History Main / TheCoconutEffect

7th Nov '16 6:35:33 AM hyphz
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** This happening in the criminal underworld is nothing new: it's known that the term "godfather" for the leader of the Mafia was adopted ''from'' the film TheGodfather after real life crime family members saw the film. Some even altered their usage of language to imitate the more eloquent Mafia members shown in the film.
7th Nov '16 6:34:51 AM hyphz
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** This happening in the criminal underworld is nothing new: it's known that the term "godfather" for the leader of the Mafia was adopted ''from'' the film TheGodfather after real life crime family members saw the film. Some even altered their usage of language to imitate the more eloquent Mafia members shown in the film.
6th Nov '16 8:01:40 PM Destreux
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[[caption-width-right:350:The reality tends to color people surprised.]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:The reality tends to color [[JustForPun color]] people surprised.]]
2nd Nov '16 10:56:30 AM RETheUgly
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** Talking on the phone without comfort noise usually results in a "hey, are you still there?" after nearly every sentence.

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** Talking on the phone without comfort noise usually results in a "hey, are you still there?" after nearly every sentence. This is noticeable particularly in VoIP programs with automatic voice activation, and button activation to a lesser extent. When the participants aren't speaking and the program isn't transmitting anything, the lack of any environmental noise makes it hard to tell who is present without visual cues. This is part of the reason for sound bites used to signal when a user connects or disconnects from a channel, because adding background noise might be annoying during long conversations.
13th Oct '16 5:55:51 AM Niklasedg
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* KungFoley: The 'whump' of a person getting punched in the face, or the exaggerated smack of a boxing glove. [[note]]This is one of the reasons {{slapstick}} comedy got its name: The slapstick was two sticks that, when struck together, sounded more like a "slap" than an actual slap did.[[/note]] Real-life fistfights tend to be eerily silent, which obviously wouldn't be very dramatic or exciting (and more than a little creepy.) In sword duels, there is a loud, echoing clash of metal when, in reality, swords just make a small 'tink' sound. Any "aerodynamic" missile (from arrows to throwing knives or poisoned dart) must make a distinctive "fssshhh" when traveling through the air.

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* KungFoley: The 'whump' of a person getting punched in the face, or the exaggerated smack of a boxing glove. [[note]]This is one of the reasons {{slapstick}} comedy got its name: The slapstick was two sticks that, when struck together, sounded more like a "slap" than an actual slap did.[[/note]] Real-life fistfights tend to be eerily silent, which obviously wouldn't be very dramatic or exciting (and more than a little creepy.) In sword duels, there is a loud, echoing clash of metal when, in reality, swords just make a small 'tink' sound. ) Any "aerodynamic" missile (from arrows to throwing knives or poisoned dart) must make a distinctive "fssshhh" when traveling through the air.
11th Oct '16 6:53:32 AM jamespolk
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* Also done in-universe in ''Film/SpiteMarriage'', when Trilby's theater troupe needs to simulate horse's hooves.
8th Oct '16 4:16:01 PM schoi30
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** Lions themselves are not immune to this, the roars they are often associated with being that of tigers and jaguar. The real life roars of lions actually sound more like moaning.

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** Lions themselves are not immune to this, the powerful roars they are often associated with being that those of tigers and jaguar.tigers. The real life roars of lions actually sound more like moaning.
8th Oct '16 4:11:24 PM schoi30
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Added DiffLines:

** Lions themselves are not immune to this, the roars they are often associated with being that of tigers and jaguar. The real life roars of lions actually sound more like moaning.
21st Sep '16 2:18:12 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* [[https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/File:Zenith_Space_Commander_600.jpg Early remote controls]] were mechanical and did have plastic buttons that clicked into place when you pressed them (hence the nickname "clicker"). In the earliest remotes (like the one linked), the clicking sound wasn't just a resultant of a mechanical button being moved, it's how they sent the signal to the T.V. Each button flicked a different tine, setting it resonating (like a tuning fork), and the T.V. was able to detect this sound; different tones would trigger different functions. Naturally, there isn't a lot of bandwith there, so these early remote controls did little more than adjust the volume, power, and sometimes change the channels. It was only later that televisions began to be signalled electrically, first by wired remote and later wireless (via infrared or radio-frequency).

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* [[https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/File:Zenith_Space_Commander_600.jpg Early remote controls]] were mechanical and did have plastic buttons that clicked into place when you pressed them (hence the nickname "clicker"). In the earliest remotes (like the one linked), the clicking sound wasn't just a resultant of a mechanical button being moved, it's how they sent the signal to the T.V. Each button flicked a different tine, setting it resonating (like a tuning fork), and the T.V. was able to detect this sound; different tones would trigger different functions. Naturally, there isn't a lot of bandwith bandwidth there, so these early remote controls did little more than adjust the volume, power, and sometimes change the channels.channels. Said limited bandwidth could be sometimes problematic, with random noises (such as a toy xylophone's overtones) triggering the T.V., and the ultrasonic signals could be heard by (and annoy) some a la "The Mosquito". It was only later that televisions began to be signalled electrically, first by wired remote and later wireless (via infrared or radio-frequency).
21st Sep '16 1:57:32 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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*** Even in Quebec, now. Until only 3-5 years ago margarine sold there had to be undyed -- as the powerful dairy lobby convinced the province to make margarine less appealing to consumers in order to protect a valuable industry that employed so many rural (Francophone) voters.
** The butter that margarine is trying to mimic probably also had yellow coloring added, as butter's natural color varies and depends on the cow's diet.

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*** Even Said yellow coloring has long been a point of contention for dairy farmers in Quebec, now. Until only 3-5 years ago the U.S.; starting in the 1880's, various state laws were enacted which either forced margarine manufacturers to dye their product in an unpalatable pink or levied heavy taxes against yellow margarine, all in the name of protecting the dairy industry. However, margarine companies sidestepped around the law by providing the yellow coloring separately, and bootleg yellow margarine became commonplace, which shows how effective those laws were. After World War II, the margarine lobby gained enough power to get those restrictions lifted, with Wisconsin being the last state to lift theirs in 1967.
*** Canada did one better than the U.S. by banning margarine entirely starting in 1886. After being temporarily allowed from 1917 to 1923 due to dairy shortages, the federal law was lifted in 1948[[labelnote:]](it was one of the three non-negotiable conditions for Newfoundland's union with Canada that year; the former Dominion produced margarine which was smuggled into Canada and
sold there had to be undyed -- as at half the price of butter)[[/labelnote]], but after a court ruling in 1950 allowed provinces to regulate the product, most of them started requiring that margarine be dyed bright yellow, orange or colorless depending on the province. Most of these laws were repealed by the 1980's, with Ontario lifting theirs in 1995 and Quebec in 2008. (Quebec took so long thanks to its powerful dairy lobby convinced the province to make margarine less appealing to consumers in order to protect a valuable lobby, whose industry that employed so many employs a lot of rural (Francophone) voters.
Francophone voters.)
** The butter that margarine is trying to mimic probably also had yellow coloring added, as butter's natural color varies and depends on the cow's diet. Which makes the dairy industry's opposition to yellow margarine slightly hypocritical.
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