History Main / TheComputerIsACheatingBastard

25th Jul '16 6:19:20 AM longWriter
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*** ... if allied with you, will do its own thing without regard for others. This often turns into a [[StopHelpingMe nuisance]] from a strategic/tactical point of view.

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*** ... if allied with you, will do its own thing without regard for others. This often turns into a [[StopHelpingMe [[AnnoyingVideoGameHelper nuisance]] from a strategic/tactical point of view.
24th Jul '16 9:03:31 PM justanid
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Compare GangUpOnTheHuman and RubberbandAI. Contrast PerfectPlayAI. See also TheComputerIsALyingBastard, ComputersAreFast, GameplayAndStorySegregation, TheGMIsACheatingBastard, NintendoHard, RandomNumberGod, and RedemptionDemotion. When InUniverse AIs have these {{justified|Trope}} abilities, see TheSingularity.

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Compare GangUpOnTheHuman GangUpOnTheHuman, RubberbandAI, and RubberbandAI.SpitefulAI. Contrast PerfectPlayAI. See also TheComputerIsALyingBastard, ComputersAreFast, GameplayAndStorySegregation, TheGMIsACheatingBastard, NintendoHard, RandomNumberGod, and RedemptionDemotion. When InUniverse AIs have these {{justified|Trope}} abilities, see TheSingularity.
24th Jul '16 8:40:44 PM justanid
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Compare GangUpOnTheHuman and RubberbandAI. Contrast PerfectPlayAI. See also ComputersAreFast, GameplayAndStorySegregation, TheGMIsACheatingBastard, NintendoHard, RandomNumberGod, and RedemptionDemotion. When InUniverse AIs have these {{justified|Trope}} abilities, see TheSingularity.

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Compare GangUpOnTheHuman and RubberbandAI. Contrast PerfectPlayAI. See also TheComputerIsALyingBastard, ComputersAreFast, GameplayAndStorySegregation, TheGMIsACheatingBastard, NintendoHard, RandomNumberGod, and RedemptionDemotion. When InUniverse AIs have these {{justified|Trope}} abilities, see TheSingularity.
24th Jul '16 8:31:53 PM justanid
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This trope does ''not'' include "fair challenges" of the game (wide pits, [[DemonicSpiders powerful]] / [[GoddamnedBats numerous]] enemies, etc.); those are Real Difficulty. Likewise, one should not accuse the computer of cheating simply because it plays to a computer's natural strengths ([[ComputersAreFast lightning reflexes]], [[TheAllSeeingAI omniscient knowledge]] [[RulesLawyer of the game rules]], and so forth), or because you have a single streak of bad luck. Consistent bad luck, however, may be a sign that the computer is using the [[RandomNumberGod RNG]] to cheat. On the other hand, some cheats can actually work to the player's advantage, such as with the RubberbandAI or [[ClassicCheatCode plain old Cheat Codes]].

Note that this is not a place to complain about enemies that have skills you don't have, or about how unlucky you are and how many times you missed (unless the computer has a different chance of missing with the same skill), or about how hard ThatOneBoss is, or how the computer is actually half decent at some of the game's more advanced maneuvers that you happen to suck at. This is only for scenarios where it would be expected for the player and the AI to be on even footing. For example, in the campaign of a strategy game, it would be natural for the computer to outnumber you and/or have more resources than you - that's part of the challenge of a campaign. However, in free battle or skirmish mode, a computer starting with more resources than you is usually cheating, since you would expect to be on even footing with the computer (unless you can set what everyone starts with).

RedemptionDemotion is an example of GameplayAndStorySegregation, where the enemy you fight and the one who joins your team are two different characters, even when the story says they're one and the same. It's not an example of cheating unless the character is generic and the version your enemy has is explicitly stronger than yours.

Also, though this trope generally applies to impossibilities (things that the player literally cannot do no matter how well they play and no matter how many things they've unlocked in the game at that point, the computer will just have extra resources or abilities), it can also just apply to more conventional cheating. If the game looks at the way your characters have been customized and the AI is then given strategies or abilities specifically designed to counter yours, that's not ''impossible'', per se (it's entirely possible that you could encounter a human player with a team that counters yours perfectly!), but it's something that was specifically given to the computer as an advantage over the player, rather than random chance.

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This trope does ''not'' include "fair challenges" of the game (wide pits, [[DemonicSpiders powerful]] / [[GoddamnedBats numerous]] enemies, etc.); those are Real Difficulty. Likewise, one should not accuse the computer of cheating simply because it plays to a computer's natural strengths ([[ComputersAreFast lightning reflexes]], [[TheAllSeeingAI omniscient knowledge]] [[RulesLawyer of the game rules]], and so forth), or because you have a single streak of bad luck. Consistent bad luck, however, may be a sign that the computer is using the [[RandomNumberGod RNG]] to cheat. On the other hand, some cheats can actually work to the player's advantage, such as with the RubberbandAI or [[ClassicCheatCode plain old Cheat Codes]].

Note that this is not a place to complain about enemies that have skills you don't have, or about how unlucky you are and how many times you missed (unless the computer has a different chance of missing with the same skill), or about how hard ThatOneBoss is, or how the computer is actually half decent at some of the game's more advanced maneuvers that you happen to suck at. This is only for scenarios where it would be expected for the player and the AI to be on even footing. For example, in the campaign of a strategy game, it would be natural for the computer to outnumber you and/or have more resources than you - that's part of the challenge of a campaign. However, in free battle or skirmish mode, a computer starting with more resources than you is usually cheating, since you would expect to be on even footing with the computer (unless you can set what everyone starts with).

RedemptionDemotion is an example of GameplayAndStorySegregation, where the enemy you fight and the one who joins your team are two different characters, even when the story says they're one and the same. It's not an example of cheating unless the character is generic and the version your enemy has is explicitly stronger than yours.

Also, though
Though this trope generally applies to impossibilities (things that the player literally cannot do no matter how well they play and no matter how many things they've unlocked in the game at that point, the computer will just have extra resources or abilities), it can also just apply to more conventional cheating. If the game looks at the way your characters have been customized and the AI is then given strategies or abilities specifically designed to counter yours, that's not ''impossible'', per se (it's entirely possible that you could encounter a human player with a team that counters yours perfectly!), but it's something that was specifically given to the computer as an advantage over the player, rather than random chance.



Sub-category of FakeDifficulty. See also RubberbandAI, NintendoHard, RandomNumberGod, ComputersAreFast, PerfectPlayAI, GangUpOnTheHuman, TheGMIsACheatingBastard. For when InUniverse AIs have these [[JustifiedTrope justified]] abilities, see TheSingularity.

''Note: when adding examples here, please make sure whatever you're planning to claim is ''actually true'', meaning you have hard data saying there is cheating going on, not just some vague feeling that you ''always'' [[{{Franchise/Pokemon}} hurt yourself in confusion]] and the AI ''never'' does. The phenomenon making you feel that way is almost definitely confirmation bias, as any of the various people who have done actual testing with hundreds of data points can tell you.''

Almost every game that can have this trope does, because a game cheating on higher difficulty levels STILL usually counts, since most games aren't that honest with exactly what changes with each difficulty level (see screenshot). So please post notable examples only. On the other hand, a computer cheating in your favor does not count (not a bastard). Also, some games give what would otherwise be cheating an in-story justification, or it may be required for the plot that you ''must'' lose that fight.

!!{{Subtrope}}s:

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Sub-category SubTrope of FakeDifficulty. See also RubberbandAI, NintendoHard, RandomNumberGod, ComputersAreFast, PerfectPlayAI, GangUpOnTheHuman, TheGMIsACheatingBastard. For when InUniverse AIs have these [[JustifiedTrope justified]] abilities, see TheSingularity.

''Note: when adding examples here, please make sure whatever you're planning to claim is ''actually true'', meaning you have hard data saying there is cheating going on, not just some vague feeling that you ''always'' [[{{Franchise/Pokemon}} hurt yourself in confusion]] and the AI ''never'' does. The phenomenon making you feel that way is almost definitely confirmation bias, as any of the various people who have done actual testing with hundreds of data points can tell you.''

Almost every game that can have this trope does, because a game cheating on higher difficulty levels STILL usually counts, since most games aren't that honest with exactly what changes with each difficulty level (see screenshot). So please post notable examples only. On the other hand, a computer cheating in your favor does not count (not a bastard). Also, some games give what would otherwise be cheating an in-story justification, or it may be required for the plot that you ''must'' lose that fight.

!!{{Subtrope}}s:
FakeDifficulty.

!!!SuperTrope to:



This trope does ''not'' include "fair challenges" of the game (wide pits, [[DemonicSpiders powerful]] / [[GoddamnedBats numerous]] enemies, etc.); those are Real Difficulty. Likewise, one should not accuse the computer of cheating simply because it plays to a computer's natural strengths ([[ComputersAreFast lightning reflexes]], [[TheAllSeeingAI omniscient knowledge]] [[RulesLawyer of the game rules]], and so forth), or because you have a single streak of bad luck. Consistent bad luck, however, may be a sign that the computer is using the [[RandomNumberGod RNG]] to cheat. On the other hand, some cheats can actually work to the player's advantage, such as with the RubberbandAI or [[ClassicCheatCode plain old Cheat Codes]].

Compare GangUpOnTheHuman and RubberbandAI. Contrast PerfectPlayAI. See also ComputersAreFast, GameplayAndStorySegregation, TheGMIsACheatingBastard, NintendoHard, RandomNumberGod, and RedemptionDemotion. When InUniverse AIs have these {{justified|Trope}} abilities, see TheSingularity.

''Note: when adding examples here, please make sure whatever you're planning to claim is ''actually true'', meaning you have hard data saying there is cheating going on, not just some vague feeling that you ''always'' [[{{Franchise/Pokemon}} hurt yourself in confusion]] and the AI ''never'' does. The phenomenon making you feel that way is almost definitely confirmation bias, as any of the various people who have done actual testing with hundreds of data points can tell you.''

''This is not a place to complain about enemies that have skills you don't have, or about how unlucky you are and how many times you missed, or about how hard ThatOneBoss is, or how the computer is actually half decent at some of the game's more advanced maneuvers that you happen to suck at. This is only for scenarios where it would be expected for the player and the AI to be on even footing. For example, in the campaign of a strategy game, it would be natural for the computer to outnumber you and/or have more resources than you -- that's part of the challenge of a campaign. However, in free battle or skirmish mode, a computer starting with more resources than you is usually cheating, since you would expect to be on even footing with the computer (unless you can set what everyone starts with).''



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24th Jul '16 8:04:33 PM justanid
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HeelFaceDowngrade is an example of GameplayAndStorySegregation, where the enemy you fight and the one who joins your team are two different characters, even when the story says they're one and the same. It's not an example of cheating unless the character is generic and the version your enemy has is explicitly stronger than yours.

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HeelFaceDowngrade RedemptionDemotion is an example of GameplayAndStorySegregation, where the enemy you fight and the one who joins your team are two different characters, even when the story says they're one and the same. It's not an example of cheating unless the character is generic and the version your enemy has is explicitly stronger than yours.
15th Jul '16 8:03:58 AM Willbyr
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* Tecmo's ''CaptainTsubasa'' is NintendoHard because your oppernents have infinite Gut, meaning they can keep spamming special moves while you're struggling with saving your bests of an offensive tactic. Their overall stats overpower your, and their [[TheAce aces]] usually have superior shooting power that it doesn't really matter if your team has a goalie. Even when you have the famous [[RedBaron SGGK]] Wakabayashi, some really powerful strikers can still easily blow him away. Characters that used to be powerful like Matsuyama and Tachibana Twin, by the time you get them in your team, can barely get their shots past a keeper.

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* Tecmo's ''CaptainTsubasa'' ''VideoGame/CaptainTsubasa'' is NintendoHard because your oppernents have infinite Gut, meaning they can keep spamming special moves while you're struggling with saving your bests of an offensive tactic. Their overall stats overpower your, and their [[TheAce aces]] usually have superior shooting power that it doesn't really matter if your team has a goalie. Even when you have the famous [[RedBaron SGGK]] Wakabayashi, some really powerful strikers can still easily blow him away. Characters that used to be powerful like Matsuyama and Tachibana Twin, by the time you get them in your team, can barely get their shots past a keeper.



** This carries over into ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fangame based on ''CaptainTsubasa'', ''Touhou Soccer Moushuuden''... except the residental SGGK ([[RealityWarper Yukari]]) is usually on ''opponent's'' side. You get only [[ChineseGirl China]], who has problems stopping anything that isn't a normal shot.

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** This carries over into ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'' fangame based on ''CaptainTsubasa'', ''Captain Tsubasa'', ''Touhou Soccer Moushuuden''... except the residental SGGK ([[RealityWarper Yukari]]) is usually on ''opponent's'' side. You get only [[ChineseGirl China]], who has problems stopping anything that isn't a normal shot.
13th Jul '16 1:45:31 PM Koveras
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* Most versions of electronic Monopoly will use this as a fake difficulty depending on what the AI difficulty is set at, most Monopoly games are meant to have smarter AI that makes better investment decisions when the AI is increased but most also increase the AI's luck when rolling and getting chance cards. As a result it's not uncommon for the AI to never get a negative card during the game and always skip past human players properties, but the harder the AI is set at the more likely it is that the computer will sabotage human dice rolls and make sure the human lands on tax or high value owned property turn after turn.

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* Most versions of electronic Monopoly will use this as a fake difficulty depending on what the AI difficulty is set at, most Monopoly games are meant to have smarter AI that makes better investment decisions when the AI is increased but most also increase the AI's luck when rolling and getting chance cards. As a result it's not uncommon for the AI to never get a negative card during the game and always skip past human players properties, but the harder the AI is set at the more likely it is that the computer will sabotage human dice UsefulNotes/{{dice}} rolls and make sure the human lands on tax or high value owned property turn after turn.
12th Jul '16 6:27:19 AM mario0987
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Added DiffLines:

** Also in ''Fates'' is a Sorcerer boss capable of using staffs. Sorcerers are supposed to be able to use tomes only.
10th Jul '16 7:36:51 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* ''{{TNA}} iMPACT!'' the game. Anyone who is an established wrestler will automatically be twice as good as you, no matter who you choose. Certain matches in story mode can consist of you spending 90% of the match beating the hell out of them, only for them to come out of nowhere with enough counters to use a special move, hit it once, and win.

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* ''{{TNA}} ''Wrestling/{{TNA}} iMPACT!'' the game. Anyone who is an established wrestler will automatically be twice as good as you, no matter who you choose. Certain matches in story mode can consist of you spending 90% of the match beating the hell out of them, only for them to come out of nowhere with enough counters to use a special move, hit it once, and win.
26th Jun '16 10:45:40 AM nombretomado
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* The big battle at the end of ''Tales of the Sword Coast'' (the expansion for the first ''BaldursGate'') had an ability that allowed a save--but blatantly overrode the results of the save to affect the target anyway, ''every single time'' to ''every single party member'' in over a dozen tries. Even when not a ''single'' one of the main character's saves was greater than 1 (and some were ''less'' than one). Without a save penalty on that ability of at least -10, it is... highly improbable at best to miss all the saves.

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* The big battle at the end of ''Tales ''[[VideoGame/BaldursGateTalesOfTheSwordCoast Tales of the Sword Coast'' Coast]]'' (the expansion for the first ''BaldursGate'') ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'') had an ability that allowed a save--but blatantly overrode the results of the save to affect the target anyway, ''every single time'' to ''every single party member'' in over a dozen tries. Even when not a ''single'' one of the main character's saves was greater than 1 (and some were ''less'' than one). Without a save penalty on that ability of at least -10, it is... highly improbable at best to miss all the saves.



** From ''Baldur's Gate II'' and onwards, all high-level enemy mages (and there are a lot of these) get something called a 'tattoo of power', which is a spell trigger that can activate any number of defensive spells instantly and without any action from the user and stacks on top of existing spell triggers and contingencies. It's probably to counter the fact that the [=NPC=]s can't "pre-buff" (cast support spells shortly before a fight to avoid having to waste turns on them) like the player.

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** From ''Baldur's Gate II'' ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'' and onwards, all high-level enemy mages (and there are a lot of these) get something called a 'tattoo of power', which is a spell trigger that can activate any number of defensive spells instantly and without any action from the user and stacks on top of existing spell triggers and contingencies. It's probably to counter the fact that the [=NPC=]s can't "pre-buff" (cast support spells shortly before a fight to avoid having to waste turns on them) like the player.
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