History Main / TheHighMiddleAges

17th Oct '17 6:58:45 PM TheMorlock
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* ''Series/Galavant'' is set in the 13th century, specifically the year 1256.

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* ''Series/Galavant'' ''{{Galavant}}'' is set in the 13th century, specifically the year 1256.
1256 but it commits many anachronisms for [[RuleOfFunny comic effect]].
17th Oct '17 6:53:37 PM TheMorlock
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* ''Series/Galavant'' is set in the 13th century, specifically the year 1256.
17th Oct '17 6:42:36 PM TheMorlock
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* Creator/WilliamShakespeare’s ''Theatre/KingJohn, Theatre/RichardII, Theatre/HenryIV'' (Parts I and II), and ''Theatre/HenryV'' (strictly speaking, ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'', and ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'' should be, too, but they are very often performed in a [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance quasi-Elizabethan]] setting).

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* Creator/WilliamShakespeare’s ''Theatre/KingJohn, Theatre/RichardII, Theatre/HenryIV'' (Parts I and II), and ''Theatre/HenryV'' (strictly speaking, ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'', and ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'' should be, too, but they are it is very often performed in a [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance quasi-Elizabethan]] setting).
28th Sep '17 5:33:57 PM Abbot_Cellach
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** ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'': As quoted by phillip: "After all, this ''is'' the fourteenth century."

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** * ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'': As quoted by phillip: "After all, this ''is'' the fourteenth century."
28th Sep '17 5:33:06 PM Abbot_Cellach
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** ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'': As quoted by phillip: "After all, this ''is'' the fourteenth century."
17th Sep '17 3:15:33 AM Doug86
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* Dante's ''Literature/DivineComedy,'' sort of (Hell, Purgatory and Heaven are effectively other dimensions, but most of the characters Dante meets are his close contemporaries).

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* Dante's ''Literature/DivineComedy,'' ''Literature/TheDivineComedy,'' sort of (Hell, Purgatory and Heaven are effectively other dimensions, but most of the characters Dante meets are his close contemporaries).
16th Sep '17 3:58:14 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/WilliamShakespeare’s ''Theatre/KingJohn, Theatre/RichardII, Theatre/HenryIV'' (Parts I and II), and ''Theatre/HenryV'' (strictly speaking, ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'', and ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'' should be, too, but they are very often performed in a [[TheRenaissance quasi-Elizabethan]] setting).

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* Creator/WilliamShakespeare’s ''Theatre/KingJohn, Theatre/RichardII, Theatre/HenryIV'' (Parts I and II), and ''Theatre/HenryV'' (strictly speaking, ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'', and ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'' should be, too, but they are very often performed in a [[TheRenaissance [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance quasi-Elizabethan]] setting).
17th Aug '17 7:56:30 AM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:350:[[Creator/GustaveDore http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5fe91de607eea38222e5de3f42affb09.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:[[Literature/TheCanterburyTales I speke of manye hundred yeres ago...]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[Creator/GustaveDore [[quoteright:320:[[Creator/GustaveDore http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/5fe91de607eea38222e5de3f42affb09.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:[[Literature/TheCanterburyTales [[caption-width-right:320:[[Literature/TheCanterburyTales I speke of manye hundred yeres ago...]]]]
28th Jun '17 5:40:40 PM freyalorelei
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Speaking of UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, they lasted throughout this entire period, but particularly after the mid-1100's they start to draw a lot of attention away from continental Europe. Although some very important things happened during the Crusades (such as the always common succession wars or the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215) they tend to make up the popular fiction of the era. In truth, the Crusades were big, even involving several monarchs of the time, but there was always something going on back home. The High Middle Ages saw the rise of knights as a martial nobility, and it typically involved stereotypical knightly things such as chivalry and tournaments. The economy was also improving, mostly due to agricultural yields. This brought greater stability to Europe, and increased crop yields also meant more specialization for workers. Things like banks, corporations, and workers unions (guilds at the time) originated in this area, usually evolving from ideas gained from trade with the Muslim empires. It also meant more blacksmiths, carpenters, stonemasons, jewelers, and other non-subsistence based careers. This in turn meant more products to buy and sell, better building techniques and more organized construction efforts (such as proper castles and churches), and advances in agricultural tools. It also meant there was room for an intellectual revival, since people now had time to devote to studies and scholasticism. Secular studies were on the rise, particularly of ancient Greco-Roman works that were later immortalized in the Renaissance. Universities even sprang up during this time, and all in all the world was becoming a more connected, advanced place. Things were on a stable recovery from TheLowMiddleAges.

to:

Speaking of UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, they lasted throughout this entire period, but particularly after the mid-1100's they start to draw a lot of attention away from continental Europe. Although some very important things happened during the Crusades (such as the always common succession wars or the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215) they tend to make up the popular fiction of the era. In truth, the Crusades were big, even involving several monarchs of the time, but there was always something going on back home. The High Middle Ages saw the rise of knights as a martial nobility, and it typically involved stereotypical knightly things such as chivalry and tournaments. The economy was also improving, mostly due to agricultural yields. This brought greater stability to Europe, and increased crop yields also meant more specialization for workers. Things like banks, corporations, and workers unions (guilds at the time) originated in this area, usually evolving from ideas gained from trade with the Muslim empires. It also meant more blacksmiths, carpenters, stonemasons, jewelers, and other non-subsistence based careers. This in turn meant more products to buy and sell, better building techniques and more organized construction efforts (such as proper castles and churches), and advances in agricultural tools. It also meant there was room for an intellectual revival, since people now had time to devote to studies and scholasticism. Secular studies were on the rise, particularly of ancient Greco-Roman works that were later immortalized in the Renaissance.UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance. Universities even sprang up during this time, and all in all the world was becoming a more connected, advanced place. Things were on a stable recovery from TheLowMiddleAges.
28th Jun '17 5:38:17 PM freyalorelei
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The period also saw the final decline of Roman power from which there would not be a recovery. Although the Eastern Roman Empire had outlasted the Western half for hundreds of years, the rise of Islam brought a real challenge to its doorstep. Muslim conquests of Eastern Roman lands sparked the Crusades, which also marked a period of cooperation between the Eastern and Western churches. This all ended in 1204, when Constantinople was sacked by a group of rogue Crusaders. This became the point of no return for the Roman Empire. Although it would survive for 200 years more, it was never able to regain it's former glory.

to:

The period also saw the final decline of Roman power from which there would not be a recovery. Although the Eastern Roman Empire had outlasted the Western half for hundreds of years, the rise of Islam brought a real challenge to its doorstep. Muslim conquests of Eastern Roman lands sparked the Crusades, which also marked a period of cooperation between the Eastern and Western churches. This all ended in 1204, when [[UsefulNotes/TheFallOfConstantinople Constantinople was sacked sacked]] by a group of rogue Crusaders. This became the point of no return for the Roman Empire. Although it would survive for 200 years more, it was never able to regain it's its former glory.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheHighMiddleAges