History Main / TheComputerIsAcheatingBastard

16th Oct '17 2:21:43 PM SeptimusHeap
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* In the ''MortalKombat'' arcade series, the computer player often blatantly cheats. Here are some gems for ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2''.

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* In the ''MortalKombat'' ''VideoGame/MortalKombat'' arcade series, the computer player often blatantly cheats. Here are some gems for ''VideoGame/MortalKombat2''.
15th Oct '17 3:42:28 PM Nevermore2002
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* In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'', [[spoiler:Aribeth]] has a special Implosion spell that cause instant death. Immunity to death will not save you, spell resistance will not work and your only chance is having a high fortitude save. On the other hand, the Implosion spell used by a Cleric player allow a saving throw so yeah, that's cheating.

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* In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'', [[spoiler:Aribeth]] has a special Implosion spell that cause with a high chance of instant death. Immunity to death will not save you, spell resistance will not work and your only chance is having a high fortitude save. On the other hand, the Implosion spell used by a Cleric player allow the enemy to have a saving throw so yeah, that's cheating.throw.
15th Oct '17 3:40:11 PM Nevermore2002
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* In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'', [[spoiler:Aribeth]] has a special Implosion spell that cause instant death. Immunity to death will not save you, spell resistance will not work and your only chance is having a high fortitude save. On the other hand, the Implosion spell used by a Cleric player allow a saving throw so yeah, that's cheating.
11th Oct '17 4:46:08 AM Nikku
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** During one of the final battles against M.Bison with the player controlling Charlie in the story mode of ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV'', Bison will frequently use charge attacks... while ''walking towards the player''!
3rd Oct '17 8:18:38 AM Reparman30
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** The CPU opponents are inconsistent in their "skill", the arcade mode shifts from "Beginners" to "Tekken Lord", Beginner AI will not attempt to attack and rarely block, while from Shihan rank and above the AI has 100% perfect accuracy, knows what button are you pressing and counters with perfect timing every move, and if that's not bad enough, the AI will 99% of times kick you in the air and do a 10+ combo + finishers that will reduce your health to 15-20%, and if you try to attack, the AI will block it and will counter it before you have a chance to do a combo, mostly forcing you to use cheap moves to best the high level AI.
19th Sep '17 12:31:03 AM Kuruni
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*** To be cynical, however, you'll eventually notice a pattern of the days when Card Destruction is off the banlist (it works that every card is cycled on and off it), it will show up in your opponent's hand within the first three turns about half of the time. Aside from the AI also knowing your facedown monster's defense before it's flipped, it's pretty fair otherwise. The only place the cheating really shows up is when you're facing the anime characters, as nameless side characters will usually display pretty jarring ArtificialStupidity.

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*** To be cynical, however, However, you'll eventually notice a pattern of the days when Card Destruction is off the banlist (it works that every card is cycled on and off it), it will show up in your opponent's hand within the first three turns about half of the time. Aside from the AI also knowing your facedown monster's defense before it's flipped, it's pretty fair otherwise. The only place the cheating really shows up is when you're facing the anime characters, as nameless side characters will usually display pretty jarring ArtificialStupidity.



** Not to mention that in ''every'' video game based on the card game - no exceptions - the cards that are available to you at the start are mediocre at best, and you always have to unlock better ones by progressing in the game. But almost all of your opponents - even the lowliest of Mooks - have access to better cards right from the start, often ones you can't access until much later. (You can sometimes get some as gifts or bonuses by defeating duelists, but that's usually decided at random, and there's a lot of luck involved as to whether you'll get something good.)
** The really worst part is that, of course, the game knows which cards you have and the opponent AI will actually base the cards it plays on whichever cards you've played. This is easily tested with an emulator that allow save states. Save before playing a particular card, and see the AI play a card that counters yours. Load the save state so you can play a different card that counters the AI's and it will actually play an entirely different card that counters your new one.[[note]]Of course, if you actually use save states to give you an advantage, that counts as cheating on your part[[/note]]
*** On that note, while it is possible for the AI to miss on cards that depend on a random guess, like [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Ordeal_of_a_Traveler Ordeal of a Traveler]], the Spell Card [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Question Question]] ''never'' works against it; because this card relies on your opponent's memory, the AI will ''always'' guess right if you try. (This may be useful in some situation, like if the card in question is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Necroface Necroface]], in which case this Trope turns into ArtificialStupidity.)
** Hoo boy, ''[[VideoGame/YuGiOhForbiddenMemories Forbidden Memories]]''. Not only does the AI have cards that you can't obtain without cheating devices, but it doesn't even bother to stack the deck, no; it ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vo3hNgUAjPM turns the cards in its hands into other cards.]]''

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** Not to mention that in ''every'' video game based on the card game - no exceptions - the cards that are available to you at the start are mediocre at best, and you always have to unlock better ones by progressing in the game. But almost all of your opponents - even the lowliest of Mooks - have access to better cards right from the start, often ones you can't access until much later. (You can sometimes get some as gifts or bonuses by defeating duelists, but that's usually decided at random, and there's a lot of luck involved as to whether you'll get something good.)
** The really worst part is that, of course, the game knows which cards you have and the opponent AI will actually base the cards it plays on whichever cards you've played. This is easily tested with an emulator that allow save states. Save before playing a particular card, and see the AI play a card that counters yours. Load the save state so you can play a different card that counters the AI's and it will actually play an entirely different card that counters your new one.[[note]]Of course, if you actually use save states to give you an advantage, that counts as cheating on your part[[/note]]
*** On that note, while it is possible for the AI to miss on cards that depend on a random guess, like [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Ordeal_of_a_Traveler Ordeal of a Traveler]], the Spell Card [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Question Question]] ''never'' works against it; because this card relies on your opponent's memory, the AI will ''always'' guess right if you try. (This may be useful in some situation, like if the card in question is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Necroface Necroface]], in which case this Trope turns into ArtificialStupidity.)
part[[/note]]
** Hoo boy, ''[[VideoGame/YuGiOhForbiddenMemories Forbidden Memories]]''. Not only does the AI have cards that you can't obtain without cheating devices, but it doesn't even bother to stack the deck, no; it ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vo3hNgUAjPM turns the cards in its hands into other cards.]]''



** In actual Jeopardy, when Watson the Computer played, he had insanely fast reaction time.
*** While Watson was very fast on the buzzer, his programming often got in the way; he repeated Ken Jennings' incorrect answer, and in a choice between two identically-named cities, his information-gathering algorithm caused him to name an airport that wasn't even in the same ''country'' as the city in question (the clues were all there, but they were ambiguous enough that the question could have applied to either city).
** On ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', if a computer player rings in it will either give the right answer to a question or [[ArtificialStupidity type in nonsense]]. If you go too far ahead, the game will sometimes [[RubberBandAI make it impossible for you to buzz in at all while the computer player(s) starts closing the gap.]]
*** In the SNES version, it is so extreme that the computer buzzes in on the first possible frame. This means that, even if you're playing on an emulator and use the tools to play it frame-perfect, it's still literally impossible to buzz in before the computer. Essentially, it cheats so hard that you can't out-cheat it.

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** In actual Jeopardy, when Watson the Computer played, he had insanely fast reaction time.
*** While Watson was very fast on the buzzer, his programming often got in the way; he repeated Ken Jennings' incorrect answer, and in a choice between two identically-named cities, his information-gathering algorithm caused him to name an airport that wasn't even in the same ''country'' as the city in question (the clues were all there, but they were ambiguous enough that the question could have applied to either city).
** On ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', if a computer player rings in it will either give the right answer to a question or [[ArtificialStupidity type in nonsense]]. If you go too far ahead, the game will sometimes [[RubberBandAI make it impossible for you to buzz in at all while the computer player(s) starts closing the gap.]]
***
]] In the SNES version, it is so extreme that the computer buzzes in on the first possible frame. This means that, even if you're playing on an emulator and use the tools to play it frame-perfect, it's still literally impossible to buzz in before the computer. Essentially, it cheats so hard that you can't out-cheat it.



*** Simultaneously subverted in versions where it is possible for a computer player to call a [[PressXToDie repeated letter]].



* In the Dokapon game for DS you can expect that the computer will get the exact roll it needs 99% of the time.
** Savestates show that the computer always gives you the same predetermined "random" roll, regardless of any luck manipulation that would work in games with fair [=RNGs=]. The CPU players are essentially saying, every turn, "I want to move X spaces". At least this doesn't carry over into combat.
*** Technically, this is because the game uses a "random seed" method of determining rolls. The game has a randomly generated number that it uses as a basis to find the numbers for rolls, spins, etc. Since there is some form of pattern, the number rolled at a given time will always be the same, unless the seed changes. That happens when certain actions are performed (for example, using an item before you roll). You can still bet the AI has a say in its roll, though.

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* In the Dokapon ''Dokapon'' game for DS you can expect that the computer will get the exact roll it needs 99% of the time.
**
time. Savestates show that the computer always gives you the same predetermined "random" roll, regardless of any luck manipulation that would work in games with fair [=RNGs=]. The CPU players are essentially saying, every turn, "I want to move X spaces". At least this doesn't carry over into combat.
***
combat. Technically, this is because the game uses a "random seed" method of determining rolls. The game has a randomly generated number that it uses as a basis to find the numbers for rolls, spins, etc. Since there is some form of pattern, the number rolled at a given time will always be the same, unless the seed changes. That happens when certain actions are performed (for example, using an item before you roll). You can still bet the AI has a say in its roll, though.



* ''VideoGame/MariosGameGallery'' is rather infamous for using this trope.
** In Go Fish, it's rather obvious that the AI knows what's in your hand. Often times, it will ask for the card you just drew when you go fish.

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* ''VideoGame/MariosGameGallery'' is rather infamous for using this trope.
**
''VideoGame/MariosGameGallery'': In Go Fish, it's rather obvious that the AI knows what's in your hand. Often times, it will ask for the card you just drew when you go fish.



* ''VideoGame/RoadRash 3'' for the Genesis thoroughly abuses this trope. One racer (Lucky Luc) always manages to stay ahead of you. You can have the same bike as him, and he still manages to get ahead of you so he can spam his oilcans. If you decide to grab the next higher bike, or two after that, he STILL is usually a bit faster than you, or can at least catch up to you with no problem.
** The game also has some ''serious'' {{rubber band AI}}. The super secret bike tops out (when not using the nitro) at around 215 MPH. You get this bike (with the proper code) on the first races (if you decided to cheat back). You can speed past every other racer and take first place within the first 11 seconds of the race, but if you crash any time after that (most noticeable when you're at the end of the race), at least five other racers will pass you before you can get back onto the bike, even if you don't get flung too far away from it.

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* ''VideoGame/RoadRash 3'' for the Genesis thoroughly abuses this trope. One racer (Lucky Luc) always manages to stay ahead of you. You can have the same bike as him, and he still manages to get ahead of you so he can spam his oilcans. If you decide to grab the next higher bike, or two after that, he STILL is usually a bit faster than you, or can at least catch up to you with no problem.
**
problem. The game also has some ''serious'' {{rubber band AI}}.RubberBandAI. The super secret bike tops out (when not using the nitro) at around 215 MPH. You get this bike (with the proper code) on the first races (if you decided to cheat back). You can speed past every other racer and take first place within the first 11 seconds of the race, but if you crash any time after that (most noticeable when you're at the end of the race), at least five other racers will pass you before you can get back onto the bike, even if you don't get flung too far away from it.



* In ''RedBaron Arcade'' (as with many, many flight/driving/racing type games), if there is any penalty to being rammed, you can bet that the computer has any number of planes or cars (or whatever) cheerfully lining up to ram the absolute ''crap'' out of you as soon as you start targeting the thing that will let you win that level.
* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedUnderground'' combined RubberBandAI with your opponents always having just slightly better cars than you. Because of that it was easier to deliberately ''downgrade'' your car in the endgame by using a weak engine and so on. The AI would be downgraded as well so that relatively everything stayed the same, but the race would be a lot slower and therefore more forgiving.
* '''Need For Speed Underground''' was ''so'' blatant with this that the statistics given at the end of the race made no sense: your top speed for the race could be reported as ''x'' MPH, with your opponents given as ''x''-n. Even if, at that top speed, the opponents had passed you.

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* In ''RedBaron ''Red Baron Arcade'' (as with many, many flight/driving/racing type games), if there is any penalty to being rammed, you can bet that the computer has any number of planes or cars (or whatever) cheerfully lining up to ram the absolute ''crap'' out of you as soon as you start targeting the thing that will let you win that level.
* ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedUnderground'' ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeedUnderground'':
** It
combined RubberBandAI with your opponents always having just slightly better cars than you. Because of that it was easier to deliberately ''downgrade'' your car in the endgame by using a weak engine and so on. The AI would be downgraded as well so that relatively everything stayed the same, but the race would be a lot slower and therefore more forgiving.
* '''Need For Speed Underground''' was ''so'' blatant with this that the statistics given at the end of the race made no sense: your
forgiving. Your top speed for the race could be reported as ''x'' MPH, with your opponents given as ''x''-n. Even if, at that top speed, the opponents had passed you. The AI actually deliberately steers traffic so they'll cross paths with you. Cars come out out of an intersection with precise timing so that you'll hit them. If you're in the lead on the last lap, this becomes even more likely. The best tactic is to swerve wildly just before every intersection so you won't be where the computer thought you were going to be.



*** Most Wanted was nowhere near as bad as Underground 2, but can be a lesson in frustration if you haven't mastered getting an apex turn or don't abuse speedbreaker.
** In ''Most Wanted'', it is possible to drag a car with it facing the opposite direction, because it got its rear wheel caught on your front end, and then not only free itself, but proceed to gain magical turning abilities where it obtains a zero-degree radius turn, and speed off. Past you.
** The car damage thing is inverted, since cop cars can be taken out fairly easily while your own car is indestructible. This is [[strike:balanced]] outweighed by the fact that the computer has an infinite supply of them, though.
** The cops also rarely go after the computer players. There may be one or two occasions where if you deliberately slow down and give up your position so the other can get the cop first, they will actually go after the more {{egregious}} speeder. Otherwise, the cop will usually go after you, and completely ignore everyone else.
*** Speaking of cops, try this: Start a cop chase and go into reverse. The cop will drive alongside you. Now stop, go into first, and punch it. Even if your car can go from 0 to 100 in 0.5 seconds, the cop will stay right on your tail, despite having to make a J-turn to even drive in the same direction as you.
* Speaking of ''Most Wanted'', once the backup timer has run out, the cops are free to respawn anywhere they want. Nothing quite beats seeing a cop car flicker into view on the golf course. Of course, if ''you'' try to respawn by using R, it's an instant bust, no matter where the cops are.
** Not to mention the effect in latter tollbooth challenges, where if you take the shortcut through opposing traffic, there always ends up being traffic there. If you take the long way around, surprise, surprise, no traffic!
** In ''Need for Speed Underground'', the AI actually deliberately steers traffic so they'll cross paths with you. Cars come out out of an intersection with precise timing so that you'll hit them. If you're in the lead on the last lap, this becomes even more likely. The best tactic is to swerve wildly just before every intersection so you won't be where the computer thought you were going to be.
* ''Most Wanted'' even goes so far as to actively ''lie'' to the player. One of loading screen tips tells you that with a well-executed pursuit breaker it's possible to take out all your pursuers at once and get away easily. But doing that just causes a new police car to instantly spawn nearby. Following the advice and slowing down to allow cops to catch up and get them all can then easily have the opposite result than the tip claims, since even though the car is invulnerable, it can still get caught in the pursuit breaker and immobilized just long enough for that new cop car to bust you.
* Cop cars in '''Most Wanted''' can also travel ''sideways'' across the road in a controlled fashion (not power-sliding) to get in your way, as though they have 4-wheel steer with a 90-degree capability.
** ''Need for Speed Most Wanted'' actually cheats in ''multiplayer mode''. You can upgrade every car in the game to 100% on all three stats (acceleration, speed and handling), except for the game's signature car, the BMW M3 GTR which cannot be upgraded at all and is therefore pretty bad in single player. However, as bad as its ingame performance is, its listed stats are worse. And in multiplayer mode, the game attempts to ensure a fair race by equalising the stats of all cars in the race. The result is that your shiny Porsche Carrera GT that ordinarily blows the doors off the M3 GTR is detuned to a limping piece of junk with the same stats as the M3 GTR... at which point the M3 GTR is the better car and will proceed to beat you. This is probably a design flaw, but ironically the M3 GTR is driven in career mode by a cheating bastard who took it from you after rigging a race through sabotage.
*** Also, because of the craptastic way the game measures handling, the M3 GTR is probably one of the best vehicles you get in the late game for turning. The game's handling stat doesn't measure how well it turns, but rather how well your car stays gripped to the road, which can be really bad if your trying to make a tight turn at 140 MPH(~225km/h, for you metric users)
** Every PSP version of Need for Speed seems to put a lot of effort in ensuring that its AI has a new annoying trick at its disposal. By the time of NFS Undercover, the cpu cars could drive faster than you, no matter what was your car and how well it was upgraded, were not affected by crashes (they were back on your tail in just few seconds), could TELEPORT if you somehow managed to make them stay really behind, or TURN MID-AIR! In one of the urban stages, there is a 90 degrees turn just after a really long straight that ends with a significant bump. To drive past it you simply have to slow down, but the cpu cars can drive into it at full speed, jump and turn in the air. Funny sight when you are looking behind at that time.
* Your opponents in ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed Shift 2: Unleashed'' are rather fond of the Reverse PIT manoeuvre. It's performed in exactly the same way but it's the guy pushing that spins out. It's incredibly annoying when you've got a fast car and it gets congested. Generally, your opponent's cars weigh twice as much as yours according to the physics engine.
* In ''Need for Speed: Undercover'' (non PSP), even if you have the pedal thoroughly buried in a Mclaren F1, police [=SUV=]s will still lazily pull in front of you as though you were parked. For those still confused; this is a scenario in which a Cadillac Escalade is represented as faster than one of the fastest production cars ever produced.[[note]]The F1 remains as of 2011 one of the fastest production cars ever made; as of July 2010 it is succeeded by very few cars including the Koenigsegg CCR, the Bugatti Veyron, the SSC Ultimate Aero TT, and the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport.[[/note]]
* In '''Need For Speed:Hot Pursuit (2009)''' you can pass a parked police car, at top speed, in the ''fastest car in the game'' (Veyron) and it will be on your tail in just a couple of seconds, even if you didn't slow down at all.

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*** Most Wanted was nowhere near as bad as Underground 2, but can be a lesson in frustration if you haven't mastered getting an apex turn or don't abuse speedbreaker.
** In ''Most Wanted'', it Wanted'':
*** It
is possible to drag a car with it facing the opposite direction, because it got its rear wheel caught on your front end, and then not only free itself, but proceed to gain magical turning abilities where it obtains a zero-degree radius turn, and speed off. Past you.
** *** The car damage thing is inverted, since cop cars can be taken out fairly easily while your own car is indestructible. This is [[strike:balanced]] outweighed by the fact that the computer has an infinite supply of them, though.
** *** The cops also rarely go after the computer players. There may be one or two occasions where if you deliberately slow down and give up your position so the other can get the cop first, they will actually go after the more {{egregious}} speeder. Otherwise, the cop will usually go after you, and completely ignore everyone else.
*** Speaking of cops, try this: Start a cop chase and go into reverse. The cop will drive alongside you. Now stop, go into first, and punch it. Even if your car can go from 0 to 100 in 0.5 seconds, the cop will stay right on your tail, despite having to make a J-turn to even drive in the same direction as you.
* Speaking of ''Most Wanted'', once the backup timer has run out, the cops are free to respawn anywhere they want. Nothing quite beats seeing a cop car flicker into view on the golf course. Of course, if ''you'' try to respawn by using R, it's an instant bust, no matter where the cops are.
** Not to mention the effect in latter tollbooth challenges, where if you take the shortcut through opposing traffic, there always ends up being traffic there. If you take the long way around, surprise, surprise, no traffic!
** In ''Need for Speed Underground'', the AI actually deliberately steers traffic so they'll cross paths with you. Cars come out out of an intersection with precise timing so that you'll hit them. If you're in the lead on the last lap, this becomes even more likely. The best tactic is to swerve wildly just before every intersection so you won't be where the computer thought you were going to be.
*
''Most Wanted'' even goes so far as to actively ''lie'' to the player. One of loading screen tips tells you that with a well-executed pursuit breaker it's possible to take out all your pursuers at once and get away easily. But doing that just causes a new police car to instantly spawn nearby. Following the advice and slowing down to allow cops to catch up and get them all can then easily have the opposite result than the tip claims, since even though the car is invulnerable, it can still get caught in the pursuit breaker and immobilized just long enough for that new cop car to bust you.
* *** Cop cars in '''Most Wanted''' can also travel ''sideways'' across the road in a controlled fashion (not power-sliding) to get in your way, as though they have 4-wheel steer with a 90-degree capability.
** *** ''Need for Speed Most Wanted'' actually cheats in ''multiplayer mode''. You can upgrade every car in the game to 100% on all three stats (acceleration, speed and handling), except for the game's signature car, the BMW M3 GTR which cannot be upgraded at all and is therefore pretty bad in single player. However, as bad as its ingame performance is, its listed stats are worse. And in multiplayer mode, the game attempts to ensure a fair race by equalising the stats of all cars in the race. The result is that your shiny Porsche Carrera GT that ordinarily blows the doors off the M3 GTR is detuned to a limping piece of junk with the same stats as the M3 GTR... at which point the M3 GTR is the better car and will proceed to beat you. This is probably a design flaw, but ironically the M3 GTR is driven in career mode by a cheating bastard who took it from you after rigging a race through sabotage.
*** Also, because of the craptastic way the game measures handling, the M3 GTR is probably one of the best vehicles you get in the late game for turning. The game's handling stat doesn't measure how well it turns, but rather how well your car stays gripped to the road, which can be really bad if your trying to make a tight turn at 140 MPH(~225km/h, for you metric users)
**
Every PSP version of Need for Speed seems to put a lot of effort in ensuring that its AI has a new annoying trick at its disposal. By the time of NFS Undercover, the cpu cars could drive faster than you, no matter what was your car and how well it was upgraded, were not affected by crashes (they were back on your tail in just few seconds), could TELEPORT if you somehow managed to make them stay really behind, or TURN MID-AIR! In one of the urban stages, there is a 90 degrees turn just after a really long straight that ends with a significant bump. To drive past it you simply have to slow down, but the cpu cars can drive into it at full speed, jump and turn in the air. Funny sight when you are looking behind at that time.
* ** Your opponents in ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed Shift 2: Unleashed'' are rather fond of the Reverse PIT manoeuvre. It's performed in exactly the same way but it's the guy pushing that spins out. It's incredibly annoying when you've got a fast car and it gets congested. Generally, your opponent's cars weigh twice as much as yours according to the physics engine.
* ** In ''Need for Speed: Undercover'' (non PSP), even if you have the pedal thoroughly buried in a Mclaren F1, police [=SUV=]s will still lazily pull in front of you as though you were parked. For those still confused; this is a scenario in which a Cadillac Escalade is represented as faster than one of the fastest production cars ever produced.[[note]]The F1 remains as of 2011 one of the fastest production cars ever made; as of July 2010 it is succeeded by very few cars including the Koenigsegg CCR, the Bugatti Veyron, the SSC Ultimate Aero TT, and the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport.[[/note]]
* ** In '''Need For Speed:Hot Pursuit (2009)''' you can pass a parked police car, at top speed, in the ''fastest car in the game'' (Veyron) and it will be on your tail in just a couple of seconds, even if you didn't slow down at all.



* ''VideoGame/TestDrive'' for [=PS2=], Xbox and GC. This game exhibits extreme RubberBandAI. No matter how skilled you are or how powerful your car is, the AI will always gain a ridiculous speed boost and catch up, sometimes "teleporting", making races a LuckBasedMission. And they almost never crash or make other mistakes.

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* ''VideoGame/TestDrive'' for [=PS2=], Xbox and GC. GC.
**
This game exhibits extreme RubberBandAI. No matter how skilled you are or how powerful your car is, the AI will always gain a ridiculous speed boost and catch up, sometimes "teleporting", making races a LuckBasedMission. And they almost never crash or make other mistakes.



* MidnightClub 3 seems to be malevolent and benevolent at the exact same time. In races, your opponents are always in better cars unless you have an A tier car(to the point that races can play out with you in a D tier and your opponent in a B tier BEFORE you've completely upgraded it.), your opponents always have more nitrous shots than you (or in the case of bikes, HAVE nitrous shots.), and, somehow, obey the copenhagen interpretation, because even if you overlapped a car, if you are not watching him on the minimap, he will warp right behind you and be able to put you back into second place. However, you can outrun them on straightaways, they cannot use slipstream turbo, and cannot use any special abilities.
** Midnight Club 2 actually has a ''literal'' example: in one of the Career races, Angel gives himself a head start. It doesn't help, though, as he's almost deliberately one of the worst AI opponents you'll ever face.
* On that note, Midnight Club: Los Angeles was criticized in an IGN review because of its rubberband techniques making the game often harder than it needed to be. Not only can they rocket off the line faster, but they have NOS by the bucketload, often blowing right past you. Another gripe by that same review was for markers being in places that are hard to spot, such as on corners you will often blow past.
** A patch eased some of the Rubberband problem for the first third of the game.
* ''VideoGame/{{Forza}} Motorsport 2'' exibits several of the stated examples (not to extreme levels, but they appear). But the worst offense is when you end up with the car in 2nd place pulling a PIT Maneuver on you, giving them and their 6 other AI buddies a chance to speed off as you are forced to get back to the track ''while the penalty meter is growing''. The worst part is that you can have this happen with the AI set on Easy.
** ''Forza Motorsport 3'' is a little different. The AI players aren't bastards, they're ''assholes''. Even on Medium difficulty, they'll bump you to-and-fro in a pack-like manner, cars in front of you will seemingly drive in a tandem formation to block you from overtaking, and they're not afraid to ram you off on their way to first place. Combine this with Realistic-level damage modelling, and you can kiss your credits goodbye.

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* MidnightClub 3 ''VideoGame/MidnightClubLosAngeles'' was criticized in an IGN review because of its rubberband techniques making the game often harder than it needed to be. Not only can they rocket off the line faster, but they have NOS by the bucketload, often blowing right past you. Another gripe by that same review was for markers being in places that are hard to spot, such as on corners you will often blow past. A patch eased some of the Rubberband problem for the first third of the game.
* ''VideoGame/MidnightClub3''
seems to be malevolent and benevolent at the exact same time. In races, your opponents are always in better cars unless you have an A tier car(to the point that races can play out with you in a D tier and your opponent in a B tier BEFORE you've completely upgraded it.), your opponents always have more nitrous shots than you (or in the case of bikes, HAVE nitrous shots.), and, somehow, obey the copenhagen interpretation, because even if you overlapped a car, if you are not watching him on the minimap, he will warp right behind you and be able to put you back into second place. However, you can outrun them on straightaways, they cannot use slipstream turbo, and cannot use any special abilities.
** Midnight Club 2 * ''VideoGame/MidnightClub2'' actually has a ''literal'' example: in one of the Career races, Angel gives himself a head start. It doesn't help, though, as he's almost deliberately one of the worst AI opponents you'll ever face.
* On that note, Midnight Club: Los Angeles was criticized in an IGN review because of its rubberband techniques making the game often harder than it needed to be. Not only can they rocket off the line faster, but they have NOS by the bucketload, often blowing right past you. Another gripe by that same review was for markers being in places that are hard to spot, such as on corners you will often blow past.
''VideoGame/{{Forza}}'':
** A patch eased some of the Rubberband problem for the first third of the game.
* ''VideoGame/{{Forza}}
''Forza Motorsport 2'' exibits several of the stated examples (not to extreme levels, but they appear). But the worst offense is when you end up with the car in 2nd place pulling a PIT Maneuver on you, giving them and their 6 other AI buddies a chance to speed off as you are forced to get back to the track ''while the penalty meter is growing''. The worst part is that you can have this happen with the AI set on Easy.
** ''Forza Motorsport 3'' is a little different. The AI players aren't bastards, they're ''assholes''. :
***
Even on Medium difficulty, they'll bump you to-and-fro in a pack-like manner, cars in front of you will seemingly drive in a tandem formation to block you from overtaking, and they're not afraid to ram you off on their way to first place. Combine this with Realistic-level damage modelling, and you can kiss your credits goodbye.



*** Not only that. If you're on the inside lane during a turn with an A.I. car next to you on the outside lane, you can't push it off the track. Instead it will push you to the inside. If you do that to a human player in a multiplayer race, however, you can easily push him off the track.

to:

*** Not only that. If you're on the inside lane during a turn with an A.I. car next to you on the outside lane, you can't push it off the track. Instead it will push you to the inside. If you do that to a human player in a multiplayer race, however, you can easily push him off the track.



*** Also, any car in the same class as you can and WILL outperform your car if driven by the #1 or #2 AI. Have the fastest car model in that class, fully upgraded and tuned to be literally a millimetre away from being the next class up? Too bad. #1 AI is going to fly past you as soon as you hit the straights.

to:

*** Also, any Any car in the same class as you can and WILL outperform your car if driven by the #1 or #2 AI. Have the fastest car model in that class, fully upgraded and tuned to be literally a millimetre away from being the next class up? Too bad. #1 AI is going to fly past you as soon as you hit the straights.



* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4''. In the rally races, if you hit the wall, you get a 5 second penalty. If you run into the computer opponent, you get a 5 second penalty. If the computer runs into you, you get a 5 second penalty. And of course, the computer can pinball down the track without so much as applying the brakes, let alone catching a penalty for tapping the (occasionally invisible) track barrier.
** The computer will also use cars that it specifically disallows you the use of. (Cadillac Cien and VW Nardo W12 Concept in a race specifically limited to Production Vehicles Only, for example.)
** Back in GT2 and possibly in 4, the AI would also sometimes use cars that exceeded the HP regulations for the races, eg the Vector M12 LM on the Trial Mountain Endurance Race, [[{{Unwinnable}} making it impossible for you to win.]]
*** An special example goes to Rome Circuit on the Historical Car event. horsepower limit? 295hp. One of the opponents has a Ford GT40, which happens to have the maximum allowed Horsepower (Except when you buy the car. It shows at the dealership it has 295hp but it actually has 305hp! Which means you can't use the car on the race). But it's horsepower isn't the problem. Ford GT40 is a road version of a LE-MANS RACING CAR! So you're facing a road-going version of the legendary car that won 3 consecutive Le-mans in the 60s. HAVE FUN! Want a tip to win this? Buy the Mini that costs half a million credits. It doesn't have 74hp, it actually has 200hp and it's nimble enough to face the GT40.
** Not to mention that on most track and road races, you can drive perfectly, get several seconds ahead of your opponents in the turns, only for them to [[RubberBandAI mysteriously gain 300 horsepower]] and catch, pass, and gain several seconds on you in the straights.
*** Or it will pick a car that is within the regulations, but has some [[GameBreaker asshole trait]] making it nearly unbeatable, such as the vacuum-downforced Chapparal 2J. [[note]]In that case, however, this is an aversion. You can avoid having to face the cheating AI by literally playing as it. Why? [[FridgeBrilliance Because it is stupidly easy to make money in this game to the point that you can afford some of the most broken cars in the game with only grinding.]][[/note]]
* ''Full Auto'' for the Xbox 360 suffers from this a bit. RubberBandAI, while prevalent, is not the biggest problem - enemy cars in Career mode are also equipped with what appears to be much, '''MUCH''' stronger armor than the player's vehicle, making blowing them out of the way a time-consuming task. For example, it takes an enemy vehicle approximately 3 rough hits with the hood-mounted shotgun to completely annihilate the player (the same number it takes a player to destroy another player in Multiplayer mode), but it takes the player 5 precise hits to a single side of an AI car ''at minimum'' to take them down. Also, the player's car can completely lose its front armor after hitting only 2 mines dropped by an enemy and explode when hitting the third, but enemy cars can run over multiple mines and suffer no visible damage. They also may or may not be subject to the "Weapon Overheat" period resulting from firing a weapon too rapidly without a break. Factor in the AI cars' exclusive ability to destroy the player simply by ramming them and their unannounced ability to change their driving pattern while the Unwreck function is used (designed for the player to undo mistakes by rewinding time), and it's quite a bit to handle. Fortunately, the AI cars are also busy blasting away at each other, often leaving them damaged enough for the player to swoop in and finish them off.
** The cheating AI seems to be exclusive to Career mode. Multiplayer and Arcade modes appear to give the AI cars the same speed, abilities, and armor as the player (only 3 shots from the shotgun before exploding, 3 mines = death, etc.), but Career mode steps it up with the cheating elements. Very odd...
* On a number of car racing games the opponent drivers are essentially invulnerable. If your car hits theirs they are unaffected while you are sent flying. The AI drivers are driving a preset course and you are not allowed to interfere. The racing side missions in ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'' are an example.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4''. ''VideoGame/GranTurismo:
** In ''GranTurismo 4'':
***
In the rally races, if you hit the wall, you get a 5 second penalty. If you run into the computer opponent, you get a 5 second penalty. If the computer runs into you, you get a 5 second penalty. And of course, the computer can pinball down the track without so much as applying the brakes, let alone catching a penalty for tapping the (occasionally invisible) track barrier.
** *** The computer will also use cars that it specifically disallows you the use of. (Cadillac Cien and VW Nardo W12 Concept in a race specifically limited to Production Vehicles Only, for example.)
** Back in GT2 and possibly in 4, the GT2:
*** The
AI would also sometimes use cars that exceeded the HP regulations for the races, eg the Vector M12 LM on the Trial Mountain Endurance Race, [[{{Unwinnable}} making it impossible for you to win.]]
*** An A special example goes to Rome Circuit on the Historical Car event. horsepower limit? 295hp. One of the opponents has a Ford GT40, which happens to have the maximum allowed Horsepower (Except when you buy the car. It shows at the dealership it has 295hp but it actually has 305hp! Which means you can't use the car on the race). But it's horsepower isn't the problem. Ford GT40 is a road version of a LE-MANS RACING CAR! So you're facing a road-going version of the legendary car that won 3 consecutive Le-mans in the 60s. HAVE FUN! Want a tip to win this? Buy the Mini that costs half a million credits. It doesn't have 74hp, it actually has 200hp and it's nimble enough to face the GT40.
** Not to mention that on most track and road races, you can drive perfectly, get several seconds ahead of your opponents in the turns, only for them to [[RubberBandAI mysteriously gain 300 horsepower]] and catch, pass, and gain several seconds on you in the straights.
*** Or it will pick a car that is within the regulations, but has some [[GameBreaker asshole trait]] making it nearly unbeatable, such as the vacuum-downforced Chapparal 2J. [[note]]In that case, however, this is an aversion. You can avoid having to face the cheating AI by literally playing as it. Why? [[FridgeBrilliance Because it is stupidly easy to make money in this game to the point that you can afford some of the most broken cars in the game with only grinding.]][[/note]]
* ''Full Auto'' ''VideoGame/FullAuto'' for the Xbox 360 suffers from this a bit. RubberBandAI, while prevalent, is not the biggest problem - enemy cars in Career mode are also equipped with what appears to be much, '''MUCH''' stronger armor than the player's vehicle, making blowing them out of the way a time-consuming task. For example, it takes an enemy vehicle approximately 3 rough hits with the hood-mounted shotgun to completely annihilate the player (the same number it takes a player to destroy another player in Multiplayer mode), but it takes the player 5 precise hits to a single side of an AI car ''at minimum'' to take them down. Also, the player's car can completely lose its front armor after hitting only 2 mines dropped by an enemy and explode when hitting the third, but enemy cars can run over multiple mines and suffer no visible damage. They also may or may not be subject to the "Weapon Overheat" period resulting from firing a weapon too rapidly without a break. Factor in the AI cars' exclusive ability to destroy the player simply by ramming them and their unannounced ability to change their driving pattern while the Unwreck function is used (designed for the player to undo mistakes by rewinding time), and it's quite a bit to handle. Fortunately, the AI cars are also busy blasting away at each other, often leaving them damaged enough for the player to swoop in and finish them off.
**
off. The cheating AI seems to be exclusive to Career mode. Multiplayer and Arcade modes appear to give the AI cars the same speed, abilities, and armor as the player (only 3 shots from the shotgun before exploding, 3 mines = death, etc.), but Career mode steps it up with the cheating elements. Very odd...
* On a number of car racing games the opponent drivers are essentially invulnerable. If your car hits theirs they are unaffected while you are sent flying. The AI drivers are driving a preset course and you are not allowed to interfere. The racing side missions in ''VideoGame/BrutalLegend'' are an example.
odd...
17th Sep '17 8:43:41 PM Kuruni
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*** To take it up one more agonizing notch, even if you blatantly cheat, the Computer *still* out-cheats you! In the [=PS2=] DB fighting games by Atari, the games would follow a switch-sides method for the tournament after each round. Try and use ye olde Game Shark, or like device? Well, once the game switches sides, the AI now has whatever extras you gave yourself. But wait - there's more. You get your ass kicked in a truly unfair manner, and then the game switches sides again when you continue--and it still keeps the codes for itself--it likes them now.



*** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse2'' removed super armor and infinite Ki, and let you see the enemy's stamina and ki at all times for further assurance that they're not cheating. Except they do anyway; when fighting Frieza and Cooler at the end of the Namek Saga, ''their Stamina regen is jacked up significantly'' to the point that even the FinalBoss can't compare. Meanwhile, the AI can perfectly read player inputs, know when you're holding a button to prepare a Super or Ultimate Skill, and abuse Vanishes, Stamina Breaks and Burst Dashes with perfect timing to the point that using any Ultimate that isn't mostly risk-free will instantly have them Stamina Break you if you didn't break them beforehand.
* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' is very... [[JustForPun guilty]] of this. On top of the usual array of unfair SNKBoss attributes for the "boss" versions of otherwise regular characters--dealing dramatically more and taking dramatically less damage compared to their playable counterparts, doing even the most absurdly impossible-to-input moves ''in the middle of combos'' completely at will, gaining a full bar of tension with a thought, etc.--''all'' AI characters on high enough difficulty settings or close enough to the final match of Arcade mode gain the ability to psychically read controller input. Many characters rely on having a good mix-up game, placing continuous pressure on an opponent until they finally make a mistake in their blocking, and going from there. It works pretty well against humans so long as the attacker doesn't get too predictable. Against the CPU, though, mix-up characters are almost completely useless, as every attack is more or less a polite request for the computer to please consider allowing this next one to actually connect for once. Which is usually denied.

to:

*** ** ''VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse2'' removed super armor and infinite Ki, and let you see the enemy's stamina and ki at all times for further assurance that they're not cheating. Except they do anyway; when fighting Frieza and Cooler at the end of the Namek Saga, ''their Stamina regen is jacked up significantly'' to the point that even the FinalBoss can't compare. Meanwhile, the AI can perfectly read player inputs, know when you're holding a button to prepare a Super or Ultimate Skill, and abuse Vanishes, Stamina Breaks and Burst Dashes with perfect timing to the point that using any Ultimate that isn't mostly risk-free will instantly have them Stamina Break you if you didn't break them beforehand.
* ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'' is very... [[JustForPun guilty]] of this. this:
**
On top of the usual array of unfair SNKBoss attributes for the "boss" versions of otherwise regular characters--dealing dramatically more and taking dramatically less damage compared to their playable counterparts, doing even the most absurdly impossible-to-input moves ''in the middle of combos'' completely at will, gaining a full bar of tension with a thought, etc.--''all'' AI characters on high enough difficulty settings or close enough to the final match of Arcade mode gain the ability to psychically read controller input. Many characters rely on having a good mix-up game, placing continuous pressure on an opponent until they finally make a mistake in their blocking, and going from there. It works pretty well against humans so long as the attacker doesn't get too predictable. Against the CPU, though, mix-up characters are almost completely useless, as every attack is more or less a polite request for the computer to please consider allowing this next one to actually connect for once. Which is usually denied.



*** The attacks can be fairly easy to memorize, the problem comes when she'll sometimes switch which pattern she's using at the last second, or if the player thinks they're smart enough to simply jump over her, where the patterns never go. Too bad, if you do this, the AI reacts as if you've been hit and they all swarm you.
* Those who played ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSvCChaos'' learned to dislike Goenitz, an [[SNKBoss SNK sub-boss]] with an attack targeting one of four areas on the screen (close, close-mid, mid, far) that always knew exactly where you would be, canceled projectiles, and was ''spammed constantly'', making getting close enough to hit an exercise in frustrating patience.
** In a couple of ways, Goenitz was even worse in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '96'', since he could do desperation moves without restrictions while giving more and receiving less damage to/from the player.
* In ''VideoGame/GodzillaDestroyAllMonstersMelee'', the AI opponents will often head towards powerups that are offscreen, that the player has no idea that they're there.
** Fortunately you can counter this by running in the opposite direction and, if the pickup is far enough away, you'll get the computer stuck against the edge of the camera and unable to reach it. The computer will keep trying to get to the pickup while you're free to chuck buildings at it.

to:

*** The attacks can be fairly easy to memorize, the problem comes when she'll sometimes switch which pattern she's using at the last second, or if the player thinks they're smart enough to simply jump over her, where the patterns never go. Too bad, if you do this, the AI reacts as if you've been hit and they all swarm you.
* Those who played ''VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSvCChaos'' learned to dislike Goenitz, an [[SNKBoss SNK sub-boss]] with an attack targeting one of four areas on the screen (close, close-mid, mid, far) that always knew exactly where you would be, canceled projectiles, and was ''spammed constantly'', making getting close enough to hit an exercise in frustrating patience.
**
patience. In a couple of ways, Goenitz was even worse in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters '96'', since he could do desperation moves without restrictions while giving more and receiving less damage to/from the player.
* In ''VideoGame/GodzillaDestroyAllMonstersMelee'', the AI opponents will often head towards powerups that are offscreen, that the player has no idea that they're there.
**
there. Fortunately you can counter this by running in the opposite direction and, if the pickup is far enough away, you'll get the computer stuck against the edge of the camera and unable to reach it. The computer will keep trying to get to the pickup while you're free to chuck buildings at it.



* ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD took the unusual approach of requiring "inner energy" for all special moves. Theoretically, this forced the player to learn the characters and apply specific strategies in every possible matchup... Except against the AI, which could always execute specials with sheer and utter disregard of its own energy levels.
** Even more, well, insulting, characters have an ability called Insult which allows them to sacrifice one piece of their special gauge to destroy a little more of their opponents. The computer, especially the final boss (''bosses'' in the Sega CD version), is quite fond of repeatedly Insulting you from a distance to render you impotent -- usually shortly before, with a blatantly flashing EMPTY gauge, they execute their ultimate full-gauge-requiring attacks, some of which doing things like rendering the character completely invincible (the final boss(es) have these, naturally). Did we mention if you lose in the final battle, you can't continue?

to:

* ''VideoGame/EternalChampions'' on the UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis and UsefulNotes/SegaCD took the unusual approach of requiring "inner energy" for all special moves. Theoretically, this forced the player to learn the characters and apply specific strategies in every possible matchup... Except against the AI, which could always execute specials with sheer and utter disregard of its own energy levels.
**
levels. Even more, well, insulting, characters have an ability called Insult which allows them to sacrifice one piece of their special gauge to destroy a little more of their opponents. The computer, especially the final boss (''bosses'' in the Sega CD version), is quite fond of repeatedly Insulting you from a distance to render you impotent -- usually shortly before, with a blatantly flashing EMPTY gauge, they execute their ultimate full-gauge-requiring attacks, some of which doing things like rendering the character completely invincible (the final boss(es) have these, naturally). Did we mention if you lose in the final battle, you can't continue?



* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' suffered this terribly in the '94 and '95 incarnations. There was an ability called "Evade" that, if timed right, allowed the character to dodge attacks. This translated to "The computer is immune to projectiles". And in a callback to ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', getting blocked when you jumped in would lead to an instant throw. '96 pulled Evade completely, replacing it with the trademark "Roll", one of many reasons it's considered the first high point of the series.
** Another nasty SNKBoss advantage is one that the bosses of XI have. In addition to the usual SNK unfairness, the game uses a gauge system that goes up when you hit the opponent and down when they hit you to measure how well you do and decides who wins at time out based on that. The bosses gauge takes an ENORMOUS leap if they so much as brush past you, you however barely make it twitch even if you hit them multiple times. Combined with the fact the timer acts like it is on speed combines to add yet another layer of evil to the mix.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'' suffered this terribly in the '94 and '95 incarnations. There was an ability called "Evade" that, if timed right, allowed the character to dodge attacks. This translated to "The computer is immune to projectiles". And in a callback to ''VideoGame/FatalFury 2'', getting blocked when you jumped in would lead to an instant throw. '96 pulled Evade completely, replacing it with the trademark "Roll", one of many reasons it's considered the first high point of the series.
**
series. Another nasty SNKBoss advantage is one that the bosses of XI have. In addition to the usual SNK unfairness, the game uses a gauge system that goes up when you hit the opponent and down when they hit you to measure how well you do and decides who wins at time out based on that. The bosses gauge takes an ENORMOUS leap if they so much as brush past you, you however barely make it twitch even if you hit them multiple times. Combined with the fact the timer acts like it is on speed combines to add yet another layer of evil to the mix.



** The Tag Team Challanges in DOA Dimensions will make you throw that brand new 3DS right into a wall. Sure, it starts out easy enough to lull you into a false sense of security, but then the madness begins. The opponent AI is damn near PERFECT. With one hit, it can take down almost HALF of your health, whereas if you hit THEM, it's like hitting a brick wall with an inflatable hammer
*** The computer also controls your tag partner...and is worse then ANY noob you could ever face online. Really, its only use is to be a punching bag so you can recover your health. But considering your opponent can usually kill both you AND your tag partner within two seconds, it doesn't help much.
*** Oh, and the fight mechanics don't apply to them. Land a strike through a block? Sure. Counter a strike with a throw? Go for it. Block a throw? Absolutely. You'd love to be able to do that too, wouldn't you? Well too bad.

to:

** The Tag Team Challanges in DOA Dimensions will make you throw that brand new 3DS right into a wall. Sure, it starts out easy enough to lull you into a false sense of security, but then the madness begins. The opponent AI is damn near PERFECT. With one hit, it can take down almost HALF of your health, whereas if you hit THEM, it's like hitting a brick wall with an inflatable hammer
***
hammer. The computer also controls your tag partner...and is worse then ANY noob you could ever face online. Really, its only use is to be a punching bag so you can recover your health. But considering your opponent can usually kill both you AND your tag partner within two seconds, it doesn't help much.
*** Oh, and the fight mechanics don't apply to them. Land a strike through a block? Sure. Counter a strike with a throw? Go for it. Block a throw? Absolutely. You'd love to be able to do that too, wouldn't you? Well too bad.
much.



** Wrestling/{{WWE}} Smackdown Vs Raw 2009's career mode suffers the same issue above when facing the "higher level" wrestlers.



* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}: Blade Of Fate'', the human character can only FlashStep or use RF Special Attacks when they have enough Spiritual Power to do so. The AI opponents have infinite Spiritual Power.
** In ''Bleach: Soul Resurrección'', a character can enter "[[SuperMode Ignition Mode]]" to increase attack power, and from there use an "[[LimitBreak Ignition Attack]]", a powerful attack that completely empties the Ignition Gague. Usually the Ignition Gague can only be filled by causing damage, especially many hits quickly. The computer is not bound by these restrictions, and can enter Ignition Mode and use an Ignition Attack whenever they feel like it, which on harder difficulties they will. It's not unheard of for a computer-controlled character to use an Ignition Attack, and then re-enter Ignition mode ''before the player has even hit the ground'', especially when fighting multiple enemies at once.

to:

* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}: Blade Of Fate'', the human character can only FlashStep or use RF Special Attacks when they have enough Spiritual Power to do so. The AI opponents have infinite Spiritual Power.
**
Power. In ''Bleach: Soul Resurrección'', a character can enter "[[SuperMode Ignition Mode]]" to increase attack power, and from there use an "[[LimitBreak Ignition Attack]]", a powerful attack that completely empties the Ignition Gague. Usually the Ignition Gague can only be filled by causing damage, especially many hits quickly. The computer is not bound by these restrictions, and can enter Ignition Mode and use an Ignition Attack whenever they feel like it, which on harder difficulties they will. It's not unheard of for a computer-controlled character to use an Ignition Attack, and then re-enter Ignition mode ''before the player has even hit the ground'', especially when fighting multiple enemies at once.



*** Don't forget she has autogain on her Heat meter, has very little recovery time on her attacks and can (and will) combo any and all hits into her Distortion Drive, which hits for about 50% life. Bear in mind, this will happen if you fail to block ''even once'', while you will require about 40 minor miracles in a row to beat her.



* Up until ''Vegas'', ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' seemed quite unfair in that the AI could somehow detect you even if you couldn't figure out where it was. And a major problem with the first games was that being spotted once, even if the guy didn't alert his comrades, meant [[TheAllSeeingAI everyone knew where you were]].
** In the original PC trilogy, the AI also had ImprobableAimingSkills: [[ArmorIsUseless no matter what body armor you chose]], a hit was usually deadly because the AI [[BoomHeadshot scored a headshot]] practically every time. And could do it from the other side of the map, with a machine pistol, and ''facing the wrong way''. ''Raven Shield'''s Elite setting is especially cheap, coupled with the ArtificialStupidity of friendly teammates.

to:

* Up until ''Vegas'', ''VideoGame/RainbowSix'' seemed quite unfair in that the AI could somehow detect you even if you couldn't figure out where it was. And a major problem with the first games was that being spotted once, even if the guy didn't alert his comrades, meant [[TheAllSeeingAI everyone knew where you were]].
**
were]]. In the original PC trilogy, the AI also had ImprobableAimingSkills: [[ArmorIsUseless no matter what body armor you chose]], a hit was usually deadly because the AI [[BoomHeadshot scored a headshot]] practically every time. And could do it from the other side of the map, with a machine pistol, and ''facing the wrong way''. ''Raven Shield'''s Elite setting is especially cheap, coupled with the ArtificialStupidity of friendly teammates.



*** Though one offender is the ''[[StealthMission Hid]][[ThrowbackLevel den]]'' mission in Modern Warfare 2's Special Ops mode. The main issue with making it through alive is ghillie snipers. Normally this wouldn't be so bad, because you're wearing a ghillie suit yourself, and it's an incredibly bushy area, so it shouldn't be so bad, right? '''''WRONG!''''' These snipers [[ImprobableAimingSkills could hit a gnat resting on a fencepost from ten kilometers away]], and when they aren't moving, which is a lot, are essentially invisible, while they plug bullets into you as if you're wearing high-visibility clothing. And on the off chance you manage to see one due to the glare on the scope, by then it's [[KilledMidSentence too]] [[BoomHeadshot la--]]



** Under normal circumstances, "facestabbing" as a Spy is a rare, [[GoodBadBugs hilarious glitch]]. Spy-bots in the [[ManVersusMachine Mann vs. Machine]] [[TheWarSequence mode]], however, seem capable of facestabbing players ''whenever the hell they want to.'' This starts making more sense when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZpGtx3orK4#t=28s you see how loopy the backstab hitboxes can be]], and take into account the spies know ''exactly'' where these places begin and end. Thankfully averted elsewhere: Just like übered human players, übered bomb carriers (and their medics) aren't immune to the Pyro's airblast. Especially useful if the map has a BottomlessPit, which not even über-bots can be exempted from. And as a nice bonus, that resets the bomb all the way back to the beginning. [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap And you thought MvM would turn Pyros useless]].
** Spy Robots can also backstab Snipers wearing the Razorback. As in, that piece of equipment whose ''sole purpose'' is to ''protect the Sniper from backstabs''.
** Meanwhile, in regular game modes featuring bots, it can be extremely difficult to kill any of them as a sniper, [[TheAllSeeingAI because bots automatically know when they're being targeted, even if you're aiming at their back halfway across the map]]. They'll also stare at disguised enemy Spies, waiting for them to reveal themselves.
** However, any bots who require aim do so with a virtual mouse, and their aim isn't perfect.

to:

** Under normal circumstances, "facestabbing" as a Spy is a rare, [[GoodBadBugs hilarious glitch]]. Spy-bots in the [[ManVersusMachine Mann vs. Machine]] [[TheWarSequence mode]], however, seem capable of facestabbing players ''whenever the hell they want to.'' This starts making more sense when [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZpGtx3orK4#t=28s you see how loopy the backstab hitboxes can be]], and take into account the spies know ''exactly'' where these places begin and end. Thankfully averted elsewhere: Just like übered human players, übered bomb carriers (and their medics) aren't immune to the Pyro's airblast. Especially useful if the map has a BottomlessPit, which not even über-bots can be exempted from. And as a nice bonus, that resets the bomb all the way back to the beginning. [[RescuedFromTheScrappyHeap And you thought MvM would turn Pyros useless]].
**
useless]]. Spy Robots can also backstab Snipers wearing the Razorback. As in, that piece of equipment whose ''sole purpose'' is to ''protect the Sniper from backstabs''.
** Meanwhile, in regular game modes featuring bots, it can be extremely difficult to kill any of them as a sniper, [[TheAllSeeingAI because bots automatically know when they're being targeted, even if you're aiming at their back halfway across the map]]. They'll also stare at disguised enemy Spies, waiting for them to reveal themselves.
** However, any bots who require aim do so with a virtual mouse, and their aim isn't perfect.
backstabs''.
16th Sep '17 10:26:37 PM wingedcatgirl
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* And of course, there would be the time when the computer is on the receiving end of a CurbstompBattle and decide to just blatently cheat by freezing, glitching and crashing the game. Not even Michael Jordan is that sore a loser.
16th Sep '17 10:24:06 PM wingedcatgirl
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!!Specific Examples:

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!!Specific Examples:
!!Examples:


Added DiffLines:

[[foldercontrol]]
16th Sep '17 9:45:15 PM Kuruni
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''Note: when adding examples here, please make sure whatever you're planning to claim is ''actually true'', meaning you have hard data saying there is cheating going on, not just some vague feeling that you ''always'' [[{{Franchise/Pokemon}} hurt yourself in confusion]] and the AI ''never'' does. The phenomenon making you feel that way is almost definitely confirmation bias, as any of the various people who have done actual testing with hundreds of data points can tell you.''

''This is not a place to complain about enemies that have skills you don't have, or about how unlucky you are and how many times you missed, or about how hard ThatOneBoss is, or how the computer is actually half decent at some of the game's more advanced maneuvers that you happen to suck at. This is only for scenarios where it would be expected for the player and the AI to be on even footing. For example, in the campaign of a strategy game, it would be natural for the computer to outnumber you and/or have more resources than you -- that's part of the challenge of a campaign. However, in free battle or skirmish mode, a computer starting with more resources than you is usually cheating, since you would expect to be on even footing with the computer (unless you can set what everyone starts with).''

to:

''Note: '''Note:''' when adding examples here, please make sure whatever you're planning to claim is ''actually true'', meaning you have hard data saying there is cheating going on, not just some vague feeling that you ''always'' [[{{Franchise/Pokemon}} hurt yourself in confusion]] and the AI ''never'' does. The phenomenon making you feel that way is almost definitely confirmation bias, as any of the various people who have done actual testing with hundreds of data points can tell you.''

''This This is not a place to complain about enemies that have skills you don't have, or about how unlucky you are and how many times you missed, or about how hard ThatOneBoss is, or how the computer is actually half decent at some of the game's more advanced maneuvers that you happen to suck at. This is only for scenarios where it would be expected for the player and the AI to be on even footing. For example, in the campaign of a strategy game, it would be natural for the computer to outnumber you and/or have more resources than you -- that's part of the challenge of a campaign. However, in free battle or skirmish mode, a computer starting with more resources than you is usually cheating, since you would expect to be on even footing with the computer (unless you can set what everyone starts with).''
with).
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