History Main / TheLawofConservationofDetail

17th Jun '17 2:32:20 PM DustSnitch
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** Everything spouted by the resident ConspiracyTheorist, sounds hilarious if utterly pointless. In his debut episode, they are...until the end of his rant in that episode, where he is now obsessed with rock people, with most of his theories --
[[spoiler:their alien nature, the existence of a Diamond Authority, a suggestion that Gems are burrowing into the Earth, etc.]] -- proving to be true. Later episodes continue to have his theories serve as foreshadowing to future events.

to:

** Everything spouted by the resident ConspiracyTheorist, sounds hilarious if utterly pointless. In his debut episode, they are...until the end of his rant in that episode, where he is now obsessed with rock people, with most of his theories --
-- [[spoiler:their alien nature, the existence of a Diamond Authority, a suggestion that Gems are burrowing into the Earth, etc.]] -- proving to be true. Later episodes continue to have his theories serve as foreshadowing to future events.
15th Jun '17 3:43:59 PM TompaDompa
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* In-universe example in ''Film/TheDraughtsmansContract''. Mr. Neville insists on drawing everything exactly as he sees it, and therefore demands that nothing be moved, altered, or disturbed to preserve continuity. When items start showing up in places they should not be in his drawings (such as a ladder leaning against a wall and an abandoned pair of boots in a field), characters start suspecting that something is amiss.
10th Jun '17 9:09:40 AM nombretomado
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* The Phase novels of the WhateleyUniverse seem to run on this trope. There's so much detail you can't tell what's going to be important in this chapter, and what's going to matter at the end of the book, and what will be crucial three novels later. In book 4, Phase becomes insistent that fellow student could be an avatar of Hera. (He's right, but no one believes him then.) Then he works out from that who the other Greek gods are. In book 7, this knowledge is critical to getting the team out of a holographic simulation that has been rigged to kill them.

to:

* The Phase novels of the WhateleyUniverse Literature/WhateleyUniverse seem to run on this trope. There's so much detail you can't tell what's going to be important in this chapter, and what's going to matter at the end of the book, and what will be crucial three novels later. In book 4, Phase becomes insistent that fellow student could be an avatar of Hera. (He's right, but no one believes him then.) Then he works out from that who the other Greek gods are. In book 7, this knowledge is critical to getting the team out of a holographic simulation that has been rigged to kill them.
7th Jun '17 8:10:20 PM RacattackForce
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** This aversion can be attributed to another trope: the UniverseBible. For any given book, movie, or television series, the people making it more likely than not have developed aspects about the characters and the world far beyond either what can be shown in the work itself; be it due to time, being hard to naturally work into the plot, and (of course) being too unimportant to the story being told. You don't need to know the first name of a character's mother, or that person driving the bus, if they has nothing to do with the events of the story after all.

to:

** This aversion can be attributed to another trope: the UniverseBible. For any given book, movie, or television series, the people making it more likely than not have developed aspects about the characters and the world far beyond either what can be shown in the work itself; be it due to time, being hard to naturally work into the plot, and (of course) being too unimportant to the story being told. You don't need to know the first name of a character's mother, or that person driving how the bus, city was built, if they has nothing to do with the events of the story after all.



* The show ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' [[ZigzaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] this quite often. Plot points like the bunker, the gobblewonker, and [[CloudCuckoolander 8 1/2 president Quentin Trembley]] were dropped after their first episode and only referenced off-handedly once or twice throughout the rest of the series; other points, such as the agents and the "Time Police" ended abruptly in rather anti-climactic ways. On the other hand, several important details, such as [[ChekhovsSkill McGucket's seemingly random ability with robots]], the journals, and the vending machine secret door were played straight and became extremely vital to the plot as a whole.

to:

* The show ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' [[ZigzaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] zig-zagged]] this quite often. Plot points like the bunker, the gobblewonker, and [[CloudCuckoolander 8 1/2 president Quentin Trembley]] were dropped after their first episode and only referenced off-handedly once or twice throughout the rest of the series; other points, such as the agents and the "Time Police" ended abruptly in rather anti-climactic ways. On the other hand, several important details, such as [[ChekhovsSkill McGucket's seemingly random ability with robots]], the journals, and the vending machine secret door were played straight and became extremely vital to the plot as a whole.



* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' is filled with examples.
** Episode 3: The Gems are careful to mention how many of Steven's ideas worked along their trip to the Lunar Sea Spire, conveniently seeming confused or frustrated at every challenge, only for Steven to find a creative solution. Tellingly, Pearl is oddly dismissive of the fact that their apparent goal of restoring the statue to the spire is brushed off as unimportant. [[spoiler:In episode 38, "The Test", it's revealed that entire mission is exactly what the episode suggested.]]
** Garnet ends the episode "Arcade Mania" with a humorous quip about the group keeping Amethyst. [[spoiler:Come ep 40, "On the Run", and we see just how accurate that comment was.]]
** Hey, a fun little story featuring a battlefield covered in roses and some primitive paintings on the pyramid walls. Eh, it's probably just to give flavor to the backgrounds. Wait, is that [[spoiler:Rose Quartz fighting other Gems with different insignias than the Crystal Gems'?]] They depict a crucial hint towards the series MythArc.
** A random episode about the resident ConspiracyTheorist spouting off nonsense, sounds hilarious if utterly pointless. Most of it is, but the last rant, [[spoiler:featuring a Diamond Authority, a suggestion that Gems are burrowing into the Earth, and planning a takeover]] are more or less true, and connect to the pyramid drawings stated above.
** In short, nearly every odd-sounding joke or throwaway line is laced with foreshadowing towards future character development and or plot reveals. Many jokes are still just random jokes, but as the series has gone on, more and more of what seemed unconnected, random MonsterOfTheWeek plots have contributed towards it's greater MythArc.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' is filled with examples.
so many examples, that when asked by a fan why there was so much "filler", a writer immediately countered that ''nothing is filler''.
** Episode 3: The In "Cheeseburger Backpack", the Gems are careful to mention how many of Steven's ideas worked along their trip to the Lunar Sea Spire, conveniently seeming confused or frustrated at every challenge, only for Steven to find a creative solution. Tellingly, Pearl is oddly dismissive of the fact that their apparent goal of restoring the statue to the spire is brushed off as unimportant. [[spoiler:In episode 38, "The Test", it's Half a season later, [[spoiler:it's revealed that that entire mission is exactly what was a test to see if Steven was ready to accompany the episode suggested.group on dangerous missions.]]
** Garnet ends the episode "Arcade Mania" with a humorous quip about the group keeping Amethyst. [[spoiler:Come ep 40, "On the Run", and Yet again, half a season later, [[spoiler:and we see just how accurate learn that comment was.Amethyst was found abandoned in a [[BizarreAlienReproduction Kindergarten]] and was adopted by the group's previous leader.]]
** Hey, a fun little story featuring a battlefield covered in roses and some primitive paintings on the pyramid walls. Eh, it's probably just to give flavor to the backgrounds. Wait, is that [[spoiler:Rose Quartz fighting other Gems with different insignias than the Crystal Gems'?]] They depict a crucial hint towards the series MythArc.
** A random episode about
Everything spouted by the resident ConspiracyTheorist spouting off nonsense, ConspiracyTheorist, sounds hilarious if utterly pointless. Most of it is, but In his debut episode, they are...until the last rant, [[spoiler:featuring end of his rant in that episode, where he is now obsessed with rock people, with most of his theories --
[[spoiler:their alien nature, the existence of
a Diamond Authority, a suggestion that Gems are burrowing into the Earth, and planning a takeover]] are more or less true, and connect etc.]] -- proving to the pyramid drawings stated above.
** In short, nearly every odd-sounding joke or throwaway line is laced with
be true. Later episodes continue to have his theories serve as foreshadowing towards to future character development and or plot reveals. Many jokes are still just random jokes, but as events.
** A number of background elements seen when
the series has gone on, more and more Crystal Gems visit old Gem locations on Earth hinted heavily at [[spoiler: the [[GreatOffscreenWar Great Gem War]] that took place thousands of what seemed unconnected, random MonsterOfTheWeek plots have contributed towards it's greater MythArc.years ago]].
7th Jun '17 7:50:52 PM RacattackForce
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** This aversion can be attributed to another trope: the UniverseBible. For any given book, movie, or television series, the people making it more likely than not have developed aspects about the characters and the world far beyond either what can be shown in the work itself; be it due to time, being hard to naturally work into the plot, and (of course) being too unimportant to the story being told. You don't need to know the first name of a character's mother, or that person driving the bus, if they has nothing to do with the events of the story after all.
5th Jun '17 2:34:52 AM fdsa1234567890
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** Another example comes from the reveal of the mother's name. In an early episode, Ted has a conversation with a stripper named Tracy, joking to his kids that this was their mother. The mother's name really is Tracy.
22nd May '17 2:10:55 PM ruthlesstyrant
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* Averted in most of the work of Quentin Tarrantino, who has an uncanny preference for long dialogues scenes that don't affect the plot (like for example the lengthy foot massage conversation in PulpFiction).
22nd May '17 2:07:53 PM ruthlesstyrant
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** Notable aversions usually are the PoV characters from the prologues and epilogues of the book. They are introduced exclusively for one chapter, get more characterization than plenty of other authors give actual main characters, and then are unceremoniously killed off; with neither their lives nor their deaths having much bearing on the overall plot.
4th Apr '17 5:39:09 PM nombretomado
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* Averted by {{Pixar}} with the Pixarpedia - even sub-minor characters, such as nameless, faceless, do-nothing bystanders get an entry in the encyclopedia. This is still ultimately played straight, as we don't learn the names and backstories of minor characters in the films because of this trope.

to:

* Averted by {{Pixar}} Creator/{{Pixar}} with the Pixarpedia - even sub-minor characters, such as nameless, faceless, do-nothing bystanders get an entry in the encyclopedia. This is still ultimately played straight, as we don't learn the names and backstories of minor characters in the films because of this trope.
20th Mar '17 9:43:48 AM SubjectFive
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* The show ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' [[ZigzaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] this quite often. Plot points like the bunker, the gobblewonker, and [[CloudCuckoolander 8 1/2 president Quentin Trembley]] were dropped after their first episode and only referenced off-handedly once or twice throughout the rest of the series; other points, such as the agents and the "Time Police" ended abruptly in rather anti-climactic ways. On the other hand, several important details, such as [[ChekhovsSkill McGucket's seemingly random ability with robots]], the journals, and the vending machine secret door were played straight and became extremely vital to the plot as a whole.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheLawofConservationofDetail