History Main / TheLawofConservationofDetail

17th Apr '18 10:59:54 PM PaulA
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%%* ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo'': Averted big-time.
27th Mar '18 12:53:42 PM MasterFuzzy
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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zags]] this so much it can make readers' heads spin. Westeros is [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters a very, very big kingdom in an even bigger world]], and almost from the start we're given a whole mess of names belonging to people, organizations, families, deities, stories and locations, such that any first-time reader without a photographic memory or a notebook will be hard-pressed to remember who's who, even with the [[AllThereInTheManual convenient appendix]] in the back. In addition, the multiple POV characters and the people around them have many distinct priorities and focuses; the characters in the first book alone have concerns that range from [[ConspiracyTheorist national]] (or even [[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt worldwide]]) security to [[WrongGenreSavvy whether they'll get to attend an extravagant tournament]]. This enables the characters (read: the author) to slip all kinds of relevant information to and past each other (read: the reader) without them realizing it until it's too late. After all, with [[NeedleInAStackOfNeedles so much information]], [[ChekhovsArmoury anything can turn out to be relevant]] [[{{Foreshadowing}} when the crucial details]] [[RedHerring are mixed so neatly with the worldbuilding]]. Even characters that had previously only appeared in the Appendixes can turn out to be important.

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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zags]] this so much it can make readers' heads spin. Westeros is [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters a very, very big kingdom in an even bigger world]], and almost from the start we're given a whole mess of names belonging to people, organizations, families, deities, stories and locations, such that any first-time reader without a photographic memory or a notebook will be hard-pressed to remember who's who, even with the [[AllThereInTheManual convenient appendix]] in the back. In addition, the multiple POV [=POV=] characters and the people around them have many distinct priorities and focuses; the characters in the first book alone have concerns that range from [[ConspiracyTheorist national]] (or even [[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt worldwide]]) security to [[WrongGenreSavvy whether they'll get to attend an extravagant tournament]]. This enables the characters (read: the author) to slip all kinds of relevant information to and past each other (read: the reader) without them realizing it until it's too late. After all, with [[NeedleInAStackOfNeedles so much information]], [[ChekhovsArmoury anything can turn out to be relevant]] [[{{Foreshadowing}} when the crucial details]] [[RedHerring are mixed so neatly with the worldbuilding]]. Even characters that had previously only appeared in the Appendixes can turn out to be important.
27th Feb '18 2:24:33 AM KBABZ
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** Subverted with a [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Truck#Rumors one-of-a-kind truck in the game]] (vehicles aren't seen anywhere else in the game since the preferred methods of travel are walking and flying or surfing on Pokémon) that can only be seen under very specific conditions at a certain point in the game before [[PermanentlyMissableContent becoming inaccessible]] (although there are ways to return to it later in the game); a very high percentage of players would not see it while playing through the game. Endless rumors were spouted about the truck, such as finding a Mew there, etc.; however, the truck actually had no real significance at all. The rest of the series just follow this trope in every possible way.
** Subverted with the building foundation in Vermilion City, where a man is having his Machop "stop the land flat" in preparation for building. It appears in every version of Kanto in the series, and the building has still never been finished.

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** Subverted with a [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Truck#Rumors one-of-a-kind truck in the game]] (vehicles aren't seen anywhere else in the game since the preferred methods of travel are walking and flying or surfing on Pokémon) that can only be seen under very specific conditions at a certain point in the game before [[PermanentlyMissableContent becoming inaccessible]] (although there are ways to return to it later in the game); a very high percentage of players would not see it while playing through the game. game, [[UrbanLegendOfZelda Endless rumors were spouted about the truck, truck]], such as finding a Mew there, there using Strength, etc.; however, the truck actually had no real significance at all. The rest of the series just follow this trope in every possible way.
*** The truck is given a subversive lampshade in the Gen III remakes on UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance; the truck is still there and still totally unique, but if the player interacts with it, they'll find a Lava Cookie underneath. In addition to being a useful item, Mew's clone Mewtwo was created on Cinnabar Island, which has a volcano on it.
** Subverted with the building foundation in Vermilion City, where a man is having his Machop "stop "stomp the land flat" in preparation for building. It appears in every version of Kanto in the series, and the building has still never been finished.
23rd Feb '18 6:30:08 PM NemoHerring
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zags]] this so much it can make readers' heads spin. Westeros is [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters a very, very big kingdom in an even bigger world]], and almost from the start we're given a whole mess of names belonging to people, organizations, families, deities, stories and locations, such that any first-time reader without a photographic memory or a notebook will be hard-pressed to remember who's who, even with the [[AllThereInTheManual convenient appendix]] in the back. In addition, the multiple POV characters and the people around them have many distinct priorities and focuses; the characters in the first book alone have concerns that range from [[ConspiracyTheorist national]] (or even [[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt worldwide]]) security to [[WrongGenreSavvy whether they'll get to attend an extravagant tournament]]. This enables the characters (read: the author) to slip all kinds of relevant information to and past each other (read: the reader) without them realizing it until it's too late. After all, with [[NeedleInAStackOfNeedles so much information]], [[ChekhovsArmoury anything can turn out to be relevant]] [[{{Foreshadowing}} when the crucial details]] [[RedHerring are mixed so neatly with the worldbuilding]]. Even characters that had previously only appeared in the Appendixes can turn out to be important.
** For example, [[spoiler:Jon Connington is an exiled lord mentioned in passing as having drunk himself to death. He later turns to be alive, becomes a POV character, and leads an attack to put a HiddenBackupPrince, Aegon Targaryen, who was believed to have died 15 years before the books began, on the throne.]]
** Even the History of the world is important, such as figures in ''The Tales of Dunk and Egg'' and ''The World of Ice and Fire''. The Blackfyres are a cadet Targaryen branch who tried to usurp the throne several times. They feature prominently in the history and are a significant threat in ''Dunk and Egg'', along with being mentioned a few times in the main series, but are believed extinct. [[spoiler:It is not yet confirmed but it is widely believed the boy believed to be Aegon is really descended from the Blackfyres, hence why the Golden Company is supporting him; Illyrio Mopatis tellingly says the Blackfyres are extinct in the male line.]]
** Notable aversions usually are the PoV characters from the prologues and epilogues of the book. They are introduced exclusively for one chapter, get more characterization than plenty of other authors give actual main characters, and then are unceremoniously killed off; with neither their lives nor their deaths having much bearing on the overall plot.
6th Feb '18 4:45:20 AM StFan
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!!Examples

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!!Examples
!!Examples:



[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



* ''Manga/OnePiece''

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* ''Manga/OnePiece''''Manga/OnePiece'':



[[folder:Fan Fiction]]
* In [[FanFic/EquestriaAHistoryRevealed Equestria: A History Revealed]], you can count on a lot of the asides and jokes in the fic to come back one way or another, whether in [[BrickJoke another joke]] or actually having a role in Equestrian history. However, given the [[InsaneTrollLogic clear insanity]] of the LemonyNarrator, the validity of the latter is quite questionable.
** A one-off mention of the game Yahtzee is expanded into a massive cover-up on the absence of Princess Luna and the guards during the Changeling invasion, with the narrator going as far to cite a pair of dice found in Luna's bedroom as evidence of this.
* Played with in ''FanFic/HarryPotterAndTheNatural20.'' Milo, an [[GenreSavvy RPG veteran,]] claims to be able to identify the significance of a character based on how many adjectives they have: for instance, he looks at [[TheMole Quirrell]], counts 'jumpy', 'wears a turban,' 'stutters,' and 'smells funny,' and immediately identifies him as very important. This [[WrongGenreSavvy backfires]] when [[FakeUltimateHero Lockhart]] forces him to answer hundreds of minute trivia questions about his life, causing Milo to conclude that Lockhart is the centerpiece of the story. Turns out he's just a narcissist.

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[[folder:Fan Fiction]]
Works]]
* In [[FanFic/EquestriaAHistoryRevealed Equestria: A History Revealed]], ''Fanfic/EquestriaAHistoryRevealed'', you can count on a lot of the asides and jokes in the fic to come back one way or another, whether in [[BrickJoke another joke]] or actually having a role in Equestrian history. However, given the [[InsaneTrollLogic clear insanity]] of the LemonyNarrator, the validity of the latter is quite questionable.
**
questionable. A one-off mention of the game Yahtzee is expanded into a massive cover-up on the absence of Princess Luna and the guards during the Changeling invasion, with the narrator going as far to cite a pair of dice found in Luna's bedroom as evidence of this.
* Played with in ''FanFic/HarryPotterAndTheNatural20.''Fanfic/HarryPotterAndTheNatural20.'' Milo, an [[GenreSavvy RPG veteran,]] claims to be able to identify the significance of a character based on how many adjectives they have: for instance, he looks at [[TheMole Quirrell]], counts 'jumpy', 'wears a turban,' 'stutters,' and 'smells funny,' and immediately identifies him as very important. This [[WrongGenreSavvy backfires]] when [[FakeUltimateHero Lockhart]] forces him to answer hundreds of minute trivia questions about his life, causing Milo to conclude that Lockhart is the centerpiece of the story. Turns out he's just a narcissist.



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]Animation]]



* ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'': Used extensively in the first act, [[http://johnaugust.com/2014/scriptnotes-ep-128-frozen-with-jennifer-lee-transcript per Jennifer Lee]]. With a fairly complex, multi-protagonist story and only 90 minutes to work with, the filmmakers intentionally left out some side details to focus on the heart of the story. Why does Elsa have powers? She was born with them; no further explanation offered. What did Elsa do all those years? Aside from a couple shots of her outside her room to show she wasn't a prisoner, we get nothing. Who runs the kingdom for the three years before Elsa's coronation? No time for that. Lee confesses that, while the film intentionally subverts Disney/princess story/fairy tale tropes, it also uses some (e.g. a princess falls in love at first sight for a handsome prince) as shortcuts to deal with the 90-minute constraint.
** Done using singing, of all things, to foreshadow the villain. How do you show [[spoiler: Prince Hans]] is not who they appear to be? [[spoiler: Have them sing a romantic duet about how much they love and are in sync with someone, but have them do things like come in late on their part or clearly not anticipate what the other is about to say or what movement they're about to make. This from ''Disney,'' who will go the extra mile for perfect singing and in an animated film, where every movement is intentional.]] That's right, [[spoiler: the love song being imperfect]] was foreshadowing.

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* ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'': ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'':
**
Used extensively in the first act, [[http://johnaugust.com/2014/scriptnotes-ep-128-frozen-with-jennifer-lee-transcript per Jennifer Lee]]. With a fairly complex, multi-protagonist story and only 90 minutes to work with, the filmmakers intentionally left out some side details to focus on the heart of the story. Why does Elsa have powers? She was born with them; no further explanation offered. What did Elsa do all those years? Aside from a couple shots of her outside her room to show she wasn't a prisoner, we get nothing. Who runs the kingdom for the three years before Elsa's coronation? No time for that. Lee confesses that, while the film intentionally subverts Disney/princess story/fairy tale tropes, it also uses some (e.g. a princess falls in love at first sight for a handsome prince) as shortcuts to deal with the 90-minute constraint.
** Done using singing, of all things, to foreshadow the villain. How do you show [[spoiler: Prince [[spoiler:Prince Hans]] is not who they appear to be? [[spoiler: Have [[spoiler:Have them sing a romantic duet about how much they love and are in sync with someone, but have them do things like come in late on their part or clearly not anticipate what the other is about to say or what movement they're about to make. This from ''Disney,'' ''Disney'', who will go the extra mile for perfect singing and in an animated film, where every movement is intentional.]] That's right, [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the love song being imperfect]] was foreshadowing.



* Used to create tension in the final battle of ''Film/IronMan''. When Tony creates his original power generator, he observes that it could run "something big for 15 minutes." [[spoiler: When he is forced to use his original generator after Stane steals his improved model, there is a literal deadline for Iron Man -- if he does not beat Ironmonger in less than 15 minutes, he will run out of power ''and'' his heart will stop.]]
** Also, the "icing problem."

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* Used to create tension in the final battle of ''Film/IronMan''. When Tony creates his original power generator, he observes that it could run "something big for 15 minutes." [[spoiler: When [[spoiler:When he is forced to use his original generator after Stane steals his improved model, there is a literal deadline for Iron Man -- if he does not beat Ironmonger in less than 15 minutes, he will run out of power ''and'' his heart will stop.]]
**
]] Also, the "icing problem."



--> '''Wayne:''' Isn't it lucky that we got all this information? It seemed extraneous at the time.

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--> '''Wayne:''' -->'''Wayne:''' Isn't it lucky that we got all this information? It seemed extraneous at the time.



* Averted in most of the work of Quentin Tarrantino, who has an uncanny preference for long dialogues scenes that don't affect the plot (like for example the lengthy foot massage conversation in PulpFiction).

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* Averted in most of the work of Quentin Tarrantino, who has an uncanny preference for long dialogues scenes that don't affect the plot (like for example the lengthy foot massage conversation in PulpFiction).''Film/PulpFiction'').



* This is rather ''infamously'' "subverted" by pretty much all of the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, almost to the point of it being memetic; it's not at all unusual in his works for there to be several pages of tangential activity that seemingly has nothing to do with the rest of the plot whatsoever. But to some extent, it's left up to the reader to determine what exactly constitutes as "important" in the greater lore of his work. For instance, his work TheSilmarillion could by some people be easily misconstrued as a book of ''nothing but'' such unnecessary fluff, but in reality it serves as the entire body of ancient Elvish history spanning back to the creation of the world (and fans sometimes appropriately refer to it as the "Elvish Bible" as a result), and that "fluff" provides considerable insight into the context of the Elves' existence, their culture, and even their worldviews which tend to differ considerably from that of Men or Dwarves, and doesn't often get extrapolated upon in his other, [[LordOfTheRings more]] [[TheHobbit famous]] works, which feature only light brushes with the Elves that leave readers/viewers with a stark impression of their strange ways but no real understanding of it. And needless to say, considering his works are essentially the primordial ooze from which was birthed modern HighFantasy, no detail is truly unimportant in hindsight.

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* This is rather ''infamously'' "subverted" by pretty much all of the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, almost to the point of it being memetic; it's not at all unusual in his works for there to be several pages of tangential activity that seemingly has nothing to do with the rest of the plot whatsoever. But to some extent, it's left up to the reader to determine what exactly constitutes as "important" in the greater lore of his work. For instance, his work TheSilmarillion ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' could by some people be easily misconstrued as a book of ''nothing but'' such unnecessary fluff, but in reality it serves as the entire body of ancient Elvish history spanning back to the creation of the world (and fans sometimes appropriately refer to it as the "Elvish Bible" as a result), and that "fluff" provides considerable insight into the context of the Elves' existence, their culture, and even their worldviews which tend to differ considerably from that of Men or Dwarves, and doesn't often get extrapolated upon in his other, [[LordOfTheRings more]] [[TheHobbit famous]] works, more famous works (''Literature/TheHobbit'' and ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings''), which feature only light brushes with the Elves that leave readers/viewers with a stark impression of their strange ways but no real understanding of it. And needless to say, considering his works are essentially the primordial ooze from which was birthed modern HighFantasy, no detail is truly unimportant in hindsight.



* ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo'': Averted big-time.

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* %%* ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo'': Averted big-time.



* Subverted repeatedly in Hawthorne's ''The House Of The Seven Gables''.

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* Subverted repeatedly in Hawthorne's ''The House Of The of the Seven Gables''.



* Subverted in the book series ''Literature/PersonalEffects.'' The main gimmick of the series is that it encourages the reader to follow up on details mentioned in the books - calling the phone numbers gives you voicemails, and all the websites actually exist. The first printed book even comes packaged with a bunch of handwritten notes and pictures.

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* Subverted in the book series ''Literature/PersonalEffects.'' The main gimmick of the series is that it encourages the reader to follow up on details mentioned in the books - -- calling the phone numbers gives you voicemails, and all the websites actually exist. The first printed book even comes packaged with a bunch of handwritten notes and pictures.



* If someone is invited to a banquet in ''RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', then chances are that it's part of a plan to kill them. Most of the banquets without murderous intent go unmentioned, leaving modern readers to wonder why anyone would be stupid enough to go to a banquet in the first place.

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* If someone is invited to a banquet in ''RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'', then chances are that it's part of a plan to kill them. Most of the banquets without murderous intent go unmentioned, leaving modern readers to wonder why anyone would be stupid enough to go to a banquet in the first place.



** However, he does a ''fantastic'' subversion in ''Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency'' (which is itself a ''book'' of this trope) - there's a scene where the protagonist is looking into a bathroom, and Adams spends several paragraphs describing the contents of the room, the paneling on the walls, the scuffs on the floor, and so forth, in intricate detail, only to end with "There was also a large horse in the room, taking up most of it."

to:

** However, he does a ''fantastic'' subversion in ''Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency'' (which is itself a ''book'' of this trope) - -- there's a scene where the protagonist is looking into a bathroom, and Adams spends several paragraphs describing the contents of the room, the paneling on the walls, the scuffs on the floor, and so forth, in intricate detail, only to end with "There was also a large horse in the room, taking up most of it."



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



** In the Season Four episode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E1PartnersInCrime "Partners in Crime"]], the taxi that was meant to pick up [[spoiler:Stacy, who died from Adipose conversion]] had an ATMOS sticker on the front, foreshadowing [[spoiler:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem "The Sontaran Stratagem"]]]].

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** In the Season Four episode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E1PartnersInCrime "Partners "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E1PartnersInCrime Partners in Crime"]], Crime]]", the taxi that was meant to pick up [[spoiler:Stacy, who died from Adipose conversion]] had an ATMOS sticker on the front, foreshadowing [[spoiler:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem "The [[spoiler:"[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E4TheSontaranStratagem The Sontaran Stratagem"]]]].Stratagem]]"]].



* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' - A fan theory regarding the identity of the mother relies on this trope. In season 3, Ted [[spoiler: bumps into a girl at a party that he reveals the mother was at. The scene is at most 3 seconds. Ergo, due to conservation of detail, she is the mother.]]

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* ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' - ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'': A fan theory regarding the identity of the mother relies on this trope. In season 3, Ted [[spoiler: bumps into a girl at a party that he reveals the mother was at. The scene is at most 3 seconds. Ergo, due to conservation of detail, she is the mother.]]



* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' - Played straight during a series regarding the Dominion, which was mentioned in passing in the first episode it showed up in and [[spoiler: was on the verge of taking over the Federation a few seasons later.]]\\
\\
The extra material on the [=DVDs=] even makes note that they were first mentioned in a Ferengi episode, where fans expect nothing to have a lasting effect.
** In the episode Time's Orphan it's done a bit heavy handed when Keiko gives little Molly a shiny silver bracelet and the music swells for a moment before going back to normal. Guess what feral Molly is wearing when they pull her back from the past?
* On one episode of [[Series/TwentyFour 24]], Jack is captured and forced to give bad tactical information to CTU. He ends the information by declaring he is in a "flank-two position". Given that the series is all about time constraints, it's reasonable for viewers to assume that any apparently-innocuous dialogue that's not {{technobabble}} is important. In-character, the terrorists holding Jack just assume its standard tactical talk. Naturally, it turns out to be the duress phrase. Except that CTU ''changed'' the duress phrase since Jack was last part of it, and they barely pick up on it before it's too late.

to:

* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' - ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
**
Played straight during a series regarding the Dominion, which was mentioned in passing in the first episode it showed up in and [[spoiler: was on the verge of taking over the Federation a few seasons later.]]\\
\\
]] The extra material on the [=DVDs=] even makes note that they were first mentioned in a Ferengi episode, where fans expect nothing to have a lasting effect.
** In the episode Time's Orphan "Time's Orphan", it's done a bit heavy handed when Keiko gives little Molly a shiny silver bracelet and the music swells for a moment before going back to normal. Guess what feral Molly is wearing when they pull her back from the past?
* On one episode of [[Series/TwentyFour 24]], ''Series/TwentyFour'', Jack is captured and forced to give bad tactical information to CTU. He ends the information by declaring he is in a "flank-two position". Given that the series is all about time constraints, it's reasonable for viewers to assume that any apparently-innocuous dialogue that's not {{technobabble}} is important. In-character, the terrorists holding Jack just assume its standard tactical talk. Naturally, it turns out to be the duress phrase. Except that CTU ''changed'' the duress phrase since Jack was last part of it, and they barely pick up on it before it's too late.



** ''Series/{{Castle}}'' is fond of this one as well. Usually it's Castle's daughter or mother who makes the seemingly-innocuous comment.

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** * ''Series/{{Castle}}'' is fond of this one as well. Usually it's Castle's daughter or mother who makes the seemingly-innocuous comment.



* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' occasionally uses this trope to explain why all the magic and gear seems designed for folks crawling into caverns, killing ugly people, and taking their stuff. The local magicians probably do make magical plows to help farmers, magical compasses for navigators, and so on. However, since players don't care about most of this stuff most of the time, let's cut back to the stuff that will affect the world as players experience it.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Eberron}}'' outright states this in its campaign setting.
** Several articles in Dragon Magazine have been dedicated to listing such mundane magic items.

to:

* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' occasionally uses this trope to explain why all the magic and gear seems designed for folks crawling into caverns, killing ugly people, and taking their stuff. The local magicians probably do make magical plows to help farmers, magical compasses for navigators, and so on. However, since players don't care about most of this stuff most of the time, let's cut back to the stuff that will affect the world as players experience it.
**
it. ''TabletopGame/{{Eberron}}'' outright states this in its campaign setting.
**
setting. Several articles in Dragon Magazine ''Dragon Magazine'' have been dedicated to listing such mundane magic items.



* One RPG group went by the tenet that 'Any woman or plant the GM bothers to describe is a trap.' The GM caught on and ran them through an adventure that could roughly be described as 'The Magic Greenhouse Land of Amazons'.

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* One RPG group went by the tenet that 'Any "Any woman or plant the GM bothers to describe is a trap.' " The GM caught on and ran them through an adventure that could roughly be described as 'The "The Magic Greenhouse Land of Amazons'.Amazons".



* Subverted in ''VideoGame/ChronoCross''. Of the portraits that characters have, forty of them are playable characters, five of them are alternate versions of the playable characters, and twenty six of them are [=NPCs=]. Of the [=NPCs=], one is unimportant: a shopkeeper you meet early on. Throughout the game you become convinced she'll be important, but she never does, being the only one of the LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters who isn't.\\
\\
The shopkeeper, however, is ''related'' to Funguy. Every single NPC with a character portrait seems to be related to one of the [=PCs=].

to:

* Subverted in ''VideoGame/ChronoCross''. Of the portraits that characters have, forty of them are playable characters, five of them are alternate versions of the playable characters, and twenty six of them are [=NPCs=]. Of the [=NPCs=], one is unimportant: a shopkeeper you meet early on. Throughout the game you become convinced she'll be important, but she never does, being the only one of the LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters who isn't.\\
\\
The shopkeeper, however, is ''related'' to Funguy. Every single NPC with a character portrait seems to be related to one of the [=PCs=].



[[folder:Webcomics]]

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[[folder:Webcomics]][[folder:Web Comics]]



** Also doubly subverted in chapter 454, where Haley fires four arrows to hit the goblin leaders so they take notice of them and fight them instead of entering the castle. After four panels, all of the arrows miss:
-->'''Haley:''' I mean, why spend four panels watching the arrow if it wasn't going to do anything???
-->'''Hinjo:''' It got someone's attention, all right... Just not the right someones.
-->Cue the entire goblin legion aiming their bows at them.

to:

** Also doubly subverted in chapter 454, where Haley fires four arrows an arrow to hit the goblin leaders so they take notice of them and fight them instead of entering the castle. After four panels, all of the arrows miss:
-->'''Haley:'''
arrow misses:
--->'''Haley:'''
I mean, why spend four panels watching the arrow if it wasn't going to do anything???
-->'''Hinjo:'''
anything???\\
'''Hinjo:'''
It got someone's attention, all right... Just not the right someones.
-->Cue
someones.\\
''[cue
the entire goblin legion aiming their bows at them.them]''



-->'''Elan:''' Plus, it woulda been weird for everyone to mention that Girard was into illusions and then not see, like, ''any''. Who wastes perfectly good {{foreshadowing}} like that?

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-->'''Elan:''' --->'''Elan:''' Plus, it woulda been weird for everyone to mention that Girard was into illusions and then not see, like, ''any''. Who wastes perfectly good {{foreshadowing}} like that?



** WordOfGod is that in ''Start of Darkness'', [[spoiler:some of the paladins who slaughtered Redcloak's village probably Fell]], and the reason it wasn't shown is (partly) that it wasn't relevant to Redcloak's StartOfDarkness, which was the story being told at the time. As he put it, "Everything you see happened. However, everything that happened is not necessarily seen."

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** WordOfGod is that in ''Start of Darkness'', ''Recap/StartOfDarkness'', [[spoiler:some of the paladins who slaughtered Redcloak's village probably Fell]], and the reason it wasn't shown is (partly) that it wasn't relevant to Redcloak's StartOfDarkness, which was the story being told at the time. As he put it, "Everything you see happened. However, everything that happened is not necessarily seen."



[[folder:WebOriginal]]

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[[folder:WebOriginal]][[folder:Web Original]]
27th Jan '18 8:34:14 PM DustSnitch
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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zags]] this so much it can make readers' heads spin. Westeros is [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters a very, very big kingdom in an even bigger world]], and almost from the start we're given a whole mess of names belonging to people, organizations, families, deities, stories and locations, such that any first-time reader without a photographic memory or a notebook will be hard-pressed to remember who's who, even with the [[AllThereInTheManual convenient appendix]] in the back. In addition, the multiple POV characters and the people around them have many distinct priorities and focuses; the characters in the first book alone have concerns that range from [[ConspiracyTheorist national]] (or even [[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt worldwide]]) security to [[WrongGenreSavvy whether they'll get to attend an extravagant tournament]]. This enables the characters (read: the author) to slip all kinds of relevant information to and past each other (read: the reader) without them realizing it until it's too late. After all, with [[NeedleInAStackOfNeedles so much information]], [[ChekhovsArmoury anything can turn out to be relevant]] [[{{Foreshadowing}} when the crucial details]] [[RedHerring are mixed so neatly with the worldbuilding]]. Even characters that had previously only appeared in the Appendixes can turn out to be important.
** For example, [[spoiler:Jon Connington is an exiled lord mentioned in passing as having drunk himself to death. He later turns to be alive, becomes a POV character, and leads an attack to put a HiddenBackupPrince, Aegon Targaryen, who was believed to have died 15 years before the books began, on the throne.]]
** Even the History of the world is important, such as figures in ''The Tales of Dunk and Egg'' and ''The World of Ice and Fire''. The Blackfyres are a cadet Targaryen branch who tried to usurp the throne several times. They feature prominently in the history and are a significant threat in ''Dunk and Egg'', along with being mentioned a few times in the main series, but are believed extinct. [[spoiler:It is not yet confirmed but it is widely believed the boy believed to be Aegon is really descended from the Blackfyres, hence why the Golden Company is supporting him; Illyrio Mopatis tellingly says the Blackfyres are extinct in the male line.]]
** Notable aversions usually are the PoV characters from the prologues and epilogues of the book. They are introduced exclusively for one chapter, get more characterization than plenty of other authors give actual main characters, and then are unceremoniously killed off; with neither their lives nor their deaths having much bearing on the overall plot.


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* Conversations between Virgil and Dante that are irrelevant to ''Literature/TheDivineComedy'' are written out of the narrative, as the narrator admits in the 21st canto.
22nd Dec '17 8:27:30 PM nombretomado
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*** Subverted with Ziegfried; the character is interesting and appears throughout the game, but is completely unimportant. This characteristic has its own entry on TheGrandListOfConsoleRolePlayingGameCliches. Ziegfried's Contradiction: Just because someone is weird doesn't mean they're important.

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*** Subverted with Ziegfried; the character is interesting and appears throughout the game, but is completely unimportant. This characteristic has its own entry on TheGrandListOfConsoleRolePlayingGameCliches.Website/TheGrandListOfConsoleRolePlayingGameCliches. Ziegfried's Contradiction: Just because someone is weird doesn't mean they're important.
16th Dec '17 4:30:14 PM wingedcatgirl
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* [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' when Elan meets Julio Scoundrél. Elan, who wants to get on an airship to get to Azure City from Cliffport, starts a conversation with a random man in the tavern. It turns out that this man is actually an airship captain. See quotes page for the conversation.
** Also doubly subverted in chapter 454, where Haley fires four arrows to hit the goblin leaders so they take notice of them and fight them instead of entering the castle. After four panels, all of the arrow miss:

to:

* ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'':
**
[[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'' when Elan meets Julio Scoundrél. Elan, who wants to get on an airship to get to Azure City from Cliffport, starts a conversation with a random man in the tavern. It turns out that this man is actually an airship captain. See quotes page for the conversation.
** Also doubly subverted in chapter 454, where Haley fires four arrows to hit the goblin leaders so they take notice of them and fight them instead of entering the castle. After four panels, all of the arrow arrows miss:


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** WordOfGod is that in ''Start of Darkness'', [[spoiler:some of the paladins who slaughtered Redcloak's village probably Fell]], and the reason it wasn't shown is (partly) that it wasn't relevant to Redcloak's StartOfDarkness, which was the story being told at the time. As he put it, "Everything you see happened. However, everything that happened is not necessarily seen."
2nd Dec '17 4:52:03 PM Trying2CIt
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[[RaceAgainstTheClock We have 42 minutes.]] If we give a detail, [[PlotPoint it better be important]].

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[[RaceAgainstTheClock We have 42 minutes.]] If we give a detail, [[PlotPoint it it'd better be important]].



This is an OmnipresentTrope. There is a fine line between good WorldBuilding, and rambling on about pointless crap -- conservation of detail is all about filtering out irrelevant information to highlight the actual plot or interesting aspects of the setting. It is rare for an author to devote thirty pages of description to a character's choice of clothing, unless those choices provide great insight into a character or are being used as a metaphor for the human condition.

to:

This is an OmnipresentTrope. There is a fine line between having good WorldBuilding, WorldBuilding and rambling on about pointless crap -- conservation of detail is all about filtering out irrelevant information to highlight the actual plot or interesting aspects of the setting. It is rare for an author to devote thirty pages of description to a character's choice of clothing, unless those choices provide great insight into a character or are being used as a metaphor for the human condition.



Video games have their own version of this law, in that any detail in the game requires a significant investment of time and manpower to develop between art asset creation, writing, programming, and insertion into the game. Details of lesser importance get economized: One-off [=NPCs=] rarely ever get anything more than a [[OnlySixFaces generic sprite or character model]], have only the most generic walking animations, and have [[NominalImportance no name]]. You can tell that a character will play some role in the plot if they have an unusually complex character model or a headshot next to their dialog (unless plenty of other characters share that same headshot). Plotwise, this serves to separate [[RoundCharacter Round]] and {{Flat Character}}s. Since artists create video game worlds from scratch, scenery also obeys the law. Say they set a level in a supermarket; a real supermarket stocks ''thousands'' of individual products in ''hundreds'' of different brands, each and every one with different label designs, and the time it would take to design (or license) all that packaging and trademarks could easily add up to several games' worth of development cycles. So they use a handful of designs over and over. And it works to their favor: We accept less detail because it is not central to the game.

to:

Video games have their own version of this law, in that any detail in the game requires a significant investment of time and manpower to develop between art asset creation, writing, programming, and insertion into the game. Details of lesser importance get economized: One-off [=NPCs=] rarely ever get anything more than a [[OnlySixFaces generic sprite or character model]], have only the most generic walking animations, and have [[NominalImportance no name]]. You can tell that a character will play some role in the plot if they have an unusually complex character model or a headshot next to their dialog (unless plenty of other characters share that same headshot). Plotwise, this serves to separate [[RoundCharacter Round]] and {{Flat Character}}s. Since artists create video game worlds from scratch, scenery also obeys the law. Say Suppose that they set a level in a supermarket; a real supermarket stocks ''thousands'' of individual products in ''hundreds'' of different brands, each and every one with different label designs, and the time it would take to design (or license) all that packaging and trademarks could easily add up to several games' worth of development cycles. So they use a handful of designs over and over. And it works to their favor: We accept less detail because it is not central to the game.
1st Dec '17 11:32:54 AM totoofze47
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** In Shabaody Archipelago, we meet Silvers Rayleigh. Mentioned initially as a man the crew needs to prepare there ship for the cottage to Fishman Island, then revealed upon his proper introduction to be c[[spoiler: the right hand of the Pirate King Gold Roger]]. If one checks carefully, however, his face had ''already been shown'' in a ''single panel'' of a ''side flashback'' in volume three, almost five hundred chapters before.

to:

** In Shabaody Sabaody Archipelago, we meet Silvers Rayleigh. Mentioned initially as a man the crew needs to prepare there ship for the cottage to Fishman Island, then revealed upon his proper introduction to be c[[spoiler: the right hand of the Pirate King Gold Roger]]. If one checks carefully, however, his face had ''already been shown'' in a ''single panel'' of a ''side flashback'' in volume three, almost five hundred chapters before.



* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'':
** Every piece of evidence in the [[ChekhovsArmoury Court Record]] -- besides the lawyer's badge, etc. -- is used in most cases every game.
** Profiles in ''Justice for All'' and ''Trials & Tribulations'', a notable case in the latter being the one time in the entire series when the character you're currently playing shows up in the profiles screen. Of course you're bound to present it at some point. The lawyer's badge gets used once or twice outside of the courtroom. You even had to present the screwdriver, which had importance exactly because it has ''no importance at all'', which throws suspicion on the suspect's reasoning for having Edgeworth personally pick it up in the first place.
** A "unique" one happens in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth''. In Case 5, "Turnabout Ablaze," which is the last and LONGEST case, Edgeworth tidies his evidence several times, removing used and useless evidence. [[InterfaceSpoiler And so you know "Samurai Dogs" are going to be used at some point because it survived the first two "evidence-sortings."]]
** ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' plays with this. Several pieces of evidence may not be used for more than reference, and characters make a point of tidying up unnecessary evidence between chapters. Some items, despite having an icon, may not actually show up in your court record, and at one point evidence previously thrown out is swapped back in when they become relevant again. In fact, a lot of evidence is kept, and ends up being used for a completely different reason that you think it's gonna be used for. One particular example coming in the DLC case, where you carry around a piece of fish for the entire case, with it never leaving the the court-record throughout despite the many "unnecessary evidence disposed off" moments. This obviously leads you into thinking the fish will be one of, if not THE big piece of evidence that'll crack the case. [[spoiler:In actual fact, you don't even use it until the episode's epilogue, and then it's just to give it to Orla the Orca as a treat.]]
** In the fourth case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'', even when it seems like everything is about to be wrapped up nicely, it's obvious a twist is coming up because you were told much earlier about a dog eating dumplings and burying the leftover in the backyard. Of course, these dumplings end up being an important clue.



[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'':
** Every piece of evidence in the [[ChekhovsArmoury Court Record]] -- besides the lawyer's badge, etc. -- is used in most cases every game.
** Profiles in ''Justice for All'' and ''Trials & Tribulations'', a notable case in the latter being the one time in the entire series when the character you're currently playing shows up in the profiles screen. Of course you're bound to present it at some point. The lawyer's badge gets used once or twice outside of the courtroom. You even had to present the screwdriver, which had importance exactly because it has ''no importance at all'', which throws suspicion on the suspect's reasoning for having Edgeworth personally pick it up in the first place.
** A "unique" one happens in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth''. In Case 5, "Turnabout Ablaze," which is the last and LONGEST case, Edgeworth tidies his evidence several times, removing used and useless evidence. [[InterfaceSpoiler And so you know "Samurai Dogs" are going to be used at some point because it survived the first two "evidence-sortings."]]
** ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' plays with this. Several pieces of evidence may not be used for more than reference, and characters make a point of tidying up unnecessary evidence between chapters. Some items, despite having an icon, may not actually show up in your court record, and at one point evidence previously thrown out is swapped back in when they become relevant again. In fact, a lot of evidence is kept, and ends up being used for a completely different reason that you think it's gonna be used for. One particular example coming in the DLC case, where you carry around a piece of fish for the entire case, with it never leaving the the court-record throughout despite the many "unnecessary evidence disposed off" moments. This obviously leads you into thinking the fish will be one of, if not THE big piece of evidence that'll crack the case. [[spoiler:In actual fact, you don't even use it until the episode's epilogue, and then it's just to give it to Orla the Orca as a treat.]]
** In the fourth case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'', even when it seems like everything is about to be wrapped up nicely, it's obvious a twist is coming up because you were told much earlier about a dog eating dumplings and burying the leftover in the backyard. Of course, these dumplings end up being an important clue.
[[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheLawofConservationofDetail