History Main / TheComputerIsAcheatingBastard

10th Feb '17 11:47:22 AM ThraggLootrippa
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** As the page quote suggests, Dawn of War 2 was trying to be a lot better about this, or at least attempting to not getting caught. What actually happens is referred to as "Dawn of Resource". The A.I. is completely and utterly ''obsessed'' with securing all of the resource points on the map. [[https://1d4chan.org/wiki/File:DOW2Guide.jpg It will try to grab all of your points, constantly allowing its units to get killed just so the A.I. can complete the capture. It knows how far your units can see to the last pixel, and will make its units perfectly avoid the sight radius of yours. The only time the computer actually starts playing the game is when it finally has all of the resource points, where it suddenly becomes reasonably competent. As soon as you take back a single point, it immediately reverts back to its shy kleptomania.]]

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** As the page quote suggests, Dawn of War 2 was trying to be a lot better about this, or at least attempting to not getting caught. get caught doing so. What actually happens is referred to as the "Dawn of Resource". The A.I. is completely and utterly ''obsessed'' with securing all of the resource points on the map. [[https://1d4chan.org/wiki/File:DOW2Guide.jpg It will try to grab all of your points, constantly allowing its units to get killed just so the A.I. can complete the capture. ]] It knows how far your units can see to the last pixel, and will make its units perfectly avoid the sight radius of yours. The only time the computer actually starts playing the game is when it finally has all of the resource points, where it suddenly becomes reasonably competent. As soon as you take back a single point, it immediately reverts back to its shy kleptomania.]]
10th Feb '17 10:10:03 AM LegoLover58
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*The Boss Pig in Angry Birds Transformers.
8th Feb '17 1:58:53 PM sniperfox29
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*** To be fair, the "weaker" cards really can be very useful with the plus and same rule in effect, so as long as the "open" rule is in effect, you can play the AI the same way they play you. Of course, most players hate this rule simply because it means they can't curb stomp the opposition and actually have to use some strategy.


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*** Not to mention, a Gold Chocobo is also not held up by obstacles, so although Joe still has better stats, a player with even a small amount of skill can still beat him. Plus racing Joe normally saves having to wait for all the others to catch up since you can't end the race til the second place rider finishes.
27th Jan '17 2:21:25 PM Trevorg2000
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** There is one opponent who regularly breaks the level cap of 99. While some may break it once (generally in the Famicom or Super Famicom games), this one has broken it in every appearance. [[spoiler:It's YHVH, who debuted in ''Megami Tensei II'' at Level 150 and returned in ''Shin Megami Tensei II'' at Level 108 and ''Shin Megami Tensei IV: Final'' at Level 100]].

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** There is one opponent who regularly breaks the level cap of 99. While some may break it once (generally in the Famicom or Super Famicom games), this one has broken it in every appearance. [[spoiler:It's YHVH, who debuted in ''Megami Tensei II'' at Level 150 and returned in ''Shin Megami Tensei II'' at Level 108 OneHundredAndEight and ''Shin Megami Tensei IV: Final'' at Level 100]].
19th Jan '17 9:35:07 AM SpinAttaxx
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** One particular opponent/partner in the Battle Tree uses a Latios. This can potentially hold a Latiosite, but the player is completely unable to acquire Latiosite themselves, as with a few exceptions, only the Mega Stones for Pokémon in the Alola Dex can be obtained.
** The usual instance of the computer's Pokémon having illegal moves has been {{subverted|Trope}} a few times; Battle Maison Evelyn's Entei has Sacred Fire, which it got added to its moveset in Generation VI, though a Move Reminder is needed to relearn it. ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' also had a Kommo-o in the Battle Tree that knew Shell Smash -- a move the line can't learn. A patch ended up changing it to the more sensible Draco Meteor.

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** * One particular opponent/partner in the Battle Tree uses a Latios. This can potentially hold a Latiosite, but the player is completely unable to acquire Latiosite themselves, as with a few exceptions, only the Mega Stones for Pokémon in the Alola Dex can be obtained.
** * The usual instance of the computer's Pokémon having illegal moves has been {{subverted|Trope}} a few times; Battle Maison Evelyn's Entei has Sacred Fire, which it got added to its moveset in Generation VI, though a Move Reminder is needed to relearn it. ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' also had a Kommo-o in the Battle Tree that knew Shell Smash -- a move the line can't learn. A patch ended up changing it to the more sensible Draco Meteor.
19th Jan '17 9:34:22 AM SpinAttaxx
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* [=NPC=]s, even ones with no plot significance, often have Franchise/{{Pokemon}} that learned powerful moves about five levels early. In later games, Pokémon learning moves early is actually [[JustifiedTrope justified]] -- a skilled breeder can get level-up moves and moves the Pokémon otherwise couldn't know (Egg moves) bred onto Level 5 (and, from Generation IV onward, Level 1) Pokémon if the father knows it, so presumably the computer-controlled trainers bred their own. While the player can't do this at first, many TournamentPlay fans use this in the {{Metagame}}.

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* [=NPC=]s, even ones with no plot significance, often have Franchise/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon that learned know powerful moves about five levels early. In later games, Pokémon learning moves early is actually [[JustifiedTrope justified]] -- a skilled breeder can get level-up moves and moves the Pokémon otherwise couldn't know (Egg moves) bred onto Level 5 (and, from Generation IV onward, Level 1) Pokémon if the father knows it, so presumably the computer-controlled trainers bred their own. While the player can't do this at first, many TournamentPlay fans use this in the {{Metagame}}.



* [=NPCs=] in Generation I could never run out of PP. Have fun with the Elite Four-Champion Gauntlet...
* Speaking of the Elite Four, Lance's Dragonite in Generation I has Barrier. Go on. Check. Done? Yep. Dragonite's line has forever been incapable of learning Barrier, no matter how much breeding you do. What's more, in Generation II, his Aerodactyl knows Rock Slide, which it couldn't learn until ''[[VideoGame/PokemonFireRedAndLeafGreen FireRed and LeafGreen]]''.

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* [=NPCs=] in Generation I could never run out of PP. Have fun with the Elite Four-Champion Gauntlet...
gauntlet...
* Speaking of the Elite Four, Lance's Dragonite in Generation I has Barrier. Go on. Check.Check to see how the line learns it. Done? Yep. Dragonite's line has forever been incapable of learning Barrier, no matter how much breeding you do. What's more, in Generation II, his Aerodactyl knows Rock Slide, which it couldn't learn until ''[[VideoGame/PokemonFireRedAndLeafGreen FireRed and LeafGreen]]''.



* In a similar vein, various characters have Pokémon that have evolved at levels lower than their designated evolution level, if you were to train up its pre-evolution. Also {{Justified|Trope}} in that various areas contain wild evolved Pokémon at lower levels than ought to be possible, allowing the player to catch them -- the [=NPC=]s may have caught their Pokémon in places the player simply hasn't been to.
** Ghetsis in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a particularly notable example of this in his level 54 Hydreigon, which is 10 levels lower then when it can normally be obtained. {{Fandom}} claims that this [[BadBoss action]] led to Ghetsis [[http://images5.fanpop.com/image/quiz/832000/832998_1334165220971_160.jpg?v=1334165104 losing his right eye]].
*** In ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', Ghetsis still has his Hydreigon, now two levels ''lower'', albeit with a weaker moveset [[spoiler:due to being wounded]]. [[spoiler: Iris]], however, is packing one of her own that's almost as nasty as his was in the prequel (And just as nasty in Challenge Mode).

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* In a similar vein, various characters have Pokémon that have evolved at levels lower than their designated evolution level, if you were to train up its pre-evolution. Also {{Justified|Trope}} {{justified|Trope}} in that various areas contain wild evolved Pokémon at lower levels than ought to be possible, allowing the player to catch them -- the [=NPC=]s may have caught their Pokémon in places the player simply hasn't been to.
** Ghetsis in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a particularly notable example of this in his level 54 Hydreigon, which is 10 levels lower then when it can normally be obtained. {{Fandom}} {{Fanon}} claims that this [[BadBoss action]] action led to Ghetsis [[http://images5.fanpop.com/image/quiz/832000/832998_1334165220971_160.jpg?v=1334165104 losing his right eye]].
*** In ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'', Ghetsis still has his Hydreigon, now two levels ''lower'', albeit with a weaker moveset [[spoiler:due to being wounded]]. moveset. [[spoiler: Iris]], however, is packing one of her own that's almost as nasty as his was in the prequel (And (and just as nasty in Challenge Mode).



** Up until the fifth generation, in the event that both trainers had their last Pokemon KO'd as a result of Self-Destruct or Explosion, the AI would be declared the winner no matter what, despite the fact that the trainer who ''used'' one of said moves is supposed to lose by default.

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** Up until the fifth generation, ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'', in the event that both trainers had their last Pokemon KO'd as a result of Self-Destruct or Explosion, the AI would be declared the winner no matter what, despite the fact that the trainer who ''used'' one of said moves is supposed to lose by default.



* ''Emerald'' is also a blatant offender. It introduced the Battle Frontier, and set the standard for all subsequent games. It has multiple Gym Leaders with Pokémon they should not have at certain levels, such as Winona's Altaria. To top it all off, regular trainers, in Victory Road, have completely impossible movesets. One in particular is absurd: a Lanturn in a Double Battle knows NOTHING BUT EARTHQUAKE, a move it cannot learn in the first place.
* In ''HeartGold and SoulSilver'', during your first battle with Brock, he has a Rhyhorn with Sturdy. No other Rhyhorn can have this Ability as of G6.
* The AI of the battle facilities of Generation III onward (often either the 'Battle Tower' or the 'Battle Frontier') are designed to gain knowledge about your team as you accumulate winning streaks, despite the fact that you're facing new opponents over and over again and thus it wouldn't make sense for "Schoolgirl Jane" to know anything about the team that "Punk Sid" just battled. Specifically, you'll be forced to face teams that are increasingly designed to counter yours the higher your streak.
** While this may seem like a coincidence in many instances, the most damning evidence is that players that have used hacked Pokémon, Pokémon with special abilities and sets that literally do not exist anywhere in the game and thus the computer cannot ''possibly'' have had the knowledge to counter them beforehand, will still encounter teams that are tailor made to overcome the player's strategies.
** The most popular of these hacks was the powerful Wondertomb/Wondereye, a combination of an ability (Wonder Guard) that will only allow attacks if you're hit by something you're weak to, placed onto a Pokémon with no weaknesses (Spiritomb and Sableye, respectively). Get a high enough streak, and you'll find opponents carrying Mold Breaker (which lets them ignore Wonder Guard); not too strange, since Mold Breaker is a good ability and you'd encounter that anyway. Go farther, and they'll use ''nothing but status moves'' (which Wonder Guard can't block, and would be a baffling strategy unless the computer knew what it was dealing with beforehand). The strangest, of course, has to be the move Fire Fang. Due to a glitch, Fire Fang will hit opponents with Wonder Guard regardless of their type, and it's completely unknown why this move, and this move alone, has this ability. Even considering that this is a glitch, the computer ''will still use this, knowing that it works against you''.
** Another of these hacks is to give a Pokémon One-Hit KO moves (that cause anything they hit to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin immediately faint]] in exchange for poor accuracy that makes it unlikely that they'll actually work) combined with the ability "No Guard" (that allows you and your opponent to bypass all accuracy checks). Use this strategy to sweep enough teams and you'll eventually start encountering Pokémon with the ability "Sturdy", an ability that, during Generations III and IV at least, does ''nothing else'' except block OHKO moves.
** For evidence this still exists in the 6th generation's Battle Maison, try entering a Pokemon with Sand Stream[[note]]stirs up a sandstorm when the Pokemon enters battle[[/note]] as your lead plus an Aron with Sturdy[[note]]if it's at full HP and takes a hit that would normally KO it in one hit, it'll hang on with 1 HP[[/note]] and Endeavor[[note]]a move that brings the target's HP down to the user's[[/note]]. In the Battle Maison, you'll quickly start encountering a disproportionate number of Pokemon who are immune to sandstorms.

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* ''Emerald'' is also a blatant offender. It introduced the Battle Frontier, and set the standard for all subsequent games. It has multiple Gym Leaders with Pokémon they should not have at certain levels, such as Winona's Altaria. To top it all off, regular trainers, trainers in Victory Road, Road have completely impossible movesets. One in particular is absurd: a Lanturn in a Double Battle knows NOTHING BUT EARTHQUAKE, a move it cannot learn in the first place.
* In ''HeartGold and SoulSilver'', during your first battle with Brock, he has a Rhyhorn with Sturdy. No other Rhyhorn can have this Ability as of G6.
Gen VII.
* The AI of the battle facilities of Generation III onward (often either the 'Battle Tower' or the 'Battle Frontier') (the Battle Tower/Frontier/Subway/Maison/Tree) are designed to gain knowledge about your team as you accumulate winning streaks, despite the fact that you're facing new opponents over and over again and thus it wouldn't make sense for "Schoolgirl Jane" to know anything about the team that "Punk Sid" just battled. Specifically, you'll be forced to face teams that are increasingly designed to counter yours the higher your streak.
** While this may seem like a coincidence in many instances, the most damning evidence is that players that have used hacked Pokémon, Pokémon -- Pokémon with special abilities and sets that literally do not exist anywhere in the game and thus the computer cannot ''possibly'' have had the knowledge to counter them beforehand, will beforehand -- and still encounter teams that are tailor made tailor-made to overcome the player's their strategies.
** The most popular of these hacks (prior to the introduction of the Fairy-type) was the powerful Wondertomb/Wondereye, a Wondertomb/Wondereye[[labelnote:Explanation]]A combination of Wonder Guard -- an ability (Wonder Guard) Ability that will only allow attacks if you're hit by something you're weak to, placed onto to -- and a Pokémon with no weaknesses (Spiritomb weaknesses; Spiritomb and Sableye, respectively).respectively[[/labelnote]]. Get a high enough streak, and you'll find opponents carrying Mold Breaker (which lets them ignore Wonder Guard); not too strange, since Mold Breaker is a good ability and you'd encounter that anyway. Go farther, and they'll use ''nothing but status moves'' (which Wonder Guard can't block, and would be a baffling strategy unless the computer knew what it was dealing with beforehand). The strangest, of course, has to be the move Fire Fang. Due to a glitch, Fire Fang will hit opponents with Wonder Guard regardless of their type, and it's completely unknown why this move, and this move alone, has this ability. Even considering that this is a glitch, the computer ''will still use this, knowing that it works against you''.
** Another of these hacks is to give a Pokémon One-Hit KO OneHitKO moves (that cause anything they hit to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin immediately faint]] in exchange for poor accuracy [[AwesomeButImpractical that makes it unlikely that they'll actually work) work]]) combined with the ability "No Guard" (that allows you and your opponent to [[AlwaysAccurateAttack bypass all accuracy checks).checks]]). Use this strategy to sweep enough teams and you'll eventually start encountering Pokémon with the ability "Sturdy", an ability that, during Generations III and IV at least, does ''nothing else'' except block OHKO moves.
** For evidence this still exists in the 6th generation's Gen VI's Battle Maison, try entering a Pokemon with Sand Stream[[note]]stirs Stream[[note]]An Ability that stirs up a sandstorm when the Pokemon enters battle[[/note]] as your lead plus an Aron with Sturdy[[note]]if Sturdy[[note]]If it's at full HP and takes a hit that would normally KO it in one hit, it'll hang on with 1 HP[[/note]] and Endeavor[[note]]a Endeavor[[note]]A move that brings the target's HP down to the user's[[/note]]. In the Battle Maison, you'll quickly start encountering a disproportionate number of Pokemon who are immune to sandstorms.



%% The below example (Fighting attack vs a Ghost type) is probably not an instance of the computer cheating, but rather of a good AI knowing how to predict. Also, the example is wrong, because there are known instances of such predictions being made.
%% ** What's worse, the AI trainers in higher tournaments will make predictions not even the ballsiest player would make. Say you have a [[NoSell ghost type]] out, and want to switch in to a steel type out. Invariably, the opponent will use a fighting type attack.[[note]]An explanation could be that the AI only makes a move ''after'' you make the decision to switch the Ghost out for the Steel (in which it will know what you are going to switch it out for) instead of making a move ''before'' you switch out (in which it will not know what you are going to switch it out for). [[/note]]



** Subverted with Battle Maison Evelyn's Entei having Sacred Fire, [[GuideDangIt which has been ninja'd into its moveset]] in Generation VI.

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** Subverted One particular opponent/partner in the Battle Tree uses a Latios. This can potentially hold a Latiosite, but the player is completely unable to acquire Latiosite themselves, as with a few exceptions, only the Mega Stones for Pokémon in the Alola Dex can be obtained.
** The usual instance of the computer's Pokémon having illegal moves has been {{subverted|Trope}} a few times;
Battle Maison Evelyn's Entei having has Sacred Fire, [[GuideDangIt which has been ninja'd into it got added to its moveset]] moveset in Generation VI.VI, though a Move Reminder is needed to relearn it. ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' also had a Kommo-o in the Battle Tree that knew Shell Smash -- a move the line can't learn. A patch ended up changing it to the more sensible Draco Meteor.



** When you play a Contest against Lisia in gen 6, her Altaria will have a Condition that is higher than you can reach through the use of [=PokéBlocks=].

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** When you play a Contest against Lisia in gen 6, ''OR/AS'', her Altaria will have a Condition that is higher than you can reach through the use of [=PokéBlocks=].[=PokéBlocks=].
* ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon''
15th Jan '17 12:24:29 PM zaphod77
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** When the rules were changed to stop that, they resorted to having a separate database of "spoiler questions." Ones which no one can reasonably be expected to know the answer to. If you get good enough, they start throwing them at you. The game keeps track of the spoiler questions that have already been asked, so it can keep asking new ones as needed to stop winning.
15th Jan '17 3:21:26 AM blurrylightning
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** Neo Raimon, Red Team, and White Team in the third game. The team you're facing have alternate versions of Inazuma Japan players, they have a larger GP and TP pool, plus they have some of the most powerful moves in the game and they're fully evolved. For example, Neo Raimon Hiroto has Tenkuu Otoshi V3, Boost Glider V3, True Planet Shield, and Chowaza! (A skill that powers up moves by 20% at the price of 20% more TP). Luckily, this is at least mitigated by the fact that most of the moves used by these alternate versions are some of the most TP consuming moves in the game (sometimes even more thanks to Chowaza!), and they only have two (one for Red Team and White Team) subtitutes.

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** Neo Raimon, Red Team, and White Team in the third game. The team you're facing have alternate versions of Inazuma Japan players, they have a larger GP and TP pool, plus they have some of the most powerful moves in the game and they're fully evolved. For example, Neo Raimon Hiroto has Tenkuu Otoshi V3, Boost Glider V3, True Planet Shield, and Chowaza! (A Chowaza![[note]]A skill that powers up moves by 20% at the price of 20% more TP).TP[[/note]]. Luckily, this is at least mitigated by the fact that most of the moves used by these alternate versions are some of the most TP consuming moves in the game (sometimes even more thanks to Chowaza!), and they only have two (one for Red Team and White Team) subtitutes.


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** Shinsei Inazuma Japan and Chrono Storm in ''Chrono Stone'' is a downplayed example. These two unlike the teams mentioned above aren't unfair, but it doesn't change the fact that they evolved moves that couldn't be evolved. Such as Kinako who Mixi-Maxed with Master Dragon that has Kirakira Illusion G3[[note]]Which is impossible to do since Master Dragon isn't recruitable until Galaxy[[/note]].
10th Jan '17 7:10:55 AM blurrylightning
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** In the ''Chrono Stone'' game, playing against Inazuma Legend Japan in the post-game story mode can be a nightmare. All of their players are as strong as a Keshin Armed player, without the Keshin Armed. Luckily none of them can use a Keshin, but it also means that unlike them; you don't have much time until you're screwed. Even if you Mixi-Maxed and use your player's Keshin Armed, you might still be screwed by a small margin. The bright side is they're nowhere near as bad in the Taisen Route, but good luck getting there; because you need to finish the post-game story if you want to play them there.

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** In the ''Chrono Stone'' game, playing against Inazuma Legend Japan in the post-game story mode can be a nightmare. All of their players are as strong as a Keshin Armed player, without the Keshin Armed. Luckily none of them can use a Keshin, but it also means that unlike them; you don't have much time until you're screwed. Even if you Mixi-Maxed and use your player's Keshin Armed, you might still be screwed by a small margin. The bright side is that they're nowhere near as bad in the Taisen Route, but good luck getting there; because you need to finish the post-game story if you want to play them there.there.
*** Imagine the above scenario with Inazuma Legend Japan, now give all their player a Keshin and give their captain a Mixi-Max. That's basically you against Tsukigami no Ichizoku (Nepuu) or Vamp Time (Raimei), and here you thought Inazuma Legend Japan was hard.
4th Jan '17 7:32:21 PM NondescriptLarva
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*** While Watson was very fast on the buzzer, his programming often got in the way; he repeated Ken Jennings' incorrect answer, and in a choice between two identically-named cities, his information-gathering algorithm caused him to name an airport that wasn't even in the same ''country'' as the city in question (the clues were all there, but they were ambiguous enough that the question could have applied to either city).
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