History Main / TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong

26th Jun '16 8:10:43 AM jessicaotiesha
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* Similar to Wheeler below Stan from AmericanDad is always considered an abusive jerkass no matter the situation even when the Aesop is completely flip flopped with another character doing the exact same thing Stan will still be presented as in the wrong.

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* Similar to Wheeler below Stan from AmericanDad ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' is always considered an abusive jerkass no matter the situation even when the Aesop is completely flip flopped with another character doing the exact same thing Stan will still be presented as in the wrong.
26th Jun '16 8:09:18 AM jessicaotiesha
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Added DiffLines:

* Similar to Wheeler below Stan from AmericanDad is always considered an abusive jerkass no matter the situation even when the Aesop is completely flip flopped with another character doing the exact same thing Stan will still be presented as in the wrong.
26th Jun '16 3:27:04 AM nngnna
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* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' depicts an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' different than the government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly. He is also Obviously wrong and insane, even if is thougt is something as self-evident as 2+2=4.

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* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' depicts an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' different than the government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly. He is also Obviously wrong and insane, even if is his thougt is something as self-evident as 2+2=4.
26th Jun '16 3:25:58 AM nngnna
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* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' depicts an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' different than government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly. He is also Obviously wrong and insane, even if is thougt is something as self-evident as 2+2=4.

to:

* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' depicts an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' different than the government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly. He is also Obviously wrong and insane, even if is thougt is something as self-evident as 2+2=4.
26th Jun '16 3:25:41 AM nngnna
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* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' depicts an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' against the government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly.

to:

* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' depicts an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' against the different than government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly.accordingly. He is also Obviously wrong and insane, even if is thougt is something as self-evident as 2+2=4.
24th Jun '16 12:59:18 AM NNinja
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* A pretty frustrating example happens with ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' with Cho Chang. Late in the book, Cho's friend, Marietta Edgecomb, [[spoiler: attempts to rat out Dumbledore's Army to Umbridge]]. This causes her to have almost permanent boils in a pattern to read SNEAK on her face.
18th Jun '16 12:27:20 PM CaptEquinox
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* ''Film/ChristmasWithTheKranks'' involves the Kranks being pressured into expensively celebrating Christmas by the ''entire neighborhood''. Every house on their block is apparently supposed to have Frosty on the roof and soon protesters are demanding that they "Free Frosty!" At the end, their daughter decides to come home for Christmas so they and the neighbors can deck the house out in record time for a big, fluffy ending celebrating the joys of absolute conformity.

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* ''Film/ChristmasWithTheKranks'' involves the Kranks being pressured into expensively celebrating Christmas by the ''entire neighborhood''. Every house on their block is apparently supposed to have Frosty a gigantic FrostyTheSnowman on the roof and soon protesters are demanding that they the Kranks "Free Frosty!" At the end, their daughter decides to come home for Christmas so they and the neighbors can deck the house out in record time for a big, fluffy ending celebrating the joys of absolute conformity.



* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' is an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' against the government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly.

to:

* ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' is depicts an extreme example of a system that [[EnforcedTrope believes in this trope]]. Anyone who even ''thinks'' against the government is treated as a criminal in the eyes of the state and is dealt with accordingly.
2nd Jun '16 10:34:49 AM mlsmithca
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* Jim Henson created some puppet characters to advertise Advertising/WilkinsCoffee. One was called Wilkins and one was called Wontkins. Wilkins would go on about how wonderful coffee was and would offer some to Wontkins, who would refuse. Wilkins would then shoot Wontkins with a cannon or drop something heavy on him. In one ad, Wilkins ''erased Wontkins from existence'' before cryptically saying to the camera, "If you don't like Wilkins, you don't go anywhere!" Less The Complainer Is Always Wrong, more The Complainer Must DIE!
** And as pointed out by a Website/{{Cracked}} article, the Muppet used as the Wilkins spokesman later evolved into KermitTheFrog.

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* Jim Henson created some puppet characters to advertise Advertising/WilkinsCoffee. One was called Wilkins and one was called Wontkins. Wilkins would go on about how wonderful coffee was and would offer some to Wontkins, who would refuse. Wilkins would then shoot Wontkins with a cannon or drop something heavy on him. In one ad, Wilkins ''erased Wontkins from existence'' before cryptically saying to the camera, "If you don't like Wilkins, you don't go anywhere!" Less The Complainer Is Always Wrong, more The Complainer Must DIE!
**
DIE! And as pointed out by a Website/{{Cracked}} article, the Muppet used as the Wilkins spokesman later evolved into KermitTheFrog.



** In ''Anime/GatchamanCrowds Insight'', [[spoiler: the Kuus start enforcing this on society in general. And not only is the complainer wrong, (s)he gets ''eaten''.]]

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** * In ''Anime/GatchamanCrowds Insight'', [[spoiler: the Kuus start enforcing this on society in general. And not only is the complainer wrong, (s)he gets ''eaten''.]]



* Between himself and his best friend Suzaku and dear sister Nunnally, it sure feels like this for Lelouch of ''CodeGeass''.
** Taken to even greater heights in Turn 19 of R2 during Schneizel's meeting with the Black Knights; first with Tamaki and Diethard, who contend that [[spoiler:anyone could have faked the recording]], and after everyone has made up their minds, Kallen, [[spoiler:who in an attempt to protect Zero from his would-be traitors, calls her fellow comrades out on being too one-sided, only to be warned to get out of the way or be shot down on suspicion of being geassed. Lelouch ends up lying to her in order for her life to be spared.]] The following episode, Diethard's earlier attempt to rein in an AWOL Ohgi by holding Villetta, the one responsible, captive, ended up with him getting a few bruises, and complaining to himself that Ohgi, who remains on the Black Knights and is now joined by Villetta, is miscast as a leader.

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* Between himself and his best friend Suzaku and dear sister Nunnally, it sure feels like this for Lelouch of ''CodeGeass''.
**
''CodeGeass''. Taken to even greater heights in Turn 19 of R2 during Schneizel's meeting with the Black Knights; first with Tamaki and Diethard, who contend that [[spoiler:anyone could have faked the recording]], and after everyone has made up their minds, Kallen, [[spoiler:who in an attempt to protect Zero from his would-be traitors, calls her fellow comrades out on being too one-sided, only to be warned to get out of the way or be shot down on suspicion of being geassed. Lelouch ends up lying to her in order for her life to be spared.]] The following episode, Diethard's earlier attempt to rein in an AWOL Ohgi by holding Villetta, the one responsible, captive, ended up with him getting a few bruises, and complaining to himself that Ohgi, who remains on the Black Knights and is now joined by Villetta, is miscast as a leader.



* Another Creator/MontyPython example, from ''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian''

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* Another Creator/MontyPython example, from ''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian''''Film/MontyPythonsLifeOfBrian''. This example gets bonus points as the lone man ad-libbed the line, earning himself a pay-raise and AscendedExtra status for his ingenuity.



** This example gets bonus points as the lone man ad-libbed the line, earning himself a pay-raise and AscendedExtra status for his ingenuity.



** It should be noted that even in cases where the character is dead wrong on one thing, Lewis tends to give the character many redeeming qualities in other areas. Trumpkin may not believe in Aslan or the legendary rulers of Narnia, but he is also brave, loyal, smart, and kind. When he sees that Caspian is set on trying to summon supernatural aid, Trumpkin volunteers to help despite his certainty that no such aid will come.

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** It should be noted that even Even in cases where the character is dead wrong on one thing, Lewis tends to give the character many redeeming qualities in other areas. Trumpkin may not believe in Aslan or the legendary rulers of Narnia, but he is also brave, loyal, smart, and kind. When he sees that Caspian is set on trying to summon supernatural aid, Trumpkin volunteers to help despite his certainty that no such aid will come.



* The character Thersites in book two of Homer's ''Literature/TheIliad''. He suggests, quite reasonably, that Achilles's refusal to fight is an example of his cowardice, and that Agamemnon is only continuing the war into its tenth year out of arrogance. His appearance is described as hideous, in contrast to the fawning praise Homer dispenses when describing the muscle-bound, shining specimens of superb Greek manhood. For his suggestion that perhaps, after ten years fighting away from home with effectively no progress, some of the Achaians might want to go home, he is savagely beaten by Odysseus with Agamemnon's scepter and never spoken of again.
** In other myths related to the Trojan War, Thersites is referenced several times as a character who does not respect authority, with this scene used as one example of many. He finally goes too far when he mocks Achilles for crying over the body of the Amazon queen Penthesilia (who Achilles had just killed); Achilles kills him on the spot. In some versions, the tipping point comes when he acts disgusted when Achilles shows his "[[ILoveTheDead love]]" for the beautiful queen a little [[{{Squick}} too much]].

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* The character Thersites in book two of Homer's ''Literature/TheIliad''. He suggests, quite reasonably, that Achilles's refusal to fight is an example of his cowardice, and that Agamemnon is only continuing the war into its tenth year out of arrogance. His appearance is described as hideous, in contrast to the fawning praise Homer dispenses when describing the muscle-bound, shining specimens of superb Greek manhood. For his suggestion that perhaps, after ten years fighting away from home with effectively no progress, some of the Achaians might want to go home, he is savagely beaten by Odysseus with Agamemnon's scepter and never spoken of again.
**
again. In other myths related to the Trojan War, Thersites is referenced several times as a character who does not respect authority, with this scene used as one example of many. He finally goes too far when he mocks Achilles for crying over the body of the Amazon queen Penthesilia (who Achilles had just killed); Achilles kills him on the spot. In some versions, the tipping point comes when he acts disgusted when Achilles shows his "[[ILoveTheDead love]]" for the beautiful queen a little [[{{Squick}} too much]].



* ''St. Therese and the Roses'' is a fictionalized account, marketed to children, of the life of St. Therese of Lisieux. Her sister Léonie, the middle child, is depicted as brooding and melancholic while the other girls are cheerful and outgoing. If the father suggests an outing, the other girls respond gleefully, but Léonie isn't in the mood, it is portrayed as her not being as good as her sisters. She promises her dying mother she would "try to be better," which meant trying to be more cheerful like her sisters, and later in life won't even join the same strict convent the others do, because she feels she isn't as good as they.
** Even HarsherInHindsight: the real Leonie was [[http://cloisters.tripod.com/leonieleague/id8.html learning disabled and possibly autistic]]. She's even the last to get her cause for sainthood turned in to the Vatican.

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* ''St. Therese and the Roses'' is a fictionalized account, marketed to children, of the life of St. Therese of Lisieux. Her sister Léonie, the middle child, is depicted as brooding and melancholic while the other girls are cheerful and outgoing. If the father suggests an outing, the other girls respond gleefully, but Léonie isn't in the mood, it is portrayed as her not being as good as her sisters. She promises her dying mother she would "try to be better," which meant trying to be more cheerful like her sisters, and later in life won't even join the same strict convent the others do, because she feels she isn't as good as they.
**
they. Even HarsherInHindsight: the real Leonie was [[http://cloisters.tripod.com/leonieleague/id8.html learning disabled and possibly autistic]]. She's even the last to get her cause for sainthood turned in to the Vatican.



** Played with in ''Literature/FantasticBeastsAndWhereToFindThem'', concerning the Runespoor, a three headed serpent. While two heads do damage, the third head criticizes them, causing it to get bitten off.

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** * Played with in ''Literature/FantasticBeastsAndWhereToFindThem'', concerning the Runespoor, a three headed serpent. While two heads do damage, the third head criticizes them, causing it to get bitten off.



* ''Series/ICarly'': iMeet Fred. Freddie is bashed with a tennis racquet because he said Fred wasn't that funny. And then tossed out of a treehouse. Among other things.
** This is HarsherInHindsight when you consider that Fred is considered ''highly'' LoveItOrHateIt out-of-universe.

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* ''Series/ICarly'': iMeet Fred. Freddie is bashed with a tennis racquet because he said Fred wasn't that funny. And then tossed out of a treehouse. Among other things.
**
things. This is HarsherInHindsight when you consider that Fred is considered ''highly'' LoveItOrHateIt out-of-universe.



* Nearly every episode of ''Series/{{House}}'' has the team break into the patient's home; anyone who objects to these illegal searches comes across as paranoid or ungrateful.
** One episode had them break into a ''wrong'' house, as the patient turned out to be a Gypsy and didn't have a permanent address, so he simply gave them a fake address. They break in and catch a couple having sex. They immediately assume that the guy is the owner of the house, and the woman is the maid, since she doesn't have a ring (and the guy does). Thus, they smugly threaten to expose the affair and casually mention that she's a terrible maid given the state of the kitchen. The woman then reveals it's ''her'' house, and the guy is her lover (although there is still an affair, given that he's married), and demands that they elaborate on the state of the kitchen. The doctors quickly run away before she can call the cops. Naturally, this is PlayedForLaughs.

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* Nearly every episode of ''Series/{{House}}'' has the team break into the patient's home; anyone who objects to these illegal searches comes across as paranoid or ungrateful.
**
ungrateful. One episode had them break into a ''wrong'' house, as the patient turned out to be a Gypsy and didn't have a permanent address, so he simply gave them a fake address. They break in and catch a couple having sex. They immediately assume that the guy is the owner of the house, and the woman is the maid, since she doesn't have a ring (and the guy does). Thus, they smugly threaten to expose the affair and casually mention that she's a terrible maid given the state of the kitchen. The woman then reveals it's ''her'' house, and the guy is her lover (although there is still an affair, given that he's married), and demands that they elaborate on the state of the kitchen. The doctors quickly run away before she can call the cops. Naturally, this is PlayedForLaughs.



** "Mikko on siisti ja turvallinen, Mikko on yhteiskuntakelpoinen...Mitä enemmän, nostatte kohua, sitä enemmän lapsenne rakastaa mua." ("Mikko is clean and safe, Mikko is fit for society...the more you create rockus the more your children love me.")

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** "Mikko -->"Mikko on siisti ja turvallinen, Mikko on yhteiskuntakelpoinen...Mitä enemmän, nostatte kohua, sitä enemmän lapsenne rakastaa mua." ("Mikko is clean and safe, Mikko is fit for society...the more you create rockus the more your children love me.")



* Creator/HenrikIbsen was generally not fond of this trope (perhaps because, as a critic of Victorian society, he ended up being shouted down a lot) and used pretty much every one of his plays as a celebration of individualism and subverting TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong. Especially ''AnEnemyOfThePeople'' is particularly harsh in criticizing such form of thinking, despite the complainer ending up something of a DoomedMoralVictor.

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* Creator/HenrikIbsen was generally not fond of this trope (perhaps because, as a critic of Victorian society, he ended up being shouted down a lot) and used pretty much every one of his plays as a celebration of individualism and subverting TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong. Especially ''AnEnemyOfThePeople'' ''Theatre/AnEnemyOfThePeople'' is particularly harsh in criticizing such form of thinking, despite the complainer ending up something of a DoomedMoralVictor.



* Played for laughs in ''FireEmblem: The Sacred Stones'': L'Arachel and Dozla are both constantly happy and hyperactive, while Rennac is cynical and wants nothing to do with their adventures. Naturally, he always gets dragged along for the ride. [[spoiler:His ending hints that he eventually got used to them, though; his many escape attempts failed, but admittedly he didn't try very hard to get away in the first place.]]
** It might be part of it, however, that Rennac has [[StatisticallySpeaking absolutely terrible luck]].

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* Played for laughs in ''FireEmblem: The Sacred Stones'': L'Arachel and Dozla are both constantly happy and hyperactive, while Rennac is cynical and wants nothing to do with their adventures. Naturally, he always gets dragged along for the ride. [[spoiler:His ending hints that he eventually got used to them, though; his many escape attempts failed, but admittedly he didn't try very hard to get away in the first place.]]
**
]] It might be part of it, however, that Rennac has [[StatisticallySpeaking absolutely terrible luck]].



** Well, there's nothing saying ''she'' can't stop fighting. It's that she's endlessly complaining about escaping, even after [[spoiler:knowing that allowing even a single person to leave will result in humanity being screwed]], yet never stops to think that she can just leave the party and wait with the rest of the survivors. On top of that, she doesn't think about the consequences of breaking out of a lockdown of ''the capital of Japan''.



* The article referenced above talks about this being the reason for [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold Eric's]] existence in the ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'' cartoon.
** Fortunately, this trope was also subverted by the show: In some episodes, primarily in season two, there are cases where Eric is right and everyone else is wrong. One of the writers has since said that Eric was originally supposed to be right a lot more often, but the MoralGuardians basically forced this trope. The script for the unproduced final episode subverts this trope in that the group splits in two, and looks like Eric's group may be getting set up for this, but it turns out that [[spoiler:''both'' groups are wrong. Fortunately, they figure out what they really need to do just in time.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheGetAlongGang'' was, in the eyes of some, completely dedicated to this trope. The "complainer" in this case was even depicted as [[JustEatGilligan a compulsive gambler who'd bet the clubhouse at the slightest provocation]].
** Creator/MarkEvanier would directly make fun of what he felt was this series' message of this trope in ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'' as seen below.

to:

* The article referenced above talks about this being the reason for [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold Eric's]] existence in the ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'' cartoon.
**
cartoon. Fortunately, this trope was also subverted by the show: In some episodes, primarily in season two, there are cases where Eric is right and everyone else is wrong. One of the writers has since said that Eric was originally supposed to be right a lot more often, but the MoralGuardians basically forced this trope. The script for the unproduced final episode subverts this trope in that the group splits in two, and looks like Eric's group may be getting set up for this, but it turns out that [[spoiler:''both'' groups are wrong. Fortunately, they figure out what they really need to do just in time.]]
* ''WesternAnimation/TheGetAlongGang'' was, in the eyes of some, completely dedicated to this trope. The "complainer" in this case was even depicted as [[JustEatGilligan a compulsive gambler who'd bet the clubhouse at the slightest provocation]].
**
provocation]]. Creator/MarkEvanier would directly make fun of what he felt was this series' message of this trope in ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'' as seen below.''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends''.



* Parodied mercilessly with the ShowWithinAShow "The Buddy Bears" from ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends''. They were three "cute" bears in [[TheGayNineties Gay Nineties]] attire who would endlessly perform an obnoxious "barbershop" routine with canes and madcap dancing. Not coincidentally, the head writer of ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'', and the writer of this episode, was Creator/MarkEvanier. One episode featured Garfield, sick of having to deal with them, [[AppleOfDiscord manipulate them into a situation where they COULDN'T agree]]: [[spoiler:pizza toppings, which Garfield claims ''no'' two people "in the history of Italian cooking" have ''ever'' been able to agree on]].

to:

* Parodied mercilessly with the ShowWithinAShow "The Buddy Bears" from ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends''. They were three "cute" bears in [[TheGayNineties Gay Nineties]] attire who would endlessly perform an obnoxious "barbershop" routine with canes and madcap dancing. Not coincidentally, the head writer of ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'', and the writer of this episode, was Creator/MarkEvanier. Creator/MarkEvanier.
**
One episode featured Garfield, sick of having to deal with them, [[AppleOfDiscord manipulate them into a situation where they COULDN'T agree]]: [[spoiler:pizza toppings, which Garfield claims ''no'' two people "in the history of Italian cooking" have ''ever'' been able to agree on]].



* ''MuppetBabies'': Fozzie Bear. The jokes he tells are booed at regardless.
** Though it was subverted when Fozzie finally got fed up with the boos and decided to give up jokes. This eventually made everyone sad as they realized that seeing Fozzie miserable is worse than enduring his jokes and at least knowing ''he's'' happy. Piggy ultimately puts it best: "We love to hate your jokes!"

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* ''MuppetBabies'': Fozzie Bear. The jokes he tells are booed at regardless.
**
regardless. Though it was subverted when Fozzie finally got fed up with the boos and decided to give up jokes. This eventually made everyone sad as they realized that seeing Fozzie miserable is worse than enduring his jokes and at least knowing ''he's'' happy. Piggy ultimately puts it best: "We love to hate your jokes!"



* ''Franchise/CareBears'': most of the characters are characterized by unique personality quirks, but GrumpyBear is unique in being the only bear to make a hobby out of finding the cloud wrapped around every silver lining (understandably, since the universe's opinion of him tends towards the ButtMonkey-esque.) Nonetheless, he remains quite possibly [[EnsembleDarkhorse the most awesome character on the show]], having cobbled together a fully-functional teleporter, survived an attack from a renegade bowl of fruit and ''playing baseball with lightning''. Even the latest TV series, which gives all the bears a special power unique to their symbol, happily grants Grumpy arguably the most broken power on the show... The complainer may usually be wrong, but even hunting for clouds among the silver linings sometimes has a silver lining.
** The trope is outright subverted in at least one ''FranchiseCareBears'' story involving Grumpy Bear; the other Care Bears spend the entire story trying to cheer Grumpy Bear up and only succeed in irritating him. Eventually they reach the revelation that Grumpy Bear is ''happy being grumpy'' and that they should just let him go on being so. Although one might interpret this as the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop "If someone you care about is unhappy, don't bother trying to cheer them up because it won't work."
* There was a similar episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh'', in which the animals attempted to cheer up Eeyore because he spent all his days staring gloomily at clouds. In a nice twist, after each of their heavy-handed attempts failed, Piglet simply sits and talks to Eeyore, who reveals that he's not depressed - he is, in fact, playing an imaginary game with the clouds. A nice avoidance of this trope, in that the gang is encouraged to find out more about Eeyore's unusual behaviour and even appreciate it on its own terms.
** ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' tended to subvert this frequently with Eeyore, with the others and even himself suggesting making him over to be happier and fit in more, in the end however they usually decide both Eeyore and the others are happy with [[TheEeyore his usual "depressed" self]]. This is occasionally played more straight with Rabbit however, whose objections to the antics of the others (usually Tigger) are usually shot down, though granted his ControlFreak tendencies and extremely prudish demeanor justifies it a little.

to:

* ''Franchise/CareBears'': most of the characters are characterized by unique personality quirks, but GrumpyBear is unique in being the only bear to make a hobby out of finding the cloud wrapped around every silver lining (understandably, since the universe's opinion of him tends towards the ButtMonkey-esque.) Nonetheless, he remains quite possibly [[EnsembleDarkhorse the most awesome character on the show]], having cobbled together a fully-functional teleporter, survived an attack from a renegade bowl of fruit and ''playing baseball with lightning''. Even the latest TV series, which gives all the bears a special power unique to their symbol, happily grants Grumpy arguably the most broken power on the show... The complainer may usually be wrong, but even hunting for clouds among the silver linings sometimes has a silver lining.
**
lining. The trope is outright subverted in at least one ''FranchiseCareBears'' story involving Grumpy Bear; the other Care Bears spend the entire story trying to cheer Grumpy Bear up and only succeed in irritating him. Eventually they reach the revelation that Grumpy Bear is ''happy being grumpy'' and that they should just let him go on being so. Although one might interpret this as the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop "If someone you care about is unhappy, don't bother trying to cheer them up because it won't work."
* There was a similar episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfWinnieThePooh'', in which the animals attempted to cheer up Eeyore because he spent all his days staring gloomily at clouds. In a nice twist, after each of their heavy-handed attempts failed, Piglet simply sits and talks to Eeyore, who reveals that he's not depressed - he is, in fact, playing an imaginary game with the clouds. A nice avoidance of this trope, in that the gang is encouraged to find out more about Eeyore's unusual behaviour and even appreciate it on its own terms.
**
terms. ''Franchise/WinnieThePooh'' tended to subvert this frequently with Eeyore, with the others and even himself suggesting making him over to be happier and fit in more, in the end however they usually decide both Eeyore and the others are happy with [[TheEeyore his usual "depressed" self]]. This is occasionally played more straight with Rabbit however, whose objections to the antics of the others (usually Tigger) are usually shot down, though granted his ControlFreak tendencies and extremely prudish demeanor justifies it a little.



* Many episodes of ''KingOfTheHill'' have rather pro-conformity messages. Whenever a members of a hostile subculture appear far-right Christians, far-left hippies, Canadians, etc they are usually eventually exposed as selfish, bullying hypocrites of some form or another. In the end, everyone learns to not take their contrarian view of the world seriously.
* ''TheBusyWorldOfRichardScarry'' has the brothers Pig Will and Pig Won't, who somehow manage to embody this Aesop using only two people. As their names suggest, one agrees to ''every'' request or offer, and the other refuses every offer. In the original book Pig Won't would always say "I won't", without even thinking about it. So one day when their father asks who wants to go with him to visit the fire station, Pig Won't declares "I won't". At the fire station, Pig Will gets to play with the dalmatian, wear a fire suit, play with the fire hose (with adult supervision), and it all ends with an all-you-can-eat hot fudge sundae orgy! When Pig Won't sees all the fun Pig Will had, he immediately becomes Pig Me Too.
* Subverted in ''{{Transformers}}''. Gears complains about everything but the other Autobots actually like having him around because they find his complaints amusing and his behavior never leads him to trouble. In fact, the one time he was content and helpful it was because the Decepticons were controlling him. Played straight with Starscream, whose constant complaints about Megatron's leadership often gave the Autobots an opening for victory. The complainer is always wrong even when the group is evil.

to:

* Many episodes of ''KingOfTheHill'' ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' have rather pro-conformity messages. Whenever a members of a hostile subculture appear far-right Christians, far-left hippies, Canadians, etc they are usually eventually exposed as selfish, bullying hypocrites of some form or another. In the end, everyone learns to not take their contrarian view of the world seriously.
* ''TheBusyWorldOfRichardScarry'' ''WesternAnimation/TheBusyWorldOfRichardScarry'' has the brothers Pig Will and Pig Won't, who somehow manage to embody this Aesop using only two people. As their names suggest, one agrees to ''every'' request or offer, and the other refuses every offer. In the original book Pig Won't would always say "I won't", without even thinking about it. So one day when their father asks who wants to go with him to visit the fire station, Pig Won't declares "I won't". At the fire station, Pig Will gets to play with the dalmatian, wear a fire suit, play with the fire hose (with adult supervision), and it all ends with an all-you-can-eat hot fudge sundae orgy! When Pig Won't sees all the fun Pig Will had, he immediately becomes Pig Me Too.
* Subverted in ''{{Transformers}}''.''WesternAnimation/{{Transformers}}''. Gears complains about everything but the other Autobots actually like having him around because they find his complaints amusing and his behavior never leads him to trouble. In fact, the one time he was content and helpful it was because the Decepticons were controlling him. Played straight with Starscream, whose constant complaints about Megatron's leadership often gave the Autobots an opening for victory. The complainer is always wrong even when the group is evil.



* Subverted in ''TheAdventuresOfJimmyNeutron''. When the Yolkians (the villains from TheMovie) come to the Earth, Jimmy says they're not to be trusted, [[CivilianVillain even after they seem harmless and give everyone free stuff]]. It turns out they ''were'' trying to destroy the Earth and were only giving them stuff to get on their good side. After saving the town, Jimmy makes them say "We were wrong and you were right" in English and French (and tries with Chinese, but nobody knows it).
** Really most of the time Jimmy is always right and will always be the one to solve the problem, [[IgnoredExpert but no one ever trusts him]] because [[InsufferableGenius he's such a jerk about it]] and half of the problems were [[NiceJobBreakingItHero caused by him in the first place]].

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* Subverted in ''TheAdventuresOfJimmyNeutron''. When the Yolkians (the villains from TheMovie) come to the Earth, Jimmy says they're not to be trusted, [[CivilianVillain even after they seem harmless and give everyone free stuff]]. It turns out they ''were'' trying to destroy the Earth and were only giving them stuff to get on their good side. After saving the town, Jimmy makes them say "We were wrong and you were right" in English and French (and tries with Chinese, but nobody knows it).
**
it). Really most of the time Jimmy is always right and will always be the one to solve the problem, [[IgnoredExpert but no one ever trusts him]] because [[InsufferableGenius he's such a jerk about it]] and half of the problems were [[NiceJobBreakingItHero caused by him in the first place]].



** Also frequently averted by the rest of the series. The main complainer of the heroes, Twilight Sparkle, is actually ''right'' about half the time. [[spoiler:It also derails the BigBad's plot in the first season when she points out the factual errors in a prophecy about how she'd be sealed up again.]]

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** Also frequently averted by the rest of the series. The main complainer of the heroes, Twilight Sparkle, is actually ''right'' about half the time. time.
***
[[spoiler:It also derails the BigBad's plot in the first season when she points out the factual errors in a prophecy about how she'd be sealed up again.]]



* ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' once has TechnicalPacifist Comicbook/AntMan try to break up a battle between the Avengers and the Serpent Society by suggesting the Serpent Society talk their problems out with him instead. The Serpent Society refuses to cooperate, and instead, the fight between them and the Avengers intensifies. After the criminals escape, the Avengers scold Ant-Man for chastising their violent means of tackling villains. Did we mention that they also had ''hostages?''
** Although in the second season, after quitting the team, Ant-Man has a nervous breakdown that leads a complete personality shift resulting in him becoming a new action-oriented hero who gets in trouble with the rest of the Avengers for looking like he's going around killing the members of the Serpent Society. Even when it turns out he was only teleporting them to a microscopic prison, he's still like that for the rest of the show.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' once has TechnicalPacifist Comicbook/AntMan try to break up a battle between the Avengers and the Serpent Society by suggesting the Serpent Society talk their problems out with him instead. The Serpent Society refuses to cooperate, and instead, the fight between them and the Avengers intensifies. After the criminals escape, the Avengers scold Ant-Man for chastising their violent means of tackling villains. Did we mention that they also had ''hostages?''
**
''hostages?'' Although in the second season, after quitting the team, Ant-Man has a nervous breakdown that leads a complete personality shift resulting in him becoming a new action-oriented hero who gets in trouble with the rest of the Avengers for looking like he's going around killing the members of the Serpent Society. Even when it turns out he was only teleporting them to a microscopic prison, he's still like that for the rest of the show.
13th May '16 4:10:00 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''TheGetAlongGang'' was, in the eyes of some, completely dedicated to this trope. The "complainer" in this case was even depicted as [[JustEatGilligan a compulsive gambler who'd bet the clubhouse at the slightest provocation]].

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* ''TheGetAlongGang'' ''WesternAnimation/TheGetAlongGang'' was, in the eyes of some, completely dedicated to this trope. The "complainer" in this case was even depicted as [[JustEatGilligan a compulsive gambler who'd bet the clubhouse at the slightest provocation]].
1st May '16 10:28:46 AM Prometheus117
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** Zig-Zagged in the episode "No Second Prances", where Twilight is suspicious of [[HeelFaceTurn Starlight Glimmer's]] new friend and former bad-pony [[MilesGlorious Trixie]] and feels that Trixie might be manipulating Starlight for her own ends and she shouldn't make friends with her. Starlight eventually gets fed up with this and [[WhatTheHellHero calls Twilight out on being suspicious of Trixie despite having given her a second chance]] and wonders what that means about herself. [[spoiler:As it turns out unlike the Discord example above, Trixie originally ''did'' only befriend Starlight [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter as a means of getting back at Twilight]], but she [[BecomingTheMask eventually grew to enjoy the bond they developed]] and was [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone crushed when she realized she almost destroyed one of the few genuine friendships she ever made]]. Twilight in turn realizes that she went overboard with her suspicions and apologizes]].

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** Zig-Zagged in the episode "No Second Prances", where Twilight is suspicious of [[HeelFaceTurn Starlight Glimmer's]] new friend and former bad-pony [[MilesGlorious [[MilesGloriosus Trixie]] and feels that Trixie might be manipulating Starlight for her own ends and she shouldn't make friends with her. Starlight eventually gets fed up with this and [[WhatTheHellHero calls Twilight out on being suspicious of Trixie despite having given her a second chance]] and wonders what that means about herself. [[spoiler:As it turns out unlike the Discord example above, Trixie originally ''did'' only befriend Starlight [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter as a means of getting back at Twilight]], but she [[BecomingTheMask eventually grew to enjoy the bond they developed]] and was [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone crushed when she realized she almost destroyed one of the few genuine friendships she ever made]]. Twilight in turn realizes that she went overboard with her suspicions and apologizes]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong