History Main / TheLawOfConservationOfDetail

20th Mar '17 9:43:48 AM SubjectFive
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* The show ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' [[ZigzaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] this quite often. Plot points like the bunker, the gobblewonker, and [[CloudCuckoolander 8 1/2 president Quentin Trembley]] were dropped after their first episode and only referenced off-handedly once or twice throughout the rest of the series; other points, such as the agents and the "Time Police" ended abruptly in rather anti-climactic ways. On the other hand, several important details, such as [[ChekhovsSkill McGucket's seemingly random ability with robots]], the journals, and the vending machine secret door were played straight and became extremely vital to the plot as a whole.
14th Mar '17 10:27:12 AM Gosicrystal
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* The entire ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series does this. Every piece of evidence -- besides the lawyer's badge, etc. -- is used in most episodes.
** Similarly: Profiles in ''Justice for All'' and ''Trials & Tribulations'', a notable case in the latter being the one time in the entire series when the character you're currently playing shows up in the profiles screen. Of course you're bound to present it at some point. The lawyer's badge gets used once or twice outside of the courtroom. You even had to present the screwdriver, which had importance exactly because it has ''no importance at all'', which throws suspicion on the suspect's reasoning for having Edgeworth personally pick it up in the first place.
** A "unique" one happens in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth''. In Case 5, "Turnabout Ablaze," which is the last and LONGEST case, Edgeworth tidies his evidence several times, removing used and useless evidence. [[InterfaceSpoiler And so you know "Samurai Dogs" are going to be used at some point because it survived the first two "evidence-sortings."]]
** ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' plays with this. Several pieces of evidence may not be used for more than reference, and characters make a point of tidying up unnecessary evidence between chapters. Some items, despite having an icon, may not actually show up in your court record, and at one point evidence previously thrown out is swapped back in when they become relevant again. In fact, a lot of evidence is kept, and ends up being used for a completely different reason that you think it's gonna be used for.
*** One particular example coming in the DLC case, where you carry around a piece of fish for the entire case, with it never leaving the the court-record throughout despite the many "unnecessary evidence disposed off" moments. This obviously leads you into thinking the fish will be one of, if not THE big piece of evidence that'll crack the case. [[spoiler:In actual fact, you don't even use it until the episode's epilogue, and then it's just to give it to Orla the Orca as a treat.]]
** In the fourth case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'', even when it seems like everything is about to be wrapped up nicely, it's obvious a twist is coming up because you were told much earlier about a dog eating dumplings and burying the leftover in the backyard. Of course, these dumplings end up being an important clue.
* ''VideoGame/AceCombat''

to:

* The entire ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series does this. Every piece of evidence -- besides the lawyer's badge, etc. -- is used in most episodes.
** Similarly: Profiles in ''Justice for All'' and ''Trials & Tribulations'', a notable case in the latter being the one time in the entire series when the character you're currently playing shows up in the profiles screen. Of course you're bound to present it at some point. The lawyer's badge gets used once or twice outside of the courtroom. You even had to present the screwdriver, which had importance exactly because it has ''no importance at all'', which throws suspicion on the suspect's reasoning for having Edgeworth personally pick it up in the first place.
** A "unique" one happens in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth''. In Case 5, "Turnabout Ablaze," which is the last and LONGEST case, Edgeworth tidies his evidence several times, removing used and useless evidence. [[InterfaceSpoiler And so you know "Samurai Dogs" are going to be used at some point because it survived the first two "evidence-sortings."]]
** ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' plays with this. Several pieces of evidence may not be used for more than reference, and characters make a point of tidying up unnecessary evidence between chapters. Some items, despite having an icon, may not actually show up in your court record, and at one point evidence previously thrown out is swapped back in when they become relevant again. In fact, a lot of evidence is kept, and ends up being used for a completely different reason that you think it's gonna be used for.
*** One particular example coming in the DLC case, where you carry around a piece of fish for the entire case, with it never leaving the the court-record throughout despite the many "unnecessary evidence disposed off" moments. This obviously leads you into thinking the fish will be one of, if not THE big piece of evidence that'll crack the case. [[spoiler:In actual fact, you don't even use it until the episode's epilogue, and then it's just to give it to Orla the Orca as a treat.]]
** In the fourth case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'', even when it seems like everything is about to be wrapped up nicely, it's obvious a twist is coming up because you were told much earlier about a dog eating dumplings and burying the leftover in the backyard. Of course, these dumplings end up being an important clue.
* ''VideoGame/AceCombat''
''VideoGame/AceCombat'':



** Subverted in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOriginsAwakening'' where they introduced Mhairi, a potential Grey Warden. Before the game got released she got treated the same as any other character, receiving her own trailer and character page. When you play the game, she has an approval bar and can gain XP. All this trouble [[spoiler:only for her to die during the Joining after the opening segment.]]

to:

** * Subverted in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOriginsAwakening'' where they introduced Mhairi, a potential Grey Warden. Before the game got released she got treated the same as any other character, receiving her own trailer and character page. When you play the game, she has an approval bar and can gain XP. All this trouble [[spoiler:only for her to die during the Joining after the opening segment.]]



* Subverted in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX''. The world map is a fairly large place, but not all of it is covered with interesting things. A lot of the dead-ends are covered in item gathering points, and eventually you find maps to grottoes, randomly-generated dungeons that are invisible on the world map until you "search" them with the A button. However, most of these grottoes rarely stray far from the beaten path, and a noticeable amount of areas on the world map end up never becoming the slightest bit notable. The Eastern Stornway area is particularly empty; the enemy encounters there are nearly identical to the Western Stornway area, there's very few grottoes in the area, and a single item-gathering point (seashells, on the southern stretch of beach). The bulk of the Eastern Stornway area, including the entire northern beach, remains unused.
** Played straight with characters, though. Plot-important [=NPCs=] generally get 3D sprites. Generic ones are all 2D sprites, recycled throughout the game.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'':
**
Subverted in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX''. The with the world map is map: it's a fairly large place, but not all of it is covered with interesting things. A lot of the dead-ends are covered in item gathering points, and eventually you find maps to grottoes, randomly-generated dungeons that are invisible on the world map until you "search" them with the A button. However, most of these grottoes rarely stray far from the beaten path, and a noticeable amount of areas on the world map end up never becoming the slightest bit notable. The Eastern Stornway area is particularly empty; the enemy encounters there are nearly identical to the Western Stornway area, there's very few grottoes in the area, and a single item-gathering point (seashells, on the southern stretch of beach). The bulk of the Eastern Stornway area, including the entire northern beach, remains unused.
** Played straight with characters, though.characters. Plot-important [=NPCs=] generally get 3D sprites. Generic ones are all 2D sprites, recycled throughout the game.



* Used in a different way in the first two ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games. The point-and-click aspect leads to a prevalence of "examining" objects similar to Wasteland. Therefore, even if the character sprites are the same, a player can tell the difference this way. Upon examining two men in leather jackets, you might see this:
-->''You see a bar patron.''
-->''You see a short, stocky man. He has the confident, relaxed stance of an experienced fighter.''
** Also used hilariously for innocuous items that aren't really meant to be examined. Upon examining a pile of rocks:
-->--''You see a large pile of rocks.''
-->--''You keep a close eye on these rocks, in case they move to attack you.''
* Subverted with Ziegfried in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI''; the character is interesting and appears throughout the game, but is completely unimportant. This characteristic has its own entry on TheGrandListOfConsoleRolePlayingGameCliches. Ziegfried's Contradiction: Just because someone is weird doesn't mean they're important.\\
\\
Square's been subverting this trope since the first Final Fantasy. Coneria Town, the first city you can visit, has a well that you can inspect:
-->This is a well. You might think that there is something to it... But in fact it is just an ordinary well.

to:

* Used in a different way in the first two ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games. and ''VideoGame/Fallout2'':
**
The point-and-click aspect leads to a prevalence of "examining" objects similar to Wasteland. Therefore, even if the character sprites are the same, a player can tell the difference this way. Upon examining two men in leather jackets, you might see this:
-->''You --->''You see a bar patron.''
-->''You --->''You see a short, stocky man. He has the confident, relaxed stance of an experienced fighter.''
** Also used Used hilariously for innocuous items that aren't really meant to be examined. Upon examining a pile of rocks:
-->--''You --->--''You see a large pile of rocks.''
-->--''You --->--''You keep a close eye on these rocks, in case they move to attack you.''
* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'':
** Square's been subverting this trope since the first Final Fantasy. Coneria Town, the first city you can visit, has a well that you can inspect:
--->This is a well. You might think that there is something to it... But in fact it is just an ordinary well.
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'':
***
Subverted with Ziegfried in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI''; Ziegfried; the character is interesting and appears throughout the game, but is completely unimportant. This characteristic has its own entry on TheGrandListOfConsoleRolePlayingGameCliches. Ziegfried's Contradiction: Just because someone is weird doesn't mean they're important.\\
\\
Square's been subverting this trope since the first Final Fantasy. Coneria Town, the first city
important.
*** Subverted as
you can visit, has a well go to an auction house where they are auctioning off multiple airship parts. This may seem important especially at that you can inspect:
-->This is a well. You might think that there is something to it...
point in the game, where the plot revolves around getting an airship. But in fact it is just an ordinary well.impossible to get them (nor the talking chocobo) as a bratty kid screams for her father to buy it for her, and the game doesn't let you outbid him, so the game is trolling you.



** Also subverted in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' as you can go to an auction house where they are auctioning off multiple airship parts. This may seem important especially at that point in the game, where the plot revolves around getting an airship. But it is impossible to get them (nor the talking chocobo) as a bratty kid screams for her father to buy it for her, and the game doesn't let you outbid him, so the game is trolling you.
* In ''Franchise/FireEmblem'', almost all enemy units or [=NPCs=] with unique sprites and more then a few lines of dialogue is either a boss or recruitable. Which is understandable, considering how many enemies you end up facing.
** Averted whenever Anna pops up, as she's just a RunningGag. Subverted in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'', where she pops up as a merchant. You then get a sidequest where she helps a village. Unlike other NPC characters, she has a unique model, color scheme, and voice not only in her lines but going so far as to have quotes for critical hits and [[SuperMovePortraitAttack a picture as well]]. This points to her being playable, even getting the option for your lord to talk to her if he moves next to her, but absolutely nothing will recruit her. [[spoiler:If she survives, you get another sidequest where she pops up again, and this time IS recruitable. Then she explains that [[InexplicablyIdenticalIndividuals there are multiple Annas and that you've never met her before]].]]
*** This continues with ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemFates Fates]]'', where Anna shows up as the person in charge of the [[DownloadableContent Dragon's Gate]] and also gives out one-time gifts in two different free-of-charge DLC chapters, but does not join your party. Instead, [[spoiler:there is a separate Xenologue, Anna on the Run, where she pops up again. It is essentially identical to the aforementioned Anna the Merchant Paralogue from ''Awakening'', only Anna must survive in order to be recruited. Like before, this is yet another Anna, distinct from the ones seen previously]].
** The one aversion in the series is [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Heimler]], a Paladin who, despite getting his own portrait, has no dialogue or importance and is just a normal enemy.

to:

** Also subverted in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' as you can go to an auction house where they are auctioning off multiple airship parts. This may seem important especially at that point in the game, where the plot revolves around getting an airship. But it is impossible to get them (nor the talking chocobo) as a bratty kid screams for her father to buy it for her, and the game doesn't let you outbid him, so the game is trolling you.
* In ''Franchise/FireEmblem'', almost all enemy units or [=NPCs=] with unique sprites and more then than a few lines of dialogue is either a boss or recruitable. Which is understandable, considering how many enemies you end up facing. \n There are aversions, though:
** Averted whenever Anna pops up, Anna, as she's just a RunningGag. Subverted in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'', where she pops up as a merchant. You then get a sidequest where she helps a village. Unlike other NPC characters, she has a unique model, color scheme, and voice not only in her lines but going so far as to have quotes for critical hits and [[SuperMovePortraitAttack a picture as well]]. This points to her being playable, even getting the option for your lord to talk to her if he moves next to her, but absolutely nothing will recruit her. [[spoiler:If she survives, you get another sidequest where she pops up again, and this time IS recruitable. Then she explains that [[InexplicablyIdenticalIndividuals there are multiple Annas and that you've never met her before]].]]
***
]]\\
\\
This continues with ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemFates Fates]]'', where Anna shows up as the person in charge of the [[DownloadableContent Dragon's Gate]] and also gives out one-time gifts in two different free-of-charge DLC chapters, but does not join your party. Instead, [[spoiler:there is a separate Xenologue, Anna on the Run, where she pops up again. It is essentially identical to the aforementioned Anna the Merchant Paralogue from ''Awakening'', only Anna must survive in order to be recruited. Like before, this is yet another Anna, distinct from the ones seen previously]].
** The one aversion in the series is [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Heimler]], Heimler from ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'', a Paladin who, despite getting his own portrait, has no dialogue or importance and is just a normal enemy.



* Near the beginning of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' we find a masked character that ''manually'' opens doors unlike every other NPC in the entire game. This tiny fact foreshadows just how long his particular sidequest will go on for and how important he really is. [[spoiler: He even temporarily becomes a PC.]]\\
\\
You also get a notebook that is useful for sidequests -- of which the game has many. Any NPC who appears in this notebook after talking to you has a mask to give you. Characters that do not appear in the notebook are not important for sidequests, though they may still be important to the plot.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'':
**
Near the beginning of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'' the game, we find a masked character that ''manually'' opens doors unlike every other NPC in the entire game. This tiny fact foreshadows just how long his particular sidequest will go on for and how important he really is. [[spoiler: He [[spoiler:He even temporarily becomes a PC.]]\\
\\
]]
**
You also get a notebook that is useful for sidequests -- of which the game has many. Any NPC who appears in this notebook after talking to you has a mask to give you. Characters that do not appear in the notebook are not important for sidequests, though they may still be important to the plot.



** The ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' series is a strong example. Since there seem to be OnlySixFaces used for all the generic [=NPCs=] ever, anyone with a unique sprite is bound to have a [=NetNavi=] that you will eventually fight [[DefeatEqualsFriendship and/or]] befriend. It is particularly noticeable in ''Battle Network 5'', since you are in the process of building an anti-terrorism task force; if you're told to be on the lookout for a new member, expect the very next place you enter to have an NPC with a unique sprite, and expect that exact same member to be the operator of the next Navi to join your team.

to:

** * The ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' series is a strong example. Since there seem to be OnlySixFaces used for all the generic [=NPCs=] ever, anyone with a unique sprite is bound to have a [=NetNavi=] that you will eventually fight [[DefeatEqualsFriendship and/or]] befriend. It is particularly noticeable in ''Battle Network 5'', since you are in the process of building an anti-terrorism task force; if you're told to be on the lookout for a new member, expect the very next place you enter to have an NPC with a unique sprite, and expect that exact same member to be the operator of the next Navi to join your team.



* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': Most seemingly minor characters and scenes play into the overarching plot or one of the other character's backstories
** The drunken molester who got you convicted of assault? [[spoiler:He's the leader of the conspiracy.]]
** That stupid conversation about how the TV station building is shaped like a pancake? [[spoiler:Eventually allows Morgana and the Protagonist to deduce Goro Akechi is the traitor.]]
** That blue ButterflyOfDeathAndRebirth that keeps showing up? [[spoiler:It's Caroline and Justine's real personality, trying to help you expose the GreaterScopeVillain.]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': ** Most seemingly minor characters and scenes in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' play into the overarching plot or one of the other character's backstories
**
backstories:
***
The drunken molester who got you convicted of assault? [[spoiler:He's the leader of the conspiracy.]]
** *** That stupid conversation about how the TV station building is shaped like a pancake? [[spoiler:Eventually allows Morgana and the Protagonist to deduce Goro Akechi is the traitor.]]
** *** That blue ButterflyOfDeathAndRebirth that keeps showing up? [[spoiler:It's Caroline and Justine's real personality, trying to help you expose the GreaterScopeVillain.]]



* Similarly, in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' there is but one room in the entire game that is ''entirely'' useless. In the Armory South (near where you fight Ocelot) there is a LV. 4 door that contains three gun cameras and no items. The ''entire'' reason it exists is to have a diesel generator in it, which [[ChekhovsGun a character mentioned way back near the beginning of the game was the reason the base had air vents big enough to crawl through]].

to:

* Similarly, in In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' there is but one room in the entire game that is ''entirely'' useless. In the Armory South (near where you fight Ocelot) there is a LV. 4 door that contains three gun cameras and no items. The ''entire'' reason it exists is to have a diesel generator in it, which [[ChekhovsGun a character mentioned way back near the beginning of the game was the reason the base had air vents big enough to crawl through]].



* ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}''
** In ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden|I}}'' you can tell in the games who is one of the [[OneHundredAndEight 108 Stars]]: If they have a portrait and a name, they're a Star (or a villain, but [[DefeatMeansFriendship those are often the same thing]]).

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}''
''VideoGame/{{Suikoden}}'':
** In ''VideoGame/{{Suikoden|I}}'' ''VideoGame/SuikodenI'' you can tell in the games who is one of the [[OneHundredAndEight 108 Stars]]: If they have a portrait and a name, they're a Star (or a villain, but [[DefeatMeansFriendship those are often the same thing]]).



* This trope is guaranteed to drive ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' Soldiers and Demomen to madness, especially on new maps, because the maps are ''all'' highly detailed, with lots of items to interact with, but also to give a map more flavor. The main reason for the frustration is that these are the two classes who get the most out of the RocketJump (or Bomb Jump for Demomen), and a map with a lot of detailed protrusions will not necessarily indicate which ones are solid platforms which can be jumped to and either traversed or used for a height advantage, and which ones are intangible set dressing. For instance, Thunder Mountain which takes place on a cliffside logging mill. There are models of logs suspended over a BottomlessPit that look like dangerous but rewarding paths to target areas...where some parts of the crane holding up the log are solid, useful platforms and others are not, with no indication as to which is which. Some players will jump onto the log, find it solid, then try to jump onto the crane, thinking it's also a platform, and finding out it isn't after plummeting to their doom.
** Also the whole point of the "Prop Hunt" mode, which is Hide and Go Seek [[IncendiaryExponent with fire]]. One team of Scouts is disguised as a collection of world items and must remain HiddenInPlainSight against a team of Pyros who must hunt them down with flamethrowers. The challenge is that Pyros lose health when using their weapons, and must avoid dying while discerning which of the numerous highly detailed, cartoony objects on the map are decoys to be ignored and which are Scouts [[KillItWithFire to be ignited]]. Certain Prophunt maps even intentionally clip two pieces of scenery together just to make it look like a bad attempt at hiding.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'':
**
This trope is guaranteed to drive ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'' Soldiers and Demomen to madness, especially on new maps, because the maps are ''all'' highly detailed, with lots of items to interact with, but also to give a map more flavor. The main reason for the frustration is that these are the two classes who get the most out of the RocketJump (or Bomb Jump for Demomen), and a map with a lot of detailed protrusions will not necessarily indicate which ones are solid platforms which can be jumped to and either traversed or used for a height advantage, and which ones are intangible set dressing. For instance, Thunder Mountain which takes place on a cliffside logging mill. There are models of logs suspended over a BottomlessPit that look like dangerous but rewarding paths to target areas...where some parts of the crane holding up the log are solid, useful platforms and others are not, with no indication as to which is which. Some players will jump onto the log, find it solid, then try to jump onto the crane, thinking it's also a platform, and finding out it isn't after plummeting to their doom.
** Also the The whole point of the "Prop Hunt" mode, which is Hide and Go Seek [[IncendiaryExponent with fire]]. One team of Scouts is disguised as a collection of world items and must remain HiddenInPlainSight against a team of Pyros who must hunt them down with flamethrowers. The challenge is that Pyros lose health when using their weapons, and must avoid dying while discerning which of the numerous highly detailed, cartoony objects on the map are decoys to be ignored and which are Scouts [[KillItWithFire to be ignited]]. Certain Prophunt maps even intentionally clip two pieces of scenery together just to make it look like a bad attempt at hiding.


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[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'':
** Every piece of evidence in the [[ChekhovsArmoury Court Record]] -- besides the lawyer's badge, etc. -- is used in most cases every game.
** Profiles in ''Justice for All'' and ''Trials & Tribulations'', a notable case in the latter being the one time in the entire series when the character you're currently playing shows up in the profiles screen. Of course you're bound to present it at some point. The lawyer's badge gets used once or twice outside of the courtroom. You even had to present the screwdriver, which had importance exactly because it has ''no importance at all'', which throws suspicion on the suspect's reasoning for having Edgeworth personally pick it up in the first place.
** A "unique" one happens in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth''. In Case 5, "Turnabout Ablaze," which is the last and LONGEST case, Edgeworth tidies his evidence several times, removing used and useless evidence. [[InterfaceSpoiler And so you know "Samurai Dogs" are going to be used at some point because it survived the first two "evidence-sortings."]]
** ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' plays with this. Several pieces of evidence may not be used for more than reference, and characters make a point of tidying up unnecessary evidence between chapters. Some items, despite having an icon, may not actually show up in your court record, and at one point evidence previously thrown out is swapped back in when they become relevant again. In fact, a lot of evidence is kept, and ends up being used for a completely different reason that you think it's gonna be used for. One particular example coming in the DLC case, where you carry around a piece of fish for the entire case, with it never leaving the the court-record throughout despite the many "unnecessary evidence disposed off" moments. This obviously leads you into thinking the fish will be one of, if not THE big piece of evidence that'll crack the case. [[spoiler:In actual fact, you don't even use it until the episode's epilogue, and then it's just to give it to Orla the Orca as a treat.]]
** In the fourth case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'', even when it seems like everything is about to be wrapped up nicely, it's obvious a twist is coming up because you were told much earlier about a dog eating dumplings and burying the leftover in the backyard. Of course, these dumplings end up being an important clue.
[[/folder]]
1st Mar '17 6:58:51 AM Synch
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When a medium has less time to tell a complet estory, conservation of detail tends to be particularly pronounced. A TV show (with 25 or 50 minutes to complete a story) spends less time on details than a movie, which in turn has to provide fewer details than a comic book, and so on. How come people on TV always find a [[RockstarParking parking spot]] right outside their destination? Why [[TravellingAtTheSpeedOfPlot aren't people shown actually traveling]] between destinations? How can a couple plan a date without discussing pertinent details? Why do high school classes never seem to last more than three on-air minutes? This is why.

to:

When a medium has less time to tell a complet estory, complete story, conservation of detail tends to be particularly pronounced. A TV show (with 25 or 50 minutes to complete a story) spends less time on details than a movie, which in turn has to provide fewer details than a comic book, and so on. How come people on TV always find a [[RockstarParking parking spot]] right outside their destination? Why [[TravellingAtTheSpeedOfPlot aren't people shown actually traveling]] between destinations? How can a couple plan a date without discussing pertinent details? Why do high school classes never seem to last more than three on-air minutes? This is why.



This trope has probably caused more EpilepticTrees than every other trope combined -- DyingDream notwithstanding, as people ''expect'' things to have a reason. Conversely, issues that are not fully explored due to the constraints of this trope often make for good {{Deconstruction}} material later on.

to:

This trope has probably caused more EpilepticTrees than every other trope combined -- combined, DyingDream notwithstanding, as people ''expect'' things to have a reason. Conversely, issues that are not fully explored due to the constraints of this trope often make for good {{Deconstruction}} material later on.
28th Feb '17 5:37:47 AM Adept
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* This is rather ''infamously'' "subverted" by pretty much all of the works of JRRTolkien, almost to the point of it being memetic; it's not at all unusual in his works for there to be several pages of tangential activity that seemingly has nothing to do with the rest of the plot whatsoever. But to some extent, it's left up to the reader to determine what exactly constitutes as "important" in the greater lore of his work. For instance, his work TheSilmarillion could by some people be easily misconstrued as a book of ''nothing but'' such unnecessary fluff, but in reality it serves as the entire body of ancient Elvish history spanning back to the creation of the world (and fans sometimes appropriately refer to it as the "Elvish Bible" as a result), and that "fluff" provides considerable insight into the context of the Elves' existence, their culture, and even their worldviews which tend to differ considerably from that of Men or Dwarves, and doesn't often get extrapolated upon in his other, [[LordOfTheRings more]] [[TheHobbit famous]] works, which feature only light brushes with the Elves that leave readers/viewers with a stark impression of their strange ways but no real understanding of it. And needless to say, considering his works are essentially the primordial ooze from which was birthed modern HighFantasy, no detail is truly unimportant in hindsight.

to:

* This is rather ''infamously'' "subverted" by pretty much all of the works of JRRTolkien, Creator/JRRTolkien, almost to the point of it being memetic; it's not at all unusual in his works for there to be several pages of tangential activity that seemingly has nothing to do with the rest of the plot whatsoever. But to some extent, it's left up to the reader to determine what exactly constitutes as "important" in the greater lore of his work. For instance, his work TheSilmarillion could by some people be easily misconstrued as a book of ''nothing but'' such unnecessary fluff, but in reality it serves as the entire body of ancient Elvish history spanning back to the creation of the world (and fans sometimes appropriately refer to it as the "Elvish Bible" as a result), and that "fluff" provides considerable insight into the context of the Elves' existence, their culture, and even their worldviews which tend to differ considerably from that of Men or Dwarves, and doesn't often get extrapolated upon in his other, [[LordOfTheRings more]] [[TheHobbit famous]] works, which feature only light brushes with the Elves that leave readers/viewers with a stark impression of their strange ways but no real understanding of it. And needless to say, considering his works are essentially the primordial ooze from which was birthed modern HighFantasy, no detail is truly unimportant in hindsight.
7th Feb '17 5:08:34 PM Someoneman
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** In the fourth case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneySpiritOfJustice'', even when it seems like everything is about to be wrapped up nicely, it's obvious a twist is coming up because you were told much earlier about a dog eating dumplings and burying the leftover in the backyard. Of course, these dumplings end up being an important clue.
6th Feb '17 12:30:30 PM DavidK93
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When a medium has less time to tell a complet estory, conservation of detail tends to be particularly pronounced. A TV show (with 25 or 50 minutes to complete a story) spends less time on details than a movie, which in turn has to provide fewer details than a comic book, and so on. How come people on TV always find a [[RockstarParking parking spot]] right outside their destination? Why [[TravellingAtTheSpeedOfPlot aren't people shown actually traveling]] between destinations? Why do high school classes never seem to last more than three on-air minutes? This is why.

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When a medium has less time to tell a complet estory, conservation of detail tends to be particularly pronounced. A TV show (with 25 or 50 minutes to complete a story) spends less time on details than a movie, which in turn has to provide fewer details than a comic book, and so on. How come people on TV always find a [[RockstarParking parking spot]] right outside their destination? Why [[TravellingAtTheSpeedOfPlot aren't people shown actually traveling]] between destinations? How can a couple plan a date without discussing pertinent details? Why do high school classes never seem to last more than three on-air minutes? This is why.
4th Feb '17 10:33:13 AM Gosicrystal
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* Subverted with ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and their remakes. There's a [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Truck#Rumors one-of-a-kind truck in the game]] (vehicles aren't seen anywhere else in the game since the preferred methods of travel are walking and flying or surfing on Pokémon) that can only be seen under very specific conditions at a certain point in the game before being LostForever (although there are ways to return to it later in the game); a very high percentage of players would not see it while playing through the game. Endless rumors were spouted about the truck, such as finding a Mew there, etc.; however, the truck actually had no real significance at all. The rest of the series just follow this trope in every possible way. Another subversion in Kanto is the building foundation in Vermilion City (the same area as the truck, coincidentally), where a man is having his Machop "stop the land flat" in preparation for building. It appears in every version of Kanto in the series, and the building has still never been finished.

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* Subverted with ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' and their remakes. There's remakes:
** Subverted with
a [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Truck#Rumors one-of-a-kind truck in the game]] (vehicles aren't seen anywhere else in the game since the preferred methods of travel are walking and flying or surfing on Pokémon) that can only be seen under very specific conditions at a certain point in the game before being LostForever [[PermanentlyMissableContent becoming inaccessible]] (although there are ways to return to it later in the game); a very high percentage of players would not see it while playing through the game. Endless rumors were spouted about the truck, such as finding a Mew there, etc.; however, the truck actually had no real significance at all. The rest of the series just follow this trope in every possible way. Another subversion in Kanto is way.
** Subverted with
the building foundation in Vermilion City (the same area as the truck, coincidentally), City, where a man is having his Machop "stop the land flat" in preparation for building. It appears in every version of Kanto in the series, and the building has still never been finished.
1st Feb '17 6:42:48 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' plays this straight, mostly. Every teeny tiny detail, including ones that you've missed may well be significant, but... the author has cheerfully admitted that the difference between 'hint' and 'red herring' largely depends on his mood; he's prone to adding/tweaking things and very occasionally forgets things entirely.

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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' plays this straight, mostly. Every teeny tiny detail, including ones that you've missed may well be significant, and may boomerang back over 70 chapters late but... the author has cheerfully admitted that the difference between 'hint' and 'red herring' largely depends on his mood; he's prone to adding/tweaking things and very occasionally forgets things entirely.
20th Jan '17 3:21:06 PM justanid
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This trope is responsible for OneDegreeOfSeparation, AlwaysOnDuty, EveryoneIsRelated, and sometimes WhatHappenedToTheMouse. When an adaptation removes explanatory details to save time or attention, see AdaptationExplanationExtrication. When the creators of an interactive work account for an absurd amount of obscure variations or things the player might do in a detailed way, that is DevelopersForesight. When the characters are exactly where they need to be, when they need to be, in order to move the story forward, it's a collaboration between Conservation of Detail and the AnthropicPrinciple. Combine this with RuleOfSymbolism, and you get EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory.

Contrast NamelessNarrative. See also ChekhovsGun, ChekhovsGunman, and UniquenessValue.

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This trope is responsible for OneDegreeOfSeparation, AlwaysOnDuty, EveryoneIsRelated, NamelessNarrative, NominalImportance, and sometimes WhatHappenedToTheMouse. When an adaptation removes explanatory details to save time or attention, see AdaptationExplanationExtrication. When the creators of an interactive work account for an absurd amount of obscure variations or things the player might do in a detailed way, that is DevelopersForesight. When the characters are exactly where they need to be, when they need to be, in order to move the story forward, it's a collaboration between Conservation of Detail and the AnthropicPrinciple. Combine this with RuleOfSymbolism, and you get EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory.

Contrast NamelessNarrative. See also ChekhovsGun, ChekhovsGunman, and UniquenessValue.
20th Jan '17 3:14:54 PM justanid
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See also ChekhovsGun, ChekhovsGunman. Contrast NamelessNarrative. Responsible for OneDegreeOfSeparation, AlwaysOnDuty, EveryoneIsRelated, and sometimes WhatHappenedToTheMouse. When the characters are exactly where they need to be, when they need to be, in order to move the story forward, it's a collaboration between Conservation of Detail and the AnthropicPrinciple. When writers deliberately take advantage of this trope to overwhelm and confuse audiences, see TheWalrusWasPaul. Combine this with RuleOfSymbolism, and you get EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory.

For the drawing equivalent of this trope, see RuleOfAnimationConservation. For the nonhuman equivalent, see RuleOfPersonificationConservation. When an adaptation removes explanatory details to save time or attention, see AdaptationExplanationExtrication.

When a work flouts this trope and contains lots of little asides that are not necessary, that is NarrativeFiligree, and when the creators of an interactive work account for an absurd amount of obscure variations or things the player might do in a detailed way, that is DevelopersForesight.

'''Warning: May contained unmarked spoilers.'''

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See also ChekhovsGun, ChekhovsGunman. Contrast NamelessNarrative. Responsible For the drawing equivalent of this trope, see RuleOfAnimationConservation. For the nonhuman equivalent, see RuleOfPersonificationConservation. When writers deliberately take advantage of this trope to overwhelm and confuse audiences, see TheWalrusWasPaul. When a work flouts this trope and contains lots of little asides that are not necessary, that is NarrativeFiligree.

This trope is responsible
for OneDegreeOfSeparation, AlwaysOnDuty, EveryoneIsRelated, and sometimes WhatHappenedToTheMouse.WhatHappenedToTheMouse. When an adaptation removes explanatory details to save time or attention, see AdaptationExplanationExtrication. When the creators of an interactive work account for an absurd amount of obscure variations or things the player might do in a detailed way, that is DevelopersForesight. When the characters are exactly where they need to be, when they need to be, in order to move the story forward, it's a collaboration between Conservation of Detail and the AnthropicPrinciple. When writers deliberately take advantage of this trope to overwhelm and confuse audiences, see TheWalrusWasPaul. Combine this with RuleOfSymbolism, and you get EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory.

For the drawing equivalent of this trope, see RuleOfAnimationConservation. For the nonhuman equivalent, see RuleOfPersonificationConservation. When an adaptation removes explanatory details to save time or attention, see AdaptationExplanationExtrication.

When a work flouts this trope
Contrast NamelessNarrative. See also ChekhovsGun, ChekhovsGunman, and contains lots of little asides that are not necessary, that is NarrativeFiligree, and when the creators of an interactive work account for an absurd amount of obscure variations or things the player might do in a detailed way, that is DevelopersForesight.

UniquenessValue.

'''Warning: May Examples may contained unmarked spoilers.'''
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