History Main / TheComputerisaCheatingBastard

19th Sep '17 12:31:03 AM Kuruni
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*** To be cynical, however, you'll eventually notice a pattern of the days when Card Destruction is off the banlist (it works that every card is cycled on and off it), it will show up in your opponent's hand within the first three turns about half of the time. Aside from the AI also knowing your facedown monster's defense before it's flipped, it's pretty fair otherwise. The only place the cheating really shows up is when you're facing the anime characters, as nameless side characters will usually display pretty jarring ArtificialStupidity.

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*** To be cynical, however, However, you'll eventually notice a pattern of the days when Card Destruction is off the banlist (it works that every card is cycled on and off it), it will show up in your opponent's hand within the first three turns about half of the time. Aside from the AI also knowing your facedown monster's defense before it's flipped, it's pretty fair otherwise. The only place the cheating really shows up is when you're facing the anime characters, as nameless side characters will usually display pretty jarring ArtificialStupidity.



** Not to mention that in ''every'' video game based on the card game - no exceptions - the cards that are available to you at the start are mediocre at best, and you always have to unlock better ones by progressing in the game. But almost all of your opponents - even the lowliest of Mooks - have access to better cards right from the start, often ones you can't access until much later. (You can sometimes get some as gifts or bonuses by defeating duelists, but that's usually decided at random, and there's a lot of luck involved as to whether you'll get something good.)
** The really worst part is that, of course, the game knows which cards you have and the opponent AI will actually base the cards it plays on whichever cards you've played. This is easily tested with an emulator that allow save states. Save before playing a particular card, and see the AI play a card that counters yours. Load the save state so you can play a different card that counters the AI's and it will actually play an entirely different card that counters your new one.[[note]]Of course, if you actually use save states to give you an advantage, that counts as cheating on your part[[/note]]
*** On that note, while it is possible for the AI to miss on cards that depend on a random guess, like [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Ordeal_of_a_Traveler Ordeal of a Traveler]], the Spell Card [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Question Question]] ''never'' works against it; because this card relies on your opponent's memory, the AI will ''always'' guess right if you try. (This may be useful in some situation, like if the card in question is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Necroface Necroface]], in which case this Trope turns into ArtificialStupidity.)
** Hoo boy, ''[[VideoGame/YuGiOhForbiddenMemories Forbidden Memories]]''. Not only does the AI have cards that you can't obtain without cheating devices, but it doesn't even bother to stack the deck, no; it ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vo3hNgUAjPM turns the cards in its hands into other cards.]]''

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** Not to mention that in ''every'' video game based on the card game - no exceptions - the cards that are available to you at the start are mediocre at best, and you always have to unlock better ones by progressing in the game. But almost all of your opponents - even the lowliest of Mooks - have access to better cards right from the start, often ones you can't access until much later. (You can sometimes get some as gifts or bonuses by defeating duelists, but that's usually decided at random, and there's a lot of luck involved as to whether you'll get something good.)
** The really worst part is that, of course, the game knows which cards you have and the opponent AI will actually base the cards it plays on whichever cards you've played. This is easily tested with an emulator that allow save states. Save before playing a particular card, and see the AI play a card that counters yours. Load the save state so you can play a different card that counters the AI's and it will actually play an entirely different card that counters your new one.[[note]]Of course, if you actually use save states to give you an advantage, that counts as cheating on your part[[/note]]
*** On that note, while it is possible for the AI to miss on cards that depend on a random guess, like [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Ordeal_of_a_Traveler Ordeal of a Traveler]], the Spell Card [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Question Question]] ''never'' works against it; because this card relies on your opponent's memory, the AI will ''always'' guess right if you try. (This may be useful in some situation, like if the card in question is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Necroface Necroface]], in which case this Trope turns into ArtificialStupidity.)
part[[/note]]
** Hoo boy, ''[[VideoGame/YuGiOhForbiddenMemories Forbidden Memories]]''. Not only does the AI have cards that you can't obtain without cheating devices, but it doesn't even bother to stack the deck, no; it ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vo3hNgUAjPM turns the cards in its hands into other cards.]]''



** In actual Jeopardy, when Watson the Computer played, he had insanely fast reaction time.
*** While Watson was very fast on the buzzer, his programming often got in the way; he repeated Ken Jennings' incorrect answer, and in a choice between two identically-named cities, his information-gathering algorithm caused him to name an airport that wasn't even in the same ''country'' as the city in question (the clues were all there, but they were ambiguous enough that the question could have applied to either city).
** On ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', if a computer player rings in it will either give the right answer to a question or [[ArtificialStupidity type in nonsense]]. If you go too far ahead, the game will sometimes [[RubberBandAI make it impossible for you to buzz in at all while the computer player(s) starts closing the gap.]]
*** In the SNES version, it is so extreme that the computer buzzes in on the first possible frame. This means that, even if you're playing on an emulator and use the tools to play it frame-perfect, it's still literally impossible to buzz in before the computer. Essentially, it cheats so hard that you can't out-cheat it.

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** In actual Jeopardy, when Watson the Computer played, he had insanely fast reaction time.
*** While Watson was very fast on the buzzer, his programming often got in the way; he repeated Ken Jennings' incorrect answer, and in a choice between two identically-named cities, his information-gathering algorithm caused him to name an airport that wasn't even in the same ''country'' as the city in question (the clues were all there, but they were ambiguous enough that the question could have applied to either city).
** On ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', if a computer player rings in it will either give the right answer to a question or [[ArtificialStupidity type in nonsense]]. If you go too far ahead, the game will sometimes [[RubberBandAI make it impossible for you to buzz in at all while the computer player(s) starts closing the gap.]]
***
]] In the SNES version, it is so extreme that the computer buzzes in on the first possible frame. This means that, even if you're playing on an emulator and use the tools to play it frame-perfect, it's still literally impossible to buzz in before the computer. Essentially, it cheats so hard that you can't out-cheat it.



*** Simultaneously subverted in versions where it is possible for a computer player to call a [[PressXToDie repeated letter]].



* In the Dokapon game for DS you can expect that the computer will get the exact roll it needs 99% of the time.
** Savestates show that the computer always gives you the same predetermined "random" roll, regardless of any luck manipulation that would work in games with fair [=RNGs=]. The CPU players are essentially saying, every turn, "I want to move X spaces". At least this doesn't carry over into combat.
*** Technically, this is because the game uses a "random seed" method of determining rolls. The game has a randomly generated number that it uses as a basis to find the numbers for rolls, spins, etc. Since there is some form of pattern, the number rolled at a given time will always be the same, unless the seed changes. That happens when certain actions are performed (for example, using an item before you roll). You can still bet the AI has a say in its roll, though.

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* In the Dokapon ''Dokapon'' game for DS you can expect that the computer will get the exact roll it needs 99% of the time.
**
time. Savestates show that the computer always gives you the same predetermined "random" roll, regardless of any luck manipulation that would work in games with fair [=RNGs=]. The CPU players are essentially saying, every turn, "I want to move X spaces". At least this doesn't carry over into combat.
***
combat. Technically, this is because the game uses a "random seed" method of determining rolls. The game has a randomly generated number that it uses as a basis to find the numbers for rolls, spins, etc. Since there is some form of pattern, the number rolled at a given time will always be the same, unless the seed changes. That happens when certain actions are performed (for example, using an item before you roll). You can still bet the AI has a say in its roll, though.



* ''VideoGame/MariosGameGallery'' is rather infamous for using this trope.
** In Go Fish, it's rather obvious that the AI knows what's in your hand. Often times, it will ask for the card you just drew when you go fish.

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* ''VideoGame/MariosGameGallery'' is rather infamous for using this trope.
**
''VideoGame/MariosGameGallery'': In Go Fish, it's rather obvious that the AI knows what's in your hand. Often times, it will ask for the card you just drew when you go fish.



* ''VideoGame/RoadRash 3'' for the Genesis thoroughly abuses this trope. One racer (Lucky Luc) always manages to stay ahead of you. You can have the same bike as him, and he still manages to get ahead of you so he can spam his oilcans. If you decide to grab the next higher bike, or two after that, he STILL is usually a bit faster than you, or can at least catch up to you with no problem.
** The game also has some ''serious'' {{rubber band AI}}. The super secret bike tops out (when not using the nitro) at around 215 MPH. You get this bike (with the proper code) on the first races (if you decided to cheat back). You can speed past every other racer and take first place within the first 11 seconds of the race, but if you crash any time after that (most noticeable when you're at the end of the race), at least five other racers will pass you before you can get back onto the bike, even if you don't get flung too far away from it.

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* ''VideoGame/RoadRash 3'' for the Genesis thoroughly abuses this trope. One racer (Lucky Luc) always manages to stay ahead of you. You can have the same bike as him, and he still manages to get ahead of you so he can spam his oilcans. If you decide to grab the next higher bike, or two after that, he STILL is usually a bit faster than you, or can at least catch up to you with no problem.
**
problem. The game also has some ''serious'' {{rubber band AI}}.RubberBandAI. The super secret bike tops out (when not using the nitro) at around 215 MPH. You get this bike (with the proper code) on the first races (if you decided to cheat back). You can speed past every other racer and take first place within the first 11 seconds of the race, but if you crash any time after that (most noticeable when you're at the end of the race), at least five other racers will pass you before you can get back onto the bike, even if you don't get flung too far away from it.



* In ''RedBaron Arcade'' (as with many, many flight/driving/racing type games), if there is any penalty to being rammed, you can bet that the computer has any number of planes or cars (or whatever) cheerfully lining up to ram the absolute ''crap'' out of you as soon as you start targeting the thing that will let you win that level.
* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedUnderground'' combined RubberBandAI with your opponents always having just slightly better cars than you. Because of that it was easier to deliberately ''downgrade'' your car in the endgame by using a weak engine and so on. The AI would be downgraded as well so that relatively everything stayed the same, but the race would be a lot slower and therefore more forgiving.
* '''Need For Speed Underground''' was ''so'' blatant with this that the statistics given at the end of the race made no sense: your top speed for the race could be reported as ''x'' MPH, with your opponents given as ''x''-n. Even if, at that top speed, the opponents had passed you.

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* In ''RedBaron ''Red Baron Arcade'' (as with many, many flight/driving/racing type games), if there is any penalty to being rammed, you can bet that the computer has any number of planes or cars (or whatever) cheerfully lining up to ram the absolute ''crap'' out of you as soon as you start targeting the thing that will let you win that level.
* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedUnderground'' ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedUnderground'':
** It
combined RubberBandAI with your opponents always having just slightly better cars than you. Because of that it was easier to deliberately ''downgrade'' your car in the endgame by using a weak engine and so on. The AI would be downgraded as well so that relatively everything stayed the same, but the race would be a lot slower and therefore more forgiving.
* '''Need For Speed Underground''' was ''so'' blatant with this that the statistics given at the end of the race made no sense: your
forgiving. Your top speed for the race could be reported as ''x'' MPH, with your opponents given as ''x''-n. Even if, at that top speed, the opponents had passed you. The AI actually deliberately steers traffic so they'll cross paths with you. Cars come out out of an intersection with precise timing so that you'll hit them. If you're in the lead on the last lap, this becomes even more likely. The best tactic is to swerve wildly just before every intersection so you won't be where the computer thought you were going to be.



*** Most Wanted was nowhere near as bad as Underground 2, but can be a lesson in frustration if you haven't mastered getting an apex turn or don't abuse speedbreaker.
** In ''Most Wanted'', it is possible to drag a car with it facing the opposite direction, because it got its rear wheel caught on your front end, and then not only free itself, but proceed to gain magical turning abilities where it obtains a zero-degree radius turn, and speed off. Past you.
** The car damage thing is inverted, since cop cars can be taken out fairly easily while your own car is indestructible. This is [[strike:balanced]] outweighed by the fact that the computer has an infinite supply of them, though.
** The cops also rarely go after the computer players. There may be one or two occasions where if you deliberately slow down and give up your position so the other can get the cop first, they will actually go after the more {{egregious}} speeder. Otherwise, the cop will usually go after you, and completely ignore everyone else.
*** Speaking of cops, try this: Start a cop chase and go into reverse. The cop will drive alongside you. Now stop, go into first, and punch it. Even if your car can go from 0 to 100 in 0.5 seconds, the cop will stay right on your tail, despite having to make a J-turn to even drive in the same direction as you.
* Speaking of ''Most Wanted'', once the backup timer has run out, the cops are free to respawn anywhere they want. Nothing quite beats seeing a cop car flicker into view on the golf course. Of course, if ''you'' try to respawn by using R, it's an instant bust, no matter where the cops are.
** Not to mention the effect in latter tollbooth challenges, where if you take the shortcut through opposing traffic, there always ends up being traffic there. If you take the long way around, surprise, surprise, no traffic!
** In ''Need for Speed Underground'', the AI actually deliberately steers traffic so they'll cross paths with you. Cars come out out of an intersection with precise timing so that you'll hit them. If you're in the lead on the last lap, this becomes even more likely. The best tactic is to swerve wildly just before every intersection so you won't be where the computer thought you were going to be.
* ''Most Wanted'' even goes so far as to actively ''lie'' to the player. One of loading screen tips tells you that with a well-executed pursuit breaker it's possible to take out all your pursuers at once and get away easily. But doing that just causes a new police car to instantly spawn nearby. Following the advice and slowing down to allow cops to catch up and get them all can then easily have the opposite result than the tip claims, since even though the car is invulnerable, it can still get caught in the pursuit breaker and immobilized just long enough for that new cop car to bust you.
* Cop cars in '''Most Wanted''' can also travel ''sideways'' across the road in a controlled fashion (not power-sliding) to get in your way, as though they have 4-wheel steer with a 90-degree capability.
** ''Need for Speed Most Wanted'' actually cheats in ''multiplayer mode''. You can upgrade every car in the game to 100% on all three stats (acceleration, speed and handling), except for the game's signature car, the BMW M3 GTR which cannot be upgraded at all and is therefore pretty bad in single player. However, as bad as its ingame performance is, its listed stats are worse. And in multiplayer mode, the game attempts to ensure a fair race by equalising the stats of all cars in the race. The result is that your shiny Porsche Carrera GT that ordinarily blows the doors off the M3 GTR is detuned to a limping piece of junk with the same stats as the M3 GTR... at which point the M3 GTR is the better car and will proceed to beat you. This is probably a design flaw, but ironically the M3 GTR is driven in career mode by a cheating bastard who took it from you after rigging a race through sabotage.
*** Also, because of the craptastic way the game measures handling, the M3 GTR is probably one of the best vehicles you get in the late game for turning. The game's handling stat doesn't measure how well it turns, but rather how well your car stays gripped to the road, which can be really bad if your trying to make a tight turn at 140 MPH(~225km/h, for you metric users)
** Every PSP version of Need for Speed seems to put a lot of effort in ensuring that its AI has a new annoying trick at its disposal. By the time of NFS Undercover, the cpu cars could drive faster than you, no matter what was your car and how well it was upgraded, were not affected by crashes (they were back on your tail in just few seconds), could TELEPORT if you somehow managed to make them stay really behind, or TURN MID-AIR! In one of the urban stages, there is a 90 degrees turn just after a really long straight that ends with a significant bump. To drive past it you simply have to slow down, but the cpu cars can drive into it at full speed, jump and turn in the air. Funny sight when you are looking behind at that time.
* Your opponents in ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed Shift 2: Unleashed'' are rather fond of the Reverse PIT manoeuvre. It's performed in exactly the same way but it's the guy pushing that spins out. It's incredibly annoying when you've got a fast car and it gets congested. Generally, your opponent's cars weigh twice as much as yours according to the physics engine.
* In ''Need for Speed: Undercover'' (non PSP), even if you have the pedal thoroughly buried in a Mclaren F1, police [=SUV=]s will still lazily pull in front of you as though you were parked. For those still confused; this is a scenario in which a Cadillac Escalade is represented as faster than one of the fastest production cars ever produced.[[note]]The F1 remains as of 2011 one of the fastest production cars ever made; as of July 2010 it is succeeded by very few cars including the Koenigsegg CCR, the Bugatti Veyron, the SSC Ultimate Aero TT, and the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport.[[/note]]
* In '''Need For Speed:Hot Pursuit (2009)''' you can pass a parked police car, at top speed, in the ''fastest car in the game'' (Veyron) and it will be on your tail in just a couple of seconds, even if you didn't slow down at all.

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*** Most Wanted was nowhere near as bad as Underground 2, but can be a lesson in frustration if you haven't mastered getting an apex turn or don't abuse speedbreaker.
** In ''Most Wanted'', it Wanted'':
*** It
is possible to drag a car with it facing the opposite direction, because it got its rear wheel caught on your front end, and then not only free itself, but proceed to gain magical turning abilities where it obtains a zero-degree radius turn, and speed off. Past you.
** *** The car damage thing is inverted, since cop cars can be taken out fairly easily while your own car is indestructible. This is [[strike:balanced]] outweighed by the fact that the computer has an infinite supply of them, though.
** *** The cops also rarely go after the computer players. There may be one or two occasions where if you deliberately slow down and give up your position so the other can get the cop first, they will actually go after the more {{egregious}} speeder. Otherwise, the cop will usually go after you, and completely ignore everyone else.
*** Speaking of cops, try this: Start a cop chase and go into reverse. The cop will drive alongside you. Now stop, go into first, and punch it. Even if your car can go from 0 to 100 in 0.5 seconds, the cop will stay right on your tail, despite having to make a J-turn to even drive in the same direction as you.
* Speaking of ''Most Wanted'', once the backup timer has run out, the cops are free to respawn anywhere they want. Nothing quite beats seeing a cop car flicker into view on the golf course. Of course, if ''you'' try to respawn by using R, it's an instant bust, no matter where the cops are.
** Not to mention the effect in latter tollbooth challenges, where if you take the shortcut through opposing traffic, there always ends up being traffic there. If you take the long way around, surprise, surprise, no traffic!
** In ''Need for Speed Underground'', the AI actually deliberately steers traffic so they'll cross paths with you. Cars come out out of an intersection with precise timing so that you'll hit them. If you're in the lead on the last lap, this becomes even more likely. The best tactic is to swerve wildly just before every intersection so you won't be where the computer thought you were going to be.
*
''Most Wanted'' even goes so far as to actively ''lie'' to the player. One of loading screen tips tells you that with a well-executed pursuit breaker it's possible to take out all your pursuers at once and get away easily. But doing that just causes a new police car to instantly spawn nearby. Following the advice and slowing down to allow cops to catch up and get them all can then easily have the opposite result than the tip claims, since even though the car is invulnerable, it can still get caught in the pursuit breaker and immobilized just long enough for that new cop car to bust you.
* *** Cop cars in '''Most Wanted''' can also travel ''sideways'' across the road in a controlled fashion (not power-sliding) to get in your way, as though they have 4-wheel steer with a 90-degree capability.
** *** ''Need for Speed Most Wanted'' actually cheats in ''multiplayer mode''. You can upgrade every car in the game to 100% on all three stats (acceleration, speed and handling), except for the game's signature car, the BMW M3 GTR which cannot be upgraded at all and is therefore pretty bad in single player. However, as bad as its ingame performance is, its listed stats are worse. And in multiplayer mode, the game attempts to ensure a fair race by equalising the stats of all cars in the race. The result is that your shiny Porsche Carrera GT that ordinarily blows the doors off the M3 GTR is detuned to a limping piece of junk with the same stats as the M3 GTR... at which point the M3 GTR is the better car and will proceed to beat you. This is probably a design flaw, but ironically the M3 GTR is driven in career mode by a cheating bastard who took it from you after rigging a race through sabotage.
*** Also, because of the craptastic way the game measures handling, the M3 GTR is probably one of the best vehicles you get in the late game for turning. The game's handling stat doesn't measure how well it turns, but rather how well your car stays gripped to the road, which can be really bad if your trying to make a tight turn at 140 MPH(~225km/h, for you metric users)
**
Every PSP version of Need for Speed seems to put a lot of effort in ensuring that its AI has a new annoying trick at its disposal. By the time of NFS Undercover, the cpu cars could drive faster than you, no matter what was your car and how well it was upgraded, were not affected by crashes (they were back on your tail in just few seconds), could TELEPORT if you somehow managed to make them stay really behind, or TURN MID-AIR! In one of the urban stages, there is a 90 degrees turn just after a really long straight that ends with a significant bump. To drive past it you simply have to slow down, but the cpu cars can drive into it at full speed, jump and turn in the air. Funny sight when you are looking behind at that time.
* ** Your opponents in ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed Shift 2: Unleashed'' are rather fond of the Reverse PIT manoeuvre. It's performed in exactly the same way but it's the guy pushing that spins out. It's incredibly annoying when you've got a fast car and it gets congested. Generally, your opponent's cars weigh twice as much as yours according to the physics engine.
* ** In ''Need for Speed: Undercover'' (non PSP), even if you have the pedal thoroughly buried in a Mclaren F1, police [=SUV=]s will still lazily pull in front of you as though you were parked. For those still confused; this is a scenario in which a Cadillac Escalade is represented as faster than one of the fastest production cars ever produced.[[note]]The F1 remains as of 2011 one of the fastest production cars ever made; as of July 2010 it is succeeded by very few cars including the Koenigsegg CCR, the Bugatti Veyron, the SSC Ultimate Aero TT, and the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport.[[/note]]
* ** In '''Need For Speed:Hot Pursuit (2009)''' you can pass a parked police car, at top speed, in the ''fastest car in the game'' (Veyron) and it will be on your tail in just a couple of seconds, even if you didn't slow down at all.



* ''VideoGame/TestDrive'' for [=PS2=], Xbox and GC. This game exhibits extreme RubberBandAI. No matter how skilled you are or how powerful your car is, the AI will always gain a ridiculous speed boost and catch up, sometimes "teleporting", making races a LuckBasedMission. And they almost never crash or make other mistakes.

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* ''VideoGame/TestDrive'' for [=PS2=], Xbox and GC. GC.
**
This game exhibits extreme RubberBandAI. No matter how skilled you are or how powerful your car is, the AI will always gain a ridiculous speed boost and catch up, sometimes "teleporting", making races a LuckBasedMission. And they almost never crash or make other mistakes.



* MidnightClub 3 seems to be malevolent and benevolent at the exact same time. In races, your opponents are always in better cars unless you have an A tier car(to the point that races can play out with you in a D tier and your opponent in a B tier BEFORE you've completely upgraded it.), your opponents always have more nitrous shots than you (or in the case of bikes, HAVE nitrous shots.), and, somehow, obey the copenhagen interpretation, because even if you overlapped a car, if you are not watching him on the minimap, he will warp right behind you and be able to put you back into second place. However, you can outrun them on straightaways, they cannot use slipstream turbo, and cannot use any special abilities.
** Midnight Club 2 actually has a ''literal'' example: in one of the Career races, Angel gives himself a head start. It doesn't help, though, as he's almost deliberately one of the worst AI opponents you'll ever face.
* On that note, Midnight Club: Los Angeles was criticized in an IGN review because of its rubberband techniques making the game often harder than it needed to be. Not only can they rocket off the line faster, but they have NOS by the bucketload, often blowing right past you. Another gripe by that same review was for markers being in places that are hard to spot, such as on corners you will often blow past.
** A patch eased some of the Rubberband problem for the first third of the game.
* ''VideoGame/{{Forza}} Motorsport 2'' exibits several of the stated examples (not to extreme levels, but they appear). But the worst offense is when you end up with the car in 2nd place pulling a PIT Maneuver on you, giving them and their 6 other AI buddies a chance to speed off as you are forced to get back to the track ''while the penalty meter is growing''. The worst part is that you can have this happen with the AI set on Easy.
** ''Forza Motorsport 3'' is a little different. The AI players aren't bastards, they're ''assholes''. Even on Medium difficulty, they'll bump you to-and-fro in a pack-like manner, cars in front of you will seemingly drive in a tandem formation to block you from overtaking, and they're not afraid to ram you off on their way to first place. Combine this with Realistic-level damage modelling, and you can kiss your credits goodbye.

to:

* MidnightClub 3 ''VideoGame/MidnightClubLosAngeles'' was criticized in an IGN review because of its rubberband techniques making the game often harder than it needed to be. Not only can they rocket off the line faster, but they have NOS by the bucketload, often blowing right past you. Another gripe by that same review was for markers being in places that are hard to spot, such as on corners you will often blow past. A patch eased some of the Rubberband problem for the first third of the game.
* ''VideoGame/MidnightClub3''
seems to be malevolent and benevolent at the exact same time. In races, your opponents are always in better cars unless you have an A tier car(to the point that races can play out with you in a D tier and your opponent in a B tier BEFORE you've completely upgraded it.), your opponents always have more nitrous shots than you (or in the case of bikes, HAVE nitrous shots.), and, somehow, obey the copenhagen interpretation, because even if you overlapped a car, if you are not watching him on the minimap, he will warp right behind you and be able to put you back into second place. However, you can outrun them on straightaways, they cannot use slipstream turbo, and cannot use any special abilities.
** Midnight Club 2 * ''VideoGame/MidnightClub2'' actually has a ''literal'' example: in one of the Career races, Angel gives himself a head start. It doesn't help, though, as he's almost deliberately one of the worst AI opponents you'll ever face.
* On that note, Midnight Club: Los Angeles was criticized in an IGN review because of its rubberband techniques making the game often harder than it needed to be. Not only can they rocket off the line faster, but they have NOS by the bucketload, often blowing right past you. Another gripe by that same review was for markers being in places that are hard to spot, such as on corners you will often blow past.
''VideoGame/{{Forza}}'':
** A patch eased some of the Rubberband problem for the first third of the game.
* ''VideoGame/{{Forza}}
''Forza Motorsport 2'' exibits several of the stated examples (not to extreme levels, but they appear). But the worst offense is when you end up with the car in 2nd place pulling a PIT Maneuver on you, giving them and their 6 other AI buddies a chance to speed off as you are forced to get back to the track ''while the penalty meter is growing''. The worst part is that you can have this happen with the AI set on Easy.
** ''Forza Motorsport 3'' is a little different. The AI players aren't bastards, they're ''assholes''. :
***
Even on Medium difficulty, they'll bump you to-and-fro in a pack-like manner, cars in front of you will seemingly drive in a tandem formation to block you from overtaking, and they're not afraid to ram you off on their way to first place. Combine this with Realistic-level damage modelling, and you can kiss your credits goodbye.



*** Not only that. If you're on the inside lane during a turn with an A.I. car next to you on the outside lane, you can't push it off the track. Instead it will push you to the inside. If you do that to a human player in a multiplayer race, however, you can easily push him off the track.

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*** Not only that. If you're on the inside lane during a turn with an A.I. car next to you on the outside lane, you can't push it off the track. Instead it will push you to the inside. If you do that to a human player in a multiplayer race, however, you can easily push him off the track.



*** Also, any car in the same class as you can and WILL outperform your car if driven by the #1 or #2 AI. Have the fastest car model in that class, fully upgraded and tuned to be literally a millimetre away from being the next class up? Too bad. #1 AI is going to fly past you as soon as you hit the straights.

to:

*** Also, any Any car in the same class as you can and WILL outperform your car if driven by the #1 or #2 AI. Have the fastest car model in that class, fully upgraded and tuned to be literally a millimetre away from being the next class up? Too bad. #1 AI is going to fly past you as soon as you hit the straights.



* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4''. In the rally races, if you hit the wall, you get a 5 second penalty. If you run into the computer opponent, you get a 5 second penalty. If the computer runs into you, you get a 5 second penalty. And of course, the computer can pinball down the track without so much as applying the brakes, let alone catching a penalty for tapping the (occasionally invisible) track barrier.
** The computer will also use cars that it specifically disallows you the use of. (Cadillac Cien and VW Nardo W12 Concept in a race specifically limited to Production Vehicles Only, for example.)
** Back in GT2 and possibly in 4, the AI would also sometimes use cars that exceeded the HP regulations for the races, eg the Vector M12 LM on the Trial Mountain Endurance Race, [[{{Unwinnable}} making it impossible for you to win.]]
*** An special example goes to Rome Circuit on the Historical Car event. horsepower limit? 295hp. One of the opponents has a Ford GT40, which happens to have the maximum allowed Horsepower (Except when you buy the car. It shows at the dealership it has 295hp but it actually has 305hp! Which means you can't use the car on the race). But it's horsepower isn't the problem. Ford GT40 is a road version of a LE-MANS RACING CAR! So you're facing a road-going version of the legendary car that won 3 consecutive Le-mans in the 60s. HAVE FUN! Want a tip to win this? Buy the Mini that costs half a million credits. It doesn't have 74hp, it actually has 200hp and it's nimble enough to face the GT40.
** Not to mention that on most track and road races, you can drive perfectly, get several seconds ahead of your opponents in the turns, only for them to [[RubberBandAI mysteriously gain 300 horsepower]] and catch, pass, and gain several seconds on you in the straights.
*** Or it will pick a car that is within the regulations, but has some [[GameBreaker asshole trait]] making it nearly unbeatable, such as the vacuum-downforced Chapparal 2J. [[note]]In that case, however, this is an aversion. You can avoid having to face the cheating AI by literally playing as it. Why? [[FridgeBrilliance Because it is stupidly easy to make money in this game to the point that you can afford some of the most broken cars in the game with only grinding.]][[/note]]
* ''Full Auto'' for the Xbox 360 suffers from this a bit. RubberBandAI, while prevalent, is not the biggest problem - enemy cars in Career mode are also equipped with what appears to be much, '''MUCH''' stronger armor than the player's vehicle, making blowing them out of the way a time-consuming task. For example, it takes an enemy vehicle approximately 3 rough hits with the hood-mounted shotgun to completely annihilate the player (the same number it takes a player to destroy another player in Multiplayer mode), but it takes the player 5 precise hits to a single side of an AI car ''at minimum'' to take them down. Also, the player's car can completely lose its front armor after hitting only 2 mines dropped by an enemy and explode when hitting the third, but enemy cars can run over multiple mines and suffer no visible damage. They also may or may not be subject to the "Weapon Overheat" period resulting from firing a weapon too rapidly without a break. Factor in the AI cars' exclusive ability to destroy the player simply by ramming them and their unannounced ability to change their driving pattern while the Unwreck function is used (designed for the player to undo mistakes by rewinding time), and it's quite a bit to handle. Fortunately, the AI cars are also busy blasting away at each other, often leaving them damaged enough for the player to swoop in and finish them off.
** The cheating AI seems to be exclusive to Career mode. Multiplayer and Arcade modes appear to give the AI cars the same speed, abilities, and armor as the player (only 3 shots from the shotgun before exploding, 3 mines = death, etc.), but Career mode steps it up with the cheating elements. Very odd...
* On a number of car racing games the opponent drivers are essentially invulnerable. If your car hits theirs they are unaffected while you are sent flying. The AI drivers are driving a preset course and you are not allowed to interfere. The racing side missions in ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'' are an example.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4''. ''VideoGame/GranTurismo:
** In ''GranTurismo 4'':
***
In the rally races, if you hit the wall, you get a 5 second penalty. If you run into the computer opponent, you get a 5 second penalty. If the computer runs into you, you get a 5 second penalty. And of course, the computer can pinball down the track without so much as applying the brakes, let alone catching a penalty for tapping the (occasionally invisible) track barrier.
** *** The computer will also use cars that it specifically disallows you the use of. (Cadillac Cien and VW Nardo W12 Concept in a race specifically limited to Production Vehicles Only, for example.)
** Back in GT2 and possibly in 4, the GT2:
*** The
AI would also sometimes use cars that exceeded the HP regulations for the races, eg the Vector M12 LM on the Trial Mountain Endurance Race, [[{{Unwinnable}} making it impossible for you to win.]]
*** An A special example goes to Rome Circuit on the Historical Car event. horsepower limit? 295hp. One of the opponents has a Ford GT40, which happens to have the maximum allowed Horsepower (Except when you buy the car. It shows at the dealership it has 295hp but it actually has 305hp! Which means you can't use the car on the race). But it's horsepower isn't the problem. Ford GT40 is a road version of a LE-MANS RACING CAR! So you're facing a road-going version of the legendary car that won 3 consecutive Le-mans in the 60s. HAVE FUN! Want a tip to win this? Buy the Mini that costs half a million credits. It doesn't have 74hp, it actually has 200hp and it's nimble enough to face the GT40.
** Not to mention that on most track and road races, you can drive perfectly, get several seconds ahead of your opponents in the turns, only for them to [[RubberBandAI mysteriously gain 300 horsepower]] and catch, pass, and gain several seconds on you in the straights.
*** Or it will pick a car that is within the regulations, but has some [[GameBreaker asshole trait]] making it nearly unbeatable, such as the vacuum-downforced Chapparal 2J. [[note]]In that case, however, this is an aversion. You can avoid having to face the cheating AI by literally playing as it. Why? [[FridgeBrilliance Because it is stupidly easy to make money in this game to the point that you can afford some of the most broken cars in the game with only grinding.]][[/note]]
* ''Full Auto'' ''VideoGame/FullAuto'' for the Xbox 360 suffers from this a bit. RubberBandAI, while prevalent, is not the biggest problem - enemy cars in Career mode are also equipped with what appears to be much, '''MUCH''' stronger armor than the player's vehicle, making blowing them out of the way a time-consuming task. For example, it takes an enemy vehicle approximately 3 rough hits with the hood-mounted shotgun to completely annihilate the player (the same number it takes a player to destroy another player in Multiplayer mode), but it takes the player 5 precise hits to a single side of an AI car ''at minimum'' to take them down. Also, the player's car can completely lose its front armor after hitting only 2 mines dropped by an enemy and explode when hitting the third, but enemy cars can run over multiple mines and suffer no visible damage. They also may or may not be subject to the "Weapon Overheat" period resulting from firing a weapon too rapidly without a break. Factor in the AI cars' exclusive ability to destroy the player simply by ramming them and their unannounced ability to change their driving pattern while the Unwreck function is used (designed for the player to undo mistakes by rewinding time), and it's quite a bit to handle. Fortunately, the AI cars are also busy blasting away at each other, often leaving them damaged enough for the player to swoop in and finish them off.
**
off. The cheating AI seems to be exclusive to Career mode. Multiplayer and Arcade modes appear to give the AI cars the same speed, abilities, and armor as the player (only 3 shots from the shotgun before exploding, 3 mines = death, etc.), but Career mode steps it up with the cheating elements. Very odd...
* On a number of car racing games the opponent drivers are essentially invulnerable. If your car hits theirs they are unaffected while you are sent flying. The AI drivers are driving a preset course and you are not allowed to interfere. The racing side missions in ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'' are an example.
odd...
17th Sep '17 8:43:41 PM Kuruni
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*** To take it up one more agonizing notch, even if you blatantly cheat, the Computer *still* out-cheats you! In the [=PS2=] DB fighting games by Atari, the games would follow a switch-sides method for the tournament after each round. Try and use ye olde Game Shark, or like device? Well, once the game switches sides, the AI now has whatever extras you gave yourself. But wait - there's more. You get your ass kicked in a truly unfair manner, and then the game switches sides again when you continue--and it still keeps the codes for itself--it likes them now.



*** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse2'' removed super armor and infinite Ki, and let you see the enemy's stamina and ki at all times for further assurance that they're not cheating. Except they do anyway; when fighting Frieza and Cooler at the end of the Namek Saga, ''their Stamina regen is jacked up significantly'' to the point that even the FinalBoss can't compare. Meanwhile, the AI can perfectly read player inputs, know when you're holding a button to prepare a Super or Ultimate Skill, and abuse Vanishes, Stamina Breaks and Burst Dashes with perfect timing to the point that using any Ultimate that isn't mostly risk-free will instantly have them Stamina Break you if you didn't break them beforehand.
* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' is very... [[JustForPun guilty]] of this. On top of the usual array of unfair SNKBoss attributes for the "boss" versions of otherwise regular characters--dealing dramatically more and taking dramatically less damage compared to their playable counterparts, doing even the most absurdly impossible-to-input moves ''in the middle of combos'' completely at will, gaining a full bar of tension with a thought, etc.--''all'' AI characters on high enough difficulty settings or close enough to the final match of Arcade mode gain the ability to psychically read controller input. Many characters rely on having a good mix-up game, placing continuous pressure on an opponent until they finally make a mistake in their blocking, and going from there. It works pretty well against humans so long as the attacker doesn't get too predictable. Against the CPU, though, mix-up characters are almost completely useless, as every attack is more or less a polite request for the computer to please consider allowing this next one to actually connect for once. Which is usually denied.

to:

*** ** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse2'' removed super armor and infinite Ki, and let you see the enemy's stamina and ki at all times for further assurance that they're not cheating. Except they do anyway; when fighting Frieza and Cooler at the end of the Namek Saga, ''their Stamina regen is jacked up significantly'' to the point that even the FinalBoss can't compare. Meanwhile, the AI can perfectly read player inputs, know when you're holding a button to prepare a Super or Ultimate Skill, and abuse Vanishes, Stamina Breaks and Burst Dashes with perfect timing to the point that using any Ultimate that isn't mostly risk-free will instantly have them Stamina Break you if you didn't break them beforehand.
* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' is very... [[JustForPun guilty]] of this. this:
**
On top of the usual array of unfair SNKBoss attributes for the "boss" versions of otherwise regular characters--dealing dramatically more and taking dramatically less damage compared to their playable counterparts, doing even the most absurdly impossible-to-input moves ''in the middle of combos'' completely at will, gaining a full bar of tension with a thought, etc.--''all'' AI characters on high enough difficulty settings or close enough to the final match of Arcade mode gain the ability to psychically read controller input. Many characters rely on having a good mix-up game, placing continuous pressure on an opponent until they finally make a mistake in their blocking, and going from there. It works pretty well against humans so long as the attacker doesn't get too predictable. Against the CPU, though, mix-up characters are almost completely useless, as every attack is more or less a polite request for the computer to please consider allowing this next one to actually connect for once. Which is usually denied.



*** The attacks can be fairly easy to memorize, the problem comes when she'll sometimes switch which pattern she's using at the last second, or if the player thinks they're smart enough to simply jump over her, where the patterns never go. Too bad, if you do this, the AI reacts as if you've been hit and they all swarm you.
* Those who played ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSvCChaos'' learned to dislike Goenitz, an [[SNKBoss SNK sub-boss]] with an attack targeting one of four areas on the screen (close, close-mid, mid, far) that always knew exactly where you would be, canceled projectiles, and was ''spammed constantly'', making getting close enough to hit an exercise in frustrating patience.
** In a couple of ways, Goenitz was even worse in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '96'', since he could do desperation moves without restrictions while giving more and receiving less damage to/from the player.
* In ''VideoGame/GodzillaDestroyAllMonstersMelee'', the AI opponents will often head towards powerups that are offscreen, that the player has no idea that they're there.
** Fortunately you can counter this by running in the opposite direction and, if the pickup is far enough away, you'll get the computer stuck against the edge of the camera and unable to reach it. The computer will keep trying to get to the pickup while you're free to chuck buildings at it.

to:

*** The attacks can be fairly easy to memorize, the problem comes when she'll sometimes switch which pattern she's using at the last second, or if the player thinks they're smart enough to simply jump over her, where the patterns never go. Too bad, if you do this, the AI reacts as if you've been hit and they all swarm you.
* Those who played ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSvCChaos'' learned to dislike Goenitz, an [[SNKBoss SNK sub-boss]] with an attack targeting one of four areas on the screen (close, close-mid, mid, far) that always knew exactly where you would be, canceled projectiles, and was ''spammed constantly'', making getting close enough to hit an exercise in frustrating patience.
**
patience. In a couple of ways, Goenitz was even worse in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '96'', since he could do desperation moves without restrictions while giving more and receiving less damage to/from the player.
* In ''VideoGame/GodzillaDestroyAllMonstersMelee'', the AI opponents will often head towards powerups that are offscreen, that the player has no idea that they're there.
**
there. Fortunately you can counter this by running in the opposite direction and, if the pickup is far enough away, you'll get the computer stuck against the edge of the camera and unable to reach it. The computer will keep trying to get to the pickup while you're free to chuck buildings at it.



* ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD took the unusual approach of requiring "inner energy" for all special moves. Theoretically, this forced the player to learn the characters and apply specific strategies in every possible matchup... Except against the AI, which could always execute specials with sheer and utter disregard of its own energy levels.
** Even more, well, insulting, characters have an ability called Insult which allows them to sacrifice one piece of their special gauge to destroy a little more of their opponents. The computer, especially the final boss (''bosses'' in the Sega CD version), is quite fond of repeatedly Insulting you from a distance to render you impotent -- usually shortly before, with a blatantly flashing EMPTY gauge, they execute their ultimate full-gauge-requiring attacks, some of which doing things like rendering the character completely invincible (the final boss(es) have these, naturally). Did we mention if you lose in the final battle, you can't continue?

to:

* ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD took the unusual approach of requiring "inner energy" for all special moves. Theoretically, this forced the player to learn the characters and apply specific strategies in every possible matchup... Except against the AI, which could always execute specials with sheer and utter disregard of its own energy levels.
**
levels. Even more, well, insulting, characters have an ability called Insult which allows them to sacrifice one piece of their special gauge to destroy a little more of their opponents. The computer, especially the final boss (''bosses'' in the Sega CD version), is quite fond of repeatedly Insulting you from a distance to render you impotent -- usually shortly before, with a blatantly flashing EMPTY gauge, they execute their ultimate full-gauge-requiring attacks, some of which doing things like rendering the character completely invincible (the final boss(es) have these, naturally). Did we mention if you lose in the final battle, you can't continue?



* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' suffered this terribly in the '94 and '95 incarnations. There was an ability called "Evade" that, if timed right, allowed the character to dodge attacks. This translated to "The computer is immune to projectiles". And in a callback to ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', getting blocked when you jumped in would lead to an instant throw. '96 pulled Evade completely, replacing it with the trademark "Roll", one of many reasons it's considered the first high point of the series.
** Another nasty SNKBoss advantage is one that the bosses of XI have. In addition to the usual SNK unfairness, the game uses a gauge system that goes up when you hit the opponent and down when they hit you to measure how well you do and decides who wins at time out based on that. The bosses gauge takes an ENORMOUS leap if they so much as brush past you, you however barely make it twitch even if you hit them multiple times. Combined with the fact the timer acts like it is on speed combines to add yet another layer of evil to the mix.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' suffered this terribly in the '94 and '95 incarnations. There was an ability called "Evade" that, if timed right, allowed the character to dodge attacks. This translated to "The computer is immune to projectiles". And in a callback to ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', getting blocked when you jumped in would lead to an instant throw. '96 pulled Evade completely, replacing it with the trademark "Roll", one of many reasons it's considered the first high point of the series.
**
series. Another nasty SNKBoss advantage is one that the bosses of XI have. In addition to the usual SNK unfairness, the game uses a gauge system that goes up when you hit the opponent and down when they hit you to measure how well you do and decides who wins at time out based on that. The bosses gauge takes an ENORMOUS leap if they so much as brush past you, you however barely make it twitch even if you hit them multiple times. Combined with the fact the timer acts like it is on speed combines to add yet another layer of evil to the mix.



** The Tag Team Challanges in DOA Dimensions will make you throw that brand new 3DS right into a wall. Sure, it starts out easy enough to lull you into a false sense of security, but then the madness begins. The opponent AI is damn near PERFECT. With one hit, it can take down almost HALF of your health, whereas if you hit THEM, it's like hitting a brick wall with an inflatable hammer
*** The computer also controls your tag partner...and is worse then ANY noob you could ever face online. Really, its only use is to be a punching bag so you can recover your health. But considering your opponent can usually kill both you AND your tag partner within two seconds, it doesn't help much.
*** Oh, and the fight mechanics don't apply to them. Land a strike through a block? Sure. Counter a strike with a throw? Go for it. Block a throw? Absolutely. You'd love to be able to do that too, wouldn't you? Well too bad.

to:

** The Tag Team Challanges in DOA Dimensions will make you throw that brand new 3DS right into a wall. Sure, it starts out easy enough to lull you into a false sense of security, but then the madness begins. The opponent AI is damn near PERFECT. With one hit, it can take down almost HALF of your health, whereas if you hit THEM, it's like hitting a brick wall with an inflatable hammer
***
hammer. The computer also controls your tag partner...and is worse then ANY noob you could ever face online. Really, its only use is to be a punching bag so you can recover your health. But considering your opponent can usually kill both you AND your tag partner within two seconds, it doesn't help much.
*** Oh, and the fight mechanics don't apply to them. Land a strike through a block? Sure. Counter a strike with a throw? Go for it. Block a throw? Absolutely. You'd love to be able to do that too, wouldn't you? Well too bad.
much.



** Wrestling/{{WWE}} Smackdown Vs Raw 2009's career mode suffers the same issue above when facing the "higher level" wrestlers.



* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}: Blade Of Fate'', the human character can only FlashStep or use RF Special Attacks when they have enough Spiritual Power to do so. The AI opponents have infinite Spiritual Power.
** In ''Bleach: Soul Resurrección'', a character can enter "[[SuperMode Ignition Mode]]" to increase attack power, and from there use an "[[LimitBreak Ignition Attack]]", a powerful attack that completely empties the Ignition Gague. Usually the Ignition Gague can only be filled by causing damage, especially many hits quickly. The computer is not bound by these restrictions, and can enter Ignition Mode and use an Ignition Attack whenever they feel like it, which on harder difficulties they will. It's not unheard of for a computer-controlled character to use an Ignition Attack, and then re-enter Ignition mode ''before the player has even hit the ground'', especially when fighting multiple enemies at once.

to:

* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}: Blade Of Fate'', the human character can only FlashStep or use RF Special Attacks when they have enough Spiritual Power to do so. The AI opponents have infinite Spiritual Power.
**
Power. In ''Bleach: Soul Resurrección'', a character can enter "[[SuperMode Ignition Mode]]" to increase attack power, and from there use an "[[LimitBreak Ignition Attack]]", a powerful attack that completely empties the Ignition Gague. Usually the Ignition Gague can only be filled by causing damage, especially many hits quickly. The computer is not bound by these restrictions, and can enter Ignition Mode and use an Ignition Attack whenever they feel like it, which on harder difficulties they will. It's not unheard of for a computer-controlled character to use an Ignition Attack, and then re-enter Ignition mode ''before the player has even hit the ground'', especially when fighting multiple enemies at once.



*** Don't forget she has autogain on her Heat meter, has very little recovery time on her attacks and can (and will) combo any and all hits into her Distortion Drive, which hits for about 50% life. Bear in mind, this will happen if you fail to block ''even once'', while you will require about 40 minor miracles in a row to beat her.



* Up until ''Vegas'', ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' seemed quite unfair in that the AI could somehow detect you even if you couldn't figure out where it was. And a major problem with the first games was that being spotted once, even if the guy didn't alert his comrades, meant [[TheAllSeeingAI everyone knew where you were]].
** In the original PC trilogy, the AI also had ImprobableAimingSkills: [[ArmorIsUseless no matter what body armor you chose]], a hit was usually deadly because the AI [[BoomHeadshot scored a headshot]] practically every time. And could do it from the other side of the map, with a machine pistol, and ''facing the wrong way''. ''Raven Shield'''s Elite setting is especially cheap, coupled with the ArtificialStupidity of friendly teammates.

to:

* Up until ''Vegas'', ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' seemed quite unfair in that the AI could somehow detect you even if you couldn't figure out where it was. And a major problem with the first games was that being spotted once, even if the guy didn't alert his comrades, meant [[TheAllSeeingAI everyone knew where you were]].
**
were]]. In the original PC trilogy, the AI also had ImprobableAimingSkills: [[ArmorIsUseless no matter what body armor you chose]], a hit was usually deadly because the AI [[BoomHeadshot scored a headshot]] practically every time. And could do it from the other side of the map, with a machine pistol, and ''facing the wrong way''. ''Raven Shield'''s Elite setting is especially cheap, coupled with the ArtificialStupidity of friendly teammates.



*** Though one offender is the ''[[StealthMission Hid]][[ThrowbackLevel den]]'' mission in Modern Warfare 2's Special Ops mode. The main issue with making it through alive is ghillie snipers. Normally this wouldn't be so bad, because you're wearing a ghillie suit yourself, and it's an incredibly bushy area, so it shouldn't be so bad, right? '''''WRONG!''''' These snipers [[ImprobableAimingSkills could hit a gnat resting on a fencepost from ten kilometers away]], and when they aren't moving, which is a lot, are essentially invisible, while they plug bullets into you as if you're wearing high-visibility clothing. And on the off chance you manage to see one due to the glare on the scope, by then it's [[KilledMidSentence too]] [[BoomHeadshot la--]]



** Under normal circumstances, "facestabbing" as a Spy is a rare, [[GoodBadBugs hilarious glitch]]. Spy-bots in the [[ManVersusMachine Mann vs. Machine]] [[TheWarSequence mode]], however, seem capable of facestabbing players ''whenever the hell they want to.'' This starts making more sense when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZpGtx3orK4#t=28s you see how loopy the backstab hitboxes can be]], and take into account the spies know ''exactly'' where these places begin and end. Thankfully averted elsewhere: Just like übered human players, übered bomb carriers (and their medics) aren't immune to the Pyro's airblast. Especially useful if the map has a BottomlessPit, which not even über-bots can be exempted from. And as a nice bonus, that resets the bomb all the way back to the beginning. [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap And you thought MvM would turn Pyros useless]].
** Spy Robots can also backstab Snipers wearing the Razorback. As in, that piece of equipment whose ''sole purpose'' is to ''protect the Sniper from backstabs''.
** Meanwhile, in regular game modes featuring bots, it can be extremely difficult to kill any of them as a sniper, [[TheAllSeeingAI because bots automatically know when they're being targeted, even if you're aiming at their back halfway across the map]]. They'll also stare at disguised enemy Spies, waiting for them to reveal themselves.
** However, any bots who require aim do so with a virtual mouse, and their aim isn't perfect.

to:

** Under normal circumstances, "facestabbing" as a Spy is a rare, [[GoodBadBugs hilarious glitch]]. Spy-bots in the [[ManVersusMachine Mann vs. Machine]] [[TheWarSequence mode]], however, seem capable of facestabbing players ''whenever the hell they want to.'' This starts making more sense when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZpGtx3orK4#t=28s you see how loopy the backstab hitboxes can be]], and take into account the spies know ''exactly'' where these places begin and end. Thankfully averted elsewhere: Just like übered human players, übered bomb carriers (and their medics) aren't immune to the Pyro's airblast. Especially useful if the map has a BottomlessPit, which not even über-bots can be exempted from. And as a nice bonus, that resets the bomb all the way back to the beginning. [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap And you thought MvM would turn Pyros useless]].
**
useless]]. Spy Robots can also backstab Snipers wearing the Razorback. As in, that piece of equipment whose ''sole purpose'' is to ''protect the Sniper from backstabs''.
** Meanwhile, in regular game modes featuring bots, it can be extremely difficult to kill any of them as a sniper, [[TheAllSeeingAI because bots automatically know when they're being targeted, even if you're aiming at their back halfway across the map]]. They'll also stare at disguised enemy Spies, waiting for them to reveal themselves.
** However, any bots who require aim do so with a virtual mouse, and their aim isn't perfect.
backstabs''.
16th Sep '17 10:26:37 PM wingedcatgirl
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* And of course, there would be the time when the computer is on the receiving end of a CurbstompBattle and decide to just blatently cheat by freezing, glitching and crashing the game. Not even Michael Jordan is that sore a loser.
16th Sep '17 10:24:06 PM wingedcatgirl
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!!Specific Examples:

to:

!!Specific Examples:
!!Examples:


Added DiffLines:

[[foldercontrol]]
16th Sep '17 9:45:15 PM Kuruni
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''Note: when adding examples here, please make sure whatever you're planning to claim is ''actually true'', meaning you have hard data saying there is cheating going on, not just some vague feeling that you ''always'' [[{{Franchise/Pokemon}} hurt yourself in confusion]] and the AI ''never'' does. The phenomenon making you feel that way is almost definitely confirmation bias, as any of the various people who have done actual testing with hundreds of data points can tell you.''

''This is not a place to complain about enemies that have skills you don't have, or about how unlucky you are and how many times you missed, or about how hard ThatOneBoss is, or how the computer is actually half decent at some of the game's more advanced maneuvers that you happen to suck at. This is only for scenarios where it would be expected for the player and the AI to be on even footing. For example, in the campaign of a strategy game, it would be natural for the computer to outnumber you and/or have more resources than you -- that's part of the challenge of a campaign. However, in free battle or skirmish mode, a computer starting with more resources than you is usually cheating, since you would expect to be on even footing with the computer (unless you can set what everyone starts with).''

to:

''Note: '''Note:''' when adding examples here, please make sure whatever you're planning to claim is ''actually true'', meaning you have hard data saying there is cheating going on, not just some vague feeling that you ''always'' [[{{Franchise/Pokemon}} hurt yourself in confusion]] and the AI ''never'' does. The phenomenon making you feel that way is almost definitely confirmation bias, as any of the various people who have done actual testing with hundreds of data points can tell you.''

''This This is not a place to complain about enemies that have skills you don't have, or about how unlucky you are and how many times you missed, or about how hard ThatOneBoss is, or how the computer is actually half decent at some of the game's more advanced maneuvers that you happen to suck at. This is only for scenarios where it would be expected for the player and the AI to be on even footing. For example, in the campaign of a strategy game, it would be natural for the computer to outnumber you and/or have more resources than you -- that's part of the challenge of a campaign. However, in free battle or skirmish mode, a computer starting with more resources than you is usually cheating, since you would expect to be on even footing with the computer (unless you can set what everyone starts with).''
with).
16th Sep '17 9:43:43 PM Kuruni
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!!Notable Offenders:

to:

!!Notable Offenders:!!Specific Examples:



[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Civilization]]
* The original VideoGame/{{Civilization}} for the PC has a lot of ways for the computer to get a huge advantage over you:
-->1) Improvements in the Emperor Level are about a third of the cost for the computer.
-->2) Technologies are discovered at alarming rates.
-->3) Wonders can be built almost instantly.
-->4) The computer's caravans are transported instantaneously.
-->5) The computer never has production penalties despite city-wide riots.
-->6) Your Triremes sink if they end their turn too far from shore. Computer controlled ones can sail across the Atlantic with no problem.
-->7) The computer can build spaceships without the required technology
-->Et cetera.
** It also seems that the game tries to force averages to occur. Try using saves to make sure you always win. If your win chance is 50%, your chance of winning the first fight is 50%, right? Right. Second fight (after your unit is healed), displayed chance to win is still 50%--but try saving before it and loading. Your chances are closer to 25%. Winning a third fight in a row is likely to have even worse odds--but the displayed chance to win is still 50%. The question exists, does it work in reverse also? Sacrifice a dozen or so units for a run of good luck?
*** What you're seeing here is a bug in the game due to a programmer who doesn't understand probability theory. The displayed battle odds are calculated by the naive method of multiplying each unit's hitpoints by the odds of winning a single round of combat, and using that ratio as the odds of winning the battle. The actual odds of winning, based on the battle mechanics, are much harder to calculate, and can deviate significantly from the displayed odds: your "95% victory" fight might actually be a "0.1% victory". Once you do them right, though, it becomes clear that the computer isn't cheating in battle, just [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics lying through statistics]].
*** For context, units fight multiple rounds within a single combat until one dies. Thus winning one round in actuality only reduces the opponent by a certain amount of HP. So while a unit with low life may have a 50% chance of winning a round, if they can be killed with one hit, the first hit they take in combat (pretty likely at 50%) will kill them.
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' sequels, the game manual actually details exactly how much the computer cheats and in what areas at various difficulty levels.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJcuQQ1eWWI Here]] is a video that explains the AI cheating of Civilization 3 and 4 in more depth (25 minutes in), as well as the reasons they were designed that way.
*** There's also an example of HoistByHisOwnPetard. In Civ 3, the computer can see through the fog of war and always attacks the city with the least defense. By moving units just outside of a city faraway, you can trick the AI into marching back and forth without attacking any cities.
** You can't see strategic resources on the map in Civ 3 until you have the skills to use them. The AI can see them all right from the start of the game though, and will make an effort to build cities next to them to give itself an advantage later on.
*** Often, the AI will have building towns in the middle of the desert for oil as a very important priority during the expansion phase.
*** In Civ 4 this also works for you, the blue rings for city suggestions on your settler often uses the resources around to make it a good choice. In really rare occasions it will suggest empty fields, just to find iron, coal, uranium and oil once you have the appropriate techs.
** Also in Civ 3, the [=AI=] have their production phase after their turn instead of at the start of the next turn; or more precisely, you always have the first turn, which means the turn order goes You->AI's->Your Production Phase->AI's Production Phases->You Again, which means that they can hurry units and have them produced before your next move, while you can't, as the production phase for the units you hurried won't occur until after the AI takes their turn. You can tell when they did this because they haven't had the chance to fortify the unit yet. Sometimes, while you're fighting an AI civ, one of the cities you took will revolt back to them during your production phase, which spawns a defensive unit in that city- and they'll draft two more defensive units and rush a fourth that still completes before your turn.
** If you cheat so that you can control the enemy's cities, you will see that despite having far inferior cities, they have ''huge'' commerce and production bonuses, making them far better than yours.
** However, in the interest of fairness, the ''player'' can cheat mechanically too -- one of the ways lower difficulty levels are made easier is by giving the player free Happiness and Health.
* Computers in Civ4 will always know what you have access to, what you have explored, etc, and use this to become massive cheapskates in trade. If you have no access to horses and thus decided not to research Horseback Riding for awhile, the computer will do everything in their power to push the technology down your throat while making off with as much of your gold and technology as they can. And you can be sure that the computer will ''never'' offer their world map at a halfway decent price unless you've already explored everything they have.
** For example, the AI will pop up with a ton of trade requests for your world map if you find a second continent. While a smart human would know you would find it some dozen turns after you sent that galley off to the side of the map, they wouldn't know ''when'' you found and mapped a good portion of the new world with the crazy precision the AI does.
** If the computer uses nuclear weapons against the player or another AI then they take the "you nuked our friend" relationship modifier. If the player uses nuclear weapons they get a reputation hit with EVERY civilization, even their worst enemies.
* A subtle one in ''[=Civ5=]'': You can't place a new city within 4 hexes of a pre-existing one. Your computer opponents? [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules Don't have that problem]].
** More on Civ 5: on the nice side, no matter how rampantly the AI cheats on higher difficulties, they will never build wonders at accelerated speed; not even on Deity (although their other advantages will certainly help them build wonders sooner). On the not-so-nice side, the computer's happiness and maintenance costs are always as though the computer were playing on Chieftain ("Beginner"), so even if you're playing on Warlord ("Easy"), they still have an edge for happiness and gold. This is pretty obvious; press F9 on the first turn and your civ will already be in dead last for approval. Ever wonder why an AI can expand so much faster than you when you're playing on "Normal"? Wonder no more. Also an example of TheComputerIsALyingBastard since the game implies that Normal is fair.
** Ever settle a city nowhere near an AI player's empire, yet still get the "they covet lands you hold" message under diplomacy? Or how convenient the placing of things like Oil and Uranium are within enemy territory? That's because all the resources in the game, including future ones that haven't been revealed yet, are pre-determined upon map generation. The AI players know from the get-go where the best resources in the game will be, and settle their cities accordingly.
** Another one for Civ V, the computer can have ships that cannot cross oceans on deep sea tiles, like Civ 1. This creates a problem in Gods and Kings if you use a pirate ship to capture the enemy Trireme and then find you can't move it next turn.
* VideoGame/FreeCiv, the open source version on Civilisation has the AI settings "Experimental" and "Cheating".
* Civilization Revolution
** On Emperor, the AI gets a 20% handicap on all costs (unit production, science needed for techs), which increases to 40% on Deity
** The AI can teleport units throughout the Fog of War (even previously uncovered). Explicitly. The devs did this to save on processing resources for consoles, but it's quite annoying to have armies marching out of ANY tile you don't currently have vision of at the moment.
** Boats also count as outside your vision, as you can't see what's in them. The AI uses them like conduits to vomit units into your borders no matter how far away their cities actually are.
** AI culture is much more powerful and supercedes yours in almost all cases unless you specifically crank out culture buildings/wonders. An AI with only the Palace can push 3-ring borders just a few tens of turn into the game.

to:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Civilization]]
[[folder: Fighting Games]]
* While the AI in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' and ''Brawl'' isn't of Rubber Band variety, it still can [[TheAllSeeingAI always see everything in the stage]].
**
The original VideoGame/{{Civilization}} for the PC has computer also knows what effect clocks will have. If you see a lot of ways for clock, and don't see the computer to get a huge advantage over you:
-->1) Improvements in the Emperor Level are about a third of the cost
gunning for the computer.
-->2) Technologies are discovered at alarming rates.
-->3) Wonders
it, when you pick it up, it will slow you down. The same can be built almost instantly.
-->4) The computer's caravans
said for Poke Balls and assist trophies.
** Items, particularly the Dragoon Parts in ''Brawl'',
are transported instantaneously.
-->5) The computer never has production penalties despite city-wide riots.
-->6) Your Triremes sink if they end their turn too far from shore. Computer controlled ones can sail across the Atlantic with no problem.
-->7) The computer can build spaceships without the required technology
-->Et cetera.
** It also seems that the game tries
easier to force averages to occur. Try using saves to make sure you always win. If your win chance drop when a human player is 50%, your chance of winning the first fight is 50%, right? Right. Second fight (after your unit is healed), displayed chance to win is still 50%--but try saving before it and loading. Your chances are closer to 25%. Winning a third fight in a row is likely to have even worse odds--but the displayed chance to win is still 50%. The question exists, does it work in reverse also? Sacrifice a dozen or so units for a run of good luck?
*** What you're seeing here is a bug in the game due to a programmer who doesn't understand probability theory. The displayed battle odds are calculated by the naive method of multiplying each unit's hitpoints by the odds of winning a single round of combat, and using that ratio as the odds of winning the battle. The actual odds of winning, based on the battle mechanics, are much harder to calculate, and can deviate significantly from the displayed odds: your "95% victory" fight might actually be a "0.1% victory". Once you do them right, though, it becomes clear that the computer isn't cheating in battle, just [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics lying through statistics]].
*** For context, units fight multiple rounds within a single combat until one dies. Thus winning one round in actuality only reduces the opponent by a certain amount of HP. So while a unit with low life may have a 50% chance of winning a round, if they can be killed with one hit, the first hit they take in combat (pretty likely at 50%) will kill them.
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' sequels, the game manual actually details exactly how much the computer cheats and in what areas at various difficulty levels.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJcuQQ1eWWI Here]] is a video that explains the AI cheating of Civilization 3 and 4 in more depth (25 minutes in), as well as the reasons they were designed that way.
*** There's also an example of HoistByHisOwnPetard. In Civ 3,
attacked, but the computer can see hold onto them through the fog of war and always attacks the city with the least defense. By moving units just outside of a city faraway, lot more attacks. Don't be surprised if you can trick drop your beam sword after every single hit you take, then the AI into marching back grabs it and forth without attacking any cities.
** You can't see strategic resources on the map in Civ 3 until you have the skills to use them. The AI can see them all right from the start of the game though, and will make an effort to build cities next to them to give itself an advantage later on.
*** Often, the AI will have building towns in the middle of the desert for oil as a very important priority during the expansion phase.
*** In Civ 4 this also works for you, the blue rings for city suggestions on your settler often uses the resources around to make it a good choice. In really rare occasions it will suggest empty fields, just to find iron, coal, uranium and oil once you have the appropriate techs.
** Also in Civ 3, the [=AI=] have their production phase after their turn instead of at the start of the next turn; or more precisely, you always have the first turn, which means the turn order goes You->AI's->Your Production Phase->AI's Production Phases->You Again, which means that they can hurry units and have them produced before your next move, while you can't, as the production phase for the units you hurried won't occur until after the AI takes their turn. You can tell when they did this because they haven't had the chance to fortify the unit yet. Sometimes, while you're fighting an AI civ, one of the cities you took will revolt back to them during your production phase, which spawns a defensive unit in that city- and they'll draft two more defensive units and rush a fourth that still completes before your turn.
** If you cheat so that you can control the enemy's cities, you will see that despite having far inferior cities, they have ''huge'' commerce and production bonuses, making them far better than yours.
** However, in the interest of fairness, the ''player'' can cheat mechanically too -- one of the ways lower difficulty levels are made easier is by giving the player free Happiness and Health.
* Computers in Civ4 will always know what you have access to, what you have explored, etc, and use this to become massive cheapskates in trade. If you have no access to horses and thus decided not to research Horseback Riding for awhile, the computer will do everything in their power to push the technology down your throat while making off with as much of your gold and technology as they can. And you can be sure that the computer will
''never'' offer lets go.
** Throughout the series, changing a CPU's difficulty level changes three parameters: how aggressive they are, how likely they are to avoid your attacks, and
their world map at reaction time. In both versions of ''[=SSB4=]'', a halfway decent price unless you've level 9 CPU has a reaction time of ''one frame'' , meaning that the instant you input the button combination for a certain attack, they're already explored everything air-dodging out of harm's way. Meanwhile, of course, they're free to whale on you as much as they want.
** Picking up the hammer item will cause the player to only be able to move and jump for a duration, during which they will rapidly swing it back and forth dealing heavy damage to nearby opponents. Getting sent offstage will ensure the wielder dies if the effect doesn't wear off fast enough to allow recovery moves. The CPU however will invariably drop it on its own if they are placed into a position where they will fall to their death if they hold on to it. In addition, the hammer's head will have a random but small chance of breaking off, leaving you prone to attacks until it wears off. The AI, however, is allowed to drop it under this circumstance too.
* In the ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series, there are moves known as "charge moves" which require holding the joystick in a certain direction for a short period. The computer, however, doesn't have to do this and can often perform a charge move in the middle of moving in the ''opposite'' direction, such as using Blanka's charge-back roll attack while ''walking forward''. This also applies to "spin" moves (moves which require a 180 degree, 360, or more cycle of joystick motion). Most obvious the 3,000th time Zangief hits you with a full-strength spinning piledriver (the "air" version, triggered by any upwards joystick click, is approximately 3/4 the damage of the ground version).
** The charge move behavior has been fixed in later Capcom fighters, such as Vampire Savior. But perhaps as a throwback to the cheating AI in Street Fighter 2, Baby Bonnie Hood has a super move that enables her to use her high-damaging charge attack, Smile & Missile, without charging (replacing her normal punch attacks) for a short period of time.
** In ''VideoGame/StreetFighterTheMovie'' ([[RecursiveAdaptation the game]] [[Film/StreetFighter of the movie]] [[VideoGame/StreetFighterII of the game]]), when fighting M. Bison at the end, there was a fairly high chance that if the player was winning, Bison would stop taking damage from player attacks, or insta-kill the player with a weak attack, or the player would take damage from his own attacks.
** Another from Street Fighter II: AI opponents could deliver a barrage of crouching kicks at lightning speed. Fortunately for the player, the AI will usually only connect once, which sends the player's fighter flying away from the opponent.
* In the ''MortalKombat'' arcade series, the computer player often blatantly cheats. Here are some gems for ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2''.
** On ''any'' match after the first few, you cannot throw the computer unless it's stunned or immobilized. It would ''always'' throw you instead. In early revisions, it would even throw you when ''it'' was incapacitated. You could freeze the [=CPU=] solid with your ice ball, but if you tried to throw it, it would throw you back '''''while still looking frozen'''''. An opponent dazed for "FinishHim" If you accidentally did a throw, he'd ''still'' throw you back. And if that took you to no life, ''you'd lose''. Absolutely hilarious, unless you are the one it happened to.
** Whenever you did Scorpion's screen side shifting teleport, the computer would turn around and send a projectile your way... before you even left your side of the screen. Humans can't do this, but actually have to wait for you to wrap around before they turn around. However, if your screen wrapping teleport failed because you were backed into the corner... it would ''still'' turn around and fire the other way! Unless you were playing against a character with a really fast projectile recovery, this resulted in you getting a free chance to harpoon the computer. HilarityEnsues.
** Heaven forbid your feet leave the ground. You want to jump forward? They ''will'' jump kick you out of the air. You want to jump back? Prepare to eat a projectile. (Though those who could warp attack like Smoke and Scorpion could jump back, cancel into the warp and smack the computer silly when they inevitably fireballed).
** In ''VideoGame/MortalKombat3'', Kano and Liu Kang could pull their special charging moves almost instantly, sometimes several times in succession. Liu Kang could do several bicycle attacks and then finish you with a combo. Kano could do his spinning attack twice, and sometimes when you were in mid-air.
** One textbook case vessel of the trope and a bane to most players is Jade in [=UMK3=] who activates her invincibility technique ''the instant'' you throw a projectile at her. It doesn't help that when she activates this, she actually runs at you in the instant she does without any warning whatsoever and devastates you with her uber-long combo with no resistance and does so with impeccable timing.
** Some more things that are painfully obvious are that occasionally, when you're in the middle of a combo, the AI will throw you before you finish it. Naturally, this is not normally possible. Another case is that if you get them with a spear/hook from Scorpion or Smoke, then attempt to jump over them, they'll attack you while they should still be stunned. Finally, in some situations, the AI will kick you or block your attacks in an Endurance match. They'll do this when they're supposed to be down and the second fighter is onscreen, by the way.
** ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'' (2011) lives up to its predecessors in cheating bastardness. Enemies can counter your moves the INSTANT you throw them and can seemingly block EVERYTHING you throw at times, but that isn't the worst part. The worst part is the bosses. If a boss throws an attack of ANY kind, he becomes immune to being stunned. You jump kick Kintaro in the face while both of you are airborne? Too bad he just started his air throw, so you're getting slammed in the ground. And in Challenge tower levels where there are random powerups being dropped you can almost guarantee that they will be dropped behind the CPU, ESPECIALLY if the CPU is near death.
*** Not to mention, the absolute pain in the ass that is [[BigBad Shao Kahn]]. Most of his attacks are unblockable, though he can block the player's attacks without actually needing to block with his arms. He is capable of unleashing health-bar killing attack strings that are unavoidable, unbreakable, and unblockable once started, and his X-ray attack can take out half of the player's health-bar. Compounding this is that he's ''[[LightningBruiser ridiculously fast]]'' and is usually (but not always) ImmuneToFlinching, making him a boss who can take you out in a matter of seconds!
* ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'' games have the bad habit of allowing the computer controlled opponent to recover or receive random power-ups in a duel...where there is no feasible manner in which they could have obtained these items, as there are no boxes or dead enemy soldiers in duel mode.
** And then we have DynastyWarriorsOnline. Let's not beat around the bush, the computers cheat like a Mississippi gambler(no offense to Mississippi), but a sack of bricks is smarter than than the A.I. (where Mississippi outshines the computer). They collect resources from no source at all, and you can very visibly see while beating them up as it alerts you when they pick up flasks (needed for in battle upgrades). On the other hand this time it's justified because the A.I. simplemindedly pursues one goal: capturing bases. Bases don't give anything until you capture them and even then it's health regeneration, so it balances out.
*** Also, musou generals. These characters, the original cast of the dynasty warriors game from 5, don't show up normally. But when they do, they are difficult. They use their original movesets, which is (aside from a few choice weapons) impossible for players, and they have ungodly stats. They have high health, high defense, high attack, high damage. This makes them capable of killing all but tanks in one or two hits. Additionally, they have high flinch resistance, which means you can't prevent them from attacking by knocking them around. This makes them very hard to defeat without using a weapon with a build designed around it. This would be much worse if not for, again, the fact that they only show up on special occasions. Thankfully, unlike players, you only have to beat them once in a match. After that, they're gone for good.
** The empires series. Pretty much every game has at least one advantage the player will never
have.
*** DW4E gives you a maximum of 10 officers and 10 Lieutenants. Your enemies? 3 officers and 3 Lieutenants for every territory they have. On the flip side, you never lose your officer maximum. even if you're down to one territory.
*** DW6E has enemies never lack the troops they need. Even if you taunt them for years at a time. The only time it will be ungodly unfair in your favor is if your officers are several levels above theirs.
*** DW8E Is actually pretty fair. but it does do a lot to keep you from winning in anything except battle. Using your various strategies and tactics out of battle will never cause a kingdom to collapse even when it should. Using isolate to cause the ruler to remove every single officer under him will only cause him to take on a free officer for the sake of having more than one character in the A.I. kingdom. Otherwise, the game is pretty good about not giving the computer access to anything that will give them an unwarranted advantage.
*** ''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors 2 Empires'' have enemy officers rise in levels at ungodly speed. [[FridgeLogic Even if they never fight anyone.]]
** In the main games, enemies will sometimes reappear in the same battlefield. While it's sometimes justified via story (Meng Huos seven defeats), some are not (Zhang Liao has reappeared on the battlefield).
** Sometimes your strongest general manages to fall to a footsoldier just because you didn't get there in time. And that same general, on another faction's story, manages to endure FIVE WAVES OF ENEMIES in that same map.
** Lu FUCKING Bu! Every time he appears you can only think "I'm doomed!", as he takes down your allies one by one. But when you get to play as him... He's not that strong. Yet he is ALWAYS the strongest one when used by the CPU.
** Inversion with Tadakatsu Honda. He is a decent challenge in the hands of the CPU. But for a player using them? It's like a walk in the park with a walking brick wall with a library of powerful moves! And that is not even getting to his Special Actions!
* ''Franchise/DragonBall'' {{licensed game}}s have this during story missions. For instance, some characters in later stages are programmed to ''automatically'' dodge most combo attacks (like throwing your enemy in the air and teleporting to hit them up there, more than one energy attack, etc.). This becomes a problem in levels where you can get a RingOut. Because the enemy will doubtless be able to break your guard and counterattack whenever he feels like, you'll be easily knocked out the ring by him, while he can simply decide not to be hurt by your attacks.
** Another source of shenanigans are [[TeleportSpam ki teleports]]. Its esentially a counter that will consume an energy bar for teleporting behind the attacker and smack him on the noggin. First off, the smack can be cancelled into a combo of your choice; but then the AI will [[ComputersAreFast immediately pull them off]] wherever a human player has to first input guard, and then the combo. Second, should you do a ki teleport, the AI will inmediatly follow up with another one, and another one, and ANOTHER one, so long as they come up on top. Doesn't help that sometimes the AI will cheat and use less energy per teleport to guarantee getting the last laugh.
*** To take it up one more agonizing notch, even if you blatantly cheat, the Computer *still* out-cheats you! In the [=PS2=] DB fighting games by Atari, the games would follow a switch-sides method for the tournament after each round. Try and use ye olde Game Shark, or like device? Well, once the game switches sides, the AI now has whatever extras you gave yourself. But wait - there's more. You get your ass kicked in a truly unfair manner, and then the game switches sides again when you continue--and it still keeps the codes for itself--it likes them now.
** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ Supersonic Warriors 2'', at the end of Mania mode. Throughout the 20 match mode, the player will automatically lose any special attack BeamOWar animation. But for the last 10 machtes, the computer adds two or three of the below tricks. For three of the last six matches, it then pits the player's team against one opponent (Cell, then Broly, and in the final match SS Goku), who has access to about a half-dozen AI exclusive skills, including:
*** A shield to block ''everything'' that can last as long as the AI wants. They can't do anything while it's active, but since they don't need to guard or gather energy, and they have other attack buffs (see below), this just means that the player is lulled into gathering energy so the computer can attack at a moment's notice.
*** Special moves can be spammed at no energy cost, meaning gathered Ki is only used for their ultimate attacks. They can also be done repeatedly, interrupting each other, and with no lag.
For example, Broly's giant ball projectile, the strongest projectile in the game, that when spammed can Wombo Combo even another Broly.
*** Ultimate techniques become spiteful overkill for you ''almost'' killing them.
*** Instant teleportation to the space directly behind where you're attacking, as soon as you release that attack. Even without this, the characters can move more quickly than any other character in the game.
*** Base skill enhancements such as absurd speed, counter beams and triple throw range. For the Goku fight, theses enhancements, and ''all'' hitboxes, are doubled again. This results in a regular Kamehameha taking up most of the screen and killing most characters.
** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse'' was pretty bad about its cheating AI, mainly due to the fact that while players had Ki or Stamina drain for transformations,
the AI (who only transform when a mission makes them do so) never run out; this is bad in late game quests that liberally throw Super Saiyans at you [[OhCrap who have infinite Ki and know how to use it.]] While they suffered ArtificialStupidity due to willingly wasting their Stamina on evasive skills and vanishes, they also often packed Super Armor, effectively making them unflinching no matter how hard you hit them as they smack you back.
*** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse2'' removed super armor and infinite Ki, and let you see the enemy's stamina and ki at all times for further assurance that they're not cheating. Except they do anyway; when fighting Frieza and Cooler at the end of the Namek Saga, ''their Stamina regen is jacked up significantly'' to the point that even the FinalBoss can't compare. Meanwhile, the AI can perfectly read player inputs, know when you're holding a button to prepare a Super or Ultimate Skill, and abuse Vanishes, Stamina Breaks and Burst Dashes with perfect timing to the point that using any Ultimate that isn't mostly risk-free
will pop up instantly have them Stamina Break you if you didn't break them beforehand.
* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' is very... [[JustForPun guilty]] of this. On top of the usual array of unfair SNKBoss attributes for the "boss" versions of otherwise regular characters--dealing dramatically more and taking dramatically less damage compared to their playable counterparts, doing even the most absurdly impossible-to-input moves ''in the middle of combos'' completely at will, gaining a full bar of tension
with a ton thought, etc.--''all'' AI characters on high enough difficulty settings or close enough to the final match of trade requests Arcade mode gain the ability to psychically read controller input. Many characters rely on having a good mix-up game, placing continuous pressure on an opponent until they finally make a mistake in their blocking, and going from there. It works pretty well against humans so long as the attacker doesn't get too predictable. Against the CPU, though, mix-up characters are almost completely useless, as every attack is more or less a polite request for your world map the computer to please consider allowing this next one to actually connect for once. Which is usually denied.
** There is also, notably, Boss I-No from Guilty Gear XX -- she happens to have a boss-only move (which has recently been added to the player moveset, but not in the game she's a boss in) called 'Megalomania' which spams heart-shaped projectiles, and
if you find so much as graze one the entire swarm will mug you. It has three ranges -- one that's fairly easy to dodge, one that's kind of like a second continent. While a wave and needs to be walked through, and one that fills the entire screen in front of her. The obvious solution to that last one might be to block or to leap over and behind her before she lets it go . . . but tell that to the guy who's freaking out at the sight of innumerable 'warning' signs covering 90% of the screen (the attack, it should be noted, is kind enough to tell you where it's going to hit).
*** The attacks can be fairly easy to memorize, the problem comes when she'll sometimes switch which pattern she's using at the last second, or if the player thinks they're
smart human would know enough to simply jump over her, where the patterns never go. Too bad, if you do this, the AI reacts as if you've been hit and they all swarm you.
* Those who played ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSvCChaos'' learned to dislike Goenitz, an [[SNKBoss SNK sub-boss]] with an attack targeting one of four areas on the screen (close, close-mid, mid, far) that always knew exactly where
you would find it some dozen turns after you sent be, canceled projectiles, and was ''spammed constantly'', making getting close enough to hit an exercise in frustrating patience.
** In a couple of ways, Goenitz was even worse in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '96'', since he could do desperation moves without restrictions while giving more and receiving less damage to/from the player.
* In ''VideoGame/GodzillaDestroyAllMonstersMelee'', the AI opponents will often head towards powerups
that galley off are offscreen, that the player has no idea that they're there.
** Fortunately you can counter this by running in the opposite direction and, if the pickup is far enough away, you'll get the computer stuck against the edge of the camera and unable to reach it. The computer will keep trying to get
to the side pickup while you're free to chuck buildings at it.
* If your attack is blocked by the computer in ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', the computer ''will'' throw you. Doesn't matter what difficulty level, or how strong the attack and the subsequent blockstun is - the computer will throw you.
* ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD took the unusual approach of requiring "inner energy" for all special moves. Theoretically, this forced the player to learn the characters and apply specific strategies in every possible matchup... Except against the AI, which could always execute specials with sheer and utter disregard of its own energy levels.
** Even more, well, insulting, characters have an ability called Insult which allows them to sacrifice one piece of their special gauge to destroy a little more of their opponents. The computer, especially the final boss (''bosses'' in the Sega CD version), is quite fond of repeatedly Insulting you from a distance to render you impotent -- usually shortly before, with a blatantly flashing EMPTY gauge, they execute their ultimate full-gauge-requiring attacks, some of which doing things like rendering the character completely invincible (the final boss(es) have these, naturally). Did we mention if you lose in the final battle, you can't continue?
* The SNES game ''Dragon: the Bruce Lee Story'' probably deserves a mention. Whether or not the Demon with the halberd represents Bruce Lee's historically unalterable death, it's almost impossible to beat it.
* In that same vein, Richard Wong in the ''VideoGame/PsychicForce'' games can become unbeatable in a fight by spamming his magically-appearing sword move.
* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' suffered this terribly in the '94 and '95 incarnations. There was an ability called "Evade" that, if timed right, allowed the character to dodge attacks. This translated to "The computer is immune to projectiles". And in a callback to ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', getting blocked when you jumped in would lead to an instant throw. '96 pulled Evade completely, replacing it with the trademark "Roll", one of many reasons it's considered the first high point
of the map, series.
** Another nasty SNKBoss advantage is one that the bosses of XI have. In addition to the usual SNK unfairness, the game uses a gauge system that goes up when you hit the opponent and down when
they hit you to measure how well you do and decides who wins at time out based on that. The bosses gauge takes an ENORMOUS leap if they so much as brush past you, you however barely make it twitch even if you hit them multiple times. Combined with the fact the timer acts like it is on speed combines to add yet another layer of evil to the mix.
* ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}} 5'''s Jinpachi Mishima was a great example of this trope. He had The Stomp, an auto-stun move that didn't do damage but left your character floating and unable to block for at least seven seconds, an eternity in a fighting game. This was even worse in Dark Resurrection, when the computer learned how to do juggles with three signature uppercuts in a row, which took off about half your health. The version of the character given to the player, of course, did not have nearly as much priority for the stomp, which also had to be timed with the enemy attack (unlike the AI version which could just be done whenever).
** Jinpachi also gets a few 85%-95% damage attacks, which he will chain along with a teleporting backstep, which in the highest difficulty activates when an attack that would definitely hit is made by the player, it does it by reading controller inputs, but only at the highest difficulty level.
** In a fighting game basically devoid of projectiles, Jinpachi has fireballs and teleports. The teleports are bad enough, since they're basically instantaneous. But the fireballs? Dear Lord. Unblockable, unjumpable, unduckable. He can toss them out with no charge-up and no cool-down. That means that, even if you get smart, and try to sidestep, ''he'll just keep shooting until you take the hit.'' Of course, they do about 50% damage.
** Tekken 6's Azazel wasn't quite as bad, but had one very specific cheap cheat trick: he blocks while attacking. ''While attacking''. Normally, characters are vulnerable when performing an attack, and an opponent can interrupt them by landing the proper hit on them first. The only way to reliably hit Azazel is to get behind him and hit him while his back is turned, where he can't (usually) defend.
** To be slightly more specific, Azazel is twice your height, and you hit him in the legs when you attack. And his legs can block while his upper body attacks. It's still a violation of what has been a universal rule of Tekken until right then, and insanely frustrating. (To note: most previous Tekken games had bosses that where not too ridiculously powerful to be made available for playabler use, and who followed all the same basic rules that every other character did. Tekkens five and six where the first games to have bosses that where too obscenely powerful to give to players, or in Tekken 6's case, that didn't even follow some of the basic rules of the game.)
** ''Tekken Tag Tournament 2'' makes things much worse with the return of Jun Kazama and Unknown. Jun isn't anything threatening really, so long as you're careful. But those stupid Attack Reversals can be annoying, especially since Reversals are rarely used by the AI. Unknown however is even more fucking annoying with her many penchants to do a handful of things to interrupt your rhythm: Jinpachi's stun, her branches, her Attack Reversal and that dangerous [[OneHitKill portal move]]. That's not counting her increased health and quick regeneration.
** [[RubberBandAI And don't even think about building a winning streak.]] The computer ''will'' use unavoidable/unblockable attacks, use moves from impossible positions, move/attack faster than you, instantly use moves that require human players to execute a complex command, do combos that are impossible for the player, read your controller inputs and counters you immediately, and become impossible to fake out to punish you for it.
* By Namco, same as ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur'' has been pretty fair for the most part. There are the occasional moments when the enemy moves faster than a human, but still feels beatable. Then there's ''Broken Destiny'' and the introduction of [[LethalJokeCharacter Dampierre]]. ''All'' his moves look like feints and/or mistakes, don't deal a lot of damage, but have a nasty habit of stun-locking you, as well as many moves that are just plain annoying. An extremely devoted player can make him the deadliest fighter on the planet.
** Rock got a similar annoyance upgrade. He is slightly faster than his ''SCIV'' console counterpart and has an arsenal of grabs that can get you while your down or ''midair'', and the AI's ''very'' good at chaining them back-to-back for maximum frustration potential.
** In the original, Cervantes and Souledge have an attack called 'Self-Destruction' (renamed Geo De Rey in later installments); when the player uses it, it eats up 1/3 of their weapon gauge. The computer can decide arbitrarily if this applies to it or not; occasonally for Cervantes, hardly ever for Souledge. Souledge's version also has the advantage of controlling exactly when he launches, thus making it a nightmare when he starts spamming it, which is often, but you can control that too, so that's ok. It doesn't help that they (especially the latter) often get unbreakable weapons too while they suffer as much as everyone else when you control them, so good luck trying to disarm them. As the weapon gauge is never used again in such a fashion, it is no longer an issue from Soul Calibur Onwards.
* In the Xbox remake of ''[[VideoGame/DeadOrAlive Dead or Alive 2]]'', if you are playing Hayabusa (yes [[VideoGame/NinjaGaiden that one]]), Ein will block and counter pretty much every move that you ever make.
** The Tag Team Challanges in DOA Dimensions will make you throw that brand new 3DS right into a wall. Sure, it starts out easy enough to lull you into a false sense of security, but then the madness begins. The opponent AI is damn near PERFECT. With one hit, it can take down almost HALF of your health, whereas if you hit THEM, it's like hitting a brick wall with an inflatable hammer
*** The computer also controls your tag partner...and is worse then ANY noob you could ever face online. Really, its only use is to be a punching bag so you can recover your health. But considering your opponent can usually kill both you AND your tag partner within two seconds, it doesn't help much.
*** Oh, and the fight mechanics don't apply to them. Land a strike through a block? Sure. Counter a strike with a throw? Go for it. Block a throw? Absolutely. You'd love to be able to do that too,
wouldn't know ''when'' you? Well too bad.
** In DOA 5, it gets even worse once
you found and mapped a good portion of get to the new world with last four difficulties. You will be countered out of every string you try, usually by the crazy precision second hit before the AI does.
springs into a combo that damages at least half your health. There are ways around this, but once you get to survival mode, good luck. All four courses require you to defeat 100 opponents, in a row, with one health bar.
* In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaJudgment'', Dracula WILL put his back to the screen, and thus you will not see what attack he is going to make.
* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}: The Broken Bond'', the computer is seemingly able to use the Rage Mode (which speeds them up and makes them take no damage from anything but damage-dealing jutsus) in the middle of a combo.
** Nevermind that if you make one mistake you get totally owned. They'll juggle you, never letting you even block. If the computer uses nuclear weapons against makes a mistake it doesn't matter because you have to have pretty much perfect timing to hit them at that moment anyway. Not to mention that they'll almost ALWAYS be able to charge up their jutsu but you'll never get even one chance.
** The ''VideoGame/NarutoClashOfNinja'' series avoided this for the most part, usual computer tendencies aside. Then English releases began to be developed by [[AmericanKirbyIsHardcore American developers instead]], and now we have story mode enemies who have no stagger animations and PerfectPlayAI mindsets- sometimes in 2 on 1 matches ''against you''. These aren't even optional challenges- you HAVE to kill these people to proceed. The ''optional'' challenges involve similar things, only with the difficulty turned UpToEleven by ''better'' AI.
** The Grandpa Gen challenges in ''NarutoShippudenUltimateNinjaStorm2''. Especially the Chiyo and Jiraiya fights. Both have insanely high attack and defenses, and can either poison you (Chiyo) or regain health (Jiraiya).
** [[Manga/{{Naruto}} Naruto Ultimate Ninja Heroes 3]] has this in four distinct types.
*** Some battles as already mentioned are usually 1 (You) VS two/three, which means one attacks, one charges their chakra, then switch. Repeat until death.
*** Sometimes when you attack the computer it just goes through them, obviously this doesnít happen to you. It also lets them set up an (Unblockable) attack.
*** Tactics like continuous healing work twice as well and as fast as they do for you.
* The first ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' game was very guilty of this: The CPU could knock you out in as little as 2 hits/attacks, dizzy you repeatedly, connect more hits with the same attacks you used, stun you for more time than you could, or ''all of the above at the same time''.
* ''VideoGame/SuperGodzilla'' for the Super Nintendo did this against, well, pretty much everyone. Your own fighting spirit (a measure of how strong your techniques are) rises pretty slowly, compared to the UFO which is nearly permanently at maximum, or Mechagodzilla, who can go from nothing to max in a heartbeat, and teleport-body-slam you in the process. He will then use eye lasers just to mess with you. If you want to pull off the killer moves with a full bar, you absolutely need the booster item to fill it faster, because the enemy will hit you first otherwise.
* ''Wrestling/{{TNA}} iMPACT!'' the game. Anyone who is an established wrestler will automatically be twice as good as you, no matter who you choose. Certain matches in story mode can consist of you spending 90% of the match beating the hell out of them, only for them to come out of nowhere with enough counters to use a special move, hit it once, and win.
** Wrestling/{{WWE}} Smackdown Vs Raw 2009's career mode suffers the same issue above when facing the "higher level" wrestlers.
* In ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'', the AI also ignores equipment and accessory rules. Every piece of regular equipment (swords, shields, etc) has a level requirement that your character must meet in order to equip it, but almost every AI opponent will be wearing at least one item above their level. Accessories work somewhat differently. They are ranked from D to Star. The higher the rank, the fewer of that accessory you can use at the same time. Many AI will have three or four of the same Star-ranked accessory.
** Oddly enough, though, because of the way equipment was changed for the sequel[[note]]Equipment only has "tiered" requirements: level 1, 30, 60, 90, or 100[[/note]], the computer no longer breaks that rule.
** And we won't even mention [[spoiler: Chaos]], who cheats like a cheating cheaty-thing, especially with his Summon. (Every single other Summon in the game can only be used once per fight, except in one specific, rule-based case. He however can use his purely at will, as often as he wants.
** The prequel adds to the cheating -- if the game wants to play a character like an SNKBoss, it will -- dodging will be instant, attacks will be instant (even if you're playing the same character), their priority will be scores higher than yours, etc.
** Amusingly, ''Duodecim'' also lets you turn off most of the cheating by setting the ruleset for custom matches to "Official(Skill)", which disables equipment and summons for both sides. It's actually [[TropesAreNotBad kind of pathetic]] seeing [[ArtificialStupidity how badly the AI performs]] when forced to fight fair.
* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}: Blade Of Fate'', the human character can only FlashStep or use RF Special Attacks when they have enough Spiritual Power to do so. The AI opponents have infinite Spiritual Power.
** In ''Bleach: Soul Resurrección'', a character can enter "[[SuperMode Ignition Mode]]" to increase attack power, and from there use an "[[LimitBreak Ignition Attack]]", a powerful attack that completely empties the Ignition Gague. Usually the Ignition Gague can only be filled by causing damage, especially many hits quickly. The computer is not bound by these restrictions, and can enter Ignition Mode and use an Ignition Attack whenever they feel like it, which on harder difficulties they will. It's not unheard of for a computer-controlled character to use an Ignition Attack, and then re-enter Ignition mode ''before
the player or another AI then has even hit the ground'', especially when fighting multiple enemies at once.
* VideoGame/BlazBlue is guilty of this. Particularly Unlimited Nu and Ragna in Score Attack Mode.
** In Hakumen's story mode in Calamity Trigger, you get to fight Jin Kisaragi. Throughout this fight Jin ALWAYS HAS 100% HEAT GAUGE. He takes full advantage of this and will constantly catch you in an unwinnable loop with his Special attacks.
** Basically any fight against Hazama due to the fact that he lives up to his cheating bastard status. He will use his Distortion Drives only when you have literally no way to dodge them.
** Nu-13 on her own is bad enough; she can rapidfire summoned projectile swords. Many characters, particularly Hakumen and Tager, have no way at all to approach Nu in her NORMAL state. Based on tournaments,
they take the "you nuked our friend" relationship modifier. If the have around a 20% chance of winning a match against a Nu player uses nuclear weapons of equal skill. Unlimited Nu is Nu, except she summons twice as many swords. Yeah. It's hell.
*** Don't forget she has autogain on her Heat meter, has very little recovery time on her attacks and can (and will) combo any and all hits into her Distortion Drive, which hits for about 50% life. Bear in mind, this will happen if you fail to block ''even once'', while you will require about 40 minor miracles in a row to beat her.
** Ragna isn't much better. In his Unlimited state he has twice as much life as the tankiest glacier character in the game. He also has increased vampiric properties and his Distortion Drives in his Unlimited form can easily knock off around 75% of your HP, healing him for around 50% of his, and undoing all the work you've been doing through the entire match.
** AI-controlled characters are pretty good about having realistic reaction times, except in one specific scenario: If you're Rachel, and you're trying to manipulate them with [[BlowYouAway Sylphid]],
they get a reputation hit with EVERY civilization, even ''will'' air-dash in the opposite direction, the exact frame you press D. Doesn't matter whom you're fighting, or what you're trying to move them into; they're just programmed to instantly resist any attempts to blow them around. In fact, this can turn Sylphid into an AIBreaker; if you use it to blow them ''away'' from you, and they air dash towards you, they'll use up their worst enemies.
air dash ''and'' (if you time it right) move right into the middle of [[LimitBreak Baden Baden Lily]] (or [[FinishingMove Clownish Calendula]] if that's your thing).
* A subtle ''VideoGame/BattleCapacity'' had major issues with Pyroak in the past. Pyroak has a lot of HP, excellent projecile attacks, and a useful anti-air attack which comes out quickly at adjustable heights. He is slow, however, and suffers against most characters at close range. When the AI was using Pyroak, there was literally ''no'' slowdown between launching projectiles and using his anti-air, making him all but unapproachable.
* This
one is easy to miss, since you usually fight against human opponents in ''[=Civ5=]'': You can't place a new city within 4 hexes RumbleFighter. However, in Survival Mode, the enemies can use the [[DesperationAttack Panic Attack]] an unlimited number of times, whereas players are limited to using it once per round.
* Never let
a pre-existing one. Your fight go the distance in {{UFC}} 2. No matter how much you dominated the fight, the computer opponents? will invariably award itself the decision victory.
* ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'': your counterattacks will work approximately one time in seventeen. The A.I. can pull them off whenever it wants. And the game engine treats interrupting a string of attacks as the ''worst'' kind of impoliteness.
* It's so prevalent with the VideoGame/WWEVideoGames, that they had ''[[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard/WWEVideoGames to be moved to a separate page]]''.
** Smackdown Vs Raw, particularly when the RubberBandAI breaks. The CPU will become a PerfectPlayAI who
[[MyRulesAreNotYourRules Don't have ignores the rules]].
** In WWE 12 at least, and probably earlier games as well, it seems like matches are predetermined. If the player is meant to lose then counters are ignored to the point
that problem]].
** More on Civ 5:
blatant cheating will occur. If the CPU is slated to lose on the nice side, no matter how rampantly the AI cheats on higher difficulties, they will never build wonders at accelerated speed; not even on Deity (although their other advantages will certainly help them build wonders sooner). On hand then the not-so-nice side, game is a cheating bastard for the computer's happiness and maintenance costs are always as though human character, with the computer were playing on Chieftain ("Beginner"), so all but lying down for the pin, and you really have to work to even drag a match out of them.
** In some respects, [=WWE WrestleMania XIX=] for the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, namely in Revenge Mode. It seems as
if you're playing on Warlord ("Easy"), they still the game simply ignores your frantic spinning of the control stick or mashing of L and R when trying to get up or counter if it feels like it. And sometimes, when you have to make an edge for happiness opponent bleed, it can be done easily to you, but the opponent can take seemingly hundreds of hits to finally go down. What's worse is the opponent has seemingly impeccable timing with it's counters and gold. This is pretty obvious; press F9 dodges, even doing these on the first turn and your civ will already be in dead last for approval. Ever wonder why an AI can expand so much finishing moves.
** ''WWE 13'' is quite possibly the best portrayal of the, ahem, sport ever. It is also unquestionably the most broken. You try and attack your opponent and it reads your inputs and counters perfectly. You try and counter their attacks and the game ignores them. You are not given the chance to use finishers, special abilities or even escape attacks. The CPU recovers and attacks
faster than you when you're playing on "Normal"? Wonder no more. Also an example can. It cancels out you gaining a finisher for hot tags and comeback. The game can warp you into attacks and pins. It can even make use of TheComputerIsALyingBastard since changing the camera angle to use InterfaceScrew. You name a way the game implies that Normal is fair.
** Ever settle a city nowhere near an AI player's empire, yet still get
can cheat and this one will do it.
* The various ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' games all allow
the "they covet lands you hold" message under diplomacy? Or how convenient the placing of things opponents to break boxing rules like Oil and Uranium ''nobody's'' business while restricting you to legitimate boxing tactics. Enemies are within enemy territory? That's because all the resources in the game, including future ones that haven't been revealed yet, are pre-determined upon map generation. The AI players know from the get-go where the best resources in the game will be, and settle free to chug soda to replenish health, duct-tape a manhole cover over their cities accordingly.
** Another one for Civ V, the computer can have ships that cannot cross oceans on deep sea tiles,
only weak spot, or blatantly use prohibited moves like Civ 1. This creates a problem in Gods headbutts and Kings if ''magic'' to take you use a pirate ship to capture the enemy Trireme and then find you can't move it next turn.
* VideoGame/FreeCiv, the open source version
down. [[TropesAreTools Unlike most examples]] on Civilisation has the AI settings "Experimental" and "Cheating".
* Civilization Revolution
** On Emperor, the AI gets a 20% handicap on all costs (unit production, science needed for techs), which increases to 40% on Deity
** The AI can teleport units throughout the Fog of War (even previously uncovered). Explicitly. The devs did
this to save on processing resources for consoles, but page, it's quite annoying to have armies marching out of ANY tile you don't currently have vision of at the moment.
** Boats also count as outside your vision, as you can't see what's in them.
entirely PlayedForLaughs. The AI uses them like conduits to vomit units into your borders no matter how far away their cities actually are.
** AI culture is much more powerful and supercedes yours in almost all cases unless you specifically crank out culture buildings/wonders. An AI with
only aversion is Glass Joe's protective headgear, as it turns out if ''any'' boxer suffers 100 losses they're allowed to use it and, sure enough, Little Mac [[EasyModeMockery gets a set of his own]] if he suffers 100 losses.
* In ''Videogame/ForHonor'', higher-difficulty opponents in
the Palace can push 3-ring borders just campaign and higher-difficulty multiplayer bots are able to change attack directions faster than is physically possible for a few tens of turn into human player. As a result you'll get situations where an AI Orochi or Valkyrie will initiate attack chains from above and midway through change directions to launch side attacks, the game.latter of which is physically too fast for a player to block. The only option is to dodge the chain altogether or parry the first hit to prevent it from ever starting.



[[folder: Final Fantasy Tactics]]
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' has some boss enemies who are granted immunity from the game's law system, while you're stuck playing by the rules. Ice abilities are illegal for the battle? The boss will laugh while casting Blizzaga every turn and the judge will just yellow card him repeatedly. Some other characters are given ribbons, granting them immunity from the law.
** What's even worse is that in the Judgemaster extra missions, you almost got this yourself. But since GoodIsDumb, Marche and Cid bust the Judge before he could bestow you with it.
*** In fairness, after completing the main storyline of the game and continuing on the bonus missions, you have the chance to add Judgemaster Cid to your party. Let's not mince words: Judgemaster Cid isn't just a cheating bastard, he's a cheating bastard who enables the rest of your party to be cheating bastards. Cid's most useful ability is hands down Abate, which skips the Judge's turn, allowing you to break any laws you want without any repercussions until the judge's next turn (given that judges average one turn to three turns for every other unit on the field, this adds up to a sizable chunk of the battle).
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'', enemies will regularly be given 'bonus' turns at the beginning of a battle before you can act in any way, on top of their [[RandomNumberGod statistically unlikely shenanigans]]. Probably the worst of it is the fourth round in the Brightmoon Tor, where the enemy is given ''twelve'' bonus turns, GameBreaker abilities that cost no MP, and massive level advantages that did not exist in the previous stages. One of these abilities casts Haste and Protect on their entire party, resulting in an approximate minimum of ''twenty-four bonus turns before you can do anything.''
* In the PSP remake of ''Final Fantasy Tactics'', the Onion Knight job is marked by being able to use any piece of equipment, being unable to use abilities, yet having ''extremely'' high stats when mastered. However, in one link mission, you and your partner must defeat a team of master Onion Knights who have a full range of powerful abilities equipped. They'll hit you back and more than likely screw you over.

to:

[[folder: Final Fantasy Tactics]]
First Person Shooters]]
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' has some boss enemies who are granted immunity Up until ''Vegas'', ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' seemed quite unfair in that the AI could somehow detect you even if you couldn't figure out where it was. And a major problem with the first games was that being spotted once, even if the guy didn't alert his comrades, meant [[TheAllSeeingAI everyone knew where you were]].
** In the original PC trilogy, the AI also had ImprobableAimingSkills: [[ArmorIsUseless no matter what body armor you chose]], a hit was usually deadly because the AI [[BoomHeadshot scored a headshot]] practically every time. And could do it
from the game's law system, other side of the map, with a machine pistol, and ''facing the wrong way''. ''Raven Shield'''s Elite setting is especially cheap, coupled with the ArtificialStupidity of friendly teammates.
* On higher difficulty levels, the bots in ''VideoGame/QuakeIIIArena'' can [[TheAllSeeingAI track your character through walls]] and can one-shot kill you via Railgun the moment a single pixel of your hitbox is exposed.
* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'', especially the PC games. Nazis have [[ImprobableAimingSkills improbable accuracy]] with automatic weapons
while yours suffer from ATeamFiring, can shoot through foliage and other transparent objects that you can't very well, don't suffer from aim disruption while supposedly flinching, will draw a bead on you the moment you enter their line of fire, especially the snipers in Snipertown, [[DoNotRunWithAGun run and gun with unlikely aiming skill]], and can even get perfect shots when blindfiring. All of which is true in ''Call of Duty'' as well, made by some of the same developers.
* Enemies in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' love to automatically shoot you ''just'' before you pull the trigger and throw off your aim so you miss your shot, especially when
you're stuck playing by the rules. Ice abilities are illegal for the battle? The boss will laugh while casting Blizzaga every turn using a bolt-action rifle and the judge will just yellow card him repeatedly. Some other characters are given ribbons, granting them immunity from the law.
** What's even worse is that in the Judgemaster extra missions, you almost got this yourself. But since GoodIsDumb, Marche and Cid bust the Judge before he could bestow you with it.
*** In fairness, after completing the main storyline of the game and continuing on the bonus missions, you
have the chance to add Judgemaster Cid to your party. Let's not mince words: Judgemaster Cid isn't just wait a cheating bastard, he's a cheating bastard who enables the rest of your party to be cheating bastards. Cid's most useful ability is hands down Abate, which skips the Judge's turn, allowing you to break any laws you want without any repercussions until the judge's next turn (given that judges average one turn to three turns for every other unit on the field, this adds up to a sizable chunk of the battle).
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'', enemies will regularly be given 'bonus' turns at the beginning of a battle
full second before you can act fire again.
** Combat training
in any way, on top of the ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps Black Ops]]'' games lets you see for yourself just how much the AI cheats by letting you see killcams from their [[RandomNumberGod statistically unlikely shenanigans]]. Probably perspective. Tracking players through walls, absolutely zero recoil or bullet spread, and on higher difficulties nearly infinite look speed. One AI enemy with a semi automatic sniper rifle can kill multiple players spread out over an area in less than a second the worst instant it has line of sight to all of them. What's worse is [[SpitefulAI this generally only applies to the AI on the opposing team]] - ''your'' AI will frequently forget they have a loaded weapon in their hands and go for knife kills, ''forget they have a knife if they manage to survive to get into range'', and generally just spread out as far as possible and actively ignore enemies, especially ones that are attacking you.
** The stealth in the more modern Call of Duty games is actually quite fair. Occasionally though, your [[HollywoodSilencer amazingly quiet silenced pistol]] suddenly gives away your position as if
it fired nuclear missiles and boulders.
*** Though one offender
is the fourth round ''[[StealthMission Hid]][[ThrowbackLevel den]]'' mission in Modern Warfare 2's Special Ops mode. The main issue with making it through alive is ghillie snipers. Normally this wouldn't be so bad, because you're wearing a ghillie suit yourself, and it's an incredibly bushy area, so it shouldn't be so bad, right? '''''WRONG!''''' These snipers [[ImprobableAimingSkills could hit a gnat resting on a fencepost from ten kilometers away]], and when they aren't moving, which is a lot, are essentially invisible, while they plug bullets into you as if you're wearing high-visibility clothing. And on the off chance you manage to see one due to the glare on the scope, by then it's [[KilledMidSentence too]] [[BoomHeadshot la--]]
* ''{{Franchise/Halo}}''
** After dual-wielding in ''{{VideoGame/Halo 2}}'' and ''{{VideoGame/Halo 3}}'' proved to be rather unbalanced, it was excised
in the Brightmoon Tor, subsequent games... for players. In ''VideoGame/HaloReach'', Elites are still perfectly capable of dual-wielding weapons, letting them still tear you to pieces with double plasma rifles while you have to wear down their shields the old fashioned way.
** Players acquainted with trying to hijack Wraith tanks for themselves may know the utter rage they felt upon finding that enemy Wraiths can fire mortars ''sideways''. Meanwhile the player in a Wraith can only fire directly forward, since that's the only direction the cannon faces. Covenant baddies being thorns in your side. Nothing ''you're'' allowed to do except slowly turn to hit them. And that's not even including enemy Wraiths' incredibly long-aim with an arcing projectile on Legendary.
* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'':
** Under normal circumstances, "facestabbing" as a Spy is a rare, [[GoodBadBugs hilarious glitch]]. Spy-bots in the [[ManVersusMachine Mann vs. Machine]] [[TheWarSequence mode]], however, seem capable of facestabbing players ''whenever the hell they want to.'' This starts making more sense when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZpGtx3orK4#t=28s you see how loopy the backstab hitboxes can be]], and take into account the spies know ''exactly'' where these places begin and end. Thankfully averted elsewhere: Just like übered human players, übered bomb carriers (and their medics) aren't immune to the Pyro's airblast. Especially useful if the map has a BottomlessPit, which not even über-bots can be exempted from. And as a nice bonus, that resets the bomb all the way back to the beginning. [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap And you thought MvM would turn Pyros useless]].
** Spy Robots can also backstab Snipers wearing the Razorback. As in, that piece of equipment whose ''sole purpose'' is to ''protect the Sniper from backstabs''.
** Meanwhile, in regular game modes featuring bots, it can be extremely difficult to kill any of them as a sniper, [[TheAllSeeingAI because bots automatically know when they're being targeted, even if you're aiming at their back halfway across the map]]. They'll also stare at disguised enemy Spies, waiting for them to reveal themselves.
** However, any bots who require aim do so with a virtual mouse, and their aim isn't perfect.
* ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters''
** The 5* AI in the original ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters'' game's Arcade modes will turn a semi-automatic weapon into a fully-automatic nightmare, and they never have to reload. ''Ever''. If they get hold of Pistol x2 and see you, ''you are probably going to die horribly in an endless storm of bullets''. Curiously enough, they are ''less'' dangerous if using actual automatic weapons.
** And the bots in ''VideoGame/TimeSplittersFuturePerfect'' will frequently walk through solid walls and scenery if you're not facing in their general direction, especially on Mapmaker maps; this becomes a real problem in Virus mode,
where the enemy is given ''twelve'' bonus turns, GameBreaker abilities that cost no MP, AI will occasionally even ''fall through the fucking ceiling and massive level advantages that did not exist land on you!!'' It's possible to turn around and catch them in the previous stages. One of these abilities casts Haste and Protect on their entire party, act, resulting in an approximate minimum all sorts of ''twenty-four bonus turns before creepy visual weirdness such as arms and faces half-emerged through the walls/windows/doors.
* ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}''
** ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield 3}}''. ESPECIALLY on hard difficulty. Let's see, bullets that are flying everywhere? Check. A player that dies in two or three continuous shots? Check. Enemies that can shoot
you with just your BIG TOE sticking out of cover? Check. Enemies that can do anything.''
* In
SHOOT THROUGH ROCKS IN THE INDESTRUCTIBLE ENVIRONMENT? THAT'S A [[PrecisionFStrike BIG FUCKING CHECK!!!]]
** If you ever play against AI bots in ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}} 1942'', you basically can't use airplanes because
the PSP remake AI's aiming is so accurate that it can use ordinary machine guns (as opposed to actual anti-air weapons) to whittle down your health and knock you out of ''Final Fantasy Tactics'', the Onion Knight job is marked by being able sky.
* Darksims in VideoGame/PerfectDark's Combat Simulator. They can teleport, shoot with 100% accuracy no matter the weapon or distance, and spawn with every weapon on the map already in their inventory. [[spoiler: They still don't know how
to use any piece of equipment, Remote Mines.]]
* In ''{{VideoGame/Destiny}}'', when lining up your sights on an enemy (Usually through a sniper rifle but applies to other guns as well) the enemy will seem to magically know where you are and start moving to make your shot harder even if you haven't fired off a single round, yet. In addition, once you HAVE fired (Especially annoying if you're using a sniper rifle) the enemies will know JUST where you are and move behind appropriate cover to keep from
being unable to use abilities, yet having ''extremely'' high stats when mastered. However, in one link mission, you and your partner must defeat a team of master Onion Knights who have a full range of powerful abilities equipped. They'll hit you back and more than likely screw you over.picked off so easily.



[[folder: F-Zero]]
* Grand Prix is tough but fair. In GX's Story Mode, however, everything is stacked against you. ''Everything.''
** [[http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=711267 I'll let SA speak for me on this one.]]
*** And then you realize that that post refers to the ''easiest difficulty level'', and that there are two more to beat. And those are the ones that net you the unlocks.
** There is no way to understate the insanity that is this race in Master Difficulty. Since F-Zero tracks are sometimes upside down, it is possible for the AI cars to go so fast that they'll actually ''knock you out of the course'', causing an instant One-Hit Kill.
* In the original, you've got blatant cheating by ALL vehicles on Master mode. All vehicles can go max speed with perfect handling. If you are ahead of them, they are always right behind you, barely off the screen. Always. On the Death Wind course, it is literally impossible to win with the Golden Fox with speed alone, so you have to block your opponents' way with your rear to pull that off.
* Also in the original, computer vehicles (on all difficulties) are utterly invincible. You can knock the AI off the track into what should be an instant, unavoidable death, and they will literally drive on the air, pass through the guard rails, and continue on as if nothing happened. They take full advantage of this as well, behaving more like deterrents to your survival than actual competitors hoping to win the race.
* ''F-Zero Climax'' takes a few pages from the very first game's book; if you can see the AI, it will slam into walls and move at the normal car's top speed. If you lose sight of them however, they suddenly become godlike and navigate courses perfectly. Even worse is the fact enemy cars can frequently pop up right behind and bump into you. ''Even if you're in mid-air.''
* ''F-Zero Maximum Velocity''. In the hardest difficulty level, ''all'' of the vehicles have a higher top-speed than you do. ''All'' of them. Even the Fighting Comet (granted, you won't see it until everyone ''else'' is done flying past you). The only possible way to counter this advantage is using Boost pads, jumps, and the vehicle's own boost to their best possible effect. Oddly enough, it doesn't cheat that much when it comes to corners, as machines with poor turning performance fall ''really'' far behind in tracks with tight turns; skilled players only have to actually worry about four machines.
* ''F-Zero X'' is fairly simple if you can figure out the Side-Attack Turn and the right boosting technique, even on Expert. When you get to Master, however, you'll want to start ripping your hair out. For starters, it feels like every single pilot just slams on their brakes once they're directly lined up in front of you. Because of the sheer speed you're going at, this can be impossible to react to. Combine this with the fact that an absolutely perfect first lap is required to win at some tracks (Example: Silence - High Speed) and you have a race that comes down to a total crapshoot. Oh, by the way...if you make contact with any of them, even if it's them hitting you, you'll immediately be sent into an uncontrollable slide. (Unless you let off the accelerator, then punch it again straight after.)
** Well, every single pilot slams their brakes...except for three, that is. Every single character in the game has 3 "rivals" of sorts. (Example: If you play as Captain Falcon, your "rivals" will be Samurai Goroh, Blood Falcon, and Black Shadow.) These 3 rivals will surpass any speed you can manage to get out of your machine, almost as if they have a magnet which attracts them to the player. The kicker: They never use their boosters...not even once. Add the constant side attacks these 3 do when you're anywhere in their general area (which, by the way, can make you lose half, or even all your speed) and you'll swear these guys don't just want you to die in the game. They want you to die in real life from a stroke.
** Thought you were done after the Joker Cup? Well, surprise, surprise, it gets even worse in the DD-Cups! Some of the track designs in these 2 Japan Exclusive Grand Prix just have "sadism" written all over them. What could that possibly have to do with the computer, though?
*** Enter Silence 3 - Outside Loop. This track...if there were ever an interactive definition of "crapshoot" this would be it. First of all, the sand in the middle of the loop is so wide that it takes the world's most steady thumb just to get through cleanly, without touching the sand or the wall. But after you figure out the right angles to hold the joystick, you're in the clear, right? WRONG! If you go just 1 kmh too fast on these loops, you will fly off the track, straight to your death. You know how you could push the Joystick up in Silence 1 to prevent yourself from flying off? Well, not even that works here! The real kick to the nards: THE COMPUTER CAN TRAVEL MUCH FASTER THAN YOU AND STILL HANG ON! Once Lap 2 and Lap 3 roll around, expect them to milk this for everything it's worth.
*** For one final injury atop all those insults, you think you can just set the machine at its slowest speed to avoid falling off? Ha ha ha ha...NO!!! There's a jump after the 2nd loop which you absolutely must take if you want any hope of winning the race, and if you set your machine settings too far to the left, you'll never be able to lift off the ground to make that jump! So, you're effectively forced to put yourself in constant danger of an instant death just so you can even have a chance of winning. It's not even guaranteed, it's just a chance! Think about this for a second...if you lose all of your lives and get a Game Over, you have to go through this nightmare all over again. The only positive is that this is the very first race in its respective cup, so you won't have to do much to try again if you die here.
** On other tracks, however, you become the cheating bastard yourself in a way. Red Canyon 1, Mute City 2, Big Blue 2, Devil's Forest 3, Big Hand, Devil's Forest 4 (64-DD Only), Devil's Forest 5 (64-DD Only), and Space Plant 2 (64-DD only) come to mind. If you've mastered the Side Attack Turn, then these particular tracks will be cake walks...even on Master.

to:

[[folder: F-Zero]]
Live Action Television]]
* Grand Prix is tough but fair. In GX's Story Mode, however, everything is stacked against you. ''Everything.''
** [[http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=711267 I'll let SA speak for me on
The ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "The Mind's Eye" seems to give pointed shout-out to this one.]]
*** And then you realize that that post refers
trope when Geordie [=LaForge=] tries to pass the ''easiest difficulty level'', and that there are two more to beat. And those are the ones that net you the unlocks.
** There is no way to understate the insanity that is this race in Master Difficulty. Since F-Zero tracks are sometimes upside down, it is possible for the AI cars to go so fast that they'll actually ''knock you out of the course'', causing an instant One-Hit Kill.
* In the original, you've got blatant cheating
time on a long shuttle trip by ALL vehicles on Master mode. All vehicles can go max speed with perfect handling. If you are ahead of them, they are always right behind you, barely off the screen. Always. On the Death Wind course, it is literally impossible to win playing a trivia game with the Golden Fox with speed alone, so you have to block your opponents' way with your rear to pull that off.
* Also in
computer. When Geordie acts a little too cocky, the original, computer vehicles (on all difficulties) are utterly invincible. You can knock blatantly changes the AI off rules:
-->'''Shuttle Computer''': List
the track into what should be an instant, unavoidable death, and they will literally drive on the air, pass through the guard rails, and continue on as if nothing happened. They take full advantage [[TechnoBabble resonances of this as well, behaving more like deterrents to your survival than actual competitors hoping to win the race.
* ''F-Zero Climax'' takes a few pages from the very first game's book; if you can see the AI, it will slam into walls and move at the normal car's top speed. If you lose sight of them however, they suddenly become godlike and navigate courses perfectly. Even worse is the fact enemy cars can frequently pop up right behind and bump into you. ''Even if you're in mid-air.''
* ''F-Zero Maximum Velocity''. In the hardest difficulty level, ''all'' of the vehicles have a higher top-speed than you do. ''All'' of them. Even the Fighting Comet (granted, you won't see it until everyone ''else'' is done flying past you). The only possible way to counter this advantage is using Boost pads, jumps, and the vehicle's own boost to their best possible effect. Oddly enough, it doesn't cheat that much when it comes to corners, as machines
sub-quantum associated with poor turning performance fall ''really'' far behind in tracks with tight turns; skilled players only have to actually worry about four machines.
* ''F-Zero X'' is fairly simple if you can figure out the Side-Attack Turn and the right boosting technique, even on Expert. When you get to Master, however, you'll want to start ripping your hair out. For starters, it feels like every single pilot just slams on their brakes once they're directly lined up in front of you. Because of the sheer speed you're going at, this can be impossible to react to. Combine this with the fact that an absolutely perfect first lap is required to win at some tracks (Example: Silence - High Speed) and you have a race that comes down to a total crapshoot. Oh, by the way...if you make contact with any of them, even if it's them hitting you, you'll immediately be sent into an uncontrollable slide. (Unless you let off the accelerator, then punch it again straight after.)
** Well, every single pilot slams their brakes...except for three, that is. Every single character in the game has 3 "rivals" of sorts. (Example: If you play as Captain Falcon, your "rivals" will be Samurai Goroh, Blood Falcon, and Black Shadow.) These 3 rivals will surpass any speed you can manage to get out of your machine, almost as if they have a magnet which attracts them to the player. The kicker: They never use their boosters...not even once. Add the constant side attacks these 3 do when you're anywhere in their general area (which, by the way, can make you lose half, or even all your speed) and you'll swear these guys don't just want you to die in the game. They want you to die in real life from a stroke.
** Thought you were done after the Joker Cup? Well, surprise, surprise, it gets even worse in the DD-Cups! Some of the track designs in these 2 Japan Exclusive Grand Prix just have "sadism" written all over them. What could that possibly have to do with the computer, though?
*** Enter Silence 3 - Outside Loop. This track...if there were ever an interactive definition of "crapshoot" this would be it. First of all, the sand in the middle of the loop is so wide that it takes the world's most steady thumb just to get through cleanly, without touching the sand or the wall. But after you figure out the right angles to hold the joystick, you're in the clear, right? WRONG! If you go just 1 kmh too fast on these loops, you will fly off the track, straight to your death. You know how you could push the Joystick up in Silence 1 to prevent yourself from flying off? Well, not even that works here! The real kick to the nards: THE COMPUTER CAN TRAVEL MUCH FASTER THAN YOU AND STILL HANG ON! Once Lap 2 and Lap 3 roll around, expect them to milk this for everything it's worth.
*** For one final injury atop all those insults, you think you can just set the machine at its slowest speed to avoid falling off? Ha ha ha ha...NO!!! There's a jump after the 2nd loop which you absolutely must take if you want any hope of winning the race, and if you set your machine settings too far to the left, you'll never be able to lift off the ground to make that jump! So, you're effectively forced to put yourself in constant danger of an instant death just so you can even have a chance of winning. It's not even guaranteed, it's just a chance! Think about this for a second...if you lose all of your lives and get a Game Over, you have to go through this nightmare all over again. The only positive is that this is the very first race in its respective cup, so you won't have to do much to try again if you die here.
** On other tracks, however, you become the cheating bastard yourself in a way. Red Canyon 1, Mute City 2, Big Blue 2, Devil's Forest 3, Big Hand, Devil's Forest 4 (64-DD Only), Devil's Forest 5 (64-DD Only), and Space Plant 2 (64-DD only) come to mind. If you've mastered the Side Attack Turn, then these particular tracks will be cake walks...even on Master.
transitional relativity]].\\
'''[=LaForge=]''': That's easy--\\
'''Computer''': In alphabetical order.



[[folder: Mario Kart]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioKart 7'' is the biggest offender yet (which is saying a lot, honestly). There was an exploit that has been discovered in the Maka Wuhu track that allows you to skip one section of the track. Pull it off, and the CPU pack is no less than 5 seconds behind you when you are ferried onto the upper section of the course, rendering the entire exploit moot in 1-player mode.
* In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'', the AI opponents didn't just have RubberBandAI, but had infinite stores of super-special weapons and items that in several cases the player was never able to use -- namely, the poisoned mushrooms, dinosaur eggs, and meandering fireballs. Then there's the Mario brothers, who could activate Stars at will, making them nigh-impossible to beat if they were in the lead. For the items the player ''could'' launch, the AI opponent also had the ability to dodge by ''jumping'' the kart its own height above the track (basically an infinite supply of jump feathers).\\
They also out right clip through course obstacles like Thwomps and pipes while you need a Star to smash through the same things yourself. The only thing they ''can'' bump into that slows them down are the walls, and that's if you push them hard enough into a wall.\\
Furthermore, the Grand Prix mode would select an order of skill for each of the computer-controlled players, based on your own character selection. If one of the Mario Bros. were picked as the "champion" racer (which happened if you chose Bowser or Koopa Troopa), you could expect perfect racing lines and cornering coupled with infinite and arbitrary use of the Super Star, allowing them to go at increased speed with no slowing down, plus invincibility. Having one of the plumbers trigger this on the final stretch, powering either past or ''through'' the player and being unable to stop regardless of what's fired at them (or even more annoyingly, just as that red shell was about to knock them out of first place) meant that it was often easier just to start a new game and hope you didn't get one of them as the top racer again.
** The character selection in ''Super Mario Kart'' is arbitrary. The order of the racers is chosen by which racer you chose, it's the same every time. You can alter it but knocking them down a few places in the last lap, and then crossing the finish line before they catch up. If the screen fades to black before they overtake anyone, they are stuck in that position. It's a decent strategy when playing as Bowser to knock either Mario or Luigi down to 4th place or lower just before the finish line. Preferably both.
* In ''Mario Kart: Super Circuit'', whichever AI racer has the most cup points at the time will get their special powerups more often. Luigi and Bowser will always start with "champion" level skills, but if you attack them and cause them to lose to other AI racers, the new points leader among AI will take up the "champion" mantle instead. If Yoshi or Mario get this points lead, they'll start to spam consecutive Super Stars from nowhere and finish races 5 seconds ahead of the rest of the pack. Conversely, since poor AI Wario always starts in the back of the pack, he's rarely seen using items at all and is doomed to finish last every race.
* Another ability the computers have in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'' and ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'' is the ability to instantly recover from items as long as they weren't on screen when the item hit. The best items would simply stop computers for a moment if you couldn't see them, while the same items used on you would make you fly through the air.
* Choco Mountain. The final part of the track involves a few item crates, a 90 degree turn, and then three "hills". You better be lucky and get a mushroom from those crates, else once you jump from the first hill, you'll collide with the second and third ones, while the [=CPUs=] that are right behind you (thank you rubber-band AI) magically have enough speed to jump both. Not getting a mushroom in those crates indeed makes the difference between being first or fifth in this race.
* Apparently, the computer player chosen to be the first-placer in ''Mario Kart DS'' always has a maxed-out speed stat, regardless of what the kart they're driving should have. This makes characters that drive karts with already high acceleration [[spoiler:(Dry Bones)]] nearly impossible to beat. This may be because the designated top 3 are given boosts in top speed with the first placer given the biggest boost. If it happens to be a kart with high acceleration, your only chance of winning is to snake, simply put.\\
[=CPUs=] in ''Mario Kart DS'' will also move back into place if another kart knocks them away in midair.
* The AI in ''VideoGame/MarioKartDoubleDash'' seems to entirely ignore the weight system and kart stats -- heavy karts (the only ones available to large characters such as Bowser) all have crappy acceleration but high top speeds. Go ahead, knock Bowser off the track. Invariably, he'll be right on your ass in no time flat -- despite the nice long stall that getting put back on the track gives you, and the fact that his crappy acceleration should leave him far behind a cart that's already running at top speed with no slowdowns. In fact, most of the karts in ''Double Dash!!'' can reach ridiculous speeds trying to keep up with a human player in first, which can give a second human player further down the pack an extremely hard time when it comes to clawing their way back to the front.
* Ditto Petey Piranha, often a thorn in the side in two-player GP races at 150cc due to his '''ludicrous''' bursts of speed and acceleration.
* In ''Mario Kart 64'', computer players just used items at random rather than actually using the item boxes. This actually worked out well for the player (despite lack of realism, since they would never use certain items), since the distribution was fair. In DS and Wii, they actually use the item boxes, which means the last-place players are constantly getting the good stuff. So this is actually an instance where having the AI follow the rules actually made the game seem less fair (though technically it's ''more'' fair).
* Moreover, the computers' finishing positions aren't actually determined by the order in which they cross the finish line; rather, it's what position they're currently in when the last human player finishes and ends the race. For example, you finish in 1st place and Mario is in 3rd, but he falls back to 5th place before the results screen shows up, it will still show him finished in 3rd due to being in that spot when the player finished.
* Just let the AI get behind you with Star Power. It's like you're being tracked by a homing missile.
* Of course, all the items are at general, aimed at you, with only the occasional shot toward other AI and accidental hits if they drive the same racing line. It gets ridiculous when one sees the second place racer throw a red shell (which only homes if thrown ''forward'' in most installments, and even then, only after someone passes it) ''backwards'' towards a player-controlled third place kart when the first place kart could be easily overtaken if only the shell were thrown forward instead. More a case of 'cheating' for the AI opponents who get to avoid all attacks (their advantage being that they get to go whole races without a single item aimed at them, save for Lightning, Bullet Bills and Blue Shells, which a character has no say in controlling). The AI racers that target you rather than their competitors ahead, however, are a case of SpitefulAI.
** It couldn't be more obvious than when you play a team race in ''Mario Kart Wii'' with AI opponents, and your computer-controlled ''teammates'' start aiming shells and bananas at you.
** This carries over to ''Mario Kart 8'' and its team battle mode. At best, it'll simply be a rule of thumb to stay away from ''everyone'' until you've confirmed that the racer you're about to pass is an enemy and you should attack them, lest you run into a teammate who suddenly decides it's a good idea to throw their boomerang. At worst, you can get all three of your balloons destroyed nearly immediately just because you wound up in a populated area and you trusted your AI partners not to start throwing their items at random.
*** The irony of this is that it somehow makes the AI ''closer'' to a human player rather than putting them above them. You're given very little chance to see who's on your team during battles, and it can be difficult to tell what color another racer's balloons are from a distance (and the balloons are the only differentiation between teams). Chances are that you'll accidentally attack your teammates as often as they'll attack you.
* On the bright side, if you and a computer-controlled player have the same amount of points, it will be in favor of you. So if you and Donkey Kong are tied for 1st place with 32 points each, you'll be in first place.
* In ''Mario Kart Wii'', the AI racers almost always skip the item roulette, allowing them to use their item while you're still waiting for yours. You can do the same by pressing the "use item" button during the roulette, but it still takes time to perform (it's not perfect or immediate, whereas the opponents will be ready to go once they hit an item box).
* The Blooper item in later games is a notable exception. For human players, it's little more than a nuisance, but it will cause the AI to start randomly swerving side-to-side like drunk drivers, slowing them down significantly. Justified, though, in that an AI that simply follows a course would obviously be unhindered by an item that blocks your screen without [[ArtificialStupidity flaws programmed in]].
* Red Shells normally target the next racer ahead of the user, but they're programmed to skip racers who are very close to the racer unless they're in 1st place. When the player is in 1st, the AI is programmed to have the 2nd and 3rd place CPU racers hang close together to exploit this behavior so that any Red Shells fired by the 3rd place CPU target the player instead of the 2nd place CPU.
* This [[http://www.suppermariobroth.com/post/155589413010/in-mario-kart-double-dash-cpu-drivers-that-are blog post]] proves what we've been suspecting for a long time, [=CPU=] racers can outright clip through hazards as long as they're far enough from the player.

to:

[[folder: Mario Kart]]
Maze Games]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioKart 7'' is the biggest offender yet (which is saying a lot, honestly). There was an exploit that ''Ms. Pac-Man: Maze Madness'''s multiplayer mode has been discovered in the Maka Wuhu track that allows you to skip one section of the track. Pull it off, and the CPU pack is no less than 5 seconds behind you when you are ferried onto the upper section of the course, rendering the entire exploit moot in 1-player mode.
* In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'', the
all AI opponents didn't just have RubberBandAI, but had infinite stores of super-special weapons and items that in several cases the player was never able to use -- namely, the poisoned mushrooms, dinosaur eggs, and meandering fireballs. Then players being pretty much against all human players if there's the Mario brothers, who could activate Stars at will, making them nigh-impossible to beat if they were in the lead. For the items the player ''could'' launch, the AI opponent also had the ability to dodge by ''jumping'' the kart its own height above the track (basically an infinite supply of jump feathers).\\
They also out right clip through course obstacles like Thwomps and pipes while you need a Star to smash through the same things yourself. The only thing they ''can'' bump into that slows them down are the walls, and that's if you push them hard enough into a wall.\\
Furthermore, the Grand Prix mode would select an order of skill for each of the computer-controlled players, based on your own character selection. If one of the Mario Bros. were picked as the "champion" racer (which happened if you chose Bowser or Koopa Troopa), you could expect perfect racing lines and cornering coupled with infinite and arbitrary use of the Super Star, allowing them to go at increased speed with no slowing down, plus invincibility. Having one of the plumbers trigger this on the final stretch, powering either past or ''through'' the player and being unable to stop regardless of what's fired at them (or even more annoyingly, just as that red shell was about to knock them out of first place) meant that it was often easier just to start a new game and hope you didn't get one of them as the top racer again.
** The character selection in ''Super Mario Kart'' is arbitrary. The order of the racers is chosen by which racer you chose, it's the same every time. You can alter it but knocking them down a few places in the last lap, and then crossing the finish line before they catch up. If the screen fades to black before they overtake anyone, they are stuck in that position. It's a decent strategy when playing as Bowser to knock either Mario or Luigi down to 4th place or lower just before the finish line. Preferably both.
* In ''Mario Kart: Super Circuit'', whichever AI racer has the most cup points at the time will get their special powerups more often. Luigi and Bowser will always start with "champion" level skills, but if you attack them and cause them to lose to other AI racers, the new points leader among AI will take up the "champion" mantle instead. If Yoshi or Mario get this points lead, they'll start to spam consecutive Super Stars from nowhere and finish races 5 seconds ahead of the rest of the pack. Conversely, since poor AI Wario always starts in the back of the pack, he's rarely seen using items at all and is doomed to finish last every race.
* Another ability the computers have in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'' and ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'' is the ability to instantly recover from items as long as they weren't on screen when the item hit. The best items would simply stop computers for a moment if you couldn't see them, while the same items used on you would make you fly through the air.
* Choco Mountain. The final part of the track involves a few item crates, a 90 degree turn, and then three "hills". You better be lucky and get a mushroom from those crates, else once you jump from the first hill, you'll collide with the second and third ones, while the [=CPUs=] that are right behind you (thank you rubber-band AI) magically have enough speed to jump both. Not getting a mushroom in those crates indeed makes the difference between being first or fifth in this race.
* Apparently, the computer player chosen to be the first-placer in ''Mario Kart DS'' always has a maxed-out speed stat, regardless of what the kart they're driving
any (and should have. This makes characters that drive karts with already high acceleration [[spoiler:(Dry Bones)]] nearly impossible to beat. This may be because the designated top 3 are given boosts in top speed with the first placer given the biggest boost. If it happens to be a kart with high acceleration, your only chance at least two of winning is to snake, simply put.\\
[=CPUs=] in ''Mario Kart DS'' will also move back into place if another kart knocks them away in midair.
* The AI in ''VideoGame/MarioKartDoubleDash'' seems to entirely ignore the weight system and kart stats -- heavy karts (the only ones available to large characters such as Bowser) all have crappy acceleration but high top speeds. Go ahead, knock Bowser off the track. Invariably, he'll be right on your ass in no time flat -- despite the nice long stall that getting put back on the track gives you, and the fact that his crappy acceleration should leave him far behind a cart that's already running at top speed with no slowdowns. In fact, most of the karts in ''Double Dash!!'' can reach ridiculous speeds trying to keep up with a human player in first, which can give a second human player further down the pack an extremely hard time
them) when it comes to clawing their way back to the front.
* Ditto Petey Piranha, often
rules. Generally, they form a thorn in the side in two-player GP races at 150cc due to his '''ludicrous''' bursts of speed and acceleration.
* In ''Mario Kart 64'', computer players just used items at random rather than actually using the item boxes. This actually worked out well for
team, even though the player (despite lack of realism, since they would never use certain items), since can't do so with other players. In Dot Mania mode, dead [=AIs=] lose merely two dots as opposed to the distribution was fair. players' ten. In DS and Wii, they actually use the item boxes, which means same mode (and Ghost Tag, in the last-place players are constantly getting the good stuff. So this is actually an instance where having the AI follow the rules actually made the game seem less fair (though technically it's ''more'' fair).
* Moreover, the computers' finishing positions aren't actually determined by the order in which they cross the finish line; rather, it's what position
early moments), they're currently also notably quite [[SpitefulAI spiteful]], always chasing down power-ups if said power-up appears. Considering that 4 out of 5 power-ups in when the last human player finishes and ends the race. For example, you finish in 1st place and Mario is in 3rd, Dot Mania mode are lethal to anyone who didn't pick them up (though one power-up won't kill anyone but he falls back to 5th place before the results screen shows up, it will still show him finished result in 3rd due to being in that spot when dot loss regardless), this makes reaching the player finished.
* Just let the AI get behind you with Star Power. It's like you're being tracked by a homing missile.
* Of course, all the items are at general, aimed at you, with only the occasional shot toward other AI and accidental hits if they drive the same racing line. It gets ridiculous when one sees the second place racer throw a red shell (which only homes if thrown ''forward'' in most installments, and even then, only after someone passes it) ''backwards'' towards a player-controlled third place kart when the first place kart could be easily overtaken if only the shell were thrown forward instead. More a case of 'cheating'
intended goal difficult for the AI opponents who get to avoid all attacks (their advantage being players. Thankfully, the only power-ups that they get to go whole races without a single item aimed at them, save for Lightning, Bullet Bills the [=AIs=] actively ignore are the bag of money (steals dots from other players) and Blue Shells, which a the chocolate cake (makes the character has no say [[AttackOfThe50FootWhatever grow bigger]], enabling him/her to stomp on other players), which in controlling). The AI racers that target you rather than their competitors ahead, however, are a case of SpitefulAI.
** It couldn't be more obvious than when you play a team race in ''Mario Kart Wii'' with AI opponents, and your computer-controlled ''teammates'' start aiming shells and bananas at you.
** This carries over to ''Mario Kart 8'' and its team battle mode. At best, it'll simply be a rule of thumb to stay away from ''everyone'' until you've confirmed that the racer you're about to pass is an enemy and you should attack them, lest you run into a teammate who suddenly decides it's a good idea to throw their boomerang. At worst, you
can get all three of your balloons destroyed nearly immediately just because you wound up in a populated area and you trusted your AI partners not to start throwing their items at random.
*** The irony of this is that it somehow makes the AI ''closer'' to a human player rather than putting them above them. You're given very little chance to see who's on your team during battles, and it can be difficult to tell what color another racer's balloons are from a distance (and the balloons are the
only differentiation between teams). Chances are that you'll accidentally attack your teammates as often as they'll attack you.
*
be picked up by accident (though woe betide you if an AI happens to grab a money bag). On the bright side, if you and a computer-controlled player have the same amount of points, it will be in favor of you. So if you and Donkey Kong those [=AIs=] are tied for 1st place with 32 points each, you'll be in first place.
* In ''Mario Kart Wii'', the AI racers almost always skip the item roulette, allowing them to use their item while you're still waiting for yours. You can do the same by pressing the "use item" button during the roulette, but it still takes time to perform (it's not perfect or immediate, whereas the opponents will be ready to go once they hit an item box).
* The Blooper item in later games is a notable exception. For human players, it's little more than a nuisance, but it will cause the AI to start randomly swerving side-to-side like drunk drivers, slowing them down significantly. Justified, though, in that an AI that simply follows a course would obviously be unhindered by an item that blocks your screen without
hilariously [[ArtificialStupidity flaws programmed in]].
* Red Shells normally target
stupid]] when not doing anything else, often running back and forth or cluelessly going to random places, including using warps for no reason. Obviously, this often results in multiple hilarious deaths by ghosts (Dot Mania), easy tag targets (Ghost Tag and Da Bomb) and plain stupid deaths from running out of time (Da Bomb). For added hilarity, one map has electric hazards, so HilarityEnsues if you play against those [=AIs=] in that map.[[note]]Though, in Da Bomb, don't expect the next racer ahead "it" player to die because of those hazards, as he/she cannot be killed that way, though the user, but they're programmed to skip racers who are very close untagged player can still take advantage of dying to the racer unless they're in 1st place. When the hazards if said player is in 1st, being relentlessly chased. Just hope the AI is programmed to have chaser won't reach your spawn spot before you fully respawn (which the 2nd and 3rd place CPU racers hang close together [=AIs=] will be more than happy to exploit this behavior so that any Red Shells fired by do so). As for Ghost Tag, while all players can die to the 3rd place CPU target same hazard, [=AIs=] are still smart enough to simply tag a "dead" Pac-Person to continue gathering dots, since the foolishly dead player instead of the 2nd place CPU.
* This [[http://www.suppermariobroth.com/post/155589413010/in-mario-kart-double-dash-cpu-drivers-that-are blog post]] proves what we've been suspecting for a long time, [=CPU=] racers can outright clip through hazards as long as they're far enough from the player.
is still vulnerable to tags in that mode.[[/note]]



[[folder: Pokémon]]
* [=NPC=]s, even ones with no plot significance, often have Pokémon that know powerful moves about five levels early. In later games, Pokémon learning moves early is actually [[JustifiedTrope justified]] -- a skilled breeder can get level-up moves and moves the Pokémon otherwise couldn't know (Egg moves) bred onto Level 5 (and, from Generation IV onward, Level 1) Pokémon if the father knows it, so presumably the computer-controlled trainers bred their own. While the player can't do this at first, many TournamentPlay fans use this in the {{Metagame}}.
** However, there are still instances where the player is at a disadvantage, as there some Pokémon that the player just won't have access to, making breeding for egg moves literally impossible without trading and getting them early from other players.
* [=NPCs=] in Generation I could never run out of PP. Have fun with the Elite Four-Champion gauntlet...
* Speaking of the Elite Four, Lance's Dragonite in Generation I has Barrier. Go on. Check to see how the line learns it. Done? Yep. Dragonite's line has forever been incapable of learning Barrier, no matter how much breeding you do. What's more, in Generation II, his Aerodactyl knows Rock Slide, which it couldn't learn until ''[[VideoGame/PokemonFireRedAndLeafGreen FireRed and LeafGreen]]''.
** In 2016, Dragonite finally gets to learn Barrier legally.... at least, the event Dragonites that are in themselves a reference to Lance's Dragonite.
* In a similar vein, various characters have Pokémon that have evolved at levels lower than their designated evolution level, if you were to train up its pre-evolution. Also {{justified|Trope}} in that various areas contain wild evolved Pokémon at lower levels than ought to be possible, allowing the player to catch them -- the [=NPC=]s may have caught their Pokémon in places the player simply hasn't been to.
** Ghetsis in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a particularly notable example of this in his level 54 Hydreigon, which is 10 levels lower then when it can normally be obtained. {{Fanon}} claims that this action led to Ghetsis [[http://images5.fanpop.com/image/quiz/832000/832998_1334165220971_160.jpg?v=1334165104 losing his right eye]].
*** In ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', Ghetsis still has his Hydreigon, now two levels ''lower'', albeit with a weaker moveset. [[spoiler: Iris]], however, is packing one of her own that's almost as nasty as his was in the prequel (and just as nasty in Challenge Mode).
** Another infamous example is the grossly underleveled Purugly and Skuntank belonging to Galactic Commanders Mars and Jupiter, respectively, in ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' due to the EarlyGameHell and ForcedLevelGrinding they can put players through.
** Lance in GSC and HGSS has ''three'' underleveled Dragonite in your champion battle!
-->''"Tell that to my three inappropriately leveled Dragonites!"''
--->--'''Lance''', [[https://youtu.be/Hm5Jlnq8NHk Pokémon Golder 3]]

** Up until ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', in the event that both trainers had their last Pokemon KO'd as a result of Self-Destruct or Explosion, the AI would be declared the winner no matter what, despite the fact that the trainer who ''used'' one of said moves is supposed to lose by default.
*** Presumably, this is because you cannot continue playing if all of your Pokemon have been knocked out, and therefore whoever "won" the battle is irrelevant. Thankfully, the AI would usually try to refrain from using those moves in such a situation, and typically had to be forced into using them of your own volition.
* ''Emerald'' is also a blatant offender. It introduced the Battle Frontier, and set the standard for all subsequent games. It has multiple Gym Leaders with Pokémon they should not have at certain levels, such as Winona's Altaria. To top it all off, regular trainers in Victory Road have completely impossible movesets. One in particular is absurd: a Lanturn in a Double Battle knows NOTHING BUT EARTHQUAKE, a move it cannot learn in the first place.
* In ''VideoGame/PokemonHeartGoldAndSoulSilver'', during your first battle with Brock, he has a Rhyhorn with Sturdy. No other Rhyhorn can have this Ability as of Gen VII.
* The AI of the battle facilities of Generation III onward (the Battle Tower/Frontier/Subway/Maison/Tree) are designed to gain knowledge about your team as you accumulate winning streaks, despite the fact that you're facing new opponents over and over again and thus it wouldn't make sense for "Schoolgirl Jane" to know anything about the team that "Punk Sid" just battled. Specifically, you'll be forced to face teams that are increasingly designed to counter yours the higher your streak.
** While this may seem like a coincidence in many instances, the most damning evidence is that players that have used hacked Pokémon -- Pokémon with special abilities and sets that literally do not exist anywhere in the game and thus the computer cannot ''possibly'' have had the knowledge to counter them beforehand -- and still encounter teams that are tailor-made to overcome their strategies.
** The most popular of these hacks (prior to the introduction of the Fairy-type) was the powerful Wondertomb/Wondereye[[labelnote:Explanation]]A combination of Wonder Guard -- an Ability that will only allow attacks if you're hit by something you're weak to -- and a Pokémon with no weaknesses; Spiritomb and Sableye, respectively[[/labelnote]]. Get a high enough streak, and you'll find opponents carrying Mold Breaker (which lets them ignore Wonder Guard); not too strange, since Mold Breaker is a good ability and you'd encounter that anyway. Go farther, and they'll use ''nothing but status moves'' (which Wonder Guard can't block, and would be a baffling strategy unless the computer knew what it was dealing with beforehand). The strangest, of course, has to be the move Fire Fang. Due to a glitch, Fire Fang will hit opponents with Wonder Guard regardless of their type, and it's completely unknown why this move, and this move alone, has this ability. Even considering that this is a glitch, the computer ''will still use this, knowing that it works against you''.
** Another of these hacks is to give a Pokémon OneHitKO moves (that cause anything they hit to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin immediately faint]] in exchange for poor accuracy [[AwesomeButImpractical that makes it unlikely that they'll actually work]]) combined with the ability "No Guard" (that allows you and your opponent to [[AlwaysAccurateAttack bypass all accuracy checks]]). Use this strategy to sweep enough teams and you'll eventually start encountering Pokémon with the ability "Sturdy", an ability that, during Generations III and IV at least, does ''nothing else'' except block OHKO moves.
** For evidence this still exists in Gen VI's Battle Maison, try entering a Pokemon with Sand Stream[[note]]An Ability that stirs up a sandstorm when the Pokemon enters battle[[/note]] as your lead plus an Aron with Sturdy[[note]]If it's at full HP and takes a hit that would normally KO it in one hit, it'll hang on with 1 HP[[/note]] and Endeavor[[note]]A move that brings the target's HP down to the user's[[/note]]. In the Battle Maison, you'll quickly start encountering a disproportionate number of Pokemon who are immune to sandstorms.
* In the Pokemon World Tournament of ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', the matchups tend to pit you against opponents whose Pokémon have a general type advantage. For example, if you're participating in a single battle tournament with a Serperior, a Volcarona and a Hydreigon, chances are you'll be pitted against a Bug Type Gym Leader in the first turn, as Bug Types hold a type advantage against Serperior and Hydreigon; for the Volcarona, chances also are that at least one of the opponent's Pokémon will know a convenient Water, Flying or Rock-type move too. And then, by some miracle that you do beat that Gym Leader, you'll find your next opponent just happens to be an Ice Type user (again with at least one Pokémon that knows a move that's super effective against your Volcarona) and so on...
** Additionally, one of the most obvious examples of this trope happens when using Zoroark first, while having a Ghost-type Pokemon as your last slot in your party. Zoroark's ability Illusion makes it appear the same as the last Pokemon in your party, complete with the same name. In the Battle Subway, neither player is supposed to know what the opponent's team is composed of. However, when facing any Pokemon (for example Alakazam, a Psychic-type) as Zoroark with a Ghost-type Pokemon's name and appearance (for example Spiritomb, a Dark/Ghost type), the computer will always choose to perform a Fighting-type attack to the fake Ghost. Note that this exact example is not uncommon, and that while Dark and Ghost are both super effective against Psychic, the opponent's Pokemon stays on the field to do a Fighting-type move that the Dark/Ghost Pokemon would be completely immune to, had it not been a Zoroark using Illusion.
*** Although this may not always happen, resulting in a situation such as a Gallade repeatedly using Psycho Cut against a "Crobat" (Zoroark).
* One particular opponent/partner in the Battle Tree uses a Latios. This can potentially hold a Latiosite, but the player is completely unable to acquire Latiosite themselves, as with a few exceptions, only the Mega Stones for Pokémon in the Alola Dex can be obtained.
* The usual instance of the computer's Pokémon having illegal moves has been {{subverted|Trope}} a few times; Battle Maison Evelyn's Entei has Sacred Fire, which it got added to its moveset in Generation VI, though a Move Reminder is needed to relearn it. ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' also had a Kommo-o in the Battle Tree that knew Shell Smash -- a move the line can't learn. A patch ended up changing it to the more sensible Draco Meteor.
* The Mewtwo that serves as the FinalBoss of the first ''Stadium'' ([[NoExportForYou or second, if you're Japanese]]) has infinite PP.
** Pokémon Stadium also has a check in place to catch players cheating; if the player uses a Pokémon with an impossible move set or its stats are higher than it's supposed to be, the game declares that Pokémon illegal and won't allow the player to use it. Naturally, the AI has hacked move sets up the ass and possibly hacked stats as well. In other words, [[{{Hypocrite}} you're punished for cheating, but the AI is free to cheat as much as it wants]].
** Pokémon Stadium 2 goes the extra mile in cheating. All of the rentals in Pokémon Stadium 2 are effectively useless. The AI has hacked movesets and hacked stats; the rentals available to you have stats that are about 10% lower than they should be and the evolved Pokémon know utterly useless attacks. Unevolved rentals know decent attacks, but have far more pitiful stats that render them even more useless than their evolved counterparts. It is pretty much impossible to make any progress in Pokémon Stadium 2 without using homegrown Pokemon- as long as they're not from a Yellow Version... the game is known to delete saved games on Yellow Versions.
* ''VideoGame/PokemonColosseum'':
** There's one particularly annoying quirk in that the opponent gets to decide his moves ''after'' you use any items or send out any Pokémon. It leads to the very annoying problem of not being able to cure a Pokémon of confusion as, when you do, the opponent uses Confuse Ray on it again, despite that there's no way he'd use it normally!
** When you battle a Shadow Pokémon, it will have all four of its moves, but when you catch it, you're stuck with only Shadow Rush (though this is more of a case of RedemptionDemotion).
** Due to the increased number of Shadow moves available during Cipher's second coming, this is done away with in ''XD''.
* Last Resort, introduced in Generation IV, is a powerful move usable after every other move has been used by the Pokémon at least once. [=NPC=]s can use it early, though.
* Try using the Mean Look/Perish Song combo on a Trainer with multiple Pokémon. When you switch your Pokémon out to avoid getting [=KOed=] by Perish Song, your opponent does the ''exact same thing'', despite the trapping effect not allowing switching. [[note]]To elaborate: Perish Song is a technique that makes both Pokémon faint after three turns. Mean Look is a technique that prevents switching. By using Mean Look, then using Perish Song, the opponent's Pokémon will faint on the third turn, while you can switch out just before the final turn to avoid fainting. For human players, the player who is trapped has their switching function disabled. For the computer, however, as long as you switch out, they can switch as well.[[/note]] [[note]]This turns out to be because, technically, the AI can switch whenever it wants, and ''chooses'' not to switch when it is trapped, but then when deciding whether to switch out on the last turn of Perish Song, it erroneously checks whether ''your'' Mon is trapped, not its own.[[/note]]
* Particularly in the Masters Battle part of ''Pokémon Battle Revolution''; the computer players have an uncanny ability to know precisely what Pokémon the player is going to switch to or use at any given moment.
* The slot machines in the Game Corners are based on Japanese pachisuro machines (see the Real Life section), and thus they will slip to prevent paying out a winning combination. However, the slots in the Japanese versions of ''[=HeartGold and SoulSilver=]'' take this UpToEleven: They'll actually continue spinning well after you hit the button (even if it takes more than a half-revolution) to force two Poké Balls or two 7's to line up on the first two reels, then force the third reel to avoid lining up a third 7 or Poké Ball to achieve a near miss. This would actually be highly illegal to program into a real pachisuro machine.
* In one of the bonus downloadable tournaments in ''Black and White 2'' (which is as of yet only available in Japan), Fantina's Giratina is in its Origin Forme but is holding a Ghost Gem. Giratina can only be in Origin Forme if it is holding a Griseous Orb.
* In Generation I, your rival's Pidgey evolves into Pidgeotto at Level 18. This is perfectly normal, yet for some reason the remakes decreased its level by 1 the first time you fight Pidgeotto. And Pidgey doesn't evolve until Level 18, making an evolved Level 17 Pidgeotto impossible. It is possible that your rival simply caught a different Pidgeotto in the wild, but it is heavily implied otherwise.
* Salamence from Pokémon Ranger ''ignores'' your starter's assist, despite that an Electric-type attack should deal normal damage.
* Actually downplayed in the Battle Maison for VideoGame/PokemonXAndY. Cheating (but may be averted with future games and distribution events): Instances of abilities/items unavailable in regular play, such as Contrary Serperior [[note]]recently distributed as a special Pokémon[[/note]], or Snow Warning Aurorus [[note]]later distributed as a participation prize for the Enter the Dragon Type competition[[/note]], and Jaboca Berry [[note]](available in Gen 5, but unavailable in, and cannot be transferred via PokeBank to, Gen 6[[/note]] etc. Playing fair: Pretty much everything else. With the exception of the above, all movesets/abilities of opponent's Pokémon are obtainable by the player, and the legendaries being used in the consecutive battles are all '''legal''' in rated battles. This is averted in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', when Contrary Serperior and Snow Warning Amaura were released as Mystery Gifts, and the Jaboca Berry, among other rare Berries, was made available as a prize in one of the Pokémon Global Link minigames.
* In the TCG Online game, watch how many times your computerised opponent gets potions, roller skates, and other lovely and convenient advantages, versus how many times they occur for you, the player. Clearly, the AI really is a cheating bastard.
* In Hoenn Contests (both gen 3 and gen 6), the AI will always, without fail, know when you're about to use a jamming move, and if they can will immediately use a move preventing jamming.
** When you play a Contest against Lisia in ''OR/AS'', her Altaria will have a Condition that is higher than you can possibly reach through the use of [=PokéBlocks=], even if you also add a scarf.
* Bulbapedia has two pages dedicated to showing moves your opponent (or in rare cases, your Pokemon) cannot [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Game_move_errors legitimately know in games]] or the [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/TCG_move_errors Trading Card Game]].
* [[GameMod ROM hacks]] of first and second-generation games will often have you face against Pokémon that are ''over'' level 100. For example, in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlueKaizo Pokémon Blue Kaizo]]'', the [[spoiler:Elite Four and Champion have level ''115'' Pokémon]].
* ''VideoGame/PokemonDarkRising'' has a certain boss character use Pokemon the player can't capture. [[spoiler:the final boss uses a Shadow Lugia with altered base stats and a powerful fan made move with 200 base power]]

to:

[[folder: Pokémon]]
[[folder:Open World Sandbox]]
* [=NPC=]s, even ones with no plot significance, often have Pokémon that know powerful moves about five levels early. In later games, Pokémon learning moves early is actually [[JustifiedTrope justified]] -- a skilled breeder can The Rhino Tanks are the definition of Badass in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'', being incredibly rare to find unless you get level-up moves and moves the Pokémon otherwise couldn't know (Egg moves) bred onto Level 5 (and, a six-star wanted level, or obtain one from Generation IV onward, Level 1) Pokémon if the father knows it, so presumably the computer-controlled trainers bred their own. While the player can't do this at first, many TournamentPlay fans use this in the {{Metagame}}.
**
military base (which will give you a five-star wanted level). However, there are still instances where the player is at a disadvantage, as there some Pokémon that the player just won't have access to, making breeding for egg moves literally impossible without trading and getting them early from other players.
* [=NPCs=] in Generation I could never run out of PP. Have fun with the Elite Four-Champion gauntlet...
* Speaking of the Elite Four, Lance's Dragonite in Generation I has Barrier. Go on. Check to see how the line learns it. Done? Yep. Dragonite's line has forever been incapable of learning Barrier, no matter how much breeding you do. What's more, in Generation II, his Aerodactyl knows Rock Slide, which it couldn't learn until ''[[VideoGame/PokemonFireRedAndLeafGreen FireRed and LeafGreen]]''.
** In 2016, Dragonite finally gets to learn Barrier legally.... at least, the event Dragonites that are in themselves a reference to Lance's Dragonite.
* In a similar vein, various characters have Pokémon that have evolved at levels lower than their designated evolution level, if you were to train up its pre-evolution. Also {{justified|Trope}} in that various areas contain wild evolved Pokémon at lower levels than ought to be possible, allowing the player to catch them -- the [=NPC=]s may have caught their Pokémon in places the player simply hasn't been to.
** Ghetsis in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a particularly notable example of this in his level 54 Hydreigon, which is 10 levels lower then when it can normally be obtained. {{Fanon}} claims that this action led to Ghetsis [[http://images5.fanpop.com/image/quiz/832000/832998_1334165220971_160.jpg?v=1334165104 losing his right eye]].
*** In ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', Ghetsis still has his Hydreigon, now two levels ''lower'', albeit with a weaker moveset. [[spoiler: Iris]], however, is packing one of her own that's almost as nasty as his was in the prequel (and just as nasty in Challenge Mode).
** Another infamous example is the grossly underleveled Purugly and Skuntank belonging to Galactic Commanders Mars and Jupiter, respectively, in ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' due to the EarlyGameHell and ForcedLevelGrinding they can put players through.
** Lance in GSC and HGSS has ''three'' underleveled Dragonite in your champion battle!
-->''"Tell that to my three inappropriately leveled Dragonites!"''
--->--'''Lance''', [[https://youtu.be/Hm5Jlnq8NHk Pokémon Golder 3]]

** Up until ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', in the event that both trainers had their last Pokemon KO'd as a result of Self-Destruct or Explosion, the AI would be declared the winner no matter what, despite the fact that the trainer who ''used'' one of said moves is supposed to lose by default.
*** Presumably, this is because you cannot continue playing if all of your Pokemon have been knocked out, and therefore whoever "won" the battle is irrelevant. Thankfully, the AI would usually try to refrain from using those moves in such a situation, and typically had to be forced into using them of your own volition.
* ''Emerald'' is also a blatant offender. It introduced the Battle Frontier, and set the standard for all subsequent games. It has multiple Gym Leaders with Pokémon they should not have at certain levels, such as Winona's Altaria. To top it all off, regular trainers in Victory Road have completely impossible movesets. One in particular is absurd: a Lanturn in a Double Battle knows NOTHING BUT EARTHQUAKE, a move it cannot learn in the first place.
* In ''VideoGame/PokemonHeartGoldAndSoulSilver'', during your first battle with Brock, he has a Rhyhorn with Sturdy. No other Rhyhorn can have this Ability as of Gen VII.
* The AI of the battle facilities of Generation III onward (the Battle Tower/Frontier/Subway/Maison/Tree) are designed to gain knowledge about your team as you accumulate winning streaks, despite the fact that you're facing new opponents over and over again and thus it wouldn't make sense for "Schoolgirl Jane" to know anything about the team that "Punk Sid" just battled. Specifically, you'll be forced to face teams that are increasingly designed to counter yours the higher your streak.
** While this may seem like a coincidence in many instances, the most damning evidence is that players that have used hacked Pokémon -- Pokémon with special abilities and sets that literally do not exist anywhere in the game and thus the computer cannot ''possibly'' have had the knowledge to counter them beforehand -- and still encounter teams that are tailor-made to overcome their strategies.
** The most popular of
these hacks (prior to the introduction of the Fairy-type) was the powerful Wondertomb/Wondereye[[labelnote:Explanation]]A combination of Wonder Guard -- an Ability that will only allow attacks if you're hit by something you're weak to -- vehicles are very heavy and a Pokémon with no weaknesses; Spiritomb and Sableye, respectively[[/labelnote]]. Get a high enough streak, and you'll find opponents carrying Mold Breaker (which lets them ignore Wonder Guard); not too strange, since Mold Breaker is a good ability and you'd encounter that anyway. Go farther, and they'll use ''nothing but status moves'' (which Wonder Guard can't block, and would be a baffling strategy unless the computer knew what it was dealing with beforehand). The strangest, of course, has to be the move Fire Fang. Due to a glitch, Fire Fang will hit opponents with Wonder Guard regardless of their type, and it's completely unknown why this move, and this move alone, has this ability. Even considering that this is a glitch, the computer ''will still use this, knowing that it works against you''.
** Another of these hacks is to give a Pokémon OneHitKO moves (that cause anything they hit to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin immediately faint]] in exchange for poor accuracy [[AwesomeButImpractical that makes it unlikely that they'll actually work]]) combined with the ability "No Guard" (that allows you and your opponent to [[AlwaysAccurateAttack bypass all accuracy checks]]). Use this strategy to sweep enough teams and you'll eventually start encountering Pokémon with the ability "Sturdy", an ability that, during Generations III and IV at least, does ''nothing else'' except block OHKO moves.
** For evidence this still exists in Gen VI's Battle Maison, try entering a Pokemon with Sand Stream[[note]]An Ability that stirs up a sandstorm
definitely ''not'' nimble when the Pokemon enters battle[[/note]] as your lead plus an Aron with Sturdy[[note]]If it's at full HP and takes a hit that would normally KO it in one hit, it'll hang on with 1 HP[[/note]] and Endeavor[[note]]A move that brings the target's HP down to the user's[[/note]]. In the Battle Maison, you'll quickly start encountering a disproportionate number of Pokemon who are immune to sandstorms.
* In the Pokemon World Tournament of ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', the matchups tend to pit you against opponents whose Pokémon have a general type advantage. For example, if you're participating in a single battle tournament with a Serperior, a Volcarona and a Hydreigon, chances are you'll be pitted against a Bug Type Gym Leader in the first turn, as Bug Types hold a type advantage against Serperior and Hydreigon; for the Volcarona, chances also are that at least one of the opponent's Pokémon will know a convenient Water, Flying or Rock-type move too. And then, by some miracle that you do beat that Gym Leader, you'll find your next opponent just happens to be an Ice Type user (again with at least one Pokémon that knows a move that's super effective against your Volcarona) and so on...
** Additionally, one of the most obvious examples of this trope happens when using Zoroark first, while having a Ghost-type Pokemon as your last slot in your party. Zoroark's ability Illusion makes it appear the same as the last Pokemon in your party, complete with the same name. In the Battle Subway, neither player is supposed to know what the opponent's team is composed of.
''you'' drive them. However, when facing any Pokemon (for example Alakazam, a Psychic-type) as Zoroark with a Ghost-type Pokemon's name if you manage to outrun the police, FBI and appearance (for example Spiritomb, a Dark/Ghost type), the computer will always choose to perform a Fighting-type attack to the fake Ghost. Note that this exact example is not uncommon, and that while Dark and Ghost are both super effective against Psychic, the opponent's Pokemon stays on the field to do a Fighting-type move that the Dark/Ghost Pokemon would be completely immune to, had it not been a Zoroark using Illusion.
*** Although this may not always happen, resulting
army in a situation such as a Gallade repeatedly using Psycho Cut against a "Crobat" (Zoroark).
* One particular opponent/partner in the Battle Tree uses a Latios. This can potentially hold a Latiosite, but the player is completely unable to acquire Latiosite themselves, as with a few exceptions, only the Mega Stones for Pokémon in the Alola Dex can be obtained.
* The usual instance of the computer's Pokémon having illegal moves has been {{subverted|Trope}} a few times; Battle Maison Evelyn's Entei has Sacred Fire, which it got added to its moveset in Generation VI, though a Move Reminder is needed to relearn it. ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' also had a Kommo-o in the Battle Tree that knew Shell Smash -- a move the line can't learn. A patch ended up changing it to the more sensible Draco Meteor.
* The Mewtwo that serves as the FinalBoss of the first ''Stadium'' ([[NoExportForYou or second, if you're Japanese]]) has infinite PP.
** Pokémon Stadium also has a check in place to catch players cheating; if the player uses a Pokémon with an impossible move set or its stats are higher than it's supposed to be, the game declares that Pokémon illegal and won't allow the player to use it. Naturally, the AI has hacked move sets up the ass and possibly hacked stats as well. In other words, [[{{Hypocrite}} you're punished for cheating, but the AI is free to cheat as much as it wants]].
** Pokémon Stadium 2 goes the extra mile in cheating. All of the rentals in Pokémon Stadium 2 are effectively useless. The AI has hacked movesets and hacked stats; the rentals available to you have stats that are about 10% lower than they should be and the evolved Pokémon know utterly useless attacks. Unevolved rentals know decent attacks, but have far more pitiful stats that render them even more useless than their evolved counterparts. It is pretty much impossible to make any progress in Pokémon Stadium 2 without using homegrown Pokemon- as long as they're not from a Yellow Version... the game is known to delete saved games on Yellow Versions.
* ''VideoGame/PokemonColosseum'':
** There's one particularly annoying quirk in that the opponent gets to decide his moves ''after'' you use any items or send out any Pokémon. It leads to the very annoying problem of not being able to cure a Pokémon of confusion as, when you do, the opponent uses Confuse Ray on it again, despite that there's no way he'd use it normally!
** When you battle a Shadow Pokémon, it will have all four of its moves, but when you catch it, you're stuck with only Shadow Rush (though this is more of a case of RedemptionDemotion).
** Due to the increased number of Shadow moves available during Cipher's second coming, this is done away with in ''XD''.
* Last Resort, introduced in Generation IV, is a powerful move usable after every other move has been used by the Pokémon at least once. [=NPC=]s can use it early, though.
* Try using the Mean Look/Perish Song combo on a Trainer with multiple Pokémon. When you switch
your Pokémon out to avoid getting [=KOed=] by Perish Song, your opponent does the ''exact same thing'', despite the trapping effect not allowing switching. [[note]]To elaborate: Perish Song is a technique that makes both Pokémon faint after three turns. Mean Look is a technique that prevents switching. By using Mean Look, then using Perish Song, the opponent's Pokémon will faint on the third turn, while you can switch out just before the final turn to avoid fainting. For human players, the player who is trapped has their switching function disabled. For the computer, however, as long as you switch out, they can switch as well.[[/note]] [[note]]This turns out to be because, technically, the AI can switch whenever it wants, souped-up Infernus and ''chooses'' not to switch when it is trapped, but then when deciding whether to switch out on the last turn of Perish Song, it erroneously checks whether ''your'' Mon is trapped, not its own.[[/note]]
* Particularly in the Masters Battle part of ''Pokémon Battle Revolution''; the computer players have an uncanny ability to know precisely what Pokémon the player is going to switch to or use at any given moment.
* The slot machines in the Game Corners are based on Japanese pachisuro machines (see the Real Life section), and thus they will slip to prevent paying out a winning combination. However, the slots in the Japanese versions of ''[=HeartGold and SoulSilver=]'' take this UpToEleven: They'll actually continue spinning well after you hit the button (even if it takes more than a half-revolution) to force two Poké Balls or two 7's to line up on the first two reels, then force the third reel to avoid lining up a third 7 or Poké Ball to achieve a near miss. This would actually be highly illegal to program into a real pachisuro machine.
* In one of the bonus downloadable tournaments in ''Black and White 2'' (which is as of yet only available in Japan), Fantina's Giratina is in its Origin Forme but is holding a Ghost Gem. Giratina can only be in Origin Forme if it is holding a Griseous Orb.
* In Generation I, your rival's Pidgey evolves into Pidgeotto at Level 18. This is perfectly normal, yet for some reason the remakes decreased its level by 1 the first time you fight Pidgeotto. And Pidgey doesn't evolve until Level 18, making an evolved Level 17 Pidgeotto impossible. It is possible that your rival simply caught a different Pidgeotto in the wild, but it is heavily implied otherwise.
* Salamence from Pokémon Ranger ''ignores'' your starter's assist, despite that an Electric-type attack should deal normal damage.
* Actually downplayed in the Battle Maison for VideoGame/PokemonXAndY. Cheating (but may be averted with future games and distribution events): Instances of abilities/items unavailable in regular play, such as Contrary Serperior [[note]]recently distributed as a special Pokémon[[/note]], or Snow Warning Aurorus [[note]]later distributed as a participation prize for the Enter the Dragon Type competition[[/note]], and Jaboca Berry [[note]](available in Gen 5, but unavailable in, and cannot be transferred via PokeBank to, Gen 6[[/note]] etc. Playing fair: Pretty much everything else. With the exception of the above, all movesets/abilities of opponent's Pokémon are obtainable by the player, and the legendaries being used in the consecutive battles are all '''legal''' in rated battles. This is averted in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', when Contrary Serperior and Snow Warning Amaura were released as Mystery Gifts, and the Jaboca Berry, among other rare Berries, was made available as a prize in one of the Pokémon Global Link minigames.
* In the TCG Online game, watch how many times your computerised opponent gets potions, roller skates, and other lovely and convenient advantages, versus how many times they occur for you, the player. Clearly, the AI really is a cheating bastard.
* In Hoenn Contests (both gen 3 and gen 6), the AI will always, without fail, know when you're about to use a jamming move, and if they can will immediately use a move preventing jamming.
** When you play a Contest against Lisia in ''OR/AS'', her Altaria will have a Condition that is higher than you can possibly reach
tear through the use countryside, prepare to have the horror of [=PokéBlocks=], even if you also add a scarf.
* Bulbapedia has two pages dedicated to showing moves
your opponent (or in rare cases, your Pokemon) cannot [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Game_move_errors legitimately know in games]] or life when ''a Rhino Tank bursts out of the [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/TCG_move_errors Trading Card Game]].
* [[GameMod ROM hacks]] of first
woods and second-generation games will often have charges straight for you face against Pokémon that are ''over'' level 100. For example, in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlueKaizo Pokémon Blue Kaizo]]'', the [[spoiler:Elite Four and Champion have level ''115'' Pokémon]].
* ''VideoGame/PokemonDarkRising'' has a certain boss character use Pokemon the player can't capture. [[spoiler:the final boss uses a Shadow Lugia with altered base stats and a powerful fan made move with 200 base power]]
at speeds upwards of 120 miles per hour''.



!!Specific Examples:

''Note: Since this trope is so ''incredibly'' common, only {{egregious}} examples should be listed here, otherwise this entry would take over the entire wiki. Aversions or subversions should probably be left out as well, since that's (hopefully) the default.''

[[folder: Fighting Games]]
* While the AI in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' and ''Brawl'' isn't of Rubber Band variety, it still can [[TheAllSeeingAI always see everything in the stage]].
** The computer also knows what effect clocks will have. If you see a clock, and don't see the computer gunning for it, when you pick it up, it will slow you down. The same can be said for Poke Balls and assist trophies.
** Items, particularly the Dragoon Parts in ''Brawl'', are easier to drop when a human player is attacked, but the computer can hold onto them through a lot more attacks. Don't be surprised if you drop your beam sword after every single hit you take, then the AI grabs it and ''never'' lets go.
** Throughout the series, changing a CPU's difficulty level changes three parameters: how aggressive they are, how likely they are to avoid your attacks, and their reaction time. In both versions of ''[=SSB4=]'', a level 9 CPU has a reaction time of ''one frame'' , meaning that the instant you input the button combination for a certain attack, they're already air-dodging out of harm's way. Meanwhile, of course, they're free to whale on you as much as they want.
** Picking up the hammer item will cause the player to only be able to move and jump for a duration, during which they will rapidly swing it back and forth dealing heavy damage to nearby opponents. Getting sent offstage will ensure the wielder dies if the effect doesn't wear off fast enough to allow recovery moves. The CPU however will invariably drop it on its own if they are placed into a position where they will fall to their death if they hold on to it. In addition, the hammer's head will have a random but small chance of breaking off, leaving you prone to attacks until it wears off. The AI, however, is allowed to drop it under this circumstance too.
* In the ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series, there are moves known as "charge moves" which require holding the joystick in a certain direction for a short period. The computer, however, doesn't have to do this and can often perform a charge move in the middle of moving in the ''opposite'' direction, such as using Blanka's charge-back roll attack while ''walking forward''. This also applies to "spin" moves (moves which require a 180 degree, 360, or more cycle of joystick motion). Most obvious the 3,000th time Zangief hits you with a full-strength spinning piledriver (the "air" version, triggered by any upwards joystick click, is approximately 3/4 the damage of the ground version).
** The charge move behavior has been fixed in later Capcom fighters, such as Vampire Savior. But perhaps as a throwback to the cheating AI in Street Fighter 2, Baby Bonnie Hood has a super move that enables her to use her high-damaging charge attack, Smile & Missile, without charging (replacing her normal punch attacks) for a short period of time.
** In ''VideoGame/StreetFighterTheMovie'' ([[RecursiveAdaptation the game]] [[Film/StreetFighter of the movie]] [[VideoGame/StreetFighterII of the game]]), when fighting M. Bison at the end, there was a fairly high chance that if the player was winning, Bison would stop taking damage from player attacks, or insta-kill the player with a weak attack, or the player would take damage from his own attacks.
** Another from Street Fighter II: AI opponents could deliver a barrage of crouching kicks at lightning speed. Fortunately for the player, the AI will usually only connect once, which sends the player's fighter flying away from the opponent.
* In the ''MortalKombat'' arcade series, the computer player often blatantly cheats. Here are some gems for ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2''.
** On ''any'' match after the first few, you cannot throw the computer unless it's stunned or immobilized. It would ''always'' throw you instead. In early revisions, it would even throw you when ''it'' was incapacitated. You could freeze the [=CPU=] solid with your ice ball, but if you tried to throw it, it would throw you back '''''while still looking frozen'''''. An opponent dazed for "FinishHim" If you accidentally did a throw, he'd ''still'' throw you back. And if that took you to no life, ''you'd lose''. Absolutely hilarious, unless you are the one it happened to.
** Whenever you did Scorpion's screen side shifting teleport, the computer would turn around and send a projectile your way... before you even left your side of the screen. Humans can't do this, but actually have to wait for you to wrap around before they turn around. However, if your screen wrapping teleport failed because you were backed into the corner... it would ''still'' turn around and fire the other way! Unless you were playing against a character with a really fast projectile recovery, this resulted in you getting a free chance to harpoon the computer. HilarityEnsues.
** Heaven forbid your feet leave the ground. You want to jump forward? They ''will'' jump kick you out of the air. You want to jump back? Prepare to eat a projectile. (Though those who could warp attack like Smoke and Scorpion could jump back, cancel into the warp and smack the computer silly when they inevitably fireballed).
** In ''VideoGame/MortalKombat3'', Kano and Liu Kang could pull their special charging moves almost instantly, sometimes several times in succession. Liu Kang could do several bicycle attacks and then finish you with a combo. Kano could do his spinning attack twice, and sometimes when you were in mid-air.
** One textbook case vessel of the trope and a bane to most players is Jade in [=UMK3=] who activates her invincibility technique ''the instant'' you throw a projectile at her. It doesn't help that when she activates this, she actually runs at you in the instant she does without any warning whatsoever and devastates you with her uber-long combo with no resistance and does so with impeccable timing.
** Some more things that are painfully obvious are that occasionally, when you're in the middle of a combo, the AI will throw you before you finish it. Naturally, this is not normally possible. Another case is that if you get them with a spear/hook from Scorpion or Smoke, then attempt to jump over them, they'll attack you while they should still be stunned. Finally, in some situations, the AI will kick you or block your attacks in an Endurance match. They'll do this when they're supposed to be down and the second fighter is onscreen, by the way.
** ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9'' (2011) lives up to its predecessors in cheating bastardness. Enemies can counter your moves the INSTANT you throw them and can seemingly block EVERYTHING you throw at times, but that isn't the worst part. The worst part is the bosses. If a boss throws an attack of ANY kind, he becomes immune to being stunned. You jump kick Kintaro in the face while both of you are airborne? Too bad he just started his air throw, so you're getting slammed in the ground. And in Challenge tower levels where there are random powerups being dropped you can almost guarantee that they will be dropped behind the CPU, ESPECIALLY if the CPU is near death.
*** Not to mention, the absolute pain in the ass that is [[BigBad Shao Kahn]]. Most of his attacks are unblockable, though he can block the player's attacks without actually needing to block with his arms. He is capable of unleashing health-bar killing attack strings that are unavoidable, unbreakable, and unblockable once started, and his X-ray attack can take out half of the player's health-bar. Compounding this is that he's ''[[LightningBruiser ridiculously fast]]'' and is usually (but not always) ImmuneToFlinching, making him a boss who can take you out in a matter of seconds!
* ''VideoGame/DynastyWarriors'' games have the bad habit of allowing the computer controlled opponent to recover or receive random power-ups in a duel...where there is no feasible manner in which they could have obtained these items, as there are no boxes or dead enemy soldiers in duel mode.
** And then we have DynastyWarriorsOnline. Let's not beat around the bush, the computers cheat like a Mississippi gambler(no offense to Mississippi), but a sack of bricks is smarter than than the A.I. (where Mississippi outshines the computer). They collect resources from no source at all, and you can very visibly see while beating them up as it alerts you when they pick up flasks (needed for in battle upgrades). On the other hand this time it's justified because the A.I. simplemindedly pursues one goal: capturing bases. Bases don't give anything until you capture them and even then it's health regeneration, so it balances out.
*** Also, musou generals. These characters, the original cast of the dynasty warriors game from 5, don't show up normally. But when they do, they are difficult. They use their original movesets, which is (aside from a few choice weapons) impossible for players, and they have ungodly stats. They have high health, high defense, high attack, high damage. This makes them capable of killing all but tanks in one or two hits. Additionally, they have high flinch resistance, which means you can't prevent them from attacking by knocking them around. This makes them very hard to defeat without using a weapon with a build designed around it. This would be much worse if not for, again, the fact that they only show up on special occasions. Thankfully, unlike players, you only have to beat them once in a match. After that, they're gone for good.
** The empires series. Pretty much every game has at least one advantage the player will never have.
*** DW4E gives you a maximum of 10 officers and 10 Lieutenants. Your enemies? 3 officers and 3 Lieutenants for every territory they have. On the flip side, you never lose your officer maximum. even if you're down to one territory.
*** DW6E has enemies never lack the troops they need. Even if you taunt them for years at a time. The only time it will be ungodly unfair in your favor is if your officers are several levels above theirs.
*** DW8E Is actually pretty fair. but it does do a lot to keep you from winning in anything except battle. Using your various strategies and tactics out of battle will never cause a kingdom to collapse even when it should. Using isolate to cause the ruler to remove every single officer under him will only cause him to take on a free officer for the sake of having more than one character in the A.I. kingdom. Otherwise, the game is pretty good about not giving the computer access to anything that will give them an unwarranted advantage.
*** ''VideoGame/SamuraiWarriors 2 Empires'' have enemy officers rise in levels at ungodly speed. [[FridgeLogic Even if they never fight anyone.]]
** In the main games, enemies will sometimes reappear in the same battlefield. While it's sometimes justified via story (Meng Huos seven defeats), some are not (Zhang Liao has reappeared on the battlefield).
** Sometimes your strongest general manages to fall to a footsoldier just because you didn't get there in time. And that same general, on another faction's story, manages to endure FIVE WAVES OF ENEMIES in that same map.
** Lu FUCKING Bu! Every time he appears you can only think "I'm doomed!", as he takes down your allies one by one. But when you get to play as him... He's not that strong. Yet he is ALWAYS the strongest one when used by the CPU.
** Inversion with Tadakatsu Honda. He is a decent challenge in the hands of the CPU. But for a player using them? It's like a walk in the park with a walking brick wall with a library of powerful moves! And that is not even getting to his Special Actions!
* ''Franchise/DragonBall'' {{licensed game}}s have this during story missions. For instance, some characters in later stages are programmed to ''automatically'' dodge most combo attacks (like throwing your enemy in the air and teleporting to hit them up there, more than one energy attack, etc.). This becomes a problem in levels where you can get a RingOut. Because the enemy will doubtless be able to break your guard and counterattack whenever he feels like, you'll be easily knocked out the ring by him, while he can simply decide not to be hurt by your attacks.
** Another source of shenanigans are [[TeleportSpam ki teleports]]. Its esentially a counter that will consume an energy bar for teleporting behind the attacker and smack him on the noggin. First off, the smack can be cancelled into a combo of your choice; but then the AI will [[ComputersAreFast immediately pull them off]] wherever a human player has to first input guard, and then the combo. Second, should you do a ki teleport, the AI will inmediatly follow up with another one, and another one, and ANOTHER one, so long as they come up on top. Doesn't help that sometimes the AI will cheat and use less energy per teleport to guarantee getting the last laugh.
*** To take it up one more agonizing notch, even if you blatantly cheat, the Computer *still* out-cheats you! In the [=PS2=] DB fighting games by Atari, the games would follow a switch-sides method for the tournament after each round. Try and use ye olde Game Shark, or like device? Well, once the game switches sides, the AI now has whatever extras you gave yourself. But wait - there's more. You get your ass kicked in a truly unfair manner, and then the game switches sides again when you continue--and it still keeps the codes for itself--it likes them now.
** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ Supersonic Warriors 2'', at the end of Mania mode. Throughout the 20 match mode, the player will automatically lose any special attack BeamOWar animation. But for the last 10 machtes, the computer adds two or three of the below tricks. For three of the last six matches, it then pits the player's team against one opponent (Cell, then Broly, and in the final match SS Goku), who has access to about a half-dozen AI exclusive skills, including:
*** A shield to block ''everything'' that can last as long as the AI wants. They can't do anything while it's active, but since they don't need to guard or gather energy, and they have other attack buffs (see below), this just means that the player is lulled into gathering energy so the computer can attack at a moment's notice.
*** Special moves can be spammed at no energy cost, meaning gathered Ki is only used for their ultimate attacks. They can also be done repeatedly, interrupting each other, and with no lag. For example, Broly's giant ball projectile, the strongest projectile in the game, that when spammed can Wombo Combo even another Broly.
*** Ultimate techniques become spiteful overkill for you ''almost'' killing them.
*** Instant teleportation to the space directly behind where you're attacking, as soon as you release that attack. Even without this, the characters can move more quickly than any other character in the game.
*** Base skill enhancements such as absurd speed, counter beams and triple throw range. For the Goku fight, theses enhancements, and ''all'' hitboxes, are doubled again. This results in a regular Kamehameha taking up most of the screen and killing most characters.
** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse'' was pretty bad about its cheating AI, mainly due to the fact that while players had Ki or Stamina drain for transformations, the AI (who only transform when a mission makes them do so) never run out; this is bad in late game quests that liberally throw Super Saiyans at you [[OhCrap who have infinite Ki and know how to use it.]] While they suffered ArtificialStupidity due to willingly wasting their Stamina on evasive skills and vanishes, they also often packed Super Armor, effectively making them unflinching no matter how hard you hit them as they smack you back.
*** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse2'' removed super armor and infinite Ki, and let you see the enemy's stamina and ki at all times for further assurance that they're not cheating. Except they do anyway; when fighting Frieza and Cooler at the end of the Namek Saga, ''their Stamina regen is jacked up significantly'' to the point that even the FinalBoss can't compare. Meanwhile, the AI can perfectly read player inputs, know when you're holding a button to prepare a Super or Ultimate Skill, and abuse Vanishes, Stamina Breaks and Burst Dashes with perfect timing to the point that using any Ultimate that isn't mostly risk-free will instantly have them Stamina Break you if you didn't break them beforehand.
* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' is very... [[JustForPun guilty]] of this. On top of the usual array of unfair SNKBoss attributes for the "boss" versions of otherwise regular characters--dealing dramatically more and taking dramatically less damage compared to their playable counterparts, doing even the most absurdly impossible-to-input moves ''in the middle of combos'' completely at will, gaining a full bar of tension with a thought, etc.--''all'' AI characters on high enough difficulty settings or close enough to the final match of Arcade mode gain the ability to psychically read controller input. Many characters rely on having a good mix-up game, placing continuous pressure on an opponent until they finally make a mistake in their blocking, and going from there. It works pretty well against humans so long as the attacker doesn't get too predictable. Against the CPU, though, mix-up characters are almost completely useless, as every attack is more or less a polite request for the computer to please consider allowing this next one to actually connect for once. Which is usually denied.
** There is also, notably, Boss I-No from Guilty Gear XX -- she happens to have a boss-only move (which has recently been added to the player moveset, but not in the game she's a boss in) called 'Megalomania' which spams heart-shaped projectiles, and if you so much as graze one the entire swarm will mug you. It has three ranges -- one that's fairly easy to dodge, one that's kind of like a wave and needs to be walked through, and one that fills the entire screen in front of her. The obvious solution to that last one might be to block or to leap over and behind her before she lets it go . . . but tell that to the guy who's freaking out at the sight of innumerable 'warning' signs covering 90% of the screen (the attack, it should be noted, is kind enough to tell you where it's going to hit).
*** The attacks can be fairly easy to memorize, the problem comes when she'll sometimes switch which pattern she's using at the last second, or if the player thinks they're smart enough to simply jump over her, where the patterns never go. Too bad, if you do this, the AI reacts as if you've been hit and they all swarm you.
* Those who played ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSvCChaos'' learned to dislike Goenitz, an [[SNKBoss SNK sub-boss]] with an attack targeting one of four areas on the screen (close, close-mid, mid, far) that always knew exactly where you would be, canceled projectiles, and was ''spammed constantly'', making getting close enough to hit an exercise in frustrating patience.
** In a couple of ways, Goenitz was even worse in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '96'', since he could do desperation moves without restrictions while giving more and receiving less damage to/from the player.
* In ''VideoGame/GodzillaDestroyAllMonstersMelee'', the AI opponents will often head towards powerups that are offscreen, that the player has no idea that they're there.
** Fortunately you can counter this by running in the opposite direction and, if the pickup is far enough away, you'll get the computer stuck against the edge of the camera and unable to reach it. The computer will keep trying to get to the pickup while you're free to chuck buildings at it.
* If your attack is blocked by the computer in ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', the computer ''will'' throw you. Doesn't matter what difficulty level, or how strong the attack and the subsequent blockstun is - the computer will throw you.
* ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD took the unusual approach of requiring "inner energy" for all special moves. Theoretically, this forced the player to learn the characters and apply specific strategies in every possible matchup... Except against the AI, which could always execute specials with sheer and utter disregard of its own energy levels.
** Even more, well, insulting, characters have an ability called Insult which allows them to sacrifice one piece of their special gauge to destroy a little more of their opponents. The computer, especially the final boss (''bosses'' in the Sega CD version), is quite fond of repeatedly Insulting you from a distance to render you impotent -- usually shortly before, with a blatantly flashing EMPTY gauge, they execute their ultimate full-gauge-requiring attacks, some of which doing things like rendering the character completely invincible (the final boss(es) have these, naturally). Did we mention if you lose in the final battle, you can't continue?
* The SNES game ''Dragon: the Bruce Lee Story'' probably deserves a mention. Whether or not the Demon with the halberd represents Bruce Lee's historically unalterable death, it's almost impossible to beat it.
* In that same vein, Richard Wong in the ''VideoGame/PsychicForce'' games can become unbeatable in a fight by spamming his magically-appearing sword move.
* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' suffered this terribly in the '94 and '95 incarnations. There was an ability called "Evade" that, if timed right, allowed the character to dodge attacks. This translated to "The computer is immune to projectiles". And in a callback to ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', getting blocked when you jumped in would lead to an instant throw. '96 pulled Evade completely, replacing it with the trademark "Roll", one of many reasons it's considered the first high point of the series.
** Another nasty SNKBoss advantage is one that the bosses of XI have. In addition to the usual SNK unfairness, the game uses a gauge system that goes up when you hit the opponent and down when they hit you to measure how well you do and decides who wins at time out based on that. The bosses gauge takes an ENORMOUS leap if they so much as brush past you, you however barely make it twitch even if you hit them multiple times. Combined with the fact the timer acts like it is on speed combines to add yet another layer of evil to the mix.
* ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}} 5'''s Jinpachi Mishima was a great example of this trope. He had The Stomp, an auto-stun move that didn't do damage but left your character floating and unable to block for at least seven seconds, an eternity in a fighting game. This was even worse in Dark Resurrection, when the computer learned how to do juggles with three signature uppercuts in a row, which took off about half your health. The version of the character given to the player, of course, did not have nearly as much priority for the stomp, which also had to be timed with the enemy attack (unlike the AI version which could just be done whenever).
** Jinpachi also gets a few 85%-95% damage attacks, which he will chain along with a teleporting backstep, which in the highest difficulty activates when an attack that would definitely hit is made by the player, it does it by reading controller inputs, but only at the highest difficulty level.
** In a fighting game basically devoid of projectiles, Jinpachi has fireballs and teleports. The teleports are bad enough, since they're basically instantaneous. But the fireballs? Dear Lord. Unblockable, unjumpable, unduckable. He can toss them out with no charge-up and no cool-down. That means that, even if you get smart, and try to sidestep, ''he'll just keep shooting until you take the hit.'' Of course, they do about 50% damage.
** Tekken 6's Azazel wasn't quite as bad, but had one very specific cheap cheat trick: he blocks while attacking. ''While attacking''. Normally, characters are vulnerable when performing an attack, and an opponent can interrupt them by landing the proper hit on them first. The only way to reliably hit Azazel is to get behind him and hit him while his back is turned, where he can't (usually) defend.
** To be slightly more specific, Azazel is twice your height, and you hit him in the legs when you attack. And his legs can block while his upper body attacks. It's still a violation of what has been a universal rule of Tekken until right then, and insanely frustrating. (To note: most previous Tekken games had bosses that where not too ridiculously powerful to be made available for playabler use, and who followed all the same basic rules that every other character did. Tekkens five and six where the first games to have bosses that where too obscenely powerful to give to players, or in Tekken 6's case, that didn't even follow some of the basic rules of the game.)
** ''Tekken Tag Tournament 2'' makes things much worse with the return of Jun Kazama and Unknown. Jun isn't anything threatening really, so long as you're careful. But those stupid Attack Reversals can be annoying, especially since Reversals are rarely used by the AI. Unknown however is even more fucking annoying with her many penchants to do a handful of things to interrupt your rhythm: Jinpachi's stun, her branches, her Attack Reversal and that dangerous [[OneHitKill portal move]]. That's not counting her increased health and quick regeneration.
** [[RubberBandAI And don't even think about building a winning streak.]] The computer ''will'' use unavoidable/unblockable attacks, use moves from impossible positions, move/attack faster than you, instantly use moves that require human players to execute a complex command, do combos that are impossible for the player, read your controller inputs and counters you immediately, and become impossible to fake out to punish you for it.
* By Namco, same as ''VideoGame/{{Tekken}}'', ''VideoGame/SoulCalibur'' has been pretty fair for the most part. There are the occasional moments when the enemy moves faster than a human, but still feels beatable. Then there's ''Broken Destiny'' and the introduction of [[LethalJokeCharacter Dampierre]]. ''All'' his moves look like feints and/or mistakes, don't deal a lot of damage, but have a nasty habit of stun-locking you, as well as many moves that are just plain annoying. An extremely devoted player can make him the deadliest fighter on the planet.
** Rock got a similar annoyance upgrade. He is slightly faster than his ''SCIV'' console counterpart and has an arsenal of grabs that can get you while your down or ''midair'', and the AI's ''very'' good at chaining them back-to-back for maximum frustration potential.
** In the original, Cervantes and Souledge have an attack called 'Self-Destruction' (renamed Geo De Rey in later installments); when the player uses it, it eats up 1/3 of their weapon gauge. The computer can decide arbitrarily if this applies to it or not; occasonally for Cervantes, hardly ever for Souledge. Souledge's version also has the advantage of controlling exactly when he launches, thus making it a nightmare when he starts spamming it, which is often, but you can control that too, so that's ok. It doesn't help that they (especially the latter) often get unbreakable weapons too while they suffer as much as everyone else when you control them, so good luck trying to disarm them. As the weapon gauge is never used again in such a fashion, it is no longer an issue from Soul Calibur Onwards.
* In the Xbox remake of ''[[VideoGame/DeadOrAlive Dead or Alive 2]]'', if you are playing Hayabusa (yes [[VideoGame/NinjaGaiden that one]]), Ein will block and counter pretty much every move that you ever make.
** The Tag Team Challanges in DOA Dimensions will make you throw that brand new 3DS right into a wall. Sure, it starts out easy enough to lull you into a false sense of security, but then the madness begins. The opponent AI is damn near PERFECT. With one hit, it can take down almost HALF of your health, whereas if you hit THEM, it's like hitting a brick wall with an inflatable hammer
*** The computer also controls your tag partner...and is worse then ANY noob you could ever face online. Really, its only use is to be a punching bag so you can recover your health. But considering your opponent can usually kill both you AND your tag partner within two seconds, it doesn't help much.
*** Oh, and the fight mechanics don't apply to them. Land a strike through a block? Sure. Counter a strike with a throw? Go for it. Block a throw? Absolutely. You'd love to be able to do that too, wouldn't you? Well too bad.
** In DOA 5, it gets even worse once you get to the last four difficulties. You will be countered out of every string you try, usually by the second hit before the AI springs into a combo that damages at least half your health. There are ways around this, but once you get to survival mode, good luck. All four courses require you to defeat 100 opponents, in a row, with one health bar.
* In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaJudgment'', Dracula WILL put his back to the screen, and thus you will not see what attack he is going to make.
* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}: The Broken Bond'', the computer is seemingly able to use the Rage Mode (which speeds them up and makes them take no damage from anything but damage-dealing jutsus) in the middle of a combo.
** Nevermind that if you make one mistake you get totally owned. They'll juggle you, never letting you even block. If the computer makes a mistake it doesn't matter because you have to have pretty much perfect timing to hit them at that moment anyway. Not to mention that they'll almost ALWAYS be able to charge up their jutsu but you'll never get even one chance.
** The ''VideoGame/NarutoClashOfNinja'' series avoided this for the most part, usual computer tendencies aside. Then English releases began to be developed by [[AmericanKirbyIsHardcore American developers instead]], and now we have story mode enemies who have no stagger animations and PerfectPlayAI mindsets- sometimes in 2 on 1 matches ''against you''. These aren't even optional challenges- you HAVE to kill these people to proceed. The ''optional'' challenges involve similar things, only with the difficulty turned UpToEleven by ''better'' AI.
** The Grandpa Gen challenges in ''NarutoShippudenUltimateNinjaStorm2''. Especially the Chiyo and Jiraiya fights. Both have insanely high attack and defenses, and can either poison you (Chiyo) or regain health (Jiraiya).
** [[Manga/{{Naruto}} Naruto Ultimate Ninja Heroes 3]] has this in four distinct types.
*** Some battles as already mentioned are usually 1 (You) VS two/three, which means one attacks, one charges their chakra, then switch. Repeat until death.
*** Sometimes when you attack the computer it just goes through them, obviously this doesnít happen to you. It also lets them set up an (Unblockable) attack.
*** Tactics like continuous healing work twice as well and as fast as they do for you.
* The first ''VideoGame/SamuraiShodown'' game was very guilty of this: The CPU could knock you out in as little as 2 hits/attacks, dizzy you repeatedly, connect more hits with the same attacks you used, stun you for more time than you could, or ''all of the above at the same time''.
* ''VideoGame/SuperGodzilla'' for the Super Nintendo did this against, well, pretty much everyone. Your own fighting spirit (a measure of how strong your techniques are) rises pretty slowly, compared to the UFO which is nearly permanently at maximum, or Mechagodzilla, who can go from nothing to max in a heartbeat, and teleport-body-slam you in the process. He will then use eye lasers just to mess with you. If you want to pull off the killer moves with a full bar, you absolutely need the booster item to fill it faster, because the enemy will hit you first otherwise.
* ''Wrestling/{{TNA}} iMPACT!'' the game. Anyone who is an established wrestler will automatically be twice as good as you, no matter who you choose. Certain matches in story mode can consist of you spending 90% of the match beating the hell out of them, only for them to come out of nowhere with enough counters to use a special move, hit it once, and win.
** Wrestling/{{WWE}} Smackdown Vs Raw 2009's career mode suffers the same issue above when facing the "higher level" wrestlers.
* In ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'', the AI also ignores equipment and accessory rules. Every piece of regular equipment (swords, shields, etc) has a level requirement that your character must meet in order to equip it, but almost every AI opponent will be wearing at least one item above their level. Accessories work somewhat differently. They are ranked from D to Star. The higher the rank, the fewer of that accessory you can use at the same time. Many AI will have three or four of the same Star-ranked accessory.
** Oddly enough, though, because of the way equipment was changed for the sequel[[note]]Equipment only has "tiered" requirements: level 1, 30, 60, 90, or 100[[/note]], the computer no longer breaks that rule.
** And we won't even mention [[spoiler: Chaos]], who cheats like a cheating cheaty-thing, especially with his Summon. (Every single other Summon in the game can only be used once per fight, except in one specific, rule-based case. He however can use his purely at will, as often as he wants.
** The prequel adds to the cheating -- if the game wants to play a character like an SNKBoss, it will -- dodging will be instant, attacks will be instant (even if you're playing the same character), their priority will be scores higher than yours, etc.
** Amusingly, ''Duodecim'' also lets you turn off most of the cheating by setting the ruleset for custom matches to "Official(Skill)", which disables equipment and summons for both sides. It's actually [[TropesAreNotBad kind of pathetic]] seeing [[ArtificialStupidity how badly the AI performs]] when forced to fight fair.
* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}: Blade Of Fate'', the human character can only FlashStep or use RF Special Attacks when they have enough Spiritual Power to do so. The AI opponents have infinite Spiritual Power.
** In ''Bleach: Soul Resurrección'', a character can enter "[[SuperMode Ignition Mode]]" to increase attack power, and from there use an "[[LimitBreak Ignition Attack]]", a powerful attack that completely empties the Ignition Gague. Usually the Ignition Gague can only be filled by causing damage, especially many hits quickly. The computer is not bound by these restrictions, and can enter Ignition Mode and use an Ignition Attack whenever they feel like it, which on harder difficulties they will. It's not unheard of for a computer-controlled character to use an Ignition Attack, and then re-enter Ignition mode ''before the player has even hit the ground'', especially when fighting multiple enemies at once.
* VideoGame/BlazBlue is guilty of this. Particularly Unlimited Nu and Ragna in Score Attack Mode.
** In Hakumen's story mode in Calamity Trigger, you get to fight Jin Kisaragi. Throughout this fight Jin ALWAYS HAS 100% HEAT GAUGE. He takes full advantage of this and will constantly catch you in an unwinnable loop with his Special attacks.
** Basically any fight against Hazama due to the fact that he lives up to his cheating bastard status. He will use his Distortion Drives only when you have literally no way to dodge them.
** Nu-13 on her own is bad enough; she can rapidfire summoned projectile swords. Many characters, particularly Hakumen and Tager, have no way at all to approach Nu in her NORMAL state. Based on tournaments, they have around a 20% chance of winning a match against a Nu player of equal skill. Unlimited Nu is Nu, except she summons twice as many swords. Yeah. It's hell.
*** Don't forget she has autogain on her Heat meter, has very little recovery time on her attacks and can (and will) combo any and all hits into her Distortion Drive, which hits for about 50% life. Bear in mind, this will happen if you fail to block ''even once'', while you will require about 40 minor miracles in a row to beat her.
** Ragna isn't much better. In his Unlimited state he has twice as much life as the tankiest glacier character in the game. He also has increased vampiric properties and his Distortion Drives in his Unlimited form can easily knock off around 75% of your HP, healing him for around 50% of his, and undoing all the work you've been doing through the entire match.
** AI-controlled characters are pretty good about having realistic reaction times, except in one specific scenario: If you're Rachel, and you're trying to manipulate them with [[BlowYouAway Sylphid]], they ''will'' air-dash in the opposite direction, the exact frame you press D. Doesn't matter whom you're fighting, or what you're trying to move them into; they're just programmed to instantly resist any attempts to blow them around. In fact, this can turn Sylphid into an AIBreaker; if you use it to blow them ''away'' from you, and they air dash towards you, they'll use up their air dash ''and'' (if you time it right) move right into the middle of [[LimitBreak Baden Baden Lily]] (or [[FinishingMove Clownish Calendula]] if that's your thing).
* ''VideoGame/BattleCapacity'' had major issues with Pyroak in the past. Pyroak has a lot of HP, excellent projecile attacks, and a useful anti-air attack which comes out quickly at adjustable heights. He is slow, however, and suffers against most characters at close range. When the AI was using Pyroak, there was literally ''no'' slowdown between launching projectiles and using his anti-air, making him all but unapproachable.
* This one is easy to miss, since you usually fight against human opponents in RumbleFighter. However, in Survival Mode, the enemies can use the [[DesperationAttack Panic Attack]] an unlimited number of times, whereas players are limited to using it once per round.
* Never let a fight go the distance in {{UFC}} 2. No matter how much you dominated the fight, the computer will invariably award itself the decision victory.
* ''VideoGame/XMenNextDimension'': your counterattacks will work approximately one time in seventeen. The A.I. can pull them off whenever it wants. And the game engine treats interrupting a string of attacks as the ''worst'' kind of impoliteness.
* It's so prevalent with the VideoGame/WWEVideoGames, that they had ''[[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard/WWEVideoGames to be moved to a separate page]]''.
** Smackdown Vs Raw, particularly when the RubberBandAI breaks. The CPU will become a PerfectPlayAI who [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules ignores the rules]].
** In WWE 12 at least, and probably earlier games as well, it seems like matches are predetermined. If the player is meant to lose then counters are ignored to the point that blatant cheating will occur. If the CPU is slated to lose on the other hand then the game is a cheating bastard for the human character, with the computer all but lying down for the pin, and you really have to work to even drag a match out of them.
** In some respects, [=WWE WrestleMania XIX=] for the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, namely in Revenge Mode. It seems as if the game simply ignores your frantic spinning of the control stick or mashing of L and R when trying to get up or counter if it feels like it. And sometimes, when you have to make an opponent bleed, it can be done easily to you, but the opponent can take seemingly hundreds of hits to finally go down. What's worse is the opponent has seemingly impeccable timing with it's counters and dodges, even doing these on your finishing moves.
** ''WWE 13'' is quite possibly the best portrayal of the, ahem, sport ever. It is also unquestionably the most broken. You try and attack your opponent and it reads your inputs and counters perfectly. You try and counter their attacks and the game ignores them. You are not given the chance to use finishers, special abilities or even escape attacks. The CPU recovers and attacks faster than you can. It cancels out you gaining a finisher for hot tags and comeback. The game can warp you into attacks and pins. It can even make use of changing the camera angle to use InterfaceScrew. You name a way the game can cheat and this one will do it.
* The various ''VideoGame/PunchOut'' games all allow the opponents to break boxing rules like ''nobody's'' business while restricting you to legitimate boxing tactics. Enemies are free to chug soda to replenish health, duct-tape a manhole cover over their only weak spot, or blatantly use prohibited moves like headbutts and ''magic'' to take you down. [[TropesAreTools Unlike most examples]] on this page, it's entirely PlayedForLaughs. The only aversion is Glass Joe's protective headgear, as it turns out if ''any'' boxer suffers 100 losses they're allowed to use it and, sure enough, Little Mac [[EasyModeMockery gets a set of his own]] if he suffers 100 losses.
* In ''Videogame/ForHonor'', higher-difficulty opponents in the campaign and higher-difficulty multiplayer bots are able to change attack directions faster than is physically possible for a human player. As a result you'll get situations where an AI Orochi or Valkyrie will initiate attack chains from above and midway through change directions to launch side attacks, the latter of which is physically too fast for a player to block. The only option is to dodge the chain altogether or parry the first hit to prevent it from ever starting.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: First Person Shooters]]
* Up until ''Vegas'', ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' seemed quite unfair in that the AI could somehow detect you even if you couldn't figure out where it was. And a major problem with the first games was that being spotted once, even if the guy didn't alert his comrades, meant [[TheAllSeeingAI everyone knew where you were]].
** In the original PC trilogy, the AI also had ImprobableAimingSkills: [[ArmorIsUseless no matter what body armor you chose]], a hit was usually deadly because the AI [[BoomHeadshot scored a headshot]] practically every time. And could do it from the other side of the map, with a machine pistol, and ''facing the wrong way''. ''Raven Shield'''s Elite setting is especially cheap, coupled with the ArtificialStupidity of friendly teammates.
* On higher difficulty levels, the bots in ''VideoGame/QuakeIIIArena'' can [[TheAllSeeingAI track your character through walls]] and can one-shot kill you via Railgun the moment a single pixel of your hitbox is exposed.
* ''VideoGame/MedalOfHonor'', especially the PC games. Nazis have [[ImprobableAimingSkills improbable accuracy]] with automatic weapons while yours suffer from ATeamFiring, can shoot through foliage and other transparent objects that you can't very well, don't suffer from aim disruption while supposedly flinching, will draw a bead on you the moment you enter their line of fire, especially the snipers in Snipertown, [[DoNotRunWithAGun run and gun with unlikely aiming skill]], and can even get perfect shots when blindfiring. All of which is true in ''Call of Duty'' as well, made by some of the same developers.
* Enemies in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' love to automatically shoot you ''just'' before you pull the trigger and throw off your aim so you miss your shot, especially when you're using a bolt-action rifle and have to wait a full second before you can fire again.
** Combat training in the ''[[VideoGame/CallOfDutyBlackOps Black Ops]]'' games lets you see for yourself just how much the AI cheats by letting you see killcams from their perspective. Tracking players through walls, absolutely zero recoil or bullet spread, and on higher difficulties nearly infinite look speed. One AI enemy with a semi automatic sniper rifle can kill multiple players spread out over an area in less than a second the instant it has line of sight to all of them. What's worse is [[SpitefulAI this generally only applies to the AI on the opposing team]] - ''your'' AI will frequently forget they have a loaded weapon in their hands and go for knife kills, ''forget they have a knife if they manage to survive to get into range'', and generally just spread out as far as possible and actively ignore enemies, especially ones that are attacking you.
** The stealth in the more modern Call of Duty games is actually quite fair. Occasionally though, your [[HollywoodSilencer amazingly quiet silenced pistol]] suddenly gives away your position as if it fired nuclear missiles and boulders.
*** Though one offender is the ''[[StealthMission Hid]][[ThrowbackLevel den]]'' mission in Modern Warfare 2's Special Ops mode. The main issue with making it through alive is ghillie snipers. Normally this wouldn't be so bad, because you're wearing a ghillie suit yourself, and it's an incredibly bushy area, so it shouldn't be so bad, right? '''''WRONG!''''' These snipers [[ImprobableAimingSkills could hit a gnat resting on a fencepost from ten kilometers away]], and when they aren't moving, which is a lot, are essentially invisible, while they plug bullets into you as if you're wearing high-visibility clothing. And on the off chance you manage to see one due to the glare on the scope, by then it's [[KilledMidSentence too]] [[BoomHeadshot la--]]
* ''{{Franchise/Halo}}''
** After dual-wielding in ''{{VideoGame/Halo 2}}'' and ''{{VideoGame/Halo 3}}'' proved to be rather unbalanced, it was excised in the subsequent games... for players. In ''VideoGame/HaloReach'', Elites are still perfectly capable of dual-wielding weapons, letting them still tear you to pieces with double plasma rifles while you have to wear down their shields the old fashioned way.
** Players acquainted with trying to hijack Wraith tanks for themselves may know the utter rage they felt upon finding that enemy Wraiths can fire mortars ''sideways''. Meanwhile the player in a Wraith can only fire directly forward, since that's the only direction the cannon faces. Covenant baddies being thorns in your side. Nothing ''you're'' allowed to do except slowly turn to hit them. And that's not even including enemy Wraiths' incredibly long-aim with an arcing projectile on Legendary.
* ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2'':
** Under normal circumstances, "facestabbing" as a Spy is a rare, [[GoodBadBugs hilarious glitch]]. Spy-bots in the [[ManVersusMachine Mann vs. Machine]] [[TheWarSequence mode]], however, seem capable of facestabbing players ''whenever the hell they want to.'' This starts making more sense when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZpGtx3orK4#t=28s you see how loopy the backstab hitboxes can be]], and take into account the spies know ''exactly'' where these places begin and end. Thankfully averted elsewhere: Just like übered human players, übered bomb carriers (and their medics) aren't immune to the Pyro's airblast. Especially useful if the map has a BottomlessPit, which not even über-bots can be exempted from. And as a nice bonus, that resets the bomb all the way back to the beginning. [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap And you thought MvM would turn Pyros useless]].
** Spy Robots can also backstab Snipers wearing the Razorback. As in, that piece of equipment whose ''sole purpose'' is to ''protect the Sniper from backstabs''.
** Meanwhile, in regular game modes featuring bots, it can be extremely difficult to kill any of them as a sniper, [[TheAllSeeingAI because bots automatically know when they're being targeted, even if you're aiming at their back halfway across the map]]. They'll also stare at disguised enemy Spies, waiting for them to reveal themselves.
** However, any bots who require aim do so with a virtual mouse, and their aim isn't perfect.
* ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters''
** The 5* AI in the original ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters'' game's Arcade modes will turn a semi-automatic weapon into a fully-automatic nightmare, and they never have to reload. ''Ever''. If they get hold of Pistol x2 and see you, ''you are probably going to die horribly in an endless storm of bullets''. Curiously enough, they are ''less'' dangerous if using actual automatic weapons.
** And the bots in ''VideoGame/TimeSplittersFuturePerfect'' will frequently walk through solid walls and scenery if you're not facing in their general direction, especially on Mapmaker maps; this becomes a real problem in Virus mode, where the AI will occasionally even ''fall through the fucking ceiling and land on you!!'' It's possible to turn around and catch them in the act, resulting in all sorts of creepy visual weirdness such as arms and faces half-emerged through the walls/windows/doors.
* ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}}''
** ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield 3}}''. ESPECIALLY on hard difficulty. Let's see, bullets that are flying everywhere? Check. A player that dies in two or three continuous shots? Check. Enemies that can shoot you with just your BIG TOE sticking out of cover? Check. Enemies that can SHOOT THROUGH ROCKS IN THE INDESTRUCTIBLE ENVIRONMENT? THAT'S A [[PrecisionFStrike BIG FUCKING CHECK!!!]]
** If you ever play against AI bots in ''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}} 1942'', you basically can't use airplanes because the AI's aiming is so accurate that it can use ordinary machine guns (as opposed to actual anti-air weapons) to whittle down your health and knock you out of the sky.
* Darksims in VideoGame/PerfectDark's Combat Simulator. They can teleport, shoot with 100% accuracy no matter the weapon or distance, and spawn with every weapon on the map already in their inventory. [[spoiler: They still don't know how to use Remote Mines.]]
* In ''{{VideoGame/Destiny}}'', when lining up your sights on an enemy (Usually through a sniper rifle but applies to other guns as well) the enemy will seem to magically know where you are and start moving to make your shot harder even if you haven't fired off a single round, yet. In addition, once you HAVE fired (Especially annoying if you're using a sniper rifle) the enemies will know JUST where you are and move behind appropriate cover to keep from being picked off so easily.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Live Action Television]]
* The ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "The Mind's Eye" seems to give pointed shout-out to this trope when Geordie [=LaForge=] tries to pass the time on a long shuttle trip by playing a trivia game with the computer. When Geordie acts a little too cocky, the computer blatantly changes the rules:
-->'''Shuttle Computer''': List the [[TechnoBabble resonances of sub-quantum associated with transitional relativity]].\\
'''[=LaForge=]''': That's easy--\\
'''Computer''': In alphabetical order.
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Maze Games]]
* ''Ms. Pac-Man: Maze Madness'''s multiplayer mode has all AI players being pretty much against all human players if there's any (and should be at least two of them) when it comes to the rules. Generally, they form a team, even though the player can't do so with other players. In Dot Mania mode, dead [=AIs=] lose merely two dots as opposed to the players' ten. In the same mode (and Ghost Tag, in the early moments), they're also notably quite [[SpitefulAI spiteful]], always chasing down power-ups if said power-up appears. Considering that 4 out of 5 power-ups in Dot Mania mode are lethal to anyone who didn't pick them up (though one power-up won't kill anyone but will result in dot loss regardless), this makes reaching the intended goal difficult for the players. Thankfully, the only power-ups that the [=AIs=] actively ignore are the bag of money (steals dots from other players) and the chocolate cake (makes the character [[AttackOfThe50FootWhatever grow bigger]], enabling him/her to stomp on other players), which in their case can only be picked up by accident (though woe betide you if an AI happens to grab a money bag). On the bright side, those [=AIs=] are hilariously [[ArtificialStupidity stupid]] when not doing anything else, often running back and forth or cluelessly going to random places, including using warps for no reason. Obviously, this often results in multiple hilarious deaths by ghosts (Dot Mania), easy tag targets (Ghost Tag and Da Bomb) and plain stupid deaths from running out of time (Da Bomb). For added hilarity, one map has electric hazards, so HilarityEnsues if you play against those [=AIs=] in that map.[[note]]Though, in Da Bomb, don't expect the "it" player to die because of those hazards, as he/she cannot be killed that way, though the untagged player can still take advantage of dying to the hazards if said player is being relentlessly chased. Just hope the chaser won't reach your spawn spot before you fully respawn (which the [=AIs=] will be more than happy to do so). As for Ghost Tag, while all players can die to the same hazard, [=AIs=] are still smart enough to simply tag a "dead" Pac-Person to continue gathering dots, since the foolishly dead player is still vulnerable to tags in that mode.[[/note]]
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Open World Sandbox]]
* The Rhino Tanks are the definition of Badass in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'', being incredibly rare to find unless you get a six-star wanted level, or obtain one from the military base (which will give you a five-star wanted level). However, these vehicles are very heavy and definitely ''not'' nimble when ''you'' drive them. However, if you manage to outrun the police, FBI and army in your souped-up Infernus and tear through the countryside, prepare to have the horror of your life when ''a Rhino Tank bursts out of the woods and charges straight for you at speeds upwards of 120 miles per hour''.
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Real-Time Strategy]]
* In ''Mud and Blood 2'', there's a reason why the game tag line is "Unfair Random Brutality"...and it's this: Many a game has ended upon the arrival of German tanks or large numbers elite infantry onto the screen at unfortunate times, and randomized artillery barrages and air strikes can ruin even the most well manned defensive line.
** There is actually a mechanic around them doing this - [[http://mudandblood.net/wiki/index.php?title=Six_Man_Rule the Six Man Rule gives a chance of bad stuff happening every second for every unit over 6 you have that's unconcealed by cam nets]]. [[http://mudandblood.net/wiki/index.php?title=Category:Blitz_Waves Blitz Waves though]], those are just there to ensure you'll lose at some point.
* One egregious example occurs in the final GDI mission of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'', wherein the AI possesses the unique ability to build structures very far away from its own base and sometimes, even inside yours.
* In the Nintendo DS game ''VideoGame/LostMagic'' the enemy ai mages always have the home field advantage, being surrounded by their respective element (eg: the fire sage is surrounded by lava, that she can walk on without taking damage instead getting healed each second), which wouldnt be cheating in itself, but it lends extra annoyance when they cast spells on your from across the map with no mana constraints. The lava or shifting sands becomes a lot more annoying when you have to walk carefully around it at the same time as getting fire dropped on your head or long walls being cast to bar your way. Your player character can cast any spell that the AI can (once you have the right runes), but you have a very limited range on almost all your spells and your mana limits you to casting only 2-3 spells before needing to recharge. Of course the ai isnt nearly as intelligent as the player character and they dont have as wide a range of spells to choose from, so if they didnt cheat like they do the game would be far too easy.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} Warcraft II]]'': The AI is bad enough with its ability to see the whole map and ignore resource requirements as it is, but the Ogre Mages are outright ''evil'' in the AI's hand. The player can only cast spells with the Ogre Mage, Wizard, Paladin or Death Knight by selecting one unit at a time, selecting the spell, and targeting it. Not so with the AI, oh no. The AI is fully capable of having ''every single Ogre Mage'' cast Blood Lust on ''the entire Orc army at once'. And they spam it ''constantly''.
* ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'': On Insane difficulty, the main difference is that the AI harvests and gets gold twice as fast: for every ten gold mined, it gets twenty.
* In ''VideoGame/RiseOfNations'', the game straight up tells you that on the two [[HarderThanHard higher]] difficulties they will get a resource handicap. Inverted, however, on the two [[EasierThanEasy easiest]] difficulties: the human gets the handicap instead.
* Inverted in the ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar - Dark Crusade'' and ''Soulstorm'' campaign modes. On Easy and Normal, computer players receive a penalty to the hit points of their units, while Hard levels the playing field. This is to make up for the fact that all but the weakest battles are fought two-on-one.
** Although played very straight in Dawn of War skirmish games, where the computer has a serious case of TheAllSeeingAI. If you try to turtle up in your base, the AI will simply sit just out of sight outside the entrance. The instant you leave to attack its base, its army will run around the corner and attack yours. Cheats available in single player allow you to clearly watch it reacting to the movement of your army that it can't possibly see. This is on top of it always knowing exactly where your base, and any extensions, are without needing to scout for them and to know where stealth units are in order to target them with radar scans and the like.
** As the page quote suggests, Dawn of War 2 was trying to be a lot better about this, or at least attempting to not get caught doing so. What actually happens is referred to as the "Dawn of Resource". The A.I. is completely and utterly ''obsessed'' with securing all of the resource points on the map. [[https://1d4chan.org/wiki/File:DOW2Guide.jpg It will try to grab all of your points, constantly allowing its units to get killed just so the A.I. can complete the capture.]] It knows how far your units can see to the last pixel, and will make its units perfectly avoid the sight radius of yours. The only time the computer actually starts playing the game is when it finally has all of the resource points, where it suddenly becomes reasonably competent. As soon as you take back a single point, it immediately reverts back to its kleptomania.
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'', the nobles will always seem to be able to field large armies against you, even after you've defeated several of theirs, especially on harder difficulties. And if you invade one of their counties that doesn't have a castle built yet, they will often force conscript a large portion of the population to fight you with, along with sending all of the food to one of their counties just to spite you. If you take over one of their counties, and they have a county close enough, they will often immediately attack the county you just took over before you can even get a chance to put defenders in the castle, and promptly retake it back from you.

to:

[[folder:Real-Time Strategy]]
[[folder: F-Zero]]
* Grand Prix is tough but fair. In ''Mud GX's Story Mode, however, everything is stacked against you. ''Everything.''
** [[http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=711267 I'll let SA speak for me on this one.]]
*** And then you realize that that post refers to the ''easiest difficulty level'',
and Blood 2'', there's a reason why that there are two more to beat. And those are the game tag line is "Unfair Random Brutality"...and it's this: Many a game has ended upon ones that net you the arrival of German tanks or large numbers elite infantry onto the screen at unfortunate times, and randomized artillery barrages and air strikes can ruin even the most well manned defensive line.
unlocks.
** There is no way to understate the insanity that is this race in Master Difficulty. Since F-Zero tracks are sometimes upside down, it is possible for the AI cars to go so fast that they'll actually a mechanic around them doing this - [[http://mudandblood.net/wiki/index.php?title=Six_Man_Rule ''knock you out of the Six Man Rule gives a chance course'', causing an instant One-Hit Kill.
* In the original, you've got blatant cheating by ALL vehicles on Master mode. All vehicles can go max speed with perfect handling. If you are ahead
of bad stuff happening every second for every unit over 6 them, they are always right behind you, barely off the screen. Always. On the Death Wind course, it is literally impossible to win with the Golden Fox with speed alone, so you have that's unconcealed by cam nets]]. [[http://mudandblood.net/wiki/index.php?title=Category:Blitz_Waves Blitz Waves though]], those to block your opponents' way with your rear to pull that off.
* Also in the original, computer vehicles (on all difficulties)
are just there utterly invincible. You can knock the AI off the track into what should be an instant, unavoidable death, and they will literally drive on the air, pass through the guard rails, and continue on as if nothing happened. They take full advantage of this as well, behaving more like deterrents to ensure your survival than actual competitors hoping to win the race.
* ''F-Zero Climax'' takes a few pages from the very first game's book; if you can see the AI, it will slam into walls and move at the normal car's top speed. If you lose sight of them however, they suddenly become godlike and navigate courses perfectly. Even worse is the fact enemy cars can frequently pop up right behind and bump into you. ''Even if you're in mid-air.''
* ''F-Zero Maximum Velocity''. In the hardest difficulty level, ''all'' of the vehicles have a higher top-speed than you do. ''All'' of them. Even the Fighting Comet (granted, you won't see it until everyone ''else'' is done flying past you). The only possible way to counter this advantage is using Boost pads, jumps, and the vehicle's own boost to their best possible effect. Oddly enough, it doesn't cheat that much when it comes to corners, as machines with poor turning performance fall ''really'' far behind in tracks with tight turns; skilled players only have to actually worry about four machines.
* ''F-Zero X'' is fairly simple if you can figure out the Side-Attack Turn and the right boosting technique, even on Expert. When you get to Master, however,
you'll lose at some point.
* One egregious example occurs in the final GDI mission of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'', wherein the AI possesses the unique ability
want to build structures very far away from its own base and sometimes, even inside yours.
* In the Nintendo DS game ''VideoGame/LostMagic'' the enemy ai mages always have the home field advantage, being surrounded by their respective element (eg: the fire sage is surrounded by lava, that she can walk on without taking damage instead getting healed each second), which wouldnt be cheating in itself, but it lends extra annoyance when they cast spells on
start ripping your from across the map with no mana constraints. The lava or shifting sands becomes a lot more annoying when you have to walk carefully around hair out. For starters, it at the same time as getting fire dropped on your head or long walls being cast to bar your way. Your player character can cast any spell that the AI can (once you have the right runes), but you have a very limited range on almost all your spells and your mana limits you to casting only 2-3 spells before needing to recharge. Of course the ai isnt nearly as intelligent as the player character and they dont have as wide a range of spells to choose from, so if they didnt cheat feels like they do the game would be far too easy.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} Warcraft II]]'': The AI is bad enough with its ability to see the whole map and ignore resource requirements as it is, but the Ogre Mages are outright ''evil'' in the AI's hand. The player can only cast spells with the Ogre Mage, Wizard, Paladin or Death Knight by selecting one unit at a time, selecting the spell, and targeting it. Not so with the AI, oh no. The AI is fully capable of having ''every
every single Ogre Mage'' cast Blood Lust pilot just slams on ''the entire Orc army at once'. And they spam it ''constantly''.
* ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'': On Insane difficulty, the main difference is that the AI harvests and gets gold twice as fast: for every ten gold mined, it gets twenty.
* In ''VideoGame/RiseOfNations'', the game straight up tells you that on the two [[HarderThanHard higher]] difficulties they will get a resource handicap. Inverted, however, on the two [[EasierThanEasy easiest]] difficulties: the human gets the handicap instead.
* Inverted in the ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar - Dark Crusade'' and ''Soulstorm'' campaign modes. On Easy and Normal, computer players receive a penalty to the hit points of
their units, while Hard levels brakes once they're directly lined up in front of you. Because of the playing field. This is sheer speed you're going at, this can be impossible to make up for react to. Combine this with the fact that all but the weakest battles are fought two-on-one.
** Although played very straight in Dawn of War skirmish games, where the computer has a serious case of TheAllSeeingAI. If
an absolutely perfect first lap is required to win at some tracks (Example: Silence - High Speed) and you try to turtle up in your base, the AI will simply sit just out of sight outside the entrance. The instant you leave to attack its base, its army will run around the corner and attack yours. Cheats available in single player allow you to clearly watch it reacting to the movement of your army have a race that it can't possibly see. This is on top of it always knowing exactly where your base, and comes down to a total crapshoot. Oh, by the way...if you make contact with any extensions, are without needing to scout for of them, even if it's them and to know where stealth units are in order to target them with radar scans and the like.
** As the page quote suggests, Dawn of War 2 was trying to be a lot better about this, or at least attempting to not get caught doing so. What actually happens is referred to as the "Dawn of Resource". The A.I. is completely and utterly ''obsessed'' with securing all of the resource points on the map. [[https://1d4chan.org/wiki/File:DOW2Guide.jpg It will try to grab all of your points, constantly allowing its units to get killed just so the A.I. can complete the capture.]] It knows how far your units can see to the last pixel, and will make its units perfectly avoid the sight radius of yours. The only time the computer actually starts playing the game is when it finally has all of the resource points, where it suddenly becomes reasonably competent. As soon as you take back a single point, it
hitting you, you'll immediately reverts back to its kleptomania.
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'',
be sent into an uncontrollable slide. (Unless you let off the nobles will always seem to be able to field large armies against you, even after you've defeated several of theirs, especially on harder difficulties. And if you invade one of accelerator, then punch it again straight after.)
** Well, every single pilot slams
their counties brakes...except for three, that doesn't have a castle built yet, they will often force conscript a large portion of is. Every single character in the population to fight you with, along with sending all game has 3 "rivals" of the food to one of their counties just to spite you. sorts. (Example: If you take over one of their counties, play as Captain Falcon, your "rivals" will be Samurai Goroh, Blood Falcon, and Black Shadow.) These 3 rivals will surpass any speed you can manage to get out of your machine, almost as if they have a county close enough, they magnet which attracts them to the player. The kicker: They never use their boosters...not even once. Add the constant side attacks these 3 do when you're anywhere in their general area (which, by the way, can make you lose half, or even all your speed) and you'll swear these guys don't just want you to die in the game. They want you to die in real life from a stroke.
** Thought you were done after the Joker Cup? Well, surprise, surprise, it gets even worse in the DD-Cups! Some of the track designs in these 2 Japan Exclusive Grand Prix just have "sadism" written all over them. What could that possibly have to do with the computer, though?
*** Enter Silence 3 - Outside Loop. This track...if there were ever an interactive definition of "crapshoot" this would be it. First of all, the sand in the middle of the loop is so wide that it takes the world's most steady thumb just to get through cleanly, without touching the sand or the wall. But after you figure out the right angles to hold the joystick, you're in the clear, right? WRONG! If you go just 1 kmh too fast on these loops, you
will often immediately attack fly off the county track, straight to your death. You know how you could push the Joystick up in Silence 1 to prevent yourself from flying off? Well, not even that works here! The real kick to the nards: THE COMPUTER CAN TRAVEL MUCH FASTER THAN YOU AND STILL HANG ON! Once Lap 2 and Lap 3 roll around, expect them to milk this for everything it's worth.
*** For one final injury atop all those insults, you think you can
just took over before set the machine at its slowest speed to avoid falling off? Ha ha ha ha...NO!!! There's a jump after the 2nd loop which you absolutely must take if you want any hope of winning the race, and if you set your machine settings too far to the left, you'll never be able to lift off the ground to make that jump! So, you're effectively forced to put yourself in constant danger of an instant death just so you can even get have a chance of winning. It's not even guaranteed, it's just a chance! Think about this for a second...if you lose all of your lives and get a Game Over, you have to put defenders in go through this nightmare all over again. The only positive is that this is the castle, very first race in its respective cup, so you won't have to do much to try again if you die here.
** On other tracks, however, you become the cheating bastard yourself in a way. Red Canyon 1, Mute City 2, Big Blue 2, Devil's Forest 3, Big Hand, Devil's Forest 4 (64-DD Only), Devil's Forest 5 (64-DD Only),
and promptly retake it back from you.Space Plant 2 (64-DD only) come to mind. If you've mastered the Side Attack Turn, then these particular tracks will be cake walks...even on Master.



[[folder: Mario Kart]]
* ''VideoGame/MarioKart 7'' is the biggest offender yet (which is saying a lot, honestly). There was an exploit that has been discovered in the Maka Wuhu track that allows you to skip one section of the track. Pull it off, and the CPU pack is no less than 5 seconds behind you when you are ferried onto the upper section of the course, rendering the entire exploit moot in 1-player mode.
* In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'', the AI opponents didn't just have RubberBandAI, but had infinite stores of super-special weapons and items that in several cases the player was never able to use -- namely, the poisoned mushrooms, dinosaur eggs, and meandering fireballs. Then there's the Mario brothers, who could activate Stars at will, making them nigh-impossible to beat if they were in the lead. For the items the player ''could'' launch, the AI opponent also had the ability to dodge by ''jumping'' the kart its own height above the track (basically an infinite supply of jump feathers).\\
They also out right clip through course obstacles like Thwomps and pipes while you need a Star to smash through the same things yourself. The only thing they ''can'' bump into that slows them down are the walls, and that's if you push them hard enough into a wall.\\
Furthermore, the Grand Prix mode would select an order of skill for each of the computer-controlled players, based on your own character selection. If one of the Mario Bros. were picked as the "champion" racer (which happened if you chose Bowser or Koopa Troopa), you could expect perfect racing lines and cornering coupled with infinite and arbitrary use of the Super Star, allowing them to go at increased speed with no slowing down, plus invincibility. Having one of the plumbers trigger this on the final stretch, powering either past or ''through'' the player and being unable to stop regardless of what's fired at them (or even more annoyingly, just as that red shell was about to knock them out of first place) meant that it was often easier just to start a new game and hope you didn't get one of them as the top racer again.
** The character selection in ''Super Mario Kart'' is arbitrary. The order of the racers is chosen by which racer you chose, it's the same every time. You can alter it but knocking them down a few places in the last lap, and then crossing the finish line before they catch up. If the screen fades to black before they overtake anyone, they are stuck in that position. It's a decent strategy when playing as Bowser to knock either Mario or Luigi down to 4th place or lower just before the finish line. Preferably both.
* In ''Mario Kart: Super Circuit'', whichever AI racer has the most cup points at the time will get their special powerups more often. Luigi and Bowser will always start with "champion" level skills, but if you attack them and cause them to lose to other AI racers, the new points leader among AI will take up the "champion" mantle instead. If Yoshi or Mario get this points lead, they'll start to spam consecutive Super Stars from nowhere and finish races 5 seconds ahead of the rest of the pack. Conversely, since poor AI Wario always starts in the back of the pack, he's rarely seen using items at all and is doomed to finish last every race.
* Another ability the computers have in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioKart'' and ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'' is the ability to instantly recover from items as long as they weren't on screen when the item hit. The best items would simply stop computers for a moment if you couldn't see them, while the same items used on you would make you fly through the air.
* Choco Mountain. The final part of the track involves a few item crates, a 90 degree turn, and then three "hills". You better be lucky and get a mushroom from those crates, else once you jump from the first hill, you'll collide with the second and third ones, while the [=CPUs=] that are right behind you (thank you rubber-band AI) magically have enough speed to jump both. Not getting a mushroom in those crates indeed makes the difference between being first or fifth in this race.
* Apparently, the computer player chosen to be the first-placer in ''Mario Kart DS'' always has a maxed-out speed stat, regardless of what the kart they're driving should have. This makes characters that drive karts with already high acceleration [[spoiler:(Dry Bones)]] nearly impossible to beat. This may be because the designated top 3 are given boosts in top speed with the first placer given the biggest boost. If it happens to be a kart with high acceleration, your only chance of winning is to snake, simply put.\\
[=CPUs=] in ''Mario Kart DS'' will also move back into place if another kart knocks them away in midair.
* The AI in ''VideoGame/MarioKartDoubleDash'' seems to entirely ignore the weight system and kart stats -- heavy karts (the only ones available to large characters such as Bowser) all have crappy acceleration but high top speeds. Go ahead, knock Bowser off the track. Invariably, he'll be right on your ass in no time flat -- despite the nice long stall that getting put back on the track gives you, and the fact that his crappy acceleration should leave him far behind a cart that's already running at top speed with no slowdowns. In fact, most of the karts in ''Double Dash!!'' can reach ridiculous speeds trying to keep up with a human player in first, which can give a second human player further down the pack an extremely hard time when it comes to clawing their way back to the front.
* Ditto Petey Piranha, often a thorn in the side in two-player GP races at 150cc due to his '''ludicrous''' bursts of speed and acceleration.
* In ''Mario Kart 64'', computer players just used items at random rather than actually using the item boxes. This actually worked out well for the player (despite lack of realism, since they would never use certain items), since the distribution was fair. In DS and Wii, they actually use the item boxes, which means the last-place players are constantly getting the good stuff. So this is actually an instance where having the AI follow the rules actually made the game seem less fair (though technically it's ''more'' fair).
* Moreover, the computers' finishing positions aren't actually determined by the order in which they cross the finish line; rather, it's what position they're currently in when the last human player finishes and ends the race. For example, you finish in 1st place and Mario is in 3rd, but he falls back to 5th place before the results screen shows up, it will still show him finished in 3rd due to being in that spot when the player finished.
* Just let the AI get behind you with Star Power. It's like you're being tracked by a homing missile.
* Of course, all the items are at general, aimed at you, with only the occasional shot toward other AI and accidental hits if they drive the same racing line. It gets ridiculous when one sees the second place racer throw a red shell (which only homes if thrown ''forward'' in most installments, and even then, only after someone passes it) ''backwards'' towards a player-controlled third place kart when the first place kart could be easily overtaken if only the shell were thrown forward instead. More a case of 'cheating' for the AI opponents who get to avoid all attacks (their advantage being that they get to go whole races without a single item aimed at them, save for Lightning, Bullet Bills and Blue Shells, which a character has no say in controlling). The AI racers that target you rather than their competitors ahead, however, are a case of SpitefulAI.
** It couldn't be more obvious than when you play a team race in ''Mario Kart Wii'' with AI opponents, and your computer-controlled ''teammates'' start aiming shells and bananas at you.
** This carries over to ''Mario Kart 8'' and its team battle mode. At best, it'll simply be a rule of thumb to stay away from ''everyone'' until you've confirmed that the racer you're about to pass is an enemy and you should attack them, lest you run into a teammate who suddenly decides it's a good idea to throw their boomerang. At worst, you can get all three of your balloons destroyed nearly immediately just because you wound up in a populated area and you trusted your AI partners not to start throwing their items at random.
*** The irony of this is that it somehow makes the AI ''closer'' to a human player rather than putting them above them. You're given very little chance to see who's on your team during battles, and it can be difficult to tell what color another racer's balloons are from a distance (and the balloons are the only differentiation between teams). Chances are that you'll accidentally attack your teammates as often as they'll attack you.
* On the bright side, if you and a computer-controlled player have the same amount of points, it will be in favor of you. So if you and Donkey Kong are tied for 1st place with 32 points each, you'll be in first place.
* In ''Mario Kart Wii'', the AI racers almost always skip the item roulette, allowing them to use their item while you're still waiting for yours. You can do the same by pressing the "use item" button during the roulette, but it still takes time to perform (it's not perfect or immediate, whereas the opponents will be ready to go once they hit an item box).
* The Blooper item in later games is a notable exception. For human players, it's little more than a nuisance, but it will cause the AI to start randomly swerving side-to-side like drunk drivers, slowing them down significantly. Justified, though, in that an AI that simply follows a course would obviously be unhindered by an item that blocks your screen without [[ArtificialStupidity flaws programmed in]].
* Red Shells normally target the next racer ahead of the user, but they're programmed to skip racers who are very close to the racer unless they're in 1st place. When the player is in 1st, the AI is programmed to have the 2nd and 3rd place CPU racers hang close together to exploit this behavior so that any Red Shells fired by the 3rd place CPU target the player instead of the 2nd place CPU.
* This [[http://www.suppermariobroth.com/post/155589413010/in-mario-kart-double-dash-cpu-drivers-that-are blog post]] proves what we've been suspecting for a long time, [=CPU=] racers can outright clip through hazards as long as they're far enough from the player.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real-Time Strategy]]
* In ''Mud and Blood 2'', there's a reason why the game tag line is "Unfair Random Brutality"...and it's this: Many a game has ended upon the arrival of German tanks or large numbers elite infantry onto the screen at unfortunate times, and randomized artillery barrages and air strikes can ruin even the most well manned defensive line.
** There is actually a mechanic around them doing this - [[http://mudandblood.net/wiki/index.php?title=Six_Man_Rule the Six Man Rule gives a chance of bad stuff happening every second for every unit over 6 you have that's unconcealed by cam nets]]. [[http://mudandblood.net/wiki/index.php?title=Category:Blitz_Waves Blitz Waves though]], those are just there to ensure you'll lose at some point.
* One egregious example occurs in the final GDI mission of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer'', wherein the AI possesses the unique ability to build structures very far away from its own base and sometimes, even inside yours.
* In the Nintendo DS game ''VideoGame/LostMagic'' the enemy ai mages always have the home field advantage, being surrounded by their respective element (eg: the fire sage is surrounded by lava, that she can walk on without taking damage instead getting healed each second), which wouldnt be cheating in itself, but it lends extra annoyance when they cast spells on your from across the map with no mana constraints. The lava or shifting sands becomes a lot more annoying when you have to walk carefully around it at the same time as getting fire dropped on your head or long walls being cast to bar your way. Your player character can cast any spell that the AI can (once you have the right runes), but you have a very limited range on almost all your spells and your mana limits you to casting only 2-3 spells before needing to recharge. Of course the ai isnt nearly as intelligent as the player character and they dont have as wide a range of spells to choose from, so if they didnt cheat like they do the game would be far too easy.
* ''[[VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} Warcraft II]]'': The AI is bad enough with its ability to see the whole map and ignore resource requirements as it is, but the Ogre Mages are outright ''evil'' in the AI's hand. The player can only cast spells with the Ogre Mage, Wizard, Paladin or Death Knight by selecting one unit at a time, selecting the spell, and targeting it. Not so with the AI, oh no. The AI is fully capable of having ''every single Ogre Mage'' cast Blood Lust on ''the entire Orc army at once'. And they spam it ''constantly''.
* ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'': On Insane difficulty, the main difference is that the AI harvests and gets gold twice as fast: for every ten gold mined, it gets twenty.
* In ''VideoGame/RiseOfNations'', the game straight up tells you that on the two [[HarderThanHard higher]] difficulties they will get a resource handicap. Inverted, however, on the two [[EasierThanEasy easiest]] difficulties: the human gets the handicap instead.
* Inverted in the ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar - Dark Crusade'' and ''Soulstorm'' campaign modes. On Easy and Normal, computer players receive a penalty to the hit points of their units, while Hard levels the playing field. This is to make up for the fact that all but the weakest battles are fought two-on-one.
** Although played very straight in Dawn of War skirmish games, where the computer has a serious case of TheAllSeeingAI. If you try to turtle up in your base, the AI will simply sit just out of sight outside the entrance. The instant you leave to attack its base, its army will run around the corner and attack yours. Cheats available in single player allow you to clearly watch it reacting to the movement of your army that it can't possibly see. This is on top of it always knowing exactly where your base, and any extensions, are without needing to scout for them and to know where stealth units are in order to target them with radar scans and the like.
** As the page quote suggests, Dawn of War 2 was trying to be a lot better about this, or at least attempting to not get caught doing so. What actually happens is referred to as the "Dawn of Resource". The A.I. is completely and utterly ''obsessed'' with securing all of the resource points on the map. [[https://1d4chan.org/wiki/File:DOW2Guide.jpg It will try to grab all of your points, constantly allowing its units to get killed just so the A.I. can complete the capture.]] It knows how far your units can see to the last pixel, and will make its units perfectly avoid the sight radius of yours. The only time the computer actually starts playing the game is when it finally has all of the resource points, where it suddenly becomes reasonably competent. As soon as you take back a single point, it immediately reverts back to its kleptomania.
* In ''VideoGame/LordsOfTheRealm2'', the nobles will always seem to be able to field large armies against you, even after you've defeated several of theirs, especially on harder difficulties. And if you invade one of their counties that doesn't have a castle built yet, they will often force conscript a large portion of the population to fight you with, along with sending all of the food to one of their counties just to spite you. If you take over one of their counties, and they have a county close enough, they will often immediately attack the county you just took over before you can even get a chance to put defenders in the castle, and promptly retake it back from you.
[[/folder]]



[[folder: Pokémon]]
* [=NPC=]s, even ones with no plot significance, often have Pokémon that know powerful moves about five levels early. In later games, Pokémon learning moves early is actually [[JustifiedTrope justified]] -- a skilled breeder can get level-up moves and moves the Pokémon otherwise couldn't know (Egg moves) bred onto Level 5 (and, from Generation IV onward, Level 1) Pokémon if the father knows it, so presumably the computer-controlled trainers bred their own. While the player can't do this at first, many TournamentPlay fans use this in the {{Metagame}}.
** However, there are still instances where the player is at a disadvantage, as there some Pokémon that the player just won't have access to, making breeding for egg moves literally impossible without trading and getting them early from other players.
* [=NPCs=] in Generation I could never run out of PP. Have fun with the Elite Four-Champion gauntlet...
* Speaking of the Elite Four, Lance's Dragonite in Generation I has Barrier. Go on. Check to see how the line learns it. Done? Yep. Dragonite's line has forever been incapable of learning Barrier, no matter how much breeding you do. What's more, in Generation II, his Aerodactyl knows Rock Slide, which it couldn't learn until ''[[VideoGame/PokemonFireRedAndLeafGreen FireRed and LeafGreen]]''.
** In 2016, Dragonite finally gets to learn Barrier legally.... at least, the event Dragonites that are in themselves a reference to Lance's Dragonite.
* In a similar vein, various characters have Pokémon that have evolved at levels lower than their designated evolution level, if you were to train up its pre-evolution. Also {{justified|Trope}} in that various areas contain wild evolved Pokémon at lower levels than ought to be possible, allowing the player to catch them -- the [=NPC=]s may have caught their Pokémon in places the player simply hasn't been to.
** Ghetsis in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a particularly notable example of this in his level 54 Hydreigon, which is 10 levels lower then when it can normally be obtained. {{Fanon}} claims that this action led to Ghetsis [[http://images5.fanpop.com/image/quiz/832000/832998_1334165220971_160.jpg?v=1334165104 losing his right eye]].
*** In ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', Ghetsis still has his Hydreigon, now two levels ''lower'', albeit with a weaker moveset. [[spoiler: Iris]], however, is packing one of her own that's almost as nasty as his was in the prequel (and just as nasty in Challenge Mode).
** Another infamous example is the grossly underleveled Purugly and Skuntank belonging to Galactic Commanders Mars and Jupiter, respectively, in ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' due to the EarlyGameHell and ForcedLevelGrinding they can put players through.
** Lance in GSC and HGSS has ''three'' underleveled Dragonite in your champion battle!
-->''"Tell that to my three inappropriately leveled Dragonites!"''
--->--'''Lance''', [[https://youtu.be/Hm5Jlnq8NHk Pokémon Golder 3]]
** Up until ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', in the event that both trainers had their last Pokemon KO'd as a result of Self-Destruct or Explosion, the AI would be declared the winner no matter what, despite the fact that the trainer who ''used'' one of said moves is supposed to lose by default.
* ''Emerald'' is also a blatant offender. It introduced the Battle Frontier, and set the standard for all subsequent games. It has multiple Gym Leaders with Pokémon they should not have at certain levels, such as Winona's Altaria. To top it all off, regular trainers in Victory Road have completely impossible movesets. One in particular is absurd: a Lanturn in a Double Battle knows NOTHING BUT EARTHQUAKE, a move it cannot learn in the first place.
* In ''VideoGame/PokemonHeartGoldAndSoulSilver'', during your first battle with Brock, he has a Rhyhorn with Sturdy. No other Rhyhorn can have this Ability as of Gen VII.
* The AI of the battle facilities of Generation III onward (the Battle Tower/Frontier/Subway/Maison/Tree) are designed to gain knowledge about your team as you accumulate winning streaks, despite the fact that you're facing new opponents over and over again and thus it wouldn't make sense for "Schoolgirl Jane" to know anything about the team that "Punk Sid" just battled. Specifically, you'll be forced to face teams that are increasingly designed to counter yours the higher your streak.
** While this may seem like a coincidence in many instances, the most damning evidence is that players that have used hacked Pokémon -- Pokémon with special abilities and sets that literally do not exist anywhere in the game and thus the computer cannot ''possibly'' have had the knowledge to counter them beforehand -- and still encounter teams that are tailor-made to overcome their strategies.
** The most popular of these hacks (prior to the introduction of the Fairy-type) was the powerful Wondertomb/Wondereye[[labelnote:Explanation]]A combination of Wonder Guard -- an Ability that will only allow attacks if you're hit by something you're weak to -- and a Pokémon with no weaknesses; Spiritomb and Sableye, respectively[[/labelnote]]. Get a high enough streak, and you'll find opponents carrying Mold Breaker (which lets them ignore Wonder Guard); not too strange, since Mold Breaker is a good ability and you'd encounter that anyway. Go farther, and they'll use ''nothing but status moves'' (which Wonder Guard can't block, and would be a baffling strategy unless the computer knew what it was dealing with beforehand). The strangest, of course, has to be the move Fire Fang. Due to a glitch, Fire Fang will hit opponents with Wonder Guard regardless of their type, and it's completely unknown why this move, and this move alone, has this ability. Even considering that this is a glitch, the computer ''will still use this, knowing that it works against you''.
** Another of these hacks is to give a Pokémon OneHitKO moves (that cause anything they hit to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin immediately faint]] in exchange for poor accuracy [[AwesomeButImpractical that makes it unlikely that they'll actually work]]) combined with the ability "No Guard" (that allows you and your opponent to [[AlwaysAccurateAttack bypass all accuracy checks]]). Use this strategy to sweep enough teams and you'll eventually start encountering Pokémon with the ability "Sturdy", an ability that, during Generations III and IV at least, does ''nothing else'' except block OHKO moves.
** For evidence this still exists in Gen VI's Battle Maison, try entering a Pokemon with Sand Stream[[note]]An Ability that stirs up a sandstorm when the Pokemon enters battle[[/note]] as your lead plus an Aron with Sturdy[[note]]If it's at full HP and takes a hit that would normally KO it in one hit, it'll hang on with 1 HP[[/note]] and Endeavor[[note]]A move that brings the target's HP down to the user's[[/note]]. In the Battle Maison, you'll quickly start encountering a disproportionate number of Pokemon who are immune to sandstorms.
* In the Pokemon World Tournament of ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', the matchups tend to pit you against opponents whose Pokémon have a general type advantage. For example, if you're participating in a single battle tournament with a Serperior, a Volcarona and a Hydreigon, chances are you'll be pitted against a Bug Type Gym Leader in the first turn, as Bug Types hold a type advantage against Serperior and Hydreigon; for the Volcarona, chances also are that at least one of the opponent's Pokémon will know a convenient Water, Flying or Rock-type move too. And then, by some miracle that you do beat that Gym Leader, you'll find your next opponent just happens to be an Ice Type user (again with at least one Pokémon that knows a move that's super effective against your Volcarona) and so on...
** Additionally, one of the most obvious examples of this trope happens when using Zoroark first, while having a Ghost-type Pokemon as your last slot in your party. Zoroark's ability Illusion makes it appear the same as the last Pokemon in your party, complete with the same name. In the Battle Subway, neither player is supposed to know what the opponent's team is composed of. However, when facing any Pokemon (for example Alakazam, a Psychic-type) as Zoroark with a Ghost-type Pokemon's name and appearance (for example Spiritomb, a Dark/Ghost type), the computer will always choose to perform a Fighting-type attack to the fake Ghost. Note that this exact example is not uncommon, and that while Dark and Ghost are both super effective against Psychic, the opponent's Pokemon stays on the field to do a Fighting-type move that the Dark/Ghost Pokemon would be completely immune to, had it not been a Zoroark using Illusion.
*** Although this may not always happen, resulting in a situation such as a Gallade repeatedly using Psycho Cut against a "Crobat" (Zoroark).
* One particular opponent/partner in the Battle Tree uses a Latios. This can potentially hold a Latiosite, but the player is completely unable to acquire Latiosite themselves, as with a few exceptions, only the Mega Stones for Pokémon in the Alola Dex can be obtained.
* The usual instance of the computer's Pokémon having illegal moves has been {{subverted|Trope}} a few times; Battle Maison Evelyn's Entei has Sacred Fire, which it got added to its moveset in Generation VI, though a Move Reminder is needed to relearn it. ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' also had a Kommo-o in the Battle Tree that knew Shell Smash -- a move the line can't learn. A patch ended up changing it to the more sensible Draco Meteor.
* The Mewtwo that serves as the FinalBoss of the first ''Stadium'' ([[NoExportForYou or second, if you're Japanese]]) has infinite PP.
** Pokémon Stadium also has a check in place to catch players cheating; if the player uses a Pokémon with an impossible move set or its stats are higher than it's supposed to be, the game declares that Pokémon illegal and won't allow the player to use it. Naturally, the AI has hacked move sets up the ass and possibly hacked stats as well. In other words, [[{{Hypocrite}} you're punished for cheating, but the AI is free to cheat as much as it wants]].
** Pokémon Stadium 2 goes the extra mile in cheating. All of the rentals in Pokémon Stadium 2 are effectively useless. The AI has hacked movesets and hacked stats; the rentals available to you have stats that are about 10% lower than they should be and the evolved Pokémon know utterly useless attacks. Unevolved rentals know decent attacks, but have far more pitiful stats that render them even more useless than their evolved counterparts. It is pretty much impossible to make any progress in Pokémon Stadium 2 without using homegrown Pokemon- as long as they're not from a Yellow Version... the game is known to delete saved games on Yellow Versions.
* ''VideoGame/PokemonColosseum'':
** There's one particularly annoying quirk in that the opponent gets to decide his moves ''after'' you use any items or send out any Pokémon. It leads to the very annoying problem of not being able to cure a Pokémon of confusion as, when you do, the opponent uses Confuse Ray on it again, despite that there's no way he'd use it normally!
** When you battle a Shadow Pokémon, it will have all four of its moves, but when you catch it, you're stuck with only Shadow Rush (though this is more of a case of RedemptionDemotion).
** Due to the increased number of Shadow moves available during Cipher's second coming, this is done away with in ''XD''.
* Last Resort, introduced in Generation IV, is a powerful move usable after every other move has been used by the Pokémon at least once. [=NPC=]s can use it early, though.
* Try using the Mean Look/Perish Song combo on a Trainer with multiple Pokémon. When you switch your Pokémon out to avoid getting [=KOed=] by Perish Song, your opponent does the ''exact same thing'', despite the trapping effect not allowing switching. [[note]]To elaborate: Perish Song is a technique that makes both Pokémon faint after three turns. Mean Look is a technique that prevents switching. By using Mean Look, then using Perish Song, the opponent's Pokémon will faint on the third turn, while you can switch out just before the final turn to avoid fainting. For human players, the player who is trapped has their switching function disabled. For the computer, however, as long as you switch out, they can switch as well.[[/note]] [[note]]This turns out to be because, technically, the AI can switch whenever it wants, and ''chooses'' not to switch when it is trapped, but then when deciding whether to switch out on the last turn of Perish Song, it erroneously checks whether ''your'' Mon is trapped, not its own.[[/note]]
* Particularly in the Masters Battle part of ''Pokémon Battle Revolution''; the computer players have an uncanny ability to know precisely what Pokémon the player is going to switch to or use at any given moment.
* The slot machines in the Game Corners are based on Japanese pachisuro machines (see the Real Life section), and thus they will slip to prevent paying out a winning combination. However, the slots in the Japanese versions of ''[=HeartGold and SoulSilver=]'' take this UpToEleven: They'll actually continue spinning well after you hit the button (even if it takes more than a half-revolution) to force two Poké Balls or two 7's to line up on the first two reels, then force the third reel to avoid lining up a third 7 or Poké Ball to achieve a near miss. This would actually be highly illegal to program into a real pachisuro machine.
* In one of the bonus downloadable tournaments in ''Black and White 2'' (which is as of yet only available in Japan), Fantina's Giratina is in its Origin Forme but is holding a Ghost Gem. Giratina can only be in Origin Forme if it is holding a Griseous Orb.
* In Generation I, your rival's Pidgey evolves into Pidgeotto at Level 18. This is perfectly normal, yet for some reason the remakes decreased its level by 1 the first time you fight Pidgeotto. And Pidgey doesn't evolve until Level 18, making an evolved Level 17 Pidgeotto impossible. It is possible that your rival simply caught a different Pidgeotto in the wild, but it is heavily implied otherwise.
* Salamence from Pokémon Ranger ''ignores'' your starter's assist, despite that an Electric-type attack should deal normal damage.
* Actually downplayed in the Battle Maison for VideoGame/PokemonXAndY. Cheating (but may be averted with future games and distribution events): Instances of abilities/items unavailable in regular play, such as Contrary Serperior [[note]]recently distributed as a special Pokémon[[/note]], or Snow Warning Aurorus [[note]]later distributed as a participation prize for the Enter the Dragon Type competition[[/note]], and Jaboca Berry [[note]](available in Gen 5, but unavailable in, and cannot be transferred via PokeBank to, Gen 6[[/note]] etc. Playing fair: Pretty much everything else. With the exception of the above, all movesets/abilities of opponent's Pokémon are obtainable by the player, and the legendaries being used in the consecutive battles are all '''legal''' in rated battles. This is averted in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', when Contrary Serperior and Snow Warning Amaura were released as Mystery Gifts, and the Jaboca Berry, among other rare Berries, was made available as a prize in one of the Pokémon Global Link minigames.
* In the TCG Online game, watch how many times your computerised opponent gets potions, roller skates, and other lovely and convenient advantages, versus how many times they occur for you, the player. Clearly, the AI really is a cheating bastard.
* In Hoenn Contests (both gen 3 and gen 6), the AI will always, without fail, know when you're about to use a jamming move, and if they can will immediately use a move preventing jamming.
** When you play a Contest against Lisia in ''OR/AS'', her Altaria will have a Condition that is higher than you can possibly reach through the use of [=PokéBlocks=], even if you also add a scarf.
* Bulbapedia has two pages dedicated to showing moves your opponent (or in rare cases, your Pokemon) cannot [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Game_move_errors legitimately know in games]] or the [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/TCG_move_errors Trading Card Game]].
* [[GameMod ROM hacks]] of first and second-generation games will often have you face against Pokémon that are ''over'' level 100. For example, in ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlueKaizo Pokémon Blue Kaizo]]'', the [[spoiler:Elite Four and Champion have level ''115'' Pokémon]].
* ''VideoGame/PokemonDarkRising'' has a certain boss character use Pokemon the player can't capture. [[spoiler:the final boss uses a Shadow Lugia with altered base stats and a powerful fan made move with 200 base power]]
[[/folder]]



[[folder:Turn-Based Strategy]]
* In the PSP remake of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'', the Onion Knight job is marked by being able to use any piece of equipment, being unable to use abilities, yet having ''extremely'' high stats when mastered. However, in one link mission, you and your partner must defeat a team of master Onion Knights who have a full range of powerful abilities equipped. They'll hit you back and more than likely screw you over.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' has some boss enemies who are granted immunity from the game's law system, while you're stuck playing by the rules. Ice abilities are illegal for the battle? The boss will laugh while casting Blizzaga every turn and the judge will just yellow card him repeatedly. Some other characters are given ribbons, granting them immunity from the law.
* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2'', enemies will regularly be given 'bonus' turns at the beginning of a battle before you can act in any way, on top of their [[RandomNumberGod statistically unlikely shenanigans]]. Probably the worst of it is the fourth round in the Brightmoon Tor, where the enemy is given ''twelve'' bonus turns, GameBreaker abilities that cost no MP, and massive level advantages that did not exist in the previous stages. One of these abilities casts Haste and Protect on their entire party, resulting in an approximate minimum of ''twenty-four bonus turns before you can do anything.''
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Civilization]]
* The original VideoGame/{{Civilization}} for the PC has a lot of ways for the computer to get a huge advantage over you:
-->1) Improvements in the Emperor Level are about a third of the cost for the computer.
-->2) Technologies are discovered at alarming rates.
-->3) Wonders can be built almost instantly.
-->4) The computer's caravans are transported instantaneously.
-->5) The computer never has production penalties despite city-wide riots.
-->6) Your Triremes sink if they end their turn too far from shore. Computer controlled ones can sail across the Atlantic with no problem.
-->7) The computer can build spaceships without the required technology
-->Et cetera.
** It also seems that the game tries to force averages to occur. Try using saves to make sure you always win. If your win chance is 50%, your chance of winning the first fight is 50%, right? Right. Second fight (after your unit is healed), displayed chance to win is still 50%--but try saving before it and loading. Your chances are closer to 25%. Winning a third fight in a row is likely to have even worse odds--but the displayed chance to win is still 50%. The question exists, does it work in reverse also? Sacrifice a dozen or so units for a run of good luck?
*** What you're seeing here is a bug in the game due to a programmer who doesn't understand probability theory. The displayed battle odds are calculated by the naive method of multiplying each unit's hitpoints by the odds of winning a single round of combat, and using that ratio as the odds of winning the battle. The actual odds of winning, based on the battle mechanics, are much harder to calculate, and can deviate significantly from the displayed odds: your "95% victory" fight might actually be a "0.1% victory". Once you do them right, though, it becomes clear that the computer isn't cheating in battle, just [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics lying through statistics]].
*** For context, units fight multiple rounds within a single combat until one dies. Thus winning one round in actuality only reduces the opponent by a certain amount of HP. So while a unit with low life may have a 50% chance of winning a round, if they can be killed with one hit, the first hit they take in combat (pretty likely at 50%) will kill them.
* In the ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' sequels, the game manual actually details exactly how much the computer cheats and in what areas at various difficulty levels.
** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJcuQQ1eWWI Here]] is a video that explains the AI cheating of Civilization 3 and 4 in more depth (25 minutes in), as well as the reasons they were designed that way.
*** There's also an example of HoistByHisOwnPetard. In Civ 3, the computer can see through the fog of war and always attacks the city with the least defense. By moving units just outside of a city faraway, you can trick the AI into marching back and forth without attacking any cities.
** You can't see strategic resources on the map in Civ 3 until you have the skills to use them. The AI can see them all right from the start of the game though, and will make an effort to build cities next to them to give itself an advantage later on.
*** Often, the AI will have building towns in the middle of the desert for oil as a very important priority during the expansion phase.
*** In Civ 4 this also works for you, the blue rings for city suggestions on your settler often uses the resources around to make it a good choice. In really rare occasions it will suggest empty fields, just to find iron, coal, uranium and oil once you have the appropriate techs.
** Also in Civ 3, the [=AI=] have their production phase after their turn instead of at the start of the next turn; or more precisely, you always have the first turn, which means the turn order goes You->AI's->Your Production Phase->AI's Production Phases->You Again, which means that they can hurry units and have them produced before your next move, while you can't, as the production phase for the units you hurried won't occur until after the AI takes their turn. You can tell when they did this because they haven't had the chance to fortify the unit yet. Sometimes, while you're fighting an AI civ, one of the cities you took will revolt back to them during your production phase, which spawns a defensive unit in that city- and they'll draft two more defensive units and rush a fourth that still completes before your turn.
** If you cheat so that you can control the enemy's cities, you will see that despite having far inferior cities, they have ''huge'' commerce and production bonuses, making them far better than yours.
** However, in the interest of fairness, the ''player'' can cheat mechanically too -- one of the ways lower difficulty levels are made easier is by giving the player free Happiness and Health.
* Computers in Civ4 will always know what you have access to, what you have explored, etc, and use this to become massive cheapskates in trade. If you have no access to horses and thus decided not to research Horseback Riding for awhile, the computer will do everything in their power to push the technology down your throat while making off with as much of your gold and technology as they can. And you can be sure that the computer will ''never'' offer their world map at a halfway decent price unless you've already explored everything they have.
** For example, the AI will pop up with a ton of trade requests for your world map if you find a second continent. While a smart human would know you would find it some dozen turns after you sent that galley off to the side of the map, they wouldn't know ''when'' you found and mapped a good portion of the new world with the crazy precision the AI does.
** If the computer uses nuclear weapons against the player or another AI then they take the "you nuked our friend" relationship modifier. If the player uses nuclear weapons they get a reputation hit with EVERY civilization, even their worst enemies.
* A subtle one in ''[=Civ5=]'': You can't place a new city within 4 hexes of a pre-existing one. Your computer opponents? [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules Don't have that problem]].
** More on Civ 5: on the nice side, no matter how rampantly the AI cheats on higher difficulties, they will never build wonders at accelerated speed; not even on Deity (although their other advantages will certainly help them build wonders sooner). On the not-so-nice side, the computer's happiness and maintenance costs are always as though the computer were playing on Chieftain ("Beginner"), so even if you're playing on Warlord ("Easy"), they still have an edge for happiness and gold. This is pretty obvious; press F9 on the first turn and your civ will already be in dead last for approval. Ever wonder why an AI can expand so much faster than you when you're playing on "Normal"? Wonder no more. Also an example of TheComputerIsALyingBastard since the game implies that Normal is fair.
** Ever settle a city nowhere near an AI player's empire, yet still get the "they covet lands you hold" message under diplomacy? Or how convenient the placing of things like Oil and Uranium are within enemy territory? That's because all the resources in the game, including future ones that haven't been revealed yet, are pre-determined upon map generation. The AI players know from the get-go where the best resources in the game will be, and settle their cities accordingly.
** Another one for Civ V, the computer can have ships that cannot cross oceans on deep sea tiles, like Civ 1. This creates a problem in Gods and Kings if you use a pirate ship to capture the enemy Trireme and then find you can't move it next turn.
* VideoGame/FreeCiv, the open source version on Civilisation has the AI settings "Experimental" and "Cheating".
* Civilization Revolution
** On Emperor, the AI gets a 20% handicap on all costs (unit production, science needed for techs), which increases to 40% on Deity
** The AI can teleport units throughout the Fog of War (even previously uncovered). Explicitly. The devs did this to save on processing resources for consoles, but it's quite annoying to have armies marching out of ANY tile you don't currently have vision of at the moment.
** Boats also count as outside your vision, as you can't see what's in them. The AI uses them like conduits to vomit units into your borders no matter how far away their cities actually are.
** AI culture is much more powerful and supercedes yours in almost all cases unless you specifically crank out culture buildings/wonders. An AI with only the Palace can push 3-ring borders just a few tens of turn into the game.
[[/folder]]



* Where to start with ''Duolingo''? First off, the progress bar on a lesson will only fill up ever so slightly, and Lord help you if you even misspell or have a word slightly out of order.
16th Sep '17 9:29:26 PM Kuruni
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!!Notable Offenders:
''Note: Since this trope is so ''incredibly'' common, only {{egregious}} examples should be listed here, otherwise this entry would take over the entire wiki. Aversions or subversions should probably be left out as well, since that's (hopefully) the default.''



[[folder:Generic Examples]]

--> Note: These are ''generic'' examples. They give ways this trope manifests, not specific instances in specific games. See the "Specific Examples" section further down for case studies.

* In RealTimeStrategy and TurnBasedStrategy games, the computer...
** ... builds faster, or just has new units magically appear out of nowhere.
** ... [[NotPlayingFairWithResources acquires resources faster, starts with more, and/or simply doesn't need them.]]
** ... has [[ComputersAreFast effectively infinite cursors]] that go beyond mere lightning reflexes, and can command all of its subjects at once.
** ... can [[TheAllSeeingAI always see the entire map]], and is not affected by the FogOfWar.
** ... doesn't suffer from the "one unit at a time" build rule, making it more likely for his newly built units to survive.
** ... isn't restricted to the ArbitraryHeadcountLimit under normal skirmish-mode rules.
** ... has such a wide attack/movement range that you'll never manage to get the first strike on them, or make them [[GetBackHereBoss hit-and-run endlessly without you ever reaching them]].
** ... has access to units that you wouldn't be able to use at the point in the game where you face them, or at all.
** ... has units that follow commands with perfect precision while the player has units that are [[TooDumbToLive so dumb]] [[TheGuardsMustBeCrazy you wonder how they even made it past boot camp]].
** ... may even be able to move its units over/through obstacles which the player cannot, such as infantry units walking across oceans or phasing through walls and mountains.

* In {{RPG}}s, the computer...
** ... can use equipment that is far above its level, while you would have to level up.
** ... can see what attack you've selected before you can use it, [[FakeDifficulty often using this to its advantage]]
** ... can inflict {{element|alRockPaperScissors}}al damage and StandardStatusEffects that the victim has immunity to.
** ... never has to recharge ManaPoints.
** ... can [[CriticalHit crit]] whenever it likes.

* In [[RacingGame Racing Games]], the computer...
** ... has an infinite supply of fuel or NitroBoost.
** ... has a car which has superior performance to anything you can drive.
** ... can pick cars and upgrades to match the performance of your car, taking away the point in picking/buying better cars and upgrades.
** ... possesses [[RubberBandAI 'rubber band' capabilities]], meaning second place will ''always'' be close enough to catch you.
** ... goes to their full speed instantly.
** ... is exempt from rules by which a player is eliminated from a tournament.
** ... gets all the good positions on the starting grid, while you get stuck all the way in the back.
** ... gets a head start.
** ... never makes a major crash on its own.
*** ... never makes a minor crash on its own, either.
*** ... at least whenever you're not directly watching.
** ... instantly recovers from crashes.
** ... can turn on a dime.
** ... can brake faster than you can, especially without an explicit difference between the vehicles or in-story justification.
** ... can pop out from under your front spoiler when overtaking, but block the entire width of the road [[HitboxDissonance for you]].
** ... while in tournament mode, will have ''one specific racer'' always be first (or second if you finish first) making your points ranking pointless unless you always finish first.
** ... drives the on ideal/perfect line.
*** ... will never be disturbed if your line clashes with its. Collision also means you slowing down more times than the computer, no matter what.

* In {{First Person Shooter}}s, the computer...
** ... doesn't have to reload, or reloads instantly (assuming you do have to reload).
** ... can [[OffhandBackhand aim for and shoot you]] [[BadassBack without actually having to]] ''[[BadassBack face you]]''.
** ... has great range on all its weapons, while yours have the range of flicked pebbles.
** ... is never surprised.
** ... starts with equipment you have to go find, which often does not drop when you kill them.
** ... knows where movable objectives like the flags in capture-the-flag are, even if nobody on their team has yet seen them.
** ... knows the state of weapons and power-ups at all times so it can go for them the instant they respawn, or worse yet, knows the exact value of the respawn timer and will plan its path to snatch the items leaving no window for anyone else.
** ... has bullets which never drift or deviate, while yours seem to bend around the {{NPC}}s.
** ... has [[BottomlessMagazines infinite ammo]].
** ... always knows your exact position, and can hunt you down/avoid you at all costs almost effortlessly.
** ... has TheAllSeeingAI, which means its vision is never blocked by smoke grenades, walls or other obstacles.
** ... has grenades which roll towards you like heat-seeking missiles, while yours avoid foes as if magnetically deflected.
** ... is FriendlyFireProof, even when you're not.

* In {{Fighting Game}}s, the computer...
** ... has unavoidable/unblockable attacks that you can never have.
** ... can use moves from impossible positions.
** ... can move/attack faster than you.
** ... can strike with priority wherever it feels like it, even with moves that are shunned from the competitive scene for having low or no priority at all.
** ... can instantly use moves that require human players to execute a complex command. (Theoretically, it could have begun the command string in advance, but that excuse goes right out the window if it executes the move mere milliseconds after doing something that would disrupt said command string.)
** ... will always know exactly where all invisible characters are -- both its and yours.
** ... can use its special attacks more frequently than you, and its DesperationAttack with more health than you.
** ... can deal more damage when using the same character and the same attacks you use under the same circumstances.
** ... can do combos that are impossible for the player.
** ... can dizzy/stun the player more often than he is allowed to do the same.
** ... can revive itself after you went through hell to beat it.
** ... beats you with [[OneHitKO ONE]] [[SecretAIMoves move]] (usually when it's [[RubberBandAI actually about to lose]]).
** ... reads your controller inputs and [[PerfectPlayAI counters you immediately]], when a human would have to predict/react.
*** ... and even if they don't actually read your inputs, has a reaction time measurable in milliseconds and can respond to your moves much faster than humans.
** ... is impossible to fake out.
** ... has an intrinsic knowledge of the physics engine (such as whether a vertical attack from above that causes groundbounce will make you bounce left or right).
** ... cannot be surprised.

* In [[StealthBasedGame Stealth Games]], the computer...
** ...will grant [[NoPeripheralVision perfect vision and hearing]].
** ...will easily [[PaperThinDisguise stare through your disguises]].
** ...will see and hear you like you're some [[BlatantBurglar lumbering idiot]].
** ...will often [[SkewedPriorities drop everything just to get you]], even if you've triggered some [[RevealingCoverup big, urgent distraction]].
** ...will keep an eye on you [[ConspicuousTrenchcoat for no real reason]].
** ...at first glance know [[FakingTheDead if you're actually dead or faking]].
** ...can [[ConspicuouslySelectivePerception tell the difference between footsteps and other sounds made by the player and [=NPCs=]]], even if they sound exactly the same.
** ...respond immediately to act as one; other mooks [[HiveMind won't wait to be told your position or description]] before they [[TheAllSeeingAI charge straight towards you.]]
** ...will sometimes ignore your sneaking and efforts to [[ScriptedBattle force you into an action sequence/cutscene.]]
** ...and, if it's a [[StealthBasedMission Stealth Based]] ''[[StealthBasedMission Mission]]'', expect the controls to [[UnexpectedGameplayChange become clunky and awkward]] whilst the AI remains ''"non-stealth game"''--y.

* In puzzle/board games, the computer...
** ... will ''always'' get ''the'' right rolls at ''the'' right time.
*** ... and even if they don't, knows what number the dice will land on before it rolls and takes appropriate pre-roll strategic choices it otherwise wouldn't know to make.
** ... is able to pull the bonuses that are next to impossible to pull.
** ... will almost never get a question wrong.
** ... will always have luck on its side.
** ... will just about always be dealt the best hand.
** ... will be able to think ahead and prepare for every move you could make and the possible moves past that.

* In action games in general ...
** ... [[CollisionDamage touching an enemy damages you but does nothing to the enemy]].
** ... you've got two sticks and a rock, but the computer has BottomlessMagazines.
** ... enemies aren't affected by environmental hazards.

* In pretty much any game, the computer ...
** ... [[ComputersAreFast isn't limited by the speed]] at which a joystick/mouse can move, or buttons/keys pressed.
** ... is not affected by lag in online games or from A\V setup.
** ... may be favored by the [[RandomNumberGod Random Number Generators]].
** ... [[SpitefulAI will team up against you, but never against other [=AI=]s/[=NPC=]s.]] The computer's interest is you. Losing.
*** ... if allied with you, will do its own thing without regard for others. This often turns into a [[AnnoyingVideoGameHelper nuisance]] from a strategic/tactical point of view.
** ... is immune to {{Interface Screw}}s.
** ... can adjust its own difficulty setting without telling you.
** ... will do any of the above (that are applicable) UpToEleven if the player can't see them at the moment.
[[/folder]]

!!Notable Offenders:
''Note: Since this trope is so ''incredibly'' common, only {{egregious}} examples should be listed here, otherwise this entry would take over the entire wiki. Aversions or subversions should probably be left out as well, since that's (hopefully) the default.''

[[foldercontrol]]
16th Sep '17 3:07:59 PM Gideoncrawle
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->''"Cheat wherever you can. A.I.s are handicapped. They need to cheat from time to time if they're going to close the gap... [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught Never get caught cheating.]] Nothing ruins the illusion of a good A.I. like seeing how they're cheating."''

to:

->''"Cheat wherever you can. A.I.s are handicapped. They need to cheat from time to time if they're going to close the gap... [[NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught Never get caught cheating.]] cheating. Nothing ruins the illusion of a good A.I. like seeing how they're cheating."''
12th Sep '17 7:45:43 AM FierceLlama
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* The Rhino Tanks are the definition of Badass in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'', being incredibly rare to find unless you get a six-star wanted level, or obtain one from the military base (which will ''also'' give you a six-star wanted level). However, these vehicles are very heavy and definitely ''not'' nimble when ''you'' drive them. However, if you manage to outrun the police, FBI and army in your souped-up Infernus and tear through the countryside, prepare to have the horror of your life when ''a Rhino Tank bursts out of the woods and charges straight for you at speeds upwards of 120 miles per hour''.

to:

* The Rhino Tanks are the definition of Badass in ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'', being incredibly rare to find unless you get a six-star wanted level, or obtain one from the military base (which will ''also'' give you a six-star five-star wanted level). However, these vehicles are very heavy and definitely ''not'' nimble when ''you'' drive them. However, if you manage to outrun the police, FBI and army in your souped-up Infernus and tear through the countryside, prepare to have the horror of your life when ''a Rhino Tank bursts out of the woods and charges straight for you at speeds upwards of 120 miles per hour''.
12th Sep '17 5:02:22 AM 1810072342
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Added DiffLines:

** ... can adjust its own difficulty setting without telling you.
This list shows the last 10 events of 499. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheComputerisaCheatingBastard