History Main / TheMetricSystemIsHereToStay

23rd Oct '17 1:08:06 PM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The metric system is, at least for scientific applications, more useful than the imperial system -- most, if not all scientific data is presented in metric units, which are the scientific standard, and they are mathematically easier to work with -- there are exactly 1,000 meters in a kilometer, and exactly 1,000 millimeters in a meter. Thus, it's not surprising that the United States actually ''does'' use the metric system already, in military and scientific endeavors, as well as on pharmaceuticals and nutritional information. (For example, soft drinks commonly come in 2- or 3-liter bottles.) In fact, the United States' measurements[[note]] (not Imperial - that would be British, and there ''are'' differences, e.g. 1 Imperial gallon equals 1.20095 U.S. liquid gallons)[[/note]] are defined in metric units in relevant legislation. Further details can be found on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_system_in_the_United_States That Other Wiki.]]

to:

The metric system is, at least for scientific applications, more useful than the imperial system -- most, if not all scientific data is presented in metric units, which are the scientific standard, and they are mathematically easier to work with -- there are exactly 1,000 meters in a kilometer, and exactly 1,000 millimeters in a meter. Thus, it's not surprising that the United States actually ''does'' use the metric system already, in military and scientific endeavors, as well as on pharmaceuticals and nutritional information. (For example, soft drinks commonly come in 2- or 3-liter bottles.) In fact, the United States' measurements[[note]] (not Imperial - -- that would be British, and there ''are'' differences, e.g. 1 Imperial gallon equals 1.20095 U.S. liquid gallons)[[/note]] are defined in metric units in relevant legislation. Further details can be found on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_system_in_the_United_States That Other Wiki.]]



[[folder: Anime & Manga]]

to:

[[folder: Anime [[folder:Anime & Manga]]



[[folder:Film]]
* ''Film/{{Avatar}}'', naturally. ("[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klick_(unit_of_length) Klick]]" is military slang for kilometer, in case you were wondering.)
** Also normal person slang in Canada.

to:

[[folder:Film]]
[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* ''Film/{{Avatar}}'', naturally. ("[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klick_(unit_of_length) Klick]]" is military slang for kilometer, in case you were wondering.)
**
) Also normal person slang in Canada.



* ''Franchise/StarWars'' (though "inch" does appear occasionally in the ExpandedUniverse).
** Technically, it's set in the distant past, but it is futuristic.

to:

* ''Franchise/StarWars'' (though "inch" does appear occasionally in the ExpandedUniverse).
**
ExpandedUniverse). Technically, it's set in the distant past, but it is futuristic.



* There's a curious semi-inversion in the short-lived series of English translations of the ''Literature/PerryRhodan'' novels. Because the originals are in German distances are given in metric, but translator Wendayne Ackerman consistently renders meters into yards - not even bothering to multiply by three to get feet.

to:

* There's a curious semi-inversion in the short-lived series of English translations of the ''Literature/PerryRhodan'' novels. Because the originals are in German distances are given in metric, but translator Wendayne Ackerman consistently renders meters into yards - -- not even bothering to multiply by three to get feet.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' novels use metric (but the game mechanics use imperial).

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' novels use metric (but the game mechanics use imperial).



* ''Series/DoctorWho'': In the first episode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild "An Unearthly Child"]], the title character, Susan Foreman, didn't know [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney how many shillings there were in a pound]]:

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'': In the first episode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild "An "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An Unearthly Child"]], Child]]", the title character, Susan Foreman, didn't know [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney how many shillings there were in a pound]]:



** A good guess on the part of the program's producers, as the UK would indeed decimalize its currency eight years later. It was not, however, all that psychic, as decimalization was already being seriously discussed, and it was fairly obvious it would be adopted.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', and the follow-on serieses ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' and ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', consistently use the metric system, to the point of changing the scriptwriter's wording if necessary. This caused a scientific error at least once: During the production of the ST:TNG episode "The Royale", they "converted" a temperature to Celsius (presumably to make it more "futurey") by simply swapping the unit names. The original temperature was -291 °F (-179.4 °C), but the lowest possible temperature (absolute zero) is -273.15 °C... whoops.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and its movies were known for using both the metric and imperial systems, sometimes in the same sentence, in a faintly baffling manner... [[RealityIsUnrealistic much like]] [[ModernStasis the modern scientific community]] [[CreatorProvincialism and US military]].
** The novelisation for ''Film/{{Star Trek IV|The Voyage Home}}'' featured Scotty having to mentally translate from metric to US customary when talking to the factory owner.

to:

** :: A good guess on the part of the program's producers, as the UK would indeed decimalize its currency eight years later. It was not, however, all that psychic, as decimalization was already being seriously discussed, and it was fairly obvious it would be adopted.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', and the follow-on serieses series ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' and ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', consistently use the metric system, to the point of changing the scriptwriter's wording if necessary. This caused a scientific error at least once: During the production of the ST:TNG episode ''ST:TNG episode'' "The Royale", they "converted" a temperature to Celsius (presumably to make it more "futurey") by simply swapping the unit names. The original temperature was -291 °F (-179.4 °C), but the lowest possible temperature (absolute zero) is -273.15 °C... whoops.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and its movies were known for using both the metric and imperial systems, sometimes in the same sentence, in a faintly baffling manner... [[RealityIsUnrealistic much like]] [[ModernStasis the modern scientific community]] [[CreatorProvincialism and US military]].
**
military]]. The novelisation for ''Film/{{Star Trek IV|The Voyage Home}}'' featured Scotty having to mentally translate from metric to US customary when talking to the factory owner.



* Inverted in Steve Jackson Games' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'', which -- despite the "Generic Universal" part of its name -- has firmly stuck with the imperial system for the past twenty years, even when offering a licensed conversion of the ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' system.
** Apparently so much of the player base is American that they can't afford to switch to metric because, like many small RPG makers, [=SJGames=] is a margin business. (The Basic Set book does have a metric conversion table near the front.)
** Also averted in ''TabletopGame/CarWars''. Miles, feet, and pounds abound in Autoduel America.

to:

* Inverted in Steve Jackson Games' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'', which -- despite the "Generic Universal" part of its name -- has firmly stuck with the imperial system for the past twenty years, even when offering a licensed conversion of the ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' system.
**
system. Apparently so much of the player base is American that they can't afford to switch to metric because, like many small RPG makers, [=SJGames=] is a margin business. (The Basic Set book does have a metric conversion table near the front.)
** * Also averted in ''TabletopGame/CarWars''. Miles, feet, and pounds abound in Autoduel America.



* ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Wipeout}}'' measure ([[LudicrousSpeed ridiculously high]]) speed in kilometers per hour.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{F-Zero}}'' ''VideoGame/FZero'' and ''VideoGame/{{Wipeout}}'' measure ([[LudicrousSpeed ridiculously high]]) speed in kilometers per hour.



[[folder:Webcomics]]
* ''Webcomic/AfterlifeBlues''. "You didn't recognise the Hero of Athens when you were two meters away from her?"
* ''Webcomic/EscapeFromTerra'', in addition the Martian calendar and system of time measurement is decimalized (1 Martian day = 100 centimes).
* ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'' often has the characters using metric units with the Imperial equivalents in footnotes.
* The (essentially) culturally American society shown in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'' uses the metric system, even among civilians... but every now and then the (American) author forgets himself.

to:

[[folder:Webcomics]]
[[folder:Web Animation]]
* ''Webcomic/AfterlifeBlues''. "You didn't recognise the Hero of Athens when you were two meters away from her?"
* ''Webcomic/EscapeFromTerra'', in addition the Martian calendar and system of time measurement is decimalized (1 Martian day = 100 centimes).
* ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'' often has the characters using
''Machinima/CivilProtection'' implies that Earth's gone metric units with post-Combine-takeover when Mike gives directions in "Shadow of a Doubt":
-->'''Mike:''' Alright, what you want to do here is take a right at
the Imperial equivalents in footnotes.
* The (essentially) culturally American society shown in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'' uses the metric system, even among civilians... but every now
end of this road, and then the (American) author forgets himself.stay on it for about a mile. I mean, a kilometer or two.



[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''Machinima/CivilProtection'' implies that Earth's gone metric post-Combine-takeover when Mike gives directions in "Shadow of a Doubt":
-->'''Mike:''' Alright, what you want to do here is take a right at the end of this road, and stay on it for about a mile. I mean, a kilometer or two.

to:

[[folder:Web Original]]
Comics]]
* ''Machinima/CivilProtection'' implies that Earth's gone ''Webcomic/AfterlifeBlues''. "You didn't recognize the Hero of Athens when you were two meters away from her?"
* ''Webcomic/EscapeFromTerra'', in addition the Martian calendar and system of time measurement is decimalized (1 Martian day = 100 centimes).
* ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'' often has the characters using
metric post-Combine-takeover when Mike gives directions in "Shadow of a Doubt":
-->'''Mike:''' Alright, what you want to do here is take a right at
units with the end of this road, Imperial equivalents in footnotes.
* The (essentially) culturally American society shown in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'' uses the metric system, even among civilians... but every now
and stay on it for about a mile. I mean, a kilometer or two.then the (American) author forgets himself.



--> '''Cyril:''' You will see that from our initial supply of 1,000 kilos of cocaine, we…
--> '''Archer:''' Hang on, dummy, we had a ton of cocaine.
--> '''Cyril:''' No, we. . . well, we had a tonne, that's T-O-N-N-E, also known as a metric ton, but. . .
--> '''Mallory:''' Metric. Who uses metric?
--> '''Lana:''' Every single country on the planet except for us, Liberia, and Burma.
--> '''Archer:''' Wow, really?
--> '''Lana:''' Yup.
--> '''Archer:''' Because you never think of those other two as having their shit together.
** This culminates in Archer asking the value of their cocaine in:
--> '''Archer:''' No, I meant pounds-
--> '''Mallory:''' STERLING!
--> '''Archer:''' Exactly. As in ''Series/DoctorWho'' money.

to:

--> '''Cyril:''' -->'''Cyril:''' You will see that from our initial supply of 1,000 kilos of cocaine, we…
-->
we...\\
'''Archer:''' Hang on, dummy, we had a ton of cocaine.
-->
cocaine.\\
'''Cyril:''' No, we. . . we... well, we had a tonne, that's T-O-N-N-E, also known as a metric ton, but. . .
-->
but...\\
'''Mallory:''' Metric. Who uses metric?
-->
metric?\\
'''Lana:''' Every single country on the planet except for us, Liberia, and Burma.
-->
Burma.\\
'''Archer:''' Wow, really?
-->
really?\\
'''Lana:''' Yup.
-->
Yup.\\
'''Archer:''' Because you never think of those other two as having their shit together.
** :: This culminates in Archer asking the value of their cocaine in:
--> '''Archer:'''
in[=:=]
-->'''Archer:'''
No, I meant pounds-
-->
pounds--\\
'''Mallory:''' STERLING!
-->
STERLING!\\
'''Archer:''' Exactly. As in ''Series/DoctorWho'' money.



-->'''Judge Harm:''' From now on, the restraining order is set at 200 feet.
-->''(Everyone in the room gasps)''
-->'''Judge Harm:''' That's 61 meters.
-->''(a Dutchwoman, a Frenchman and a German in the back row gasp)''
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': The show for the most part uses metric, in keeping with ''Star Wars'' custom. There are, however, two occasions -- in the episodes [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS1E13JediCrash "Jedi Crash"]] and [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS2E10TheDeserter "The Deserter"]] -- where Imperial measurements are used for no discernable reason other than "this show was made by Americans".

to:

-->'''Judge Harm:''' From now on, the restraining order is set at 200 feet.
-->''(Everyone
feet.\\
''[everyone
in the room gasps)''
-->'''Judge
gasps]''\\
'''Judge
Harm:''' That's 61 meters.
-->''(a
meters.\\
''[a
Dutchwoman, a Frenchman and a German in the back row gasp)''
gasp]''
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': The show for the most part uses metric, in keeping with ''Star Wars'' custom. There are, however, two occasions -- in the episodes [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS1E13JediCrash "Jedi Crash"]] "[[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS1E13JediCrash Jedi Crash]]" and [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS2E10TheDeserter "The Deserter"]] "[[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS2E10TheDeserter The Deserter]]" -- where Imperial measurements are used for no discernable reason other than "this show was made by Americans".



* For some peculiar reason, British road signs still give distances in miles despite the fact that the metric system has been taught exclusively in schools since at least the early 1990s. Retailers exclusively use the metric system for ''all'' foodstuffs apart from beer and milk, which are defined in both systems… though that's more due to being required to by EU regulations, and some grocers will still sell fruit or meat by the pound if asked (they must list the metric equivalent).
** The usual cited reason for not changing is the sheer expense of changing pretty much ''every roadsign in the land that has a number on it''. Every distance sign and speed sign would need to be replaced, which would be a colossal undertaking for little practical benefit -- not to mention that whatever they may have learned in school, pretty much everyone uses miles, feet, and inches in everyday conversation. There's also a massive safety consideration, especially for things like speed limits. A driver might see the sign, and not know what unit it's in or, even if the unit is marked on the sign, just glance at it and not realize the units.
** Canada officially adopted metric in 1977, but its adoption by the general public has been hit and miss - for instance, many people use Celsius for outdoor temperature but Fahrenheit for indoor and/or body temperature, or measure long distances in kilometres but short and medium distances in inches and feet... unlike Brits who are more likely to use centimetres and metres for short and medium distances, but miles for longer distances.
*** Rural Canadians living in the prairies often use miles, simply because the grid roads are a mile distant, so measuring out three miles on an unmarked road is easy - three major cross roads, and you're there.
*** This has a lot to do with the vast majority of Canada's population living within 100 miles (160km) of the U.S. border and getting nearly all U.S. media, so the population is still constantly exposed to the old system, unlike in, say, geographically isolated Australia where it was much easier to simply ban use of Imperial. [[note]] Australia, with a colossally larger land mass, made the switch from Imperial to Metric road signs starting on the 1st of July 1974. A new metric sign was erected alongside each old sign and a large [[PublicServiceAnnouncement public education campaign]] took place. The old signs were gradually removed over the course of a month.[[/note]]
** The size and nature of highway systems in Britain and the US vs those of Canada and Australia illustrate a prime stumbling block to metrication. The United States, while approximately the same landmass size as Canada and about 15% bigger than Australia, has roughly 6× the mileage of roads of either. Britain, meanwhile, has about one third the mileage of Canada and one half that of Australia. ''However'', the problem is exacerbated in both the US and UK by the ''density'' of signage. Both countries have far larger numbers of dense population areas, and thus radically higher "signage-per-mile" quantities. A good estimate is that it would require roughly 5× the effort/cost on the UK's part and 50× the effort by the USA as to the number of signs that Canada or Australia had to replace.
** Irish road signs were a hilarious mish-mash for a long time: Distances were given in kilometres, but local speed limits were displayed in miles per hour until they finally changed them. Some older road signs with the distances displayed in miles are still present on some backroads.
* In the late-[[TheSeventies 70's]], a conclusive switch to the metric system was widely anticipated in the United States. [[ItWasHisSled Obviously, that didn't happen.]] But at the time, the expectation was so prevalent that the newly-finished [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_19 Interstate 19]] put up signs with distances in kilometers. The program ran from 1975 to 1982, and it's worth noting that its failure was not necessarily because [[AmericansHateTingle Americans disliked the metric system]]. Public opinion tended to be split or just ambivalent, and some key industries – mainly construction – were opposed, so the incoming Reagan administration (backed as it was by evangelical Christians, who were mostly anti-metric) couldn't justify the cost of overseeing and marketing the metrication effort, educating manufacturers, and changing literally millions of highway signs. Several of the aforementioned metric road signs still stand today, particularly near the Canadian and Mexican borders, as well as in Hawaii (which gets a large number of visitors from Japan).

to:

* For some peculiar reason, British road signs still give distances in miles despite the fact that the metric system has been taught exclusively in schools since at least the early 1990s. Retailers exclusively use the metric system for ''all'' foodstuffs apart from beer and milk, which are defined in both systems… systems... though that's more due to being required to by EU regulations, and some grocers will still sell fruit or meat by the pound if asked (they must list the metric equivalent).
**
equivalent). The usual cited reason for not changing is the sheer expense of changing pretty much ''every roadsign in the land that has a number on it''. Every distance sign and speed sign would need to be replaced, which would be a colossal undertaking for little practical benefit -- not to mention that whatever they may have learned in school, pretty much everyone uses miles, feet, and inches in everyday conversation. There's also a massive safety consideration, especially for things like speed limits. A driver might see the sign, and not know what unit it's in or, even if the unit is marked on the sign, just glance at it and not realize the units.
** * Canada officially adopted metric in 1977, but its adoption by the general public has been hit and miss - -- for instance, many people use Celsius for outdoor temperature but Fahrenheit for indoor and/or body temperature, or measure long distances in kilometres but short and medium distances in inches and feet... unlike Brits who are more likely to use centimetres and metres for short and medium distances, but miles for longer distances.
***
distances. Rural Canadians living in the prairies often use miles, simply because the grid roads are a mile distant, so measuring out three miles on an unmarked road is easy - -- three major cross roads, and you're there.
***
there. This has a lot to do with the vast majority of Canada's population living within 100 miles (160km) (160 km) of the U.S. border and getting nearly all U.S. media, so the population is still constantly exposed to the old system, unlike in, say, geographically isolated Australia where it was much easier to simply ban use of Imperial. [[note]] Imperial.
*
Australia, with a colossally larger land mass, made the switch from Imperial to Metric road signs starting on the 1st of July 1974. A new metric sign was erected alongside each old sign and a large [[PublicServiceAnnouncement public education campaign]] took place. The old signs were gradually removed over the course of a month.[[/note]]
**
month.
*
The size and nature of highway systems in Britain and the US vs those of Canada and Australia illustrate a prime stumbling block to metrication. The United States, while approximately the same landmass size as Canada and about 15% bigger than Australia, has roughly 6× the mileage of roads of either. Britain, meanwhile, has about one third the mileage of Canada and one half that of Australia. ''However'', the problem is exacerbated in both the US and UK by the ''density'' of signage. Both countries have far larger numbers of dense population areas, and thus radically higher "signage-per-mile" quantities. A good estimate is that it would require roughly 5× the effort/cost on the UK's part and 50× the effort by the USA as to the number of signs that Canada or Australia had to replace.
** * Irish road signs were a hilarious mish-mash for a long time: Distances were given in kilometres, but local speed limits were displayed in miles per hour until they finally changed them. Some older road signs with the distances displayed in miles are still present on some backroads.
* In the late-[[TheSeventies 70's]], '70s]], a conclusive switch to the metric system was widely anticipated in the United States. [[ItWasHisSled Obviously, that didn't happen.]] But at the time, the expectation was so prevalent that the newly-finished [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_19 Interstate 19]] put up signs with distances in kilometers. The program ran from 1975 to 1982, and it's worth noting that its failure was not necessarily because [[AmericansHateTingle Americans disliked the metric system]]. Public opinion tended to be split or just ambivalent, and some key industries – mainly construction – were opposed, so the incoming Reagan administration (backed as it was by evangelical Christians, who were mostly anti-metric) couldn't justify the cost of overseeing and marketing the metrication effort, educating manufacturers, and changing literally millions of highway signs. Several of the aforementioned metric road signs still stand today, particularly near the Canadian and Mexican borders, as well as in Hawaii (which gets a large number of visitors from Japan).
12th Oct '17 9:40:05 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''CivilProtection'' implies that Earth's gone metric post-Combine-takeover when Mike gives directions in "Shadow of a Doubt":

to:

* ''CivilProtection'' ''Machinima/CivilProtection'' implies that Earth's gone metric post-Combine-takeover when Mike gives directions in "Shadow of a Doubt":
2nd Oct '17 3:57:41 PM Specialist290
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When the metric system was introduced in the United Kingdom, ''Punch'' did a satire which was purportedly a government information pamphlet that accompanied the switch from "Biblical" measures to Imperial (how many cubits in a yard?). Which was quite funny considering that there were people who wrote complex theories trying to justify the Imperial system, which differs quite significantly from the weights and measures used in the Bible, on religious grounds, demanding that it should be maintained against the "godless" Metric system. [[note]] There are some people in America, mostly in fundamentalist circles, who genuinely believe this to this day. SI being created in France does ''not'' help.[[/note]]

to:

* When the metric system was introduced in the United Kingdom, ''Punch'' did a satire which was purportedly a government information pamphlet that accompanied the switch from "Biblical" measures to Imperial (how many cubits in a yard?). Which was quite funny considering that there were people who wrote complex theories trying to justify the Imperial system, which differs quite significantly from the weights and measures used in the Bible, on religious grounds, demanding that it should be maintained against the "godless" Metric system. [[note]] There are some people in America, mostly in fundamentalist circles, who genuinely believe this to this day. SI being created in France -- by the rabidly anticlerical First Republic directly in the aftermath of the French Revolution -- does ''not'' help.[[/note]]
20th Sep '17 6:05:48 PM Historian1912
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When the metric system was introduced in the United Kingdom, ''Punch'' did a satire which was purportedly a government information pamphlet that accompanied the switch from "Biblical" measures to Imperial (how many cubits in a yard?). Which was quite funny considering that there were people who wrote complex theories trying to justify the Imperial system, which differs quite significantly from the weights and measures used in the Bible, on religious grounds, demanding that it should be maintained against the "godless" Metric system. [[note]] There are a large number of people in America, mostly in fundamentalist circles, who genuinely believe this to this day. SI being created in France does ''not'' help.[[/note]]

to:

* When the metric system was introduced in the United Kingdom, ''Punch'' did a satire which was purportedly a government information pamphlet that accompanied the switch from "Biblical" measures to Imperial (how many cubits in a yard?). Which was quite funny considering that there were people who wrote complex theories trying to justify the Imperial system, which differs quite significantly from the weights and measures used in the Bible, on religious grounds, demanding that it should be maintained against the "godless" Metric system. [[note]] There are a large number of some people in America, mostly in fundamentalist circles, who genuinely believe this to this day. SI being created in France does ''not'' help.[[/note]]
12th Apr '17 1:05:39 PM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about a fast-acting new Ice Age, has all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius. Unless the Scottish scientists were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...
* ''StarWars'' (though "inch" does appear occasionally in the ExpandedUniverse).

to:

* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about a fast-acting new Ice Age, has all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius.Celsius. Unless the Scottish scientists were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...
* ''StarWars'' ''Franchise/StarWars'' (though "inch" does appear occasionally in the ExpandedUniverse).



* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] by Scottish author Creator/{{Ken MacLeod}}'s ''Literature/FallRevolution'' books. When asked why spacecraft use imperial measures, Ellie May Ngwethru replies, "Fucking NASA." (Which is wrong; the reason the Mars Climate Orbiter crashed was that NASA and JPL were using metric but Lockheed-Martin was using imperial, and didn't check the measurements.)

to:

* [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] by Scottish author Creator/{{Ken MacLeod}}'s Creator/KenMacLeod's ''Literature/FallRevolution'' books. When asked why spacecraft use imperial measures, Ellie May Ngwethru replies, "Fucking NASA.UsefulNotes/{{NASA}}." (Which is wrong; the reason the Mars Climate Orbiter crashed was that NASA and JPL were using metric but Lockheed-Martin was using imperial, and didn't check the measurements.)
12th Apr '17 11:23:32 AM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The thinking behind this trope may have been why Langhorne and Bedard revived the old Imperial system of measurements in the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series to prevent the colony from breaking out of its MedievalStasis. And then for good measure they tossed out Arabic numerals and reverted to Roman numerals to hinder the rise of advanced mathematics as well.

to:

* The thinking behind this trope may have been why Langhorne and Bedard Bédard revived the old Imperial system of measurements in the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series to prevent the colony from breaking out of its MedievalStasis. And then for good measure they tossed out Arabic numerals and reverted to Roman numerals to hinder the rise of advanced mathematics as well.
20th Feb '17 8:31:40 PM 64SuperNintendo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This culimantes in Archer asking the value of their cocaine in:

to:

** This culimantes culminates in Archer asking the value of their cocaine in:
14th Feb '17 5:45:09 PM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Used as a joke in ''[[Film/{{Zenon}} Zenon: Girl Of The Twenty First Century]]''. Zenon is from a space station, but when she arrives on Earth, she explodes a test tube because she was thinking in Celsius when all the instructions were in Fahrenheit.



* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about a fast-acting new Ice Age, has all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius. Unless the Scottish scientists were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...



* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about a fast-acting new Ice Age, has all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius. Unless the Scottish scientists were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...

to:

* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about Used as a fast-acting new Ice Age, has joke in ''[[Film/{{Zenon}} Zenon: Girl Of The Twenty First Century]]''. Zenon is from a space station, but when she arrives on Earth, she explodes a test tube because she was thinking in Celsius when all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius. Unless the Scottish scientists instructions were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...in Fahrenheit.



* As seen in the page quote, in British speculative fiction using the metric system in the future is usually a hint of dystopia. Oddly this is a much more common use than in American fiction, perhaps because the metric system has never been (in parts) imposed by government in America.
* Fred Saberhagen's ''Literature/EmpireOfTheEast'' and ''Literature/BookOfSwords'' series both use this trope to the fullest. The former was written in the 1970s, when the whole USA was going to convert over to metric any day now, and since the books are set 50,000 years in the future, it made sense at the time. Now it just seems a little quaint.



* In one chapter of ''Literature/TheMoonIsAHarshMistress'' one of the nuts in the Lunar Congress suggests instituting a new system of measurements based on the lunar cycle. Manny thinks that's just making things overcomplicated, and comments that his ancestors must have felt similarly when they had to switch to the metric system. But that was different because they were trying to make things easier, those old Imperial units are so confusing.
* Depending on the specific setting, Creator/LarryNiven apparently has no problem with either averting this trope or playing it straight. ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' is an example of the former, while ''The Integral Trees'' is an example of the latter.
* There's a curious semi-inversion in the short-lived series of English translations of the ''Literature/PerryRhodan'' novels. Because the originals are in German distances are given in metric, but translator Wendayne Ackerman consistently renders meters into yards - not even bothering to multiply by three to get feet.



* As seen in the page quote, in British speculative fiction using the metric system in the future is usually a hint of dystopia. Oddly this is a much more common use than in American fiction, perhaps because the metric system has never been (in parts) imposed by government in America.
* Depending on the specific setting, Creator/LarryNiven apparently has no problem with either averting this trope or playing it straight. ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' is an example of the former, while ''The Integral Trees'' is an example of the latter.

to:

* As seen in the page quote, in British speculative fiction using the metric system in the future is usually a hint of dystopia. Oddly this is a much more common use than in American fiction, perhaps because the metric system has never been (in parts) imposed by government in America.
* Depending on the specific setting, Creator/LarryNiven apparently has no problem with either averting
The thinking behind this trope or playing it straight. ''Literature/{{Ringworld}}'' is an example of may have been why Langhorne and Bedard revived the former, while ''The Integral Trees'' is an example old Imperial system of measurements in the latter.''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series to prevent the colony from breaking out of its MedievalStasis. And then for good measure they tossed out Arabic numerals and reverted to Roman numerals to hinder the rise of advanced mathematics as well.



* TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} novels use metric (but the game mechanics use imperial).



* There's a curious semi-inversion in the short-lived series of English translations of the ''Literature/PerryRhodan'' novels. Because the originals are in German distances are given in metric, but translator Wendayne Ackerman consistently renders meters into yards - not even bothering to multiply by three to get feet.
* The thinking behind this trope may have been why Langhorne and Bedard revived the old Imperial system of measurements in the ''Literature/SafeHold'' series to prevent the colony from breaking out of its MedievalStasis. And then for good measure they tossed out Arabic numerals and reverted to Roman numerals to hinder the rise of advanced mathematics as well.

to:

* There's a curious semi-inversion in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' novels use metric (but the short-lived series of English translations of the ''Literature/PerryRhodan'' novels. Because the originals are in German distances are given in metric, but translator Wendayne Ackerman consistently renders meters into yards - not even bothering to multiply by three to get feet.
* The thinking behind this trope may have been why Langhorne and Bedard revived the old Imperial system of measurements in the ''Literature/SafeHold'' series to prevent the colony from breaking out of its MedievalStasis. And then for good measure they tossed out Arabic numerals and reverted to Roman numerals to hinder the rise of advanced mathematics as well.
game mechanics use imperial).



* Fred Saberhagen's ''Literature/EmpireOfTheEast'' and ''Literature/BookOfSwords'' series both use this trope to the fullest. The former was written in the 1970s, when the whole USA was going to convert over to metric any day now, and since the books are set 50,000 years in the future, it made sense at the time. Now it just seems a little quaint.
* In one chapter of ''Literature/TheMoonIsAHarshMistress'' one of the nuts in the Lunar Congress suggests instituting a new system of measurements based on the lunar cycle. Manny thinks that's just making things overcomplicated, and comments that his ancestors must have felt similarly when they had to switch to the metric system. But that was different because they were trying to make things easier, those old Imperial units are so confusing.



* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', and the follow-on serieses ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' and ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', consistently use the metric system, to the point of changing the scriptwriter's wording if necessary. This caused a scientific error at least once: During the production of the ST:TNG episode "The Royale", they "converted" a temperature to Celsius (presumably to make it more "futurey") by simply swapping the unit names. The original temperature was -291 °F (-179.4 °C), but the lowest possible temperature (absolute zero) is -273.15 °C... whoops.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and its movies were known for using both the metric and imperial systems, sometimes in the same sentence, in a faintly baffling manner... [[RealityIsUnrealistic much like]] [[ModernStasis the modern scientific community]] [[CreatorProvincialism and US military]].
** The novelisation for ''Film/{{Star Trek IV|The Voyage Home}}'' featured Scotty having to mentally translate from metric to US customary when talking to the factory owner.



* ''Series/DoctorWho'': In the first episode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild "An Unearthly Child"]], the title character, Susan Foreman, didn't know [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney how many shillings there were in a pound]]:
-->'''Barbara:''' Don't be silly, Susan. The United States has a decimal system. You know perfectly well that we do not.\\
'''Susan:''' Of course, the decimal system hasn't started yet...
** A good guess on the part of the program's producers, as the UK would indeed decimalize its currency eight years later. It was not, however, all that psychic, as decimalization was already being seriously discussed, and it was fairly obvious it would be adopted.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'', and the follow-on serieses ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'' and ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', consistently use the metric system, to the point of changing the scriptwriter's wording if necessary. This caused a scientific error at least once: During the production of the ST:TNG episode "The Royale", they "converted" a temperature to Celsius (presumably to make it more "futurey") by simply swapping the unit names. The original temperature was -291 °F (-179.4 °C), but the lowest possible temperature (absolute zero) is -273.15 °C... whoops.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' and its movies were known for using both the metric and imperial systems, sometimes in the same sentence, in a faintly baffling manner... [[RealityIsUnrealistic much like]] [[ModernStasis the modern scientific community]] [[CreatorProvincialism and US military]].
** The novelisation for ''Film/{{Star Trek IV|The Voyage Home}}'' featured Scotty having to mentally translate from metric to US customary when talking to the factory owner.



* A variant with Susan Foreman in "An Unearthly Child", the first ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode, who didn't know [[UsefulNotes/OldBritishMoney how many shillings there were in a pound]]:
-->'''BARBARA:''' Don't be silly, Susan. The United States has a decimal system. You know perfectly well that we do not.\\
'''SUSAN:''' Of course, the decimal system hasn't started yet...
** A good guess on the part of the program's producers, as the UK would indeed decimalize its currency eight years later. It was not, however, all that psychic, as decimalization was already being seriously discussed, and it was fairly obvious it would be adopted.



* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode "On a Clear Day, I Can't See My Sister":
-->'''Judge Harm:''' From now on, the restraining order is set at 200 feet.
-->''(Everyone in the room gasps)''
-->'''Judge Harm:''' That's 61 meters.
-->''(a Dutchwoman, a Frenchman and a German in the back row gasp)''
* Although not science fiction, ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' always uses metric units, even in casual dialogue. It's an interesting choice for an American kids cartoon. Considering it is meant to look like an anime from Japan however, metric might be used since Japan ''does'' use the metric system.


Added DiffLines:

* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' episode "On a Clear Day, I Can't See My Sister":
-->'''Judge Harm:''' From now on, the restraining order is set at 200 feet.
-->''(Everyone in the room gasps)''
-->'''Judge Harm:''' That's 61 meters.
-->''(a Dutchwoman, a Frenchman and a German in the back row gasp)''
* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'': The show for the most part uses metric, in keeping with ''Star Wars'' custom. There are, however, two occasions -- in the episodes [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS1E13JediCrash "Jedi Crash"]] and [[Recap/StarWarsTheCloneWarsS2E10TheDeserter "The Deserter"]] -- where Imperial measurements are used for no discernable reason other than "this show was made by Americans".
* Although not science fiction, ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' always uses metric units, even in casual dialogue. It's an interesting choice for an American kids cartoon. Considering it is meant to look like an anime from Japan however, metric might be used since Japan ''does'' use the metric system.
4th Feb '17 1:20:39 PM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about a fast-acting new Ice Age, has all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius. Unless the Scottish cientists were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...

to:

* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about a fast-acting new Ice Age, has all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius. Unless the Scottish cientists scientists were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...
4th Feb '17 1:19:48 PM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheDayAfterTomorrow'', about a fast-acting new Ice Age, has all its temperatures quoted in Fahrenheit, even by scientists and academics outside the United States, who could be expected to have got with the programme and to use Celcius. Unless the Scottish cientists were hospitably making allowances for America being a little bit behind the times...
This list shows the last 10 events of 216. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheMetricSystemIsHereToStay