History Main / TheColonialPeriod

17th Oct '17 6:00:40 PM johnnye
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People came here expecting [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream to get rich quick]], and it almost never happened. Most of them remained poor or indentured servants all their lives. In the southern colonies, everyone was more concerned with digging for gold that didn't exist than with growing food, at least until they began growing tobacco and made loads and loads of money. They also brought in some slaves during this time, which would have some [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar really bad consequences years down the line]].

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People came here expecting [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream to get rich quick]], and it almost never happened. Most of them remained poor or indentured servants all their lives. In the southern colonies, everyone was more concerned with digging for gold that didn't exist than with growing food, at least until they began growing tobacco and made loads and loads of money. They also brought in some slaves during this time, which would have lead to some [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar really bad consequences rather heated disagreements years down the line]].
line]].
12th Oct '17 10:48:34 AM CosmicFerret
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* Touched on in ''TheAreasOfMyExpertise'', with the puritanical Oaths of the [[CreepyChild Virtuous Child]], as well as a list of colonial jobs involving eels.

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* Touched on in ''TheAreasOfMyExpertise'', ''Literature/TheAreasOfMyExpertise'', with the puritanical Oaths of the [[CreepyChild Virtuous Child]], as well as a list of colonial jobs involving eels.
29th Aug '17 11:35:21 AM Random888
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* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The first was UsefulNotes/TheLostColonyOfRoanoke. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement that lasted was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. \\

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* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The States, the first was unsuccessful one having been UsefulNotes/TheLostColonyOfRoanoke. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement that lasted was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. \\
29th Aug '17 11:34:48 AM Random888
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* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The first was a 1585 attempt to colonize the island of Roanoke along the coast on North Carolina, but that colony vanished under somewhat mysterious circumstances while the leaders were visiting England. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement that lasted was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. \\

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* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The first was a 1585 attempt to colonize the island of Roanoke along the coast on North Carolina, but that colony vanished under somewhat mysterious circumstances while the leaders were visiting England.UsefulNotes/TheLostColonyOfRoanoke. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement that lasted was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. \\
19th Aug '17 11:47:24 AM szielins
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In the early years they were essentially proto-communist (land was owned collectively, everyone produced food for the community and it was divided evenly among the citizens, etc.), but this didn't work out very well and they switched to private ownership. The colony practiced a [[FairForItsDay now-primitive but then-enlightened]] type of democracy involving local town hall meetings, elected officials to govern the entire colony, mostly universal male suffrage (though the list of qualifications grew over time), and trial by jury. The Pilgrims had surprisingly good views regarding women for the day; women could own property when unmarried, they could sign contracts, and could speak in court and serve on juries. Technically never officially chartered, it never flourished all that much and in 1691 it was merged with the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

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In the early years they were essentially proto-communist (land was owned collectively, everyone produced food for the community and it was divided evenly among the citizens, etc.), but this didn't work out very well and they switched to private ownership. The colony practiced a [[FairForItsDay now-primitive but then-enlightened]] type of democracy involving local town hall meetings, elected officials to govern the entire colony, mostly universal male suffrage (though the list of qualifications grew over time), and trial by jury. The Pilgrims had surprisingly good views regarding women for the day; women could own property when unmarried, they could sign contracts, and could speak in court and serve on juries. Technically never officially chartered, it never flourished all that much and in 1691 it was merged with the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
19th Jun '17 9:08:22 PM karstovich2
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* '''Dominion of New England (1686-89)''': Unless you are a history buff, you most certainly have never heard of this. Until the years after the French-and-Indian War, this was the most blatant example of the homeland trying to tighten its grip on the colonies. Created by the unpopular (because of his Catholicism) [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheSecond King James II]] to prevent the colonies from trading with anyone but England, it originally only covered the New England colonies until it absorbed New York and both New Jerseys as well. It was led by Sir Edmund Andros, who made the grave mistake of favoring the Church of England despite ruling over Puritans. Eventually when it became clear that the colonists did not like him, he grew more than a bit authoritarian, most notably putting an end to the town hall meetings and revoking land titles. The colonists were especially loathed to pay taxes to a man they did not elect. After news came over of the Glorious Revolution in England overthrowing James II, mobs in Boston revolted and overthrew Andros and shipped him back to England. Technically not a colony, but it needs to be mentioned.

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* '''Dominion of New England (1686-89)''': Unless you are a history buff, you most certainly have never heard of this. Until the years after the French-and-Indian War, this was the most blatant example of the homeland trying to tighten its grip on the colonies. Created by the unpopular (because of his Catholicism) [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheSecond King James II]] to prevent the colonies from trading with anyone but England, it originally only covered the New England colonies until it absorbed New York and both New Jerseys as well. It was led by Sir Edmund Andros, who made the grave mistake of favoring the Church of England despite ruling over Puritans. Eventually when it became clear that the colonists did not like him, he grew more than a bit authoritarian, most notably putting an end to the town hall meetings and revoking land titles. The colonists were especially loathed to pay taxes to a man they did not elect. After news came over of the Glorious Revolution in England overthrowing James II, mobs in Boston revolted and overthrew Andros and shipped him back to England. Technically not a colony, but it needs to be mentioned.mentioned partly for completeness, and partly because it created a bad taste in the colonists' mouths about schemes to unify the colonies under a single administration--an attitude that would create problems down the line. .
15th Jun '17 8:53:32 PM karstovich2
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* '''New Jersey (1664)''': Part of the lands conquered from the Dutch, in 1664 the Duke of York gave this land to two proprietors, Sir George Carteret and Lord John Berkeley. Most of its population came from people leaving other colonies as opposed to immigrants coming directly from Europe. From 1674 to 1702, New Jersey was split between West Jersey and East Jersey after Berkeley shared his half to Quakers. It remained like this until King William III combined the two again in 1702; that same year New Jersey was made a royal colony. There was no established church in New Jersey.
* '''Carolina (1670)''': Originally part of Virginia, this was created in the period after the English Revolution when [[UsefulNotes/CharlesII King Charles II]] was desperate to build support for the monarchy. Charted to eight nobles in 1663 and named after the sitting king, Carolina wasn't formally colonized until 1670 (the first official Carolina settlement was Charlestown in present day South Carolina; guess who the town was named after). It was created to help manage trade with the British colonies in the Caribbean, and many of its early settlers were wealthy people from those colonies. \\

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* '''New Jersey (1664)''': Part of the lands conquered from the Dutch, in 1664 the Duke of York gave this land to two proprietors, Sir George Carteret and Lord John Berkeley. Most of its population came from people leaving other colonies as opposed to immigrants coming directly from Europe. From 1674 to 1702, New Jersey was split between West Jersey and East Jersey after Berkeley shared his half to Quakers. It remained like this until King William III combined the two again in 1702; that same year New Jersey was made a royal colony. There was no established church in New Jersey.\n* '''Carolina (1670)''': Originally part of Virginia, this was created in the period after the English Revolution when [[UsefulNotes/CharlesII King Charles II]] was desperate to build support for the monarchy. Charted to eight nobles in 1663 and named after the sitting king, Carolina wasn't formally colonized until 1670 (the first official Carolina settlement was Charlestown in present day South Carolina; guess who the town was named after). It was created to help manage trade with the British colonies in the Caribbean, and many of its early settlers were wealthy people from those colonies. \\



The colony, spread over a large area of the coast, was already divided from the outset. Those in the northern half were mostly farmers who came from Virginia or were already there when the land suddenly became part of a different colony. Those in the south were mostly immigrants and wealthy plantation owners. Oh, and slaves. Lots and lots of slaves. \\

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The colony, spread over a large area of the coast, From 1674 to 1702, New Jersey was already divided from the outset. Those in the northern split between West Jersey and East Jersey after Berkeley shared his half were mostly farmers who came from Virginia or were already there when to Quakers. It remained like this until King William III combined the land suddenly became two again in 1702; that same year New Jersey was made a royal colony. However, the distinction between the New York-oriented eastern/northern part of the colony and the Philadelphia-oriented western/southern part remained important. For most of the colony's history after 1702, it had a different colony. Those split capital arrangement with the towns of Burlington (in Burlington County in the south were mostly immigrants southwest, upstream from Philadelphia) and wealthy plantation owners. Oh, and slaves. Lots and lots Perth Amboy (in Middlesex County in the northeast, across a narrow strait from Staten Island) alternating as the seat of slaves. \\government. Not for nothing did Ben Franklin call New Jersey "a barrel tapped at both ends."\\



Yes, the Caribbean planters brought their slaves. In fact, the southern part had more black slaves than white freemen from 1710 until 1865, when slavery ended in the country. They also exported thousands of Indian slaves as well, this only ending when frontier wars killed most of the remaining tribes. It's really no wonder why, in the years before UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, South Carolina was desperate to make sure its slavery-based economy would last forever. Unlike the slave colonies further north, rice was actually their main crop, not tobacco. \\

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Yes, There was no established church in New Jersey; the Caribbean planters brought their slaves. In fact, religions were far too mixed for that (with Anglicans and Presbyterians coming from New York, Congregationalists from New England via New York, Quakers coming from Pennsylvania, and the southern Dutch Reformed already there).
* '''Carolina (1670)''': Originally
part had more black slaves than white freemen from 1710 until 1865, when slavery ended of Virginia, this was created in the country. They also exported thousands of Indian slaves as well, this only ending period after the English Revolution when frontier wars killed most of the remaining tribes. It's really no wonder why, in the years before UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, South Carolina [[UsefulNotes/CharlesII King Charles II]] was desperate to make sure its slavery-based economy would last forever. Unlike build support for the slave monarchy. Charted to eight nobles in 1663 and named after the sitting king, Carolina wasn't formally colonized until 1670 (the first official Carolina settlement was Charlestown in present day South Carolina; guess who the town was named after). It was created to help manage trade with the British colonies further north, rice was actually their main crop, not tobacco.in the Caribbean, and many of its early settlers were wealthy people from those colonies. \\



The small-farm based northern half, meanwhile, was not nearly as slave-dependent and was also rather more democratic than the aristocratic southern half. Eventually these differences made the colony too difficult to govern together and they were split in 1712 between the originally named '''North Carolina''' and '''South Carolina'''. Seventeen years later, both were made into royal colonies. The established church in Carolina colony and both of its descendants was the Anglican church.
* '''Pennsylvania (1681)''': Pennsylvania means "Penn's Forest." For this reason, most people assume it was named after William Penn, the colony's founder, but it was actually named after his father, Sir William Penn, a [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships Royal Navy admiral]]. King Charles II owed a lot of money to Admiral Penn (who had spent a lot of effort and money helping the king win back his throne), and when the admiral died, his estranged son and namesake inherited the debt. The younger Penn made a deal to just give him land in the New World instead. William Penn actually objected to this name out of fear that people thought it was named after him, but no one listened. \\

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The small-farm based colony, spread over a large area of the coast, was already divided from the outset. Those in the northern half, meanwhile, was not nearly as slave-dependent and was also rather more democratic than the aristocratic southern half. Eventually these differences made the colony too difficult to govern together and they half were split in 1712 between the originally named '''North Carolina''' and '''South Carolina'''. Seventeen years later, both mostly farmers who came from Virginia or were made into royal colonies. The established church in Carolina colony and both of its descendants was the Anglican church.
* '''Pennsylvania (1681)''': Pennsylvania means "Penn's Forest." For this reason, most people assume it was named after William Penn, the colony's founder, but it was actually named after his father, Sir William Penn, a [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships Royal Navy admiral]]. King Charles II owed a lot of money to Admiral Penn (who had spent a lot of effort and money helping the king win back his throne), and
already there when the admiral died, his estranged son and namesake inherited the debt. The younger Penn made a deal to just give him land suddenly became part of a different colony. Those in the New World instead. William Penn actually objected to this name out south were mostly immigrants and wealthy plantation owners. Oh, and slaves. Lots and lots of fear that people thought it was named after him, but no one listened.slaves. \\



Anyway, this colony was also founded to protect religious dissenters, in this case members of the Quaker denomination of which Penn was a leading member. Philadelphia ("The City of Brotherly Love"), the settlement they founded, was very well-planned for a colonial city, and Penn attracted a lot of skilled craftsmen to help populate his colony. They purchased the land from the Native Americans after landing, a commitment to principle most of the other colonial founders didn't have; relations with local tribes were so peaceful that many Indians actually moved ''into'' Pennsylvania after the colony was founded. Like Rhode Island, there was also toleration for Catholics and Jews. \\

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Anyway, Yes, the Caribbean planters brought their slaves. In fact, the southern part had more black slaves than white freemen from 1710 until 1865, when slavery ended in the country. They also exported thousands of Indian slaves as well, this colony was also founded to protect religious dissenters, in this case members of the Quaker denomination of which Penn was a leading member. Philadelphia ("The City of Brotherly Love"), the settlement they founded, was very well-planned for a colonial city, and Penn attracted a lot of skilled craftsmen to help populate his colony. They purchased the land from the Native Americans after landing, a commitment to principle only ending when frontier wars killed most of the other colonial founders didn't have; relations with local tribes were so peaceful that many Indians remaining tribes. It's really no wonder why, in the years before UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, South Carolina was desperate to make sure its slavery-based economy would last forever. Unlike the slave colonies further north, rice was actually moved ''into'' Pennsylvania after the colony was founded. Like Rhode Island, there was also toleration for Catholics and Jews.their main crop, not tobacco. \\



The colony was also rather democratic when it was founded (though still limited only to male property owners), and it had what was essentially a Bill of Rights. Quakers are known for being committed to pacifism, toleration, generosity, and equality, and the movement to emancipate America's slaves appropriately began in Pennsylvania. Enlightenment thinkers like {{Creator/Voltaire}} thought colonial Pennsylvania was the closest thing to paradise on Earth. \\

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The colony small-farm based northern half, meanwhile, was not nearly as slave-dependent and was also rather more democratic when it than the aristocratic southern half. Eventually these differences made the colony too difficult to govern together and they were split in 1712 between the originally named '''North Carolina''' and '''South Carolina'''. Seventeen years later, both were made into royal colonies. The established church in Carolina colony and both of its descendants was founded (though still limited only to male property owners), and it had what was essentially a Bill of Rights. Quakers are known for being committed to pacifism, toleration, generosity, and equality, and the movement to emancipate America's slaves appropriately began in Pennsylvania. Enlightenment thinkers like {{Creator/Voltaire}} thought colonial Anglican church.
* '''Pennsylvania (1681)''':
Pennsylvania means "Penn's Forest." For this reason, most people assume it was named after William Penn, the closest thing colony's founder, but it was actually named after his father, Sir William Penn, a [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships Royal Navy admiral]]. King Charles II owed a lot of money to paradise on Earth.Admiral Penn (who had spent a lot of effort and money helping the king win back his throne), and when the admiral died, his estranged son and namesake inherited the debt. The younger Penn made a deal to just give him land in the New World instead. William Penn actually objected to this name out of fear that people thought it was named after him, but no one listened. \\


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Anyway, this colony was also founded to protect religious dissenters, in this case members of the Quaker denomination of which Penn was a leading member. Philadelphia ("The City of Brotherly Love"), the settlement they founded, was very well-planned for a colonial city, and Penn attracted a lot of skilled craftsmen to help populate his colony. They purchased the land from the Native Americans after landing, a commitment to principle most of the other colonial founders didn't have; relations with local tribes were so peaceful that many Indians actually moved ''into'' Pennsylvania after the colony was founded. Like Rhode Island, there was also toleration for Catholics and Jews. \\
\\
The colony was also rather democratic when it was founded (though still limited only to male property owners), and it had what was essentially a Bill of Rights. Quakers are known for being committed to pacifism, toleration, generosity, and equality, and the movement to emancipate America's slaves appropriately began in Pennsylvania. Enlightenment thinkers like {{Creator/Voltaire}} thought colonial Pennsylvania was the closest thing to paradise on Earth. \\
\\
29th May '17 1:34:58 PM karstovich2
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29th May '17 11:59:45 AM karstovich2
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* '''Pennsylvania (1681)''': Pennsylvania means "Penn's Forest." For this reason, most people assume it was named after William Penn, the colony's founder, but it was actually named after his father, Sir William Penn, a [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships Royal Navy admiral]]. King Charles II owed a lot of money to Admiral Penn (who had spent a lot of effort and money helping the king win back his throne), and when the admiral died, his son made a deal to just give him land in the New World instead. William Penn actually objected to this name out of fear that people thought it was named after him, but no one listened. \\

to:

* '''Pennsylvania (1681)''': Pennsylvania means "Penn's Forest." For this reason, most people assume it was named after William Penn, the colony's founder, but it was actually named after his father, Sir William Penn, a [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships Royal Navy admiral]]. King Charles II owed a lot of money to Admiral Penn (who had spent a lot of effort and money helping the king win back his throne), and when the admiral died, his estranged son and namesake inherited the debt. The younger Penn made a deal to just give him land in the New World instead. William Penn actually objected to this name out of fear that people thought it was named after him, but no one listened. \\
29th May '17 11:58:27 AM karstovich2
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Led by John Winthrop, the Puritans wanted to establish a "city upon the hill" of religiously faithful carrying out God's will. They took this concept ''notoriously'' seriously, to the point that they took rather authoritarian means to prevent any dissent. Their way was the only way in the colony, and only church (male) members could vote. Dissenters either fled, were banished, or killed, the most famous of the latter being the four Quaker "Boston martyrs" killed from 1659 to 1661. The execution of the peaceful Quakers was the last straw for many people and after that Massachusetts slowly became more tolerant. After that point, religious persecution in Massachusetts died down, except for the notorious Salem witch trials of 1692, which resulted in the deaths of twenty people accused of witchcraft.\\

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Led by John Winthrop, the Puritans wanted to establish a "city upon the hill" of religiously faithful carrying out God's will. They took this concept ''notoriously'' seriously, to the point that they took rather authoritarian means to prevent any dissent. Their way was the only way in the colony, and only church (male) members could vote. Dissenters either fled, were banished, or killed, the most famous of the latter being the four Quaker "Boston martyrs" killed from 1659 to 1661. The execution of the peaceful Quakers was the last straw for many people and after that Massachusetts slowly became more tolerant. After that point, religious persecution in Massachusetts died down, except for the notorious Salem witch trials of 1692, which resulted in the deaths of twenty people accused of witchcraft.\\ \\
\\
On the plus side, given the very religious nature of its founding, they did believe that all of the (male) Puritan faithful should be allowed to vote (this is why New England is historically famous for its town hall governments, which were as democratic as it got during the time period), which was an improvement on the land ownership qualification of Virginia, but eventually property qualifications were added. Also part of their religious nature, the colonists here were dedicated to the idea of education to help the young prepare for church service; towns above a certain size had to build elementary schools, and the first college in American history, [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Harvard]], was founded in 1636 to train ministers. This education shows; the first book of poetry in the future United States, by Anne Bradstreet (a wealthy widow from Cambridge; her father and husband had both been governor), was published in 1650. \\



On the plus side, given the very religious nature of its founding, they did believe that all of the (male) Puritan faithful should be allowed to vote (this is why New England is historically famous for its town hall governments, which were as democratic as it got during the time period), which was an improvement on the land ownership qualification of Virginia, but eventually property qualifications were added. Also part of their religious nature, the colonists here were dedicated to the idea of education to help the young prepare for church service; towns above a certain size had to build elementary schools, and the first college in American history, [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Harvard]], was founded in 1636 to train ministers. This education shows; the first book of poetry in the future United States, by Anne Bradstreet (a wealthy widow from Cambridge; her father and husband had both been governor), was published in 1650. \\
\\



The colony, spread over a large area of the coast, was already divided from the outset. Those in the northern half were mostly farmers who came from Virginia or were already there when the land suddenly became part of a different colony. Those in the south were mostly immigrants and wealthy plantation owners. Oh, and slaves. Lots and lots of slaves.\\

to:

The colony, spread over a large area of the coast, was already divided from the outset. Those in the northern half were mostly farmers who came from Virginia or were already there when the land suddenly became part of a different colony. Those in the south were mostly immigrants and wealthy plantation owners. Oh, and slaves. Lots and lots of slaves. \\
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