History Main / TheBully

24th Sep '16 5:17:13 PM MagnusForce
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'': The [[BlobMonster Horrible Gelatinous Blob]]'s son Brett Blob from ''The Route of All Evil'' acts as one towards Dwight and Cubert, Hermes and the Professor's respective son and clone.



* Reggie Bullnerd on ''WesternAnimation/ChalkZone''.

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* Reggie Bullnerd on ''WesternAnimation/ChalkZone''.''WesternAnimation/ChalkZone'', a jerkish brat who often picks on Rudy and Penny.
28th Aug '16 11:58:36 PM McJeff
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* [[Wrestling/LukeHarper "The Big Rig" Brodie Lee]] in [[Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}}]]. He outweighed most wrestlers on the roster by over 100 lbs. Every time he entered the ring he made a beeline for ring announcer Gavin Loudspeaker, who had to flee for his life. He mistreated his tag partner Grizzly Redwood. And when the usual CHIKARA comedy happened, he not only refused to participate, but gleefully ruined it for everyone. For example, when a spontaneous baseball game broke out during a match and he was supposed to be at bat, he just turned around and decked the catcher with an open hand slap.

to:

* [[Wrestling/LukeHarper "The Big Rig" Brodie Lee]] in [[Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}}]].Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}}. He outweighed most wrestlers on the roster by over 100 lbs. Every time he entered the ring he made a beeline for ring announcer Gavin Loudspeaker, who had to flee for his life. He mistreated his tag partner Grizzly Redwood. And when the usual CHIKARA comedy happened, he not only refused to participate, but gleefully ruined it for everyone. For example, when a spontaneous baseball game broke out during a match and he was supposed to be at bat, he just turned around and decked the catcher with an open hand slap.
28th Aug '16 11:57:35 PM McJeff
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Added DiffLines:

* [[Wrestling/LukeHarper "The Big Rig" Brodie Lee]] in [[Wrestling/{{CHIKARA}}]]. He outweighed most wrestlers on the roster by over 100 lbs. Every time he entered the ring he made a beeline for ring announcer Gavin Loudspeaker, who had to flee for his life. He mistreated his tag partner Grizzly Redwood. And when the usual CHIKARA comedy happened, he not only refused to participate, but gleefully ruined it for everyone. For example, when a spontaneous baseball game broke out during a match and he was supposed to be at bat, he just turned around and decked the catcher with an open hand slap.
21st Aug '16 9:34:27 PM BatmanKalEl
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It should be noted that a lot of social stereotypes that are not necessarily true in RealLife are commonly associated with fictional bullies: the bully, as a stock evildoer, is typically a DirtyCoward in the face of real danger, always dumb, and comes from an [[FreudianExcuse unhappy and problem ridden family background]]. (Real life will tell you that, in many cases, the opposite of these is true.) Also, in real life, [[SchoolBullyingIsHarmless school bullying is not a]] RiteOfPassage. Lastly, while many movies and television shows portray bullies [[BarbaricBully as being enormous in size and physical strength]] (probably so that we feel more sympathy for their victims), bullies in real life come in all shapes and sizes. So the giant football player who sits to your left in homeroom probably isn't much more likely to be a bully than the scrawny kid that sits to your right.
Often, bullies in movies will do things like steal lunch money even though that is rare in RealLife -outright mugging a kid is a step too far for most places. This is because "stealing lunch money" (and other similar crimes), from a writing standpoint, is perfect.

A: It's fast. A two and a half seconds of screentime for a kid to say "Gimme your lunch money or else" and bang, we instantly know a ton about this character. He's mean, rough, not afraid to be violent to get what he wants, and has questionable morals. Plus, there's the two simple words: "lunch money". It's money for lunch. Even if it's not how their school works, pretty much all kids understand that you can exchange money for food, and without it this kid doesn't eat today.

B: From a filming standpoint, it's extremely practical. Let's say your bully steals a Nerd's lunch instead. A tray is actually kind of an awkward instrument. What if during the shot, the bullied kid drops the tray on accident? Or if when he's stealing the tray, the bully drops it on accident? If we used real food, there's a risk of ruining the prop, and either way between each shot the crew would have to clean up and rearrange. Say the actors need to do twenty takes of this shot: the kid might get tired from holding the tray, or he'll start slouching instead of standing upright... lots of things could go wrong. Money on the other hand? Perfect. No one's going to get tired from holding a couple of bills, the handoff is simple, you drop em who cares, pick it up and let's run it again.

C: It's non-violent, while still being thuggish. Mostly ties back into the first point, but it shows the bully is a thug-type, while not necessitating any actual violence, which some Networks would probably prefer to not display.
It's an elegant solution to building a character for children's entertainment.


Strangely, many depictions of slacker bullies will show them as being actively involved in their school's extracurricular activities - they'll play sports, attend dances (and usually cause trouble at them), act in the school play, etc. Even though logic would suggest that, if they hate going to school and doing schoolwork, they also would want nothing to do with school activities.

to:

It should be noted that a lot of social stereotypes that are not necessarily true in RealLife are commonly associated with fictional bullies: the bully, as a stock evildoer, is typically a DirtyCoward in the face of real danger, always dumb, and comes from an [[FreudianExcuse unhappy and problem ridden family background]]. (Real life will tell you that, in many cases, the opposite of these is true.) Also, in real life, [[SchoolBullyingIsHarmless school bullying is not a]] RiteOfPassage. Lastly, while many movies and television shows portray bullies [[BarbaricBully as being enormous in size and physical strength]] (probably so that we feel more sympathy for their victims), bullies in real life come in all shapes and sizes. So the giant football player who sits to your left in homeroom probably isn't much more likely to be a bully than the scrawny kid that sits to your right.
Often, bullies in movies will do things like steal lunch money even though that is rare in RealLife -outright mugging a kid is a step too far for most places. This is because "stealing lunch money" (and other similar crimes), from a writing standpoint, is perfect.

A: It's fast. A two and a half seconds of screentime for a kid to say "Gimme your lunch money or else" and bang, we instantly know a ton about this character. He's mean, rough, not afraid to be violent to get what he wants, and has questionable morals. Plus, there's the two simple words: "lunch money". It's money for lunch. Even if it's not how their school works, pretty much all kids understand that you can exchange money for food, and without it this kid doesn't eat today.

B: From a filming standpoint, it's extremely practical. Let's say your bully steals a Nerd's lunch instead. A tray is actually kind of an awkward instrument. What if during the shot, the bullied kid drops the tray on accident? Or if when he's stealing the tray, the bully drops it on accident? If we used real food, there's a risk of ruining the prop, and either way between each shot the crew would have to clean up and rearrange. Say the actors need to do twenty takes of this shot: the kid might get tired from holding the tray, or he'll start slouching instead of standing upright... lots of things could go wrong. Money on the other hand? Perfect. No one's going to get tired from holding a couple of bills, the handoff is simple, you drop em who cares, pick it up and let's run it again.

C: It's non-violent, while still being thuggish. Mostly ties back into the first point, but it shows the bully is a thug-type, while not necessitating any actual violence, which some Networks would probably prefer to not display.
It's an elegant solution to building a character for children's entertainment.


Strangely, many depictions of slacker bullies will show them as being actively involved in their school's extracurricular activities - they'll play sports, attend dances (and usually cause trouble at them), act in the school play, etc. Even though logic would suggest that, if they hate going to school and doing schoolwork, they also would want nothing to do with school activities.
----
2nd Aug '16 10:06:56 AM Willbyr
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* Being a deconstruction of the FightingSeries, MutekiKanbanMusume offers a deconstruction of TheBully by Miki and Megumiís relationship:

to:

* Being a deconstruction of the FightingSeries, MutekiKanbanMusume ''Manga/MutekiKanbanMusume'' offers a deconstruction of TheBully by Miki and Megumiís relationship:
19th Jul '16 2:23:52 PM kaixokkiten
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Often, bullies in movies will do things like steal lunch money even though that is rare in RealLife, outright mugging a kid is a step too far for most places. This is because "stealing lunch money" (and other similar crimes), from a writing standpoint, is perfect.

to:

Often, bullies in movies will do things like steal lunch money even though that is rare in RealLife, outright RealLife -outright mugging a kid is a step too far for most places. This is because "stealing lunch money" (and other similar crimes), from a writing standpoint, is perfect.
17th Jul '16 7:44:50 PM GranChi
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It should be noted that a lot of social stereotypes that are not necessarily true in RealLife are commonly associated with fictional bullies: the bully, as a stock evildoer, is typically a DirtyCoward in the face of real danger, always dumb, and comes from an [[FreudianExcuse unhappy and problem ridden family background]]. (Real life will tell you that, in many cases, the opposite of these is true.) Also, in real life, [[SchoolBullyingIsHarmless school bullying is not a]] RiteOfPassage. Lastly, while many movies and television shows portray bullies [[BarbaricBully as being enormous in size and physical strength]] (probably so that we feel more sympathy for their victims), bullies in real life come in all shapes and sizes. So the giant football player who sits to your left in homeroom probably isn't much more likely to be a bully than the scrawny nerd that sits to your right.

to:

It should be noted that a lot of social stereotypes that are not necessarily true in RealLife are commonly associated with fictional bullies: the bully, as a stock evildoer, is typically a DirtyCoward in the face of real danger, always dumb, and comes from an [[FreudianExcuse unhappy and problem ridden family background]]. (Real life will tell you that, in many cases, the opposite of these is true.) Also, in real life, [[SchoolBullyingIsHarmless school bullying is not a]] RiteOfPassage. Lastly, while many movies and television shows portray bullies [[BarbaricBully as being enormous in size and physical strength]] (probably so that we feel more sympathy for their victims), bullies in real life come in all shapes and sizes. So the giant football player who sits to your left in homeroom probably isn't much more likely to be a bully than the scrawny nerd kid that sits to your right.
17th Jul '16 12:57:22 AM kaixokkiten
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to:

Often, bullies in movies will do things like steal lunch money even though that is rare in RealLife, outright mugging a kid is a step too far for most places. This is because "stealing lunch money" (and other similar crimes), from a writing standpoint, is perfect.

A: It's fast. A two and a half seconds of screentime for a kid to say "Gimme your lunch money or else" and bang, we instantly know a ton about this character. He's mean, rough, not afraid to be violent to get what he wants, and has questionable morals. Plus, there's the two simple words: "lunch money". It's money for lunch. Even if it's not how their school works, pretty much all kids understand that you can exchange money for food, and without it this kid doesn't eat today.

B: From a filming standpoint, it's extremely practical. Let's say your bully steals a Nerd's lunch instead. A tray is actually kind of an awkward instrument. What if during the shot, the bullied kid drops the tray on accident? Or if when he's stealing the tray, the bully drops it on accident? If we used real food, there's a risk of ruining the prop, and either way between each shot the crew would have to clean up and rearrange. Say the actors need to do twenty takes of this shot: the kid might get tired from holding the tray, or he'll start slouching instead of standing upright... lots of things could go wrong. Money on the other hand? Perfect. No one's going to get tired from holding a couple of bills, the handoff is simple, you drop em who cares, pick it up and let's run it again.

C: It's non-violent, while still being thuggish. Mostly ties back into the first point, but it shows the bully is a thug-type, while not necessitating any actual violence, which some Networks would probably prefer to not display.
It's an elegant solution to building a character for children's entertainment.

30th Jun '16 6:23:04 AM Morgenthaler
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* RedheadedBully
30th May '16 7:34:50 PM M84
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** Gregor Clegane was a vicious bully even as a child, burning and nearly killing his younger brother Sandor for playing with a toy Gregor had already discarded. He got even worse as he grew up, becoming one of the aforementioned "thugs with a sword and a massive sense of entitlement". It really doesn't help that he's always angry due to chronic migraines and is always looking for someone to lash out against. He's also the WorldsStrongestMan and leads a posse of other vicious bullies. Like a lot of bullies, his favorite targets are people who can't possibly put up a real fight against him, such as unarmed women and children -- pillaging the smallfolk is a ''hobby'' of his. Fighting against people who can actually challenge and ''hurt'' him on the other hand makes him upset and causes him to lose what little self control he still has, much like a SpoiledBrat whining when things don't go his way.

to:

** Gregor Clegane was a vicious bully even as a child, burning and nearly killing his younger brother Sandor for playing with a toy Gregor had already discarded. He got even worse as he grew up, becoming one of the aforementioned "thugs with a sword and a massive sense of entitlement". It really doesn't help that he's always angry due to chronic migraines and is always looking for someone to lash out against. He's also the WorldsStrongestMan and leads a posse of other vicious bullies. Like a lot of bullies, his favorite targets are people who can't possibly put up a real fight against him, such as unarmed women and children -- pillaging the smallfolk is a ''hobby'' of his. Fighting against people who can actually challenge and ''hurt'' him on the other hand makes him upset and [[VillainousBreakdown causes him to lose what little self control he still has, has]], much like a SpoiledBrat whining when things don't go his way.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TheBully