. However, it's explicitly avoided with the character of Anna, whose human body was destroyed when she became an angel again, but replaced with an identical one as she'd become attached to it and and arranged for it to be remade.



** One of the most infamous (and convoluted) versions of this occurred on ''Series/DaysOfOurLives'': When Wayne Northrop - the actor portraying Roman Brady - left the show in 1984, his character was PutOnABus via [=shooting/=][[NeverFoundTheBody body snatching]]. Two years later, the younger, taller Drake Hogestyn took over the role. Playing this trope straight, they [[HandWave explained his physical differences]] by plastic surgery needed to recover from the injuries suffered at the hands of [[BigBad Stefano DiMera]]. Then Northrop returned four years after that... ''as Roman Brady''. He'd been held prisoner by DiMera, while DiMera sent brainwashed mercenary John Black (who, in an extra dash of Soap Operaness, turned out to be Stefano's half-brother) to take over Roman's life and be his spy ([[BecomingTheMask That didn't work so well for Stefano]]). But Northrop only stuck around three more years before leaving again. This time they went straight TheOtherDarrin and brought in Josh Taylor to play Roman (and has since 1997).

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** One of the most infamous (and convoluted) versions of this occurred on ''Series/DaysOfOurLives'': When Wayne Northrop - the actor portraying Roman Brady - left the show in 1984, his character was PutOnABus via [=shooting/=][[NeverFoundTheBody body snatching]]. Two years later, the younger, taller Drake Hogestyn took over the role. Playing this trope straight, they [[HandWave explained his physical differences]] by plastic surgery needed to recover from the injuries suffered at the hands of [[BigBad Stefano DiMera]]. Then Northrop returned four years after that... ''as Roman Brady''. He'd been held prisoner by DiMera, [=DiMera=], while DiMera [=DiMera=] sent brainwashed mercenary John Black (who, in an extra dash of Soap Operaness, turned out to be Stefano's half-brother) to take over Roman's life and be his spy ([[BecomingTheMask That didn't work so well for Stefano]]). But Northrop only stuck around three more years before leaving again. This time they went straight TheOtherDarrin and brought in Josh Taylor to play Roman (and has since 1997).



* The first actor to play TheLoneRanger on the radio died tragically in a car crash. To further a) a seamless transition of the character and b) to keep young viewers from being freaked out by the Ranger's sudden vocal change, the producers decided to have the Ranger be seriously injured and spend a few episodes first unconscious and then unable to talk coherently, before introducing the new voice of the Ranger, Brace Beemer. For those who noticed the change, his injuries could provide an in-universe explanation.

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* The first actor to play TheLoneRanger Franchise/TheLoneRanger on the radio died tragically in a car crash. To further a) a seamless transition of the character and b) to keep young viewers from being freaked out by the Ranger's sudden vocal change, the producers decided to have the Ranger be seriously injured and spend a few episodes first unconscious and then unable to talk coherently, before introducing the new voice of the Ranger, Brace Beemer. For those who noticed the change, his injuries could provide an in-universe explanation.
5th Apr '16 2:14:51 PM SickBoy
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This is a catch-all for the recasting of a character using an in-continuity explanation. It takes its name from ''Series/DoctorWho'', whose eponymous Doctor is an alien capable of "[[ResurrectiveImmortality regenerating]]" into a new form whenever he is mortally wounded. This trope, both in the original show and others which employ it, has two benefits; not only can it increase the series' run by offering a method to depict an immortal main character on a long-running show, it is also a wonderful way to derive drama. With the added bonus of implying that AnyoneCanDie, without having to lose major characters. ''Doctor Who'' also treats the introduction each new Doctor as a series reboot, further enhancing its longevity; this aspect is occasionally employed by others.

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This is a catch-all for the recasting of a character using an in-continuity explanation. It takes its name from ''Series/DoctorWho'', whose eponymous Doctor is an alien capable of "[[ResurrectiveImmortality regenerating]]" into a new form whenever he is mortally wounded. This trope, both in the original show and others which employ it, has two benefits; not only can it increase the series' run by offering a method to depict an immortal main character on a long-running show, it is also a wonderful way to derive drama. With the added bonus of implying that AnyoneCanDie, without having to lose major characters. ''Doctor Who'' also treats the introduction each new Doctor as a series reboot, further enhancing its longevity; this aspect is occasionally employed by others.
characters.
19th Mar '16 3:50:48 AM Morgenthaler
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* The Terminator known as Cromartie is reduced to a metal skeleton in the first episode of ''TheSarahConnorChronicles'', and slowly creates a new flesh covering for himself over the course of the first season, being played by a second actor in the interim stages, and a third actor once the work is complete. This was due to RealLifeWritesThePlot, as the third actor was always the showrunners' first choice for the role, but was unavailable for the recording of the pilot episode.

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* The Terminator known as Cromartie is reduced to a metal skeleton in the first episode of ''TheSarahConnorChronicles'', ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', and slowly creates a new flesh covering for himself over the course of the first season, being played by a second actor in the interim stages, and a third actor once the work is complete. This was due to RealLifeWritesThePlot, as the third actor was always the showrunners' first choice for the role, but was unavailable for the recording of the pilot episode.
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