History Main / TheLawOfConservationOfDetail

26th May '16 4:27:03 AM MrThorfan64
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zags]] this so much it can make readers' heads spin. Westeros is [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters a very, very big kingdom in an even bigger world]], and almost from the start we're given a whole mess of names belonging to people, organizations, families, deities, stories and locations, such that any first-time reader without a photographic memory or a notebook will be hard-pressed to remember who's who, even with the [[AllThereInTheManual convenient appendix]] in the back. In addition, the multiple POV characters and the people around them have many distinct priorities and focuses; the characters in the first book alone have concerns that range from [[ConspiracyTheorist national]] (or even [[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt worldwide]]) security to [[WrongGenreSavvy whether they'll get to attend an extravagant tournament]]. This enables the characters (read: the author) to slip all kinds of relevant information to and past each other (read: the reader) without them realizing it until it's too late. After all, with [[NeedleInAStackOfNeedles so much information]], [[ChekhovsArmoury anything can turn out to be relevant]] [[{{Foreshadowing}} when the crucial details]] [[RedHerring are mixed so neatly with the worldbuilding]].

to:

* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig Zags]] this so much it can make readers' heads spin. Westeros is [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters a very, very big kingdom in an even bigger world]], and almost from the start we're given a whole mess of names belonging to people, organizations, families, deities, stories and locations, such that any first-time reader without a photographic memory or a notebook will be hard-pressed to remember who's who, even with the [[AllThereInTheManual convenient appendix]] in the back. In addition, the multiple POV characters and the people around them have many distinct priorities and focuses; the characters in the first book alone have concerns that range from [[ConspiracyTheorist national]] (or even [[EndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt worldwide]]) security to [[WrongGenreSavvy whether they'll get to attend an extravagant tournament]]. This enables the characters (read: the author) to slip all kinds of relevant information to and past each other (read: the reader) without them realizing it until it's too late. After all, with [[NeedleInAStackOfNeedles so much information]], [[ChekhovsArmoury anything can turn out to be relevant]] [[{{Foreshadowing}} relevant]][[{{Foreshadowing}} when the crucial details]] [[RedHerring are mixed so neatly with the worldbuilding]]. Even characters that had previously only appeared in the Appendixes can turn out to be important.
** For example, [[spoiler:Jon Connington is an exiled lord mentioned in passing as having drunk himself to death. He later turns to be alive, becomes a POV character, and leads an attack to put a HiddenBackupPrince, Aegon Targaryen, who was believed to have died 15 years before the books began on the throne.]]
** Even the History of the world is important, such as figures in "The Tales of Dunk and Egg" and "The World of Ice and Fire". The Blackfyres are a cadet Targaryen branch who tried to usurp the throne several times. They feature prominently in the history and are a significant threat in Dunk and Egg, along with being mentioned a few times in the main series, but are believed extinct. [[spoiler:It is not yet confirmed but it is widely believed the boy believed to be Aegon is really descended from the Blackfyres, hence why the Golden Company is supporting him, Illyrio Mopatis tellingly says the Blackfyres are extinct in the male line.]]
21st May '16 2:46:17 PM Tamfang
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The end of the first episode of "Series/PrettyLittleLiars takes time to show every main cast member leaving Alison's Funeral, except for [[spoiler:Mona]]. The A tag at the end then shows A staying behind at the funeral.

to:

* The end of the first episode of "Series/PrettyLittleLiars ''Series/PrettyLittleLiars'' takes time to show every main cast member leaving Alison's Funeral, except for [[spoiler:Mona]]. The A tag at the end then shows A staying behind at the funeral.



* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' did the opposite and focused on silly things(like the parking spots mentioned above), yet it was still funny. ''Curb Your Enthusiasm'' after it, however, was completely made up of small details and barely had anything else, which is why it is awesome.

to:

* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'' did the opposite and focused on silly things(like things (like the parking spots mentioned above), yet it was still funny. ''Curb Your Enthusiasm'' after it, however, was completely made up of small details and barely had anything else, which is why it is awesome.
20th May '16 8:06:16 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Inverted in ''YuYuHakusho'' when Kurama and Hiei are introduced. They, along with another youkai, get into trouble with Spirit World, who only seems to have data on the one with the least relevance to the series as a whole.

to:

* Inverted in ''YuYuHakusho'' ''Manga/YuYuHakusho'' when Kurama and Hiei are introduced. They, along with another youkai, get into trouble with Spirit World, who only seems to have data on the one with the least relevance to the series as a whole.
14th May '16 1:53:18 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' is rife with pleasant background detail, but Rowling very carefully seeds important plotline clues into trivial mentions. Hagrid got a flying motorbike from "young Sirius Black" in chapter one of book one; in book three, Sirius Black becomes an important part of the plot. Other worldbuilding items, like "goblin wars" mentioned in history books, or the idea that Hogwarts itself will give help to those who need it, tend to come back in a big way later on.

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' ''Literature/HarryPotter'':
** The series
is rife with pleasant background detail, but Rowling very carefully seeds important plotline clues into trivial mentions. Hagrid got a flying motorbike from "young Sirius Black" in chapter one of book one; in book three, Sirius Black becomes an important part of the plot. Other worldbuilding items, like "goblin wars" mentioned in history books, or the idea that Hogwarts itself will give help to those who need it, tend to come back in a big way later on.on.
** Hilariously subverted with the offscreen Mark Evans, whose surname is also Harry's mum's maiden name. Long-lost relative? Nope, Rowling just needed a common surname for someone Dudley had beaten up and didn't realize until the fans did. She later issued a tongue-in-cheek apology.
1st May '16 12:52:19 AM bwburke94
Is there an issue? Send a Message


When a work flouts this trope and contains lots of little asides that are not necessary, that is NarrativeFiligree, and when the creators of an interactive work account for an absurd amount of obscure variations or things the player might do in a detailed way, that is TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything.

to:

When a work flouts this trope and contains lots of little asides that are not necessary, that is NarrativeFiligree, and when the creators of an interactive work account for an absurd amount of obscure variations or things the player might do in a detailed way, that is TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything.
DevelopersForesight.
5th Apr '16 11:24:06 PM Galacton
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Video games also provide an excellent distillation of this law, in that any detail in the game requires a significant investment of time and manpower to develop between art asset creation, writing, programming, and insertion into the game. Details of lesser importance get economized: One-off [=NPCs=] rarely ever get anything more than a [[OnlySixFaces generic sprite/character model]], have only the most generic walking animations, and have [[NominalImportance no name]]. You can tell that a character will play some role in the plot if they have an unusually complex character model or a headshot next to their dialog (unless plenty of other characters have that same headshot). Plotwise, this serves to separate [[RoundCharacter Round]] and {{Flat Character}}s. Since artists create video game worlds from scratch, scenery also obeys the law. Say they set a level in a supermarket; a real supermarket stocks ''thousands'' of individual products in ''hundreds'' of different brands, each and every one with different label designs, and the time it would take to design (or license) all that packaging and trademarks could easily add up to several games' worth of development cycles. So they use a handful of designs over and over. And it works to their favor: We accept less detail because it is not central to the game.

to:

Video games also provide an excellent distillation have their own version of this law, in that any detail in the game requires a significant investment of time and manpower to develop between art asset creation, writing, programming, and insertion into the game. Details of lesser importance get economized: One-off [=NPCs=] rarely ever get anything more than a [[OnlySixFaces generic sprite/character sprite or character model]], have only the most generic walking animations, and have [[NominalImportance no name]]. You can tell that a character will play some role in the plot if they have an unusually complex character model or a headshot next to their dialog (unless plenty of other characters have share that same headshot). Plotwise, this serves to separate [[RoundCharacter Round]] and {{Flat Character}}s. Since artists create video game worlds from scratch, scenery also obeys the law. Say they set a level in a supermarket; a real supermarket stocks ''thousands'' of individual products in ''hundreds'' of different brands, each and every one with different label designs, and the time it would take to design (or license) all that packaging and trademarks could easily add up to several games' worth of development cycles. So they use a handful of designs over and over. And it works to their favor: We accept less detail because it is not central to the game.
3rd Apr '16 3:45:06 PM toclafane212
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The end of the first episode of "Series/PrettyLittleLiars takes time to show every main cast member leaving Alison's Funeral, except for [[spoiler:Mona]]. The A tag at the end then shows A staying behind at the funeral.
21st Feb '16 4:38:15 PM skidoo23
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Any time a critic or a fan refers to something as gratuitous in a film or TV episode, whether that be an obvious narrative tangent, a scene of extended violence, a sex scene, a comic relief scene, or an extended bout of SceneryPorn, they are invoking this trope. However, in this context it is very subjective: one viewer's porn is another viewer's necessary character development; one viewer's "boring five-minute long tracking shot of a beautiful mountain range" is another viewer's "this is not film, it's art."

to:

Any time a critic or a fan refers to something as gratuitous in a film or TV episode, "gratuitous", whether that be an obvious narrative tangent, a scene of extended violence, a sex scene, a comic relief scene, or an extended bout of SceneryPorn, etc., they are invoking this trope. However, in this context it is very subjective: one viewer's porn is another viewer's necessary character development; one viewer's "boring five-minute long tracking shot of a beautiful mountain range" is another viewer's "this is not film, a movie, it's art."
21st Feb '16 4:37:18 PM skidoo23
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

Any time a critic or a fan refers to something as gratuitous in a film or TV episode, whether that be an obvious narrative tangent, a scene of extended violence, a sex scene, a comic relief scene, or an extended bout of SceneryPorn, they are invoking this trope. However, in this context it is very subjective: one viewer's porn is another viewer's necessary character development; one viewer's "boring five-minute long tracking shot of a beautiful mountain range" is another viewer's "this is not film, it's art."
19th Feb '16 1:24:16 PM morenohijazo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/TheWitness'': Blow made a point of noting in the run-up to ''The Witness''[='=] release that adventure games of the past didn't use this trope well: they would either render too many things in the game environment, confusing players on what objects to interact with; or, if text based, have a text parser so rudimentary that it couldn't be programmed with all of the nuanced phrases a player may randomly come up with. In ''The Witness'', anything that can be interacted with is generally easy to spot (even if it's not easy to solve.)
This list shows the last 10 events of 143. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheLawOfConservationOfDetail