History Main / TheHighMiddleAges

10th Jul '16 8:12:07 PM Nightsky
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Stretching roughly from about the Norman Conquest (''1066 and All That'') to the early 1300s, but most often imagined as about the 12th or 13th century, this is the era of UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, RobinHood, and fat, lecherous, [[ChurchMilitant irascible]], but good-hearted [[ChristianityIsCatholic friars]]. Also home to [[KnightInShiningArmor knights]], beautiful [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princesses]] with [[TheLateMiddleAges anachronistic]] [[NiceHat hennins]], and tall, spire-tipped Gothic architecture (note that most versions of the story of KingArthur are depicted as if they were set in this era, though strictly speaking he belongs to [[DarkAgeEurope Late Antiquity]]). Expect to see a {{corrupt church}}man or two wandering the landscape [[BurnTheWitch burning witches]], heretics, and pretty much ''anyone'' who doesn’t agree with [[MedievalMorons him]].

to:

Stretching roughly from about the Norman Conquest (''1066 (''[[Literature/TenSixtySixAndAllThat 1066 and All That'') That]]'') to the early 1300s, but most often imagined as about the 12th or 13th century, this is the era of UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, RobinHood, and fat, lecherous, [[ChurchMilitant irascible]], but good-hearted [[ChristianityIsCatholic friars]]. Also home to [[KnightInShiningArmor knights]], beautiful [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princesses]] with [[TheLateMiddleAges anachronistic]] [[NiceHat hennins]], and tall, spire-tipped Gothic architecture (note that most versions of the story of KingArthur are depicted as if they were set in this era, though strictly speaking he belongs to [[DarkAgeEurope Late Antiquity]]). Expect to see a {{corrupt church}}man or two wandering the landscape [[BurnTheWitch burning witches]], heretics, and pretty much ''anyone'' who doesn’t agree with [[MedievalMorons him]].
13th Jun '16 4:48:01 PM Jhonny
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Our story picks up where it left off, in 1066. The Normans, a group of Frenchmen, conquered modern day England from the ruling Anglo-Saxons. England had erupted into a succession crisis largely divided between the Vikings, who conquered the isles in the 800s, and the Anglo-Saxons, a group of slightly less Viking-ish but still pretty Viking-like peoples from Northern Germany. Although the Anglo-Saxons won at the famous Battle of Stamford Bridge, William of Normady saw the opportunity to further expand his lands. He invoked a claim to the throne of England, a country that had only been unified for less than 100 years by that point. He invaded and swiftly conquered England, defeating king Harold Godwinson, whose armies were battered from fighting the Danes. The Normans would, for some time, find it hard to hold on to their new conquests, as they suffered internal strife for nearly 100 years before things finally settled down and the modern, still existing kingdom of England we know today started to take shape. However, the Norman's instituted their own famous rule of law that is well renowned throughout history. For example, the Domesday Book was a preparatory census taking stock of the demographics of England to help the new-found Norman rulers understand the kingdom they had just inherited better. The Normans, being a duchy of France, also brought the inexorable tie between the Kingdom of France and the Kingdom of England. England would continue to expand under the rule of the Normans and other French dukes, pushing further and further into formerly Celtic territories like Cumbria and Wales. However, one of the most important events in English history occurred in 1215, when the First Baron's War erupted in England. The wildly unpopular King John saw many of his Barons rise up in revolt. Much of this came over disputes concerning the church, the appointment of bishops, the authority of the King over said bishops, and of course, taxes. King John himself was subject to HistoricalVillainUpgrade because the Baron's ultimately won and, of course, portrayed him incredibly negatively. The end of the war saw King John being forced to sign the Magna Carta, often hailed as the first document cementing modern Britain and reinvigorating democracy in Europe. However, the actual document was quite limited, with the most significant change being the appointment of 25 Barons (later to become the House of Lords) to levy taxes instead of giving the King that power, this forcing the King to go through Parliament to gain any new taxes. It was an incredibly small but crucial step in the formation of modern Britain.

Elsewhere, in continental Europe, the superstates of the Carolingian Empire began to breakdown. Otto I's coronation by the Pope in 962 marked the end of East Francia and the birth of the HolyRomanEmpire, which at this time was at the peak of its power. From there, the Empire would enter into a complicated relationship with the church that would culminate in the issue of Investiture. Officially, the Pope was above all monarchs in Western Europe, but since Otto's reign the Emperors had taken it upon themselves to appoint the various religious offices within Germany. Obviously, this made the Pope angry, and for the next few years or so internal turmoil erupted between those members of the Empire who supported the Church and those who supported the Emperor. This dividing factor would later be a drive for Protestantism in Germany, as many of the more secular princes would choose to leave the Catholic church. In 1122, the Concordat of Worms was signed. It essentially admitted that the Pope held authority over the Emperor, and it also sparked the decline of the Emperor's power in favor of the princes. This was complete in the 1250's when Frederick II died and for years the Empire struggled to find an heir. Eventually, local loyalties to the church or to the princes replaced loyalties to the Emperor, and he became little more than a figurehead ruling over a collective confederacy of infighting states. Despite its weakness, the Empire would still remain a major force in Europe, and it would continue to be the largest of the European kingdoms.

to:

Our story picks up where it left off, in 1066. The Normans, a group of Frenchmen, conquered modern day England from the ruling Anglo-Saxons. England had erupted into a succession crisis largely divided between the Vikings, who conquered the isles in the 800s, and the Anglo-Saxons, a group of slightly less Viking-ish but still pretty Viking-like peoples from Northern Germany. Although the Anglo-Saxons won at the famous Battle of Stamford Bridge, William of Normady saw the opportunity to further expand his lands. He invoked a claim to the throne of England, a country that had only been unified for less than 100 years by that point. He invaded and swiftly conquered England, defeating king Harold Godwinson, whose armies were battered from fighting the Danes. The Normans would, for some time, find it hard to hold on to their new conquests, as they suffered internal strife for nearly 100 years before things finally settled down and the modern, still existing kingdom of England we know today started to take shape. However, the Norman's instituted their own famous rule of law that is well renowned throughout history. For example, the Domesday Book was a preparatory census taking stock of the demographics of England to help the new-found Norman rulers understand the kingdom they had just inherited better. The Normans, being a duchy of France, also brought the inexorable tie between the Kingdom of France and the Kingdom of England. England would continue to expand under the rule of the Normans and other French dukes, pushing further and further into formerly Celtic territories like Cumbria and Wales. However, one of the most important events in English history occurred in 1215, when the First Baron's War erupted in England. The wildly unpopular King John saw many of his Barons rise up in revolt. Much of this came over disputes concerning the church, the appointment of bishops, the authority of the King over said bishops, and of course, taxes. King John himself was subject to HistoricalVillainUpgrade because the Baron's ultimately won and, of course, portrayed him incredibly negatively. The end of the war saw King John being forced to sign the Magna Carta, often hailed as the first document cementing modern Britain and reinvigorating democracy in Europe. However, the actual document was quite limited, with the most significant change being the appointment of 25 Barons (later to become the House of Lords) to levy taxes instead of giving the King that power, this forcing the King to go through Parliament to gain any new taxes. It was an incredibly small but crucial step in the formation of modern Britain.

Britain. As should become evident in both the English and French revolutions half a millennium later, who controls the purse-strings ultimately can wedge their way into enough power to have the king beheaded.

Elsewhere, in continental Europe, the superstates of the Carolingian Empire began to breakdown.break down. Otto I's coronation by the Pope in 962 marked the end of East Francia and the birth of the HolyRomanEmpire, which at this time was at the peak of its power. From there, the Empire would enter into a complicated relationship with the church that would culminate in the issue of Investiture. Officially, the Pope was above all monarchs in Western Europe, but since Otto's reign the Emperors had taken it upon themselves to appoint the various religious offices within Germany. Obviously, this made the Pope angry, and for the next few years or so internal turmoil erupted between those members of the Empire who supported the Church and those who supported the Emperor. This dividing factor would later be a drive for Protestantism in Germany, as many of the more secular princes would choose to leave the Catholic church. In 1122, the Concordat of Worms was signed. It essentially admitted that the Pope held authority over the Emperor, and it also sparked the decline of the Emperor's power in favor of the princes. This was complete in the 1250's when Frederick II died and for years the Empire struggled to find an heir. Eventually, local loyalties to the church or to the princes replaced loyalties to the Emperor, and he became little more than a figurehead ruling over a collective confederacy of infighting states. Despite its weakness, the Empire would still remain a major force in Europe, and it would continue to be the largest of the European kingdoms.
28th May '16 6:54:36 PM Doug86
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The setting is likely to be a [[TheThemeParkVersion mythologized]] UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} or UsefulNotes/{{France}}, though there are examples from farther afield. [[UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} Jerusalem]], which had pretty much been ignored since BiblicalTimes, will now also be used as the stage for all sorts of spectacular battles involving scimitar-wielding [[ArabianNightsDays Saracens]] and sinisterly handsome [[UsefulNotes/TheKnightsTemplar Knights Templar]].

to:

The setting is likely to be a [[TheThemeParkVersion mythologized]] UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} or UsefulNotes/{{France}}, though there are examples from farther afield. [[UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} Jerusalem]], which had pretty much been ignored since BiblicalTimes, BibleTimes, will now also be used as the stage for all sorts of spectacular battles involving scimitar-wielding [[ArabianNightsDays Saracens]] and sinisterly handsome [[UsefulNotes/TheKnightsTemplar Knights Templar]].
11th May '16 3:48:34 AM Morgenthaler
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The setting is likely to be a [[TheThemeParkVersion mythologized]] UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} or UsefulNotes/{{France}}, though there are examples from farther afield. [[UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} Jerusalem]], which had pretty much been ignored since BiblicalTimes, will now also be used as the stage for all sorts of spectacular battles involving scimitar-wielding [[ArabianNightsDays Saracens]] and sinisterly handsome [[TheKnightsTemplar Knights Templar]].

to:

The setting is likely to be a [[TheThemeParkVersion mythologized]] UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} or UsefulNotes/{{France}}, though there are examples from farther afield. [[UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} Jerusalem]], which had pretty much been ignored since BiblicalTimes, will now also be used as the stage for all sorts of spectacular battles involving scimitar-wielding [[ArabianNightsDays Saracens]] and sinisterly handsome [[TheKnightsTemplar [[UsefulNotes/TheKnightsTemplar Knights Templar]].



* WarriorMonk: Not only were there many militant churchmen like Bishop Turpin in ''The Song of Roland'', but this was the era of the military religious orders such as TheKnightsHospitallers, TheKnightsTemplar, and TheTeutonicKnights.

to:

* WarriorMonk: Not only were there many militant churchmen like Bishop Turpin in ''The Song of Roland'', but this was the era of the military religious orders such as TheKnightsHospitallers, TheKnightsTemplar, UsefulNotes/TheKnightsHospitallers, UsefulNotes/TheKnightsTemplar, and TheTeutonicKnights.UsefulNotes/TheTeutonicKnights.



** The [[ComicBook/DieAbrafaxe Abrafaxe]] came to the 1270s during the final third of the Don Ferrando arc. After going through Palestine, Egypt and Mesopotamia the Don disappeared and the Abrafaxe continued their journey via India, Malaya and Japan before reaching [[UsefulNotes/DynastiesFromShangToQing the Yuan Empire]] in 1282 (January 1983-December 1991). Following that a leap in time brings them back to 1176, around the time of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa's defeat in the battle of Legnano (No. 193-207). Much later they return for the Templars arc (No. 358-381, set ca. 1118), which involves the beginnings of TheKnightsTemplar and a search for the treasure of Prester John. It is followed by the Johanna arc (No. 382-405, set ca. 1250), in which the Abrafaxe meet Albertus Magnus and encounter Nicolas Flamel (who had appeared under a different name in the Templars arc).

to:

** The [[ComicBook/DieAbrafaxe Abrafaxe]] came to the 1270s during the final third of the Don Ferrando arc. After going through Palestine, Egypt and Mesopotamia the Don disappeared and the Abrafaxe continued their journey via India, Malaya and Japan before reaching [[UsefulNotes/DynastiesFromShangToQing the Yuan Empire]] in 1282 (January 1983-December 1991). Following that a leap in time brings them back to 1176, around the time of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa's defeat in the battle of Legnano (No. 193-207). Much later they return for the Templars arc (No. 358-381, set ca. 1118), which involves the beginnings of TheKnightsTemplar UsefulNotes/TheKnightsTemplar and a search for the treasure of Prester John. It is followed by the Johanna arc (No. 382-405, set ca. 1250), in which the Abrafaxe meet Albertus Magnus and encounter Nicolas Flamel (who had appeared under a different name in the Templars arc).
10th May '16 2:56:34 PM Morgenthaler
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* The old Sierra adventure game ''ConquestsOfTheLongbow''.
* The beginning of the English campaign of ''EmpireEarth'' is set during the Norman Conquest. It then reenact UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar and UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars.

to:

* The old Sierra adventure game ''ConquestsOfTheLongbow''.
''VideoGame/ConquestsOfTheLongbow''.
* The beginning of the English campaign of ''EmpireEarth'' ''VideoGame/EmpireEarth'' is set during the Norman Conquest. It then reenact UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar and UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars.
9th May '16 1:27:35 AM Faberlich
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* ''Film/AlexanderNevsky''
* ''Becket''
* ''Film/{{Braveheart}}''
* ''Film/ElCid''
* ''Film/FirstKnight''
* Any version of the story of Francis of Assisi (''e.g., Brother Sun, Sister Moon''; ''Francesco''; or ''St. Francis of Assisi'')
* ''Film/KingdomOfHeaven''
* ''Film/LesVisiteurs''

to:

* ''Film/AlexanderNevsky''
* ''Becket''
* ''Film/{{Braveheart}}''
* ''Film/ElCid''
* ''Film/FirstKnight''
* Any version of
''Film/TheWarLord'' is set after the story 1066 Norman conquest of Francis England.
* ''Film/ElCid'' takes place in 1099.
* ''Becket'' takes place a hundred years after the Norman conquest
of Assisi (''e.g., Brother Sun, Sister Moon''; ''Francesco''; or ''St. Francis of Assisi'')
* ''Film/KingdomOfHeaven''
England.
* ''Film/LesVisiteurs'' is a TimeTravel story that starts in 1123, in the reign of French king Louis VI the Fat.
* ''Film/KingdomOfHeaven'': The battle of Hattin in 1185 and the siege of Jerusalem in 1187.




to:

* Any version of the story of Francis of Assisi (''e.g., Brother Sun, Sister Moon''; ''Francesco''; or ''St. Francis of Assisi'') in the early 13th century.
* ''Film/AlexanderNevsky'': The Battle of lake Peipus in 1242.
* ''Film/{{Braveheart}}'' is set in the late 13th century and early 14th century.
15th Apr '16 5:13:55 AM portraitinflesh42
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Our story picks up where it left off, in 1066. The Normans, a group of Frenchmen, conquered modern day England from the ruling Anglo-Saxons. England had erupted into a succession crisis largely divided between the Vikings, who conquered the isles in the 800s, and the Anglo-Saxons, a group of slightly less Viking-ish but still pretty Viking-like peoples from Northern Germany. Although the Anglo-Saxons won at the famous Battle of Stamford Bridge, William of Normady saw the opportunity to further expand his lands. He invoked a claim to the throne of England, a country that had only been unified for less than 100 years by that point. He invaded and swiftly conquered England, defeating the famous king UsefulNotes/AlfredTheGreat, whose armies were battered from fighting the Danes. The Normans would, for some time, find it hard to hold on to their new conquests, as they suffered internal strife for nearly 100 years before things finally settled down and the modern, still existing kingdom of England we know today started to take shape. However, the Norman's instituted their own famous rule of law that is well renowned throughout history. For example, the Domesday Book was a preparatory census taking stock of the demographics of England to help the new-found Norman rulers understand the kingdom they had just inherited better. The Normans, being a duchy of France, also brought the inexorable tie between the Kingdom of France and the Kingdom of England. England would continue to expand under the rule of the Normans and other French dukes, pushing further and further into formerly Celtic territories like Cumbria and Wales. However, one of the most important events in English history occurred in 1215, when the First Baron's War erupted in England. The wildly unpopular King John saw many of his Barons rise up in revolt. Much of this came over disputes concerning the church, the appointment of bishops, the authority of the King over said bishops, and of course, taxes. King John himself was subject to HistoricalVillainUpgrade because the Baron's ultimately won and, of course, portrayed him incredibly negatively. The end of the war saw King John being forced to sign the Magna Carta, often hailed as the first document cementing modern Britain and reinvigorating democracy in Europe. However, the actual document was quite limited, with the most significant change being the appointment of 25 Barons (later to become the House of Lords) to levy taxes instead of giving the King that power, this forcing the King to go through Parliament to gain any new taxes. It was an incredibly small but crucial step in the formation of modern Britain.

to:

Our story picks up where it left off, in 1066. The Normans, a group of Frenchmen, conquered modern day England from the ruling Anglo-Saxons. England had erupted into a succession crisis largely divided between the Vikings, who conquered the isles in the 800s, and the Anglo-Saxons, a group of slightly less Viking-ish but still pretty Viking-like peoples from Northern Germany. Although the Anglo-Saxons won at the famous Battle of Stamford Bridge, William of Normady saw the opportunity to further expand his lands. He invoked a claim to the throne of England, a country that had only been unified for less than 100 years by that point. He invaded and swiftly conquered England, defeating the famous king UsefulNotes/AlfredTheGreat, Harold Godwinson, whose armies were battered from fighting the Danes. The Normans would, for some time, find it hard to hold on to their new conquests, as they suffered internal strife for nearly 100 years before things finally settled down and the modern, still existing kingdom of England we know today started to take shape. However, the Norman's instituted their own famous rule of law that is well renowned throughout history. For example, the Domesday Book was a preparatory census taking stock of the demographics of England to help the new-found Norman rulers understand the kingdom they had just inherited better. The Normans, being a duchy of France, also brought the inexorable tie between the Kingdom of France and the Kingdom of England. England would continue to expand under the rule of the Normans and other French dukes, pushing further and further into formerly Celtic territories like Cumbria and Wales. However, one of the most important events in English history occurred in 1215, when the First Baron's War erupted in England. The wildly unpopular King John saw many of his Barons rise up in revolt. Much of this came over disputes concerning the church, the appointment of bishops, the authority of the King over said bishops, and of course, taxes. King John himself was subject to HistoricalVillainUpgrade because the Baron's ultimately won and, of course, portrayed him incredibly negatively. The end of the war saw King John being forced to sign the Magna Carta, often hailed as the first document cementing modern Britain and reinvigorating democracy in Europe. However, the actual document was quite limited, with the most significant change being the appointment of 25 Barons (later to become the House of Lords) to levy taxes instead of giving the King that power, this forcing the King to go through Parliament to gain any new taxes. It was an incredibly small but crucial step in the formation of modern Britain.
6th Apr '16 5:35:10 PM Faberlich
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/LesVisiteurs''
3rd Mar '16 2:52:38 AM Menshevik
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** During the ''Digedags'' era, the protagonists travelled to the 13th century, where they met [[BreakoutCharacter Ritter Runkel]].

to:

** During the ''Digedags'' era, the protagonists travelled to the 13th century, where they met [[BreakoutCharacter Ritter Runkel]]. The arc (vol. 1 No. 90-151) is still the longest in the history of the title. Covering the years 1284 to 1286 it takes the Digedags and their friend Runkel to Italy, the Byzantine Empire, the Middle East and back to Germany.
7th Feb '16 2:01:37 PM nombretomado
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Stretching roughly from about the Norman Conquest (''1066 and All That'') to the early 1300s, but most often imagined as about the 12th or 13th century, this is the era of TheCrusades, RobinHood, and fat, lecherous, [[ChurchMilitant irascible]], but good-hearted [[ChristianityIsCatholic friars]]. Also home to [[KnightInShiningArmor knights]], beautiful [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princesses]] with [[TheLateMiddleAges anachronistic]] [[NiceHat hennins]], and tall, spire-tipped Gothic architecture (note that most versions of the story of KingArthur are depicted as if they were set in this era, though strictly speaking he belongs to [[DarkAgeEurope Late Antiquity]]). Expect to see a {{corrupt church}}man or two wandering the landscape [[BurnTheWitch burning witches]], heretics, and pretty much ''anyone'' who doesn’t agree with [[MedievalMorons him]].

to:

Stretching roughly from about the Norman Conquest (''1066 and All That'') to the early 1300s, but most often imagined as about the 12th or 13th century, this is the era of TheCrusades, UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, RobinHood, and fat, lecherous, [[ChurchMilitant irascible]], but good-hearted [[ChristianityIsCatholic friars]]. Also home to [[KnightInShiningArmor knights]], beautiful [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princesses]] with [[TheLateMiddleAges anachronistic]] [[NiceHat hennins]], and tall, spire-tipped Gothic architecture (note that most versions of the story of KingArthur are depicted as if they were set in this era, though strictly speaking he belongs to [[DarkAgeEurope Late Antiquity]]). Expect to see a {{corrupt church}}man or two wandering the landscape [[BurnTheWitch burning witches]], heretics, and pretty much ''anyone'' who doesn’t agree with [[MedievalMorons him]].



Speaking of TheCrusades, they lasted throughout this entire period, but particularly after the mid-1100's they start to draw a lot of attention away from continental Europe. Although some very important things happened during the Crusades (such as the always common succession wars or the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215) they tend to make up the popular fiction of the era. In truth, the Crusades were big, even involving several monarchs of the time, but there was always something going on back home. The High Middle Ages saw the rise of knights as a martial nobility, and it typically involved stereotypical knightly things such as chivalry and tournaments. The economy was also improving, mostly due to agricultural yields. This brought greater stability to Europe, and increased crop yields also meant more specialization for workers. Things like banks, corporations, and workers unions (guilds at the time) originated in this area, usually evolving from ideas gained from trade with the Muslim empires. It also meant more blacksmiths, carpenters, stonemasons, jewelers, and other non-subsistence based careers. This in turn meant more products to buy and sell, better building techniques and more organized construction efforts (such as proper castles and churches), and advances in agricultural tools. It also meant there was room for an intellectual revival, since people now had time to devote to studies and scholasticism. Secular studies were on the rise, particularly of ancient Greco-Roman works that were later immortalized in the Renaissance. Universities even sprang up during this time, and all in all the world was becoming a more connected, advanced place. Things were on a stable recovery from TheLowMiddleAges.

to:

Speaking of TheCrusades, UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, they lasted throughout this entire period, but particularly after the mid-1100's they start to draw a lot of attention away from continental Europe. Although some very important things happened during the Crusades (such as the always common succession wars or the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215) they tend to make up the popular fiction of the era. In truth, the Crusades were big, even involving several monarchs of the time, but there was always something going on back home. The High Middle Ages saw the rise of knights as a martial nobility, and it typically involved stereotypical knightly things such as chivalry and tournaments. The economy was also improving, mostly due to agricultural yields. This brought greater stability to Europe, and increased crop yields also meant more specialization for workers. Things like banks, corporations, and workers unions (guilds at the time) originated in this area, usually evolving from ideas gained from trade with the Muslim empires. It also meant more blacksmiths, carpenters, stonemasons, jewelers, and other non-subsistence based careers. This in turn meant more products to buy and sell, better building techniques and more organized construction efforts (such as proper castles and churches), and advances in agricultural tools. It also meant there was room for an intellectual revival, since people now had time to devote to studies and scholasticism. Secular studies were on the rise, particularly of ancient Greco-Roman works that were later immortalized in the Renaissance. Universities even sprang up during this time, and all in all the world was becoming a more connected, advanced place. Things were on a stable recovery from TheLowMiddleAges.



* TheCrusades: These are a perennially favorite backdrop for medieval fiction.
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