History Main / TheBigListOfBooboosAndBlunders

8th Jan '17 1:09:21 AM morane
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* "executor" vs "executioner". The former puts in effect legal statutes such as person's last will: the latter carries out the capital punishments.
7th Jan '17 3:50:01 PM nombretomado
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** Either that or a group of crows. Crows are one of many animals that have a special name for their flock or herd - a murder of crows, a [[NotTheNineOClockNews flange of baboons]], a [[Literature/TheStarOfTheGuardians flock of priests]], etc.

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** Either that or a group of crows. Crows are one of many animals that have a special name for their flock or herd - a murder of crows, a [[NotTheNineOClockNews [[Series/NotTheNineOClockNews flange of baboons]], a [[Literature/TheStarOfTheGuardians flock of priests]], etc.
5th Jan '17 10:05:14 AM esq263
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* Also, the appropriate usages of "Muslim" and "Islam". Islam is the religion; Muslims are people who follow the religion. As a rule, the term "Islamic" refers to ''things'' that pertain to Islam, while "Muslim" is used when referring to people. Therefore, one refers to Islamic law, Islamic doctrine, Islamic republics, Islamic dress, but to Muslim men and women, Muslim families, Muslim bakers, Muslim doctors, etc.
1st Jan '17 10:41:23 PM morane
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* "aesthetic" (having to do with the fine arts or appreciation of same) vs. "ascetic" (following a strict discipline of self-control and denying oneself excess and luxuries). The classic instance of this error showed up in an early ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' rulebook in the description of the Monk character class. "Acetic" (related to vinegar) is also used for either of the above. Even more confusing if you're talking about an AsceticAesthetic.

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* "aesthetic" (having to do with the fine arts or appreciation of same) vs. "ascetic" (following a strict discipline of self-control and denying oneself excess and luxuries). The classic instance of this error showed up in an early ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' rulebook in the description of the Monk character class. While monks certainly do have fine appreciation on beauty, they are more known of their unworldly lifestyle. "Acetic" (related to vinegar) is also used for either of the above. Even more confusing if you're talking about an AsceticAesthetic.
31st Dec '16 11:06:28 AM GothicProphet
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* "hypocritical" (to object to others doing something you yourself do) vs. "hypocratical" (not a word, but could possibly be a mangled form of "Hippocratic", i.e. the oath doctors take).
** HypocriticalHumour is hypocrisy-related comedy. Hippocratical humour, if it meant anything, would be jokes related to the medical profession.



* "i.e." does not mean "in example" (which ''should'' be obvious, as that isn't even a phrase; the English is "for example"). It is short for Latin ''id est'', translated as "that is." This is used for clarification of a previous phrasing, i.e. to restate something in terms easier to understand. What you are looking for is "e.g." (''exempli gratia'').

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* "i.e." does not mean "in example" (which ''should'' be obvious, as that isn't even a phrase; the English is "for example"). It is short for Latin ''id est'', translated as "that is." is". This is used for clarification of a previous phrasing, i.e. to restate something in terms easier to understand. What you are looking for is "e.g." (''exempli gratia'').
30th Dec '16 5:13:04 PM Bootlebat
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* "epithet" (a nickname or descriptive term, usually with negative connotations). vs "epitaph" (writing on a tombstone)
29th Dec '16 5:33:51 AM morane
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* "Filter" is a device containing material for sieving out impurities, especially one used to extract impurities from air or water. A "philter" is a magic potion, especially a love potion.
29th Dec '16 5:20:47 AM morane
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** There was here an example of a sports writer who used "marquis" when apparently intending "marquee" - but he used it as an adjective implying a team was especially notable, i.e. (probably) "worthy of being billed on a marquee". It's not clear whether this adjectival form is grammatically correct.

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** There was here an example of a sports writer who used "marquis" when apparently intending "marquee" - but he used it as an adjective implying a team was especially notable, i.e. (probably) "worthy of being billed on a marquee". It's not clear whether this adjectival form is grammatically correct. "Marque" with a single 'e' is a designation.
29th Dec '16 5:14:42 AM morane
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* "Moray" (a type of eel) vs. "more" (pronounced "mor-ay"; the customs and traditions of a certain society). Eels aren't noted for their traditions, so if you see someone talking about a society's "morays" (and it's not a society where fishing is common), they probably mean the latter.

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* "Moray" (a type of eel) vs. "more" (pronounced "mor-ay"; the customs and traditions of a certain society). Eels aren't noted for their traditions, so if you see someone talking about a society's "morays" (and it's not a society where fishing is common), they probably mean the latter. "Moraine" is a kind of till.
28th Dec '16 10:59:29 PM Trying2CIt
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** If you're not sure you're using these two correctly, replace "implied" with "hinted" and "inferred" with "gathered" and see if the sentence still makes sense.

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** If you're not sure you're using these two correctly, replace "implied" with "hinted" and "inferred" with "gathered" and see if whether the sentence still makes sense.



** An easy way to tell if you want "into" or "in to": pause between "in" and "to". If it sounds right, use "in to". If not, use "into".

to:

** An easy way to tell if whether you want "into" or "in to": pause between "in" and "to". If it sounds right, use "in to". If not, use "into".



* "{{Mahjong}}" for "VideoGame/{{Shanghai}}". Let's get our terms straight; Mahjong is a 19th-century Chinese game for four players, Shanghai is a tile-matching videogame (played with Mahjong tiles, but there the resemblance ends). This can be very frustrating for those seeking to buy a Mahjong game online, as nearly all so-called "Mahjong" games are actually Shanghai, and the error isn't always apparent from the description. (If buying a boxed game from a store, the box usually has one or more screenshots, and the nature of the game is evident from those.)

to:

* "{{Mahjong}}" for "VideoGame/{{Shanghai}}". Let's get our terms straight; Mahjong is a 19th-century Chinese game for four players, Shanghai is a tile-matching videogame (played with Mahjong tiles, but there the resemblance ends). This can be very frustrating for those seeking to buy a Mahjong game online, as nearly all so-called "Mahjong" games are actually Shanghai, and the error isn't always apparent from the description. (If buying a boxed game is bought from a store, the box usually has one or more screenshots, and the nature of the game is evident from those.)



** There was here an example of a sports writer who used "marquis" when apparently intending "marquee" - but he used it as an adjective implying a team was especially notable, i.e. (probably) "worthy of being billed on a marquee". It's not clear if this adjectival form is grammatically correct.

to:

** There was here an example of a sports writer who used "marquis" when apparently intending "marquee" - but he used it as an adjective implying a team was especially notable, i.e. (probably) "worthy of being billed on a marquee". It's not clear if whether this adjectival form is grammatically correct.



* "Murder" when what is meant is "murderer." If you are a "murder," you're most likely the ''victim'' (i.e., a corpse) and not the one who did the killing.

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* "Murder" when what is meant is "murderer." If you are a "murder," so-called "murder" (the appropriate term is "murderee") you're most likely the ''victim'' (i.e., a corpse) and not the one who did the killing.



* "murderess" (obsolete feminine equivalent of "murderer") vs. "murderous" (homicidal). A murderess is murderous, but that's still no reason to mix these two up.

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* "murderess" (obsolete (somewhat uncommon feminine equivalent of "murderer") vs. "murderous" (homicidal). A murderess is murderous, but that's still no reason to mix these two up.



* "Naturist" and "Naturalist" are two diferent things. The latter studies things in a natural state, the former likes ''being'' in a natural (i.e. unclothed, i.e. ''naked'') state.

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* "Naturist" and "Naturalist" are two diferent different things. The latter studies things in a natural state, the former likes ''being'' in a natural (i.e. unclothed, i.e. ''naked'') state.



* "octopi" would be the plural of octopus if octopus was derived from Latin, however, octopus is a Greek word. The correct plural is generally "octopuses", or "octopodes" if you want to be really pedantic.

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* "octopi" would be the plural of octopus if octopus was were derived from Latin, however, octopus is a Greek word. The correct plural is generally "octopuses", or "octopodes" if you want to be really pedantic.
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