History Main / TheCreon

2nd Jan '16 11:13:37 PM nombretomado
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* Silvio in ''TheSopranos'', in his own words, always pictured himself as a behind-the-scenes advisor and, though his wife urges him to consider the possibility of taking over, very much does not enjoy his reluctant role as regent while Tony recovers from his gunshot wound. * In ''TheWestWing'', Leo [=McGarry=] describes himself and Josh Lyman as not wanting to be the guy, but instead being the guys that that guy depends on.
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* Silvio in ''TheSopranos'', ''Series/TheSopranos'', in his own words, always pictured himself as a behind-the-scenes advisor and, though his wife urges him to consider the possibility of taking over, very much does not enjoy his reluctant role as regent while Tony recovers from his gunshot wound. * In ''TheWestWing'', ''Series/TheWestWing'', Leo [=McGarry=] describes himself and Josh Lyman as not wanting to be the guy, but instead being the guys that that guy depends on.

** Goldar from MightyMorphinPowerRangers whilst not 100% behind Rita Repulsa (except for the first season) is undoubtedly loyal to Lord Zedd.
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** Goldar from MightyMorphinPowerRangers ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' whilst not 100% behind Rita Repulsa (except for the first season) is undoubtedly loyal to Lord Zedd.
14th Sep '15 6:36:23 AM GnomeTitan
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Corrected grammar in copied text to fit new context.
The TropeNamer is Creon of Thebes from Sophocles' ''Theatre/OedipusRex'', where he says quite frankly that he's not interested in being king, and finds it much more pleasant to be the one with the power and not the responsibility.
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The TropeNamer is Creon of Thebes from Sophocles' ''Theatre/OedipusRex'', where he says who quite frankly says that he's not interested in being king, and finds it much more pleasant to be the one with the power and not the responsibility.
14th Sep '15 6:35:32 AM GnomeTitan
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De-natterified one example and added information about the trope namer to the trope definition.
The TropeNamer is Creon of Thebes from Sophocles' ''Theatre/OedipusRex'', where he says quite frankly that he's not interested in being king, and finds it much more pleasant to be the one with the power and not the responsibility.

* The TropeNamer is Creon of Thebes, Son of Menoeceus, a character who appeared in several Ancient Greek Dramas. In Sophocles' ''Theatre/OedipusRex'' he actually says quite frankly that he's not interested in being king, and finds it much more pleasant to be the one with the power and not the responsibility. However he does become leader of Thebes in Sophocles' ''Antigone'', and sure enough, doesn't do very well. ** The name "Creon" (Κρέων), however, simply means "ruler" in Classical Greek (the feminine "Creousa" also shows up occasionally). So the Creon in Sophocles' Theban plays, while undoubtedly the most famous character to bear that name, is a deliberate ironic subversion of the more usual portrayal of Creons in Greek theatre and literature - he's a man called "ruler" who doesn't want to rule. Other Creons (such as Creon of Corinth in Euripides' Medea) tend to simply be straightforward in-charge types representing power, rulership and authority.
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* The TropeNamer is Creon of Thebes, Son of Menoeceus, a character who appeared in several Ancient Greek Dramas. In Sophocles' ''Theatre/OedipusRex'' he actually says quite frankly that he's not interested in being king, and finds it much more pleasant to be the one with the power and not the responsibility. However he does become leader of Thebes in Sophocles' ''Antigone'', and sure enough, doesn't do very well. \n** The name "Creon" (Κρέων), however, simply (Κρέων) is in itself an ironic subversion, since it means "ruler" in Classical Greek (the feminine "Creousa" also shows up occasionally). So the Creon in Sophocles' Theban plays, while undoubtedly the most famous character to bear that name, is a deliberate ironic subversion of the more usual portrayal of Creons in Greek theatre and literature - he's a man called "ruler" who doesn't want to rule. Greek. Other Creons (such as Creon of Corinth in Euripides' Medea) tend to simply be straightforward in-charge types representing power, rulership and authority.
14th Sep '15 5:49:35 AM Morgenthaler
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* Commander Riker of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' is another famous example of this. During the many seasons and movies he's been repeatedly offered his own command of various starships, yet chose to remain as second-in-command on the Enterprise regardless. In "The Best of Both Worlds", his entire subplot revolves around him learning to accept having command of his own, which he eventually does... only to be [[StatusQuoIsGod right back in the first officer's seat in the next episode]] (and for another whole decade). ** The show explains Riker's motivation for being The Creon several times: He didn't want to be promoted to command of his own ship, because it would be a case of KickedUpstairs; he'd much rather serve as the second-in-command of a prestigious flagship than command his own tiny ship out in the middle of nowhere. Additionally, it's hinted that Riker wishes to become Captain of the ''Enterprise'', and feels that it would be easier to do so by advancing from first officer to captain, instead of getting shipped elsewhere and hoping he'd get transferred back.
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* Commander Riker of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' is another famous example of this. During the many seasons and movies he's been repeatedly offered his own command of various starships, yet chose to remain as second-in-command on the Enterprise regardless. In "The Best of Both Worlds", his entire subplot revolves around him learning to accept having command of his own, which he eventually does... only to be [[StatusQuoIsGod right back in the first officer's seat in the next episode]] (and for another whole decade). ** The show explains Riker's motivation for being The Creon several times: He didn't want to be promoted to command of his own ship, because it would be a case of KickedUpstairs; he'd much rather serve as the second-in-command of a prestigious flagship than command his own tiny ship out in the middle of nowhere. Additionally, it's hinted that Riker wishes to become Captain of the ''Enterprise'', and feels that it would be easier to do so by advancing from first officer to captain, instead of getting shipped elsewhere and hoping he'd get transferred back. In "The Best of Both Worlds", his entire subplot revolves around him learning to accept having command of his own, which he eventually does... only to be [[StatusQuoIsGod right back in the first officer's seat in the next episode]] (and for another whole decade).
14th Sep '15 5:47:52 AM Morgenthaler
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** Before Riker, Spock was this on ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. He did become Captain of the Enterprise at the start of ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', but relinquished command as smoothly as [[HalfHumanHybrid half]]-[[IncrediblyLamePun humanly]] possible - and not just because Kirk outranks him either. ** In the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]'' episode "Mirror, Mirror", alternate Spock is this too: claiming to have no desire for the Captaincy, for the same reasons as the original Creon did. ** This is fairly standard for first officers in Star Trek. In ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', Major Kira starts out quite irate that the Federation placed one of their own people in charge after her people had spent decades fighting the Cardassians. She eventually turns around and becomes extremely loyal to Sisko, and not just because he's technically the MessianicArchetype of her religion. ** In ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', Chakotay starts out as the captain of his own ([[DeathByOriginStory doomed]]) ship, making his reassignment to First Officer of the ''Voyager'' something of a demotion. Nevertheless, he immediately becomes one of Captain Janeway's strongest supporters, and even makes it clear to his Maquis that he doesn't want them even thinking about mutiny.
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* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'': ** Before Riker, Spock was this on ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. this. He did become Captain of the Enterprise at the start of ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', but relinquished command as smoothly as [[HalfHumanHybrid half]]-[[IncrediblyLamePun humanly]] half]]-humanly possible - and not just because Kirk outranks him either. ** In the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]'' episode "Mirror, Mirror", alternate Spock is this too: claiming to have no desire for the Captaincy, for the same reasons as the original Creon did. ** This is fairly standard for first officers in Star Trek. * In ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]'', Major Kira starts out quite irate that the Federation placed one of their own people in charge after her people had spent decades fighting the Cardassians. She eventually turns around and becomes extremely loyal to Sisko, and not just because he's technically the MessianicArchetype of her religion. ** * In ''[[Series/StarTrekVoyager Voyager]]'', ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', Chakotay starts out as the captain of his own ([[DeathByOriginStory doomed]]) ship, making his reassignment to First Officer of the ''Voyager'' something of a demotion. Nevertheless, he immediately becomes one of Captain Janeway's strongest supporters, and even makes it clear to his Maquis that he doesn't want them even thinking about mutiny.
14th Sep '15 5:46:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* Ser Kevan Lannister, non-ambitious yet highly competent younger brother to the powerful Lord Tywin, is this, both in ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' and ''Series/GameOfThrones'', the HBO adaptation. Set up as a yes-man with no ambition, but it is revealed he followed Tywin because he believed his decisions were mostly right. ''A Dance With Dragons'' reveals that he fits this trope even better than previously thought; many characters (while acknowledging him as an exceptional HyperCompetentSidekick,) believed he would be completely lost without someone strong to follow, but in the aftermath of [[spoiler: Cersei]]'s EpicFail at ruling, he takes the reins in his own right (though not in name,) and does an excellent job.
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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'': ** Ser Kevan Lannister, Lannister is the non-ambitious yet highly competent younger brother to the powerful Lord Tywin, is this, both in ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' and ''Series/GameOfThrones'', the HBO adaptation. Set Tywin. While set up as a yes-man with no ambition, but it is revealed he followed Tywin because he believed his decisions were mostly right. ''A Dance With Dragons'' ''Literature/ADanceWithDragons'' reveals that he fits this trope even better than previously thought; many characters (while acknowledging him as an exceptional HyperCompetentSidekick,) HyperCompetentSidekick) believed he would be completely lost without someone strong to follow, but in the aftermath of [[spoiler: Cersei]]'s EpicFail at ruling, he takes the reins in his own right (though not in name,) name) and does an excellent job.
2nd Jul '15 5:45:36 PM nombretomado
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* Saul Tigh from the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Reimagined}}''. He is forced to take command of the fleet briefly [[spoiler: when Boomer shoots Adama]] but it doesn't go very well and he happily returns command to Adama.
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* Saul Tigh from the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Reimagined}}''.Galactica|2003}}''. He is forced to take command of the fleet briefly [[spoiler: when Boomer shoots Adama]] but it doesn't go very well and he happily returns command to Adama.
14th Jun '15 11:12:25 PM thatother1dude
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22nd May '15 10:08:59 PM yarrunmace
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* Tagon in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'' says that Thurl has told him that 'If I ever promote him an inch above Chief Warrant Officer he'll quit.' Why? Less getting shot at, that's why. [[/folder]]
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* Tagon in ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'' says that Thurl has told him that 'If I ever promote him an inch above In ''Webcomic/SchlockMercenary'', Chief Warrant Officer he'll quit.' Why? Less getting shot at, that's why. [[/folder]] Thurl is referred to as one of the most experienced senior officers in Tagon's Toughs. He's also very insistent on not going any higher than Chief Warrant Officer, claiming that he'd quit on the spot if Tagon tried.
21st May '15 4:24:42 AM Headrock
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Already mentioned...
* In the Mirror Universe, Spock is quite content to stay as first officer, because this means fewer people try to kill him.
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