History Main / TheColonialPeriod

13th Apr '16 4:09:20 AM Dravencour
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* ''Theatre/TheCrucible''

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* ''Theatre/TheCrucible''
''Theatre/TheCrucible'', set during the infamous Witch Trials of Salem.
26th Dec '15 6:17:40 PM nombretomado
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People came here expecting [[AmericanDream to get rich quick]], and it almost never happened. Most of them remained poor or indentured servants all their lives. In the southern colonies, everyone was more concerned with digging for gold that didn't exist than with growing food, at least until they began growing tobacco and made loads and loads of money. They also brought in some slaves during this time, which would have some [[{{UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar}} really bad consequences years down the line]].

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People came here expecting [[AmericanDream [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream to get rich quick]], and it almost never happened. Most of them remained poor or indentured servants all their lives. In the southern colonies, everyone was more concerned with digging for gold that didn't exist than with growing food, at least until they began growing tobacco and made loads and loads of money. They also brought in some slaves during this time, which would have some [[{{UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar}} [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar really bad consequences years down the line]].
16th Dec '15 4:30:17 PM nombretomado
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* '''Massachusetts (1630)''': Whoo boy, Massachusetts Bay Colony. It was founded by Puritans who wanted to escape persecution at the hands of [[UsefulNotes/CharlesI King Charles I]]. Chartering land just a bit north of Plymouth, the nearly one thousand Puritans on the first trip founded the city of Boston. By the 1640s, over 20,000 Puritans were already settled in Massachusetts Bay Colony, and their large population growth and need for more land is why they kept trying to integrate all of the previously established colonies in the region. Led by John Winthrop, they wanted to be a "city upon the hill" of religiously faithful carrying out God's will. They took this concept ''notoriously'' seriously, to the point that they took rather authoritarian means to prevent any dissent. Their way was the only way in the colony, and only church (male) members could vote. Dissenters either fled, were banished, or killed, the most famous of the latter being the four Quaker "Boston martyrs" killed from 1659 to 1661. The execution of the peaceful Quakers was the last straw for many people and after that Massachusetts slowly became more tolerant. Except for the notorious Salem witch trials of 1692, though, which resulted in the deaths of twenty people accused of witchcraft. On the plus side, given the very religious nature of its founding, they did believe that all of the (male) Puritan faithful should be allowed to vote (this is why New England is historically famous for its town hall governments, which were as democratic as it got during the time period), which was an improvement on the land ownership qualification of Virginia, but eventually property qualifications were added. Also part of their religious nature, the colonists here were dedicated to the idea of education to help the young prepare for church service; towns above a certain size had to build elementary schools, and the first college in American history, [[IvyLeague Harvard]], was founded in 1636 to train ministers. This education shows; the first book of poetry in the future United States, by Anne Bradstreet, was published in 1650. The First Great Awakening, an intense wave of religious sermons which swept the colonies in the middle of the 18th century, began in Massachusetts. Massachusetts was combined with Plymouth and made a royal colony in 1691. The colony's economy was primarily built around small farms, crafts, and fishing. Since this colony was very highly educated, some of the most intelligent of the Founding Fathers (such as UsefulNotes/JohnAdams) were from here and some of the earliest supporters of independence lived in Boston, which is why it is known as the "Cradle of Liberty." The established church in Massachusetts was the Congregational Church.

to:

* '''Massachusetts (1630)''': Whoo boy, Massachusetts Bay Colony. It was founded by Puritans who wanted to escape persecution at the hands of [[UsefulNotes/CharlesI King Charles I]]. Chartering land just a bit north of Plymouth, the nearly one thousand Puritans on the first trip founded the city of Boston. By the 1640s, over 20,000 Puritans were already settled in Massachusetts Bay Colony, and their large population growth and need for more land is why they kept trying to integrate all of the previously established colonies in the region. Led by John Winthrop, they wanted to be a "city upon the hill" of religiously faithful carrying out God's will. They took this concept ''notoriously'' seriously, to the point that they took rather authoritarian means to prevent any dissent. Their way was the only way in the colony, and only church (male) members could vote. Dissenters either fled, were banished, or killed, the most famous of the latter being the four Quaker "Boston martyrs" killed from 1659 to 1661. The execution of the peaceful Quakers was the last straw for many people and after that Massachusetts slowly became more tolerant. Except for the notorious Salem witch trials of 1692, though, which resulted in the deaths of twenty people accused of witchcraft. On the plus side, given the very religious nature of its founding, they did believe that all of the (male) Puritan faithful should be allowed to vote (this is why New England is historically famous for its town hall governments, which were as democratic as it got during the time period), which was an improvement on the land ownership qualification of Virginia, but eventually property qualifications were added. Also part of their religious nature, the colonists here were dedicated to the idea of education to help the young prepare for church service; towns above a certain size had to build elementary schools, and the first college in American history, [[IvyLeague [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Harvard]], was founded in 1636 to train ministers. This education shows; the first book of poetry in the future United States, by Anne Bradstreet, was published in 1650. The First Great Awakening, an intense wave of religious sermons which swept the colonies in the middle of the 18th century, began in Massachusetts. Massachusetts was combined with Plymouth and made a royal colony in 1691. The colony's economy was primarily built around small farms, crafts, and fishing. Since this colony was very highly educated, some of the most intelligent of the Founding Fathers (such as UsefulNotes/JohnAdams) were from here and some of the earliest supporters of independence lived in Boston, which is why it is known as the "Cradle of Liberty." The established church in Massachusetts was the Congregational Church.
27th Nov '15 5:48:15 PM nombretomado
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The period in America from around 1607-1763 where just about [[BlatantLies everyone was a Puritan Pilgrim]] and had to attend church services that were approximately 11 days long. [[DeliberatelyMonochrome Everyone wore black all the time]]; the men all carried [[{{BFG}} blunderbusses]] and wore [[NiceHat tall hats with big buckles around them]][[note]][[HatShop capotains]][[/note]], while the women all wore bonnets and square linen collars with optional [[TheScarletLetter large red A's]]. [[note]]This option was generally discouraged -- but then, everything, and everyone, was generally discouraged.[[/note]]

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The period in America from around 1607-1763 where just about [[BlatantLies everyone was a Puritan Pilgrim]] and had to attend church services that were approximately 11 days long. [[DeliberatelyMonochrome Everyone wore black all the time]]; the men all carried [[{{BFG}} blunderbusses]] and wore [[NiceHat tall hats with big buckles around them]][[note]][[HatShop capotains]][[/note]], while the women all wore bonnets and square linen collars with optional [[TheScarletLetter [[Literature/TheScarletLetter large red A's]]. [[note]]This option was generally discouraged -- but then, everything, and everyone, was generally discouraged.[[/note]]



* Many of Nathaniel Hawthorne's works, including ''TheScarletLetter'' and "Young Goodman Brown."

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* Many of Nathaniel Hawthorne's works, including ''TheScarletLetter'' ''Literature/TheScarletLetter'' and "Young Goodman Brown."
25th Oct '15 7:42:58 PM CompletelyNormalGuy
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http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/george-h-boughton-pilgrims-going-to-church.jpg
[[caption-width:350:"...most dismal wretches, who said their prayers before daylight, and then wrought in the forest or the cornfield till evening made it prayer time again."]]

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http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/george-h-boughton-pilgrims-going-to-church.jpg
[[caption-width:350:"...
jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:"...
most dismal wretches, who said their prayers before daylight, and then wrought in the forest or the cornfield till evening made it prayer time again."]]
9th Jun '15 12:18:16 AM Robotnik
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* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The first was an 1585 attempt to colonize the island of Roanoke along the coast on North Carolina, but that colony vanished under somewhat mysterious circumstances while the leaders were visiting England. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. Virginia was founded on purely capitalist and imperialist motives; namely, the belief that gold would be discovered and everyone would become wealthy, and England's worries that Spain and Portugal had too many colonies and England was falling behind in the balance of power. Things initially went really badly until John Smith, a Navy captain, whipped the settlers into shape, relations with the natives improved thanks to Pocahontas, and John Rolfe (Pocahontas' English husband) started to cultivate tobacco and economically saved the infant colony. In 1619, two very important events happened. First, Dutch ships brought black "indentured servants" and sold them to the colonists, [[StartOfDarkness the beginning of slavery in American history]]. The second, the House of Burgesses was created by the colonists, the first case of self-government in the future United States. They were made into a royal colony in 1624, having previously been governed by the Virginia Company; yes, it is troublingly prophetic that the first English settlement in the future United States was governed directly by a business. The cultivation of tobacco made Virginia the most desirable destination for colonial immigrants, and a lot of indentured servants came here hoping to strike it rich in the New World. Usually things didn't turn out this way, and at one point things go so bad that a group of disgruntled indentured servants, led by Nathaniel Bacon, had a rebellion and burned down Jamestown. Following this rebellion, wealthy landowners didn't trust indentured servants anymore and slavery really started to skyrocket. The established church in Virginia colony was the Anglican church. A lot of the most important Founding Fathers, such as UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson, UsefulNotes/JamesMadison, and Patrick Henry, were wealthy plantation owners from Virginia.

to:

* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The first was an a 1585 attempt to colonize the island of Roanoke along the coast on North Carolina, but that colony vanished under somewhat mysterious circumstances while the leaders were visiting England. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. Virginia was founded on purely capitalist and imperialist motives; namely, the belief that gold would be discovered and everyone would become wealthy, and England's worries that Spain and Portugal had too many colonies and England was falling behind in the balance of power. Things initially went really badly until John Smith, a Navy captain, whipped the settlers into shape, relations with the natives improved thanks to Pocahontas, and John Rolfe (Pocahontas' English husband) started to cultivate tobacco and economically saved the infant colony. In 1619, two very important events happened. First, Dutch ships brought black "indentured servants" and sold them to the colonists, [[StartOfDarkness the beginning of slavery in American history]]. The second, the House of Burgesses was created by the colonists, the first case of self-government in the future United States. They were made into a royal colony in 1624, having previously been governed by the Virginia Company; yes, it is troublingly prophetic that the first English settlement in the future United States was governed directly by a business. The cultivation of tobacco made Virginia the most desirable destination for colonial immigrants, and a lot of indentured servants came here hoping to strike it rich in the New World. Usually things didn't turn out this way, and at one point things go so bad that a group of disgruntled indentured servants, led by Nathaniel Bacon, had a rebellion and burned down Jamestown. Following this rebellion, wealthy landowners didn't trust indentured servants anymore and slavery really started to skyrocket. The established church in Virginia colony was the Anglican church. A lot of the most important Founding Fathers, such as UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson, UsefulNotes/JamesMadison, and Patrick Henry, were wealthy plantation owners from Virginia.
18th May '15 6:54:50 PM psychward360
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* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The first was an 1585 attempt to colonize the island of Roanoke along the coast on North Carolina, but that colony vanished under somewhat mysterious circumstances while the leaders were visiting England. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. Virginia was founded on purely capitalist and imperialist motives; namely, the belief that gold would be discovered and everyone would become wealthy, and England's worries that Spain and Portugal had too many colonies and England was falling behind in the balance of power. Things initially went really badly until John Smith, a Navy captain, whipped the settlers into shape, relations with the natives improved thanks to Pocahontas, and John Rolfe (Pocahontas' English husband) started to cultivate tobacco and economically saved the infant colony. In 1619, two very important events happened. First, Dutch ships brought black "indentured servants" and sold them to the colonists, [[StartOfDarkness the beginning of slavery in American history]]. The second, the House of Burgesses was created by the colonists, the first case of self-government in the future United States. They were made into a royal colony in 1624, having previously been governed by the Virginia Company; yes, it is troublingly prophetic that the first English settlement in the future United States was governed directly by a business. The cultivation of tobacco and, later, cotton made Virginia the most desirable destination for colonial immigrants, and a lot of indentured servants came here hoping to strike it rich in the New World. Usually things didn't turn out this way, and at one point things go so bad that a group of disgruntled indentured servants, led by Nathaniel Bacon, had a rebellion and burned down Jamestown. Following this rebellion, wealthy landowners didn't trust indentured servants anymore and slavery really started to skyrocket. The established church in Virginia colony was the Anglican church. A lot of the most important Founding Fathers, such as UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson, UsefulNotes/JamesMadison, and Patrick Henry, were wealthy plantation owners from Virginia.

to:

* '''Virginia (1607)''': The first successful English colony in the future United States. The first was an 1585 attempt to colonize the island of Roanoke along the coast on North Carolina, but that colony vanished under somewhat mysterious circumstances while the leaders were visiting England. Named by Sir Walter Raleigh in honor of [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen Elizabeth I]], famously known as the Virgin Queen. The first settlement was named Jamestown, after [[UsefulNotes/JamesTheFirst King James I]]. Virginia was founded on purely capitalist and imperialist motives; namely, the belief that gold would be discovered and everyone would become wealthy, and England's worries that Spain and Portugal had too many colonies and England was falling behind in the balance of power. Things initially went really badly until John Smith, a Navy captain, whipped the settlers into shape, relations with the natives improved thanks to Pocahontas, and John Rolfe (Pocahontas' English husband) started to cultivate tobacco and economically saved the infant colony. In 1619, two very important events happened. First, Dutch ships brought black "indentured servants" and sold them to the colonists, [[StartOfDarkness the beginning of slavery in American history]]. The second, the House of Burgesses was created by the colonists, the first case of self-government in the future United States. They were made into a royal colony in 1624, having previously been governed by the Virginia Company; yes, it is troublingly prophetic that the first English settlement in the future United States was governed directly by a business. The cultivation of tobacco and, later, cotton made Virginia the most desirable destination for colonial immigrants, and a lot of indentured servants came here hoping to strike it rich in the New World. Usually things didn't turn out this way, and at one point things go so bad that a group of disgruntled indentured servants, led by Nathaniel Bacon, had a rebellion and burned down Jamestown. Following this rebellion, wealthy landowners didn't trust indentured servants anymore and slavery really started to skyrocket. The established church in Virginia colony was the Anglican church. A lot of the most important Founding Fathers, such as UsefulNotes/GeorgeWashington, UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson, UsefulNotes/JamesMadison, and Patrick Henry, were wealthy plantation owners from Virginia.
22nd Apr '15 5:28:54 PM nombretomado
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* A few strips of ''AxisPowersHetalia'' take place during this time.

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* A few strips of ''AxisPowersHetalia'' ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' take place during this time.
10th Apr '15 7:12:02 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[DisneyAnimatedCanon Pocahontas]]''

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* ''[[DisneyAnimatedCanon Pocahontas]]''''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}''
27th Mar '15 12:49:13 AM Menshevik
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* ''Literature/TheLeatherstockingTales'', including ''Literature/TheLastOfTheMohicans''

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* Three of James Fenimore Cooper's ''Literature/TheLeatherstockingTales'', including ''Literature/TheLastOfTheMohicans''i. e. ''The Deerslayer'', ''Film/TheLastOfTheMohicans'' and ''The Pathfinder''. Of his other novels, ''The Wept of Wish-ton-Wish'' is set in 17th century New England.
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