History Main / ThatOneRule

11th Feb '16 3:20:46 PM JudasZala
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* Most such rules are either buried in the rulebook until a controversy uncovers it (like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule the Tuck rule]]), or through subjective over-enforcement ("Defenseless Player" rulings). ** The Calvin Johnson rule, which states a ball cannot be considered a catch if the receiver loses control of the ball going to the ground. It's one situation where IfItLooksLikeADuck does not apply. Before the Calvin Johnson Rule, there was the Bert Emanuel Rule, which was passed back in 2000.
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* Most such rules are either buried in the rulebook until a controversy uncovers it (like (e.g., [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule the Tuck rule]]), rule]], the "ineligible receiver" rule), or through subjective over-enforcement ("Defenseless (e.g., "Defenseless Player" rulings). ** The Calvin Johnson rule, which states a ball cannot be considered a catch if the receiver loses control of the ball going to the ground. It's one situation where IfItLooksLikeADuck does not apply. Since the 2014-2015 playoffs, it became unclear among the general public on what a catch is, which led to fans saying, "What is a catch?" *** Before the Calvin Johnson Rule, there was the Bert Emanuel Rule, which was passed back in 2000. Rule.
11th Feb '16 3:13:20 PM JudasZala
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* Most such rules are either buried in the rulebook until a controversy uncovers it (like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule the Tuck rule]]), or through subjective over-enforcement ("Defenseless Player" rulings or [[http://articles.boston.com/2009-03-24/sports/29263608_1_brady-rule-chiefs-safety-bernard-pollard-knee "Brady Rule" calls]]). The latter was [[CommonKnowledge wrongly attributed]] to Tom Brady; it's actually called the "Carson Palmer Rule", which was passed at the start of the 2006 NFL Season. ** The Calvin Johnson rule, which states a ball cannot be considered a catch if the receiver loses control of the ball going to the ground. It's one situation where IfItLooksLikeADuck does not apply.
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* Most such rules are either buried in the rulebook until a controversy uncovers it (like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuck_rule the Tuck rule]]), or through subjective over-enforcement ("Defenseless Player" rulings or [[http://articles.boston.com/2009-03-24/sports/29263608_1_brady-rule-chiefs-safety-bernard-pollard-knee "Brady Rule" calls]]). The latter was [[CommonKnowledge wrongly attributed]] to Tom Brady; it's actually called the "Carson Palmer Rule", which was passed at the start of the 2006 NFL Season. rulings). ** The Calvin Johnson rule, which states a ball cannot be considered a catch if the receiver loses control of the ball going to the ground. It's one situation where IfItLooksLikeADuck does not apply. \n Before the Calvin Johnson Rule, there was the Bert Emanuel Rule, which was passed back in 2000.
6th Feb '16 11:16:46 AM nombretomado
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!! AustralianRulesFootball
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!! AustralianRulesFootballUsefulNotes/AustralianRulesFootball
18th Dec '15 10:02:12 PM nombretomado
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** In SFDebris' review of the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Persistence of Vision", a vision of his disapproving father asks Tom Paris several difficult trivia questions, which Tom successfully answers, until he asks him to explain the Leg Before Wicket rule, which Tom fails to do, causing the vision to dismiss him as useless.
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** In SFDebris' WebSite/SFDebris' review of the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Persistence of Vision", a vision of his disapproving father asks Tom Paris several difficult trivia questions, which Tom successfully answers, until he asks him to explain the Leg Before Wicket rule, which Tom fails to do, causing the vision to dismiss him as useless.
15th Nov '15 12:03:05 PM nombretomado
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** An important note: ''majority'' does not mean ''50 percent or more of the total popular vote.'' UsefulNotes/BarackObama and RonaldReagan are the last two presidents to win two terms with a popular vote total above 50 percent in both elections. Even if the electoral college and popular vote are in harmony, expect quite a bit of discussion over what constitutes a "mandate." Since an enormous number of ballots of haven't even been counted by the time the election winner is announced, the percentages announced on election night are often wrong. Moreover, you don't actually need to wait for a recount unless a state is decisive (Missouri held a recount in 2008, though it received little attention, as Barack Obama had won far more than the necessary 270 votes). And now that America has adjusted, somewhat, to the electoral college -- the 2000, 2004, and 2012 elections were a prolonged lecture on the topic -- there's considerable debate over the need for an ObviousRulePatch. Electoral college votes go to the winner of the state, but selecting electors by ''county,'' as Ohio's Secretary of State suggested, would have given the majority of Ohio's votes to Mitt Romney, despite the fact that President Obama received more than 50 percent of the total vote share. And then some partisans simply hate the electoral college for failing to return their desired result, even when doing away with it would not benefit their party. Eventually, any debate will devolve into a modern remix of the initial federalist vs. anti-federalist debates.
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** An important note: ''majority'' does not mean ''50 percent or more of the total popular vote.'' UsefulNotes/BarackObama and RonaldReagan UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan are the last two presidents to win two terms with a popular vote total above 50 percent in both elections. Even if the electoral college and popular vote are in harmony, expect quite a bit of discussion over what constitutes a "mandate." Since an enormous number of ballots of haven't even been counted by the time the election winner is announced, the percentages announced on election night are often wrong. Moreover, you don't actually need to wait for a recount unless a state is decisive (Missouri held a recount in 2008, though it received little attention, as Barack Obama had won far more than the necessary 270 votes). And now that America has adjusted, somewhat, to the electoral college -- the 2000, 2004, and 2012 elections were a prolonged lecture on the topic -- there's considerable debate over the need for an ObviousRulePatch. Electoral college votes go to the winner of the state, but selecting electors by ''county,'' as Ohio's Secretary of State suggested, would have given the majority of Ohio's votes to Mitt Romney, despite the fact that President Obama received more than 50 percent of the total vote share. And then some partisans simply hate the electoral college for failing to return their desired result, even when doing away with it would not benefit their party. Eventually, any debate will devolve into a modern remix of the initial federalist vs. anti-federalist debates.
11th Nov '15 10:25:12 PM boozledorf
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adding a real world example not related to politics or games
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[[folder:Other]] * In Euclid's Elements, after describing his definitions for the basis of Geometry, he describes five Postulates, fundamental truths about the nature of the geometry he was trying to describe. They are things that you can do or things that are true no matter what. They are 1. To draw a straight line from any point to any point [[note]]You can draw a straight line between any two points[[/note]]. 2. To produce a finite straight line continuously in a straight line [[note]]you can extend a straight line in a straight line. This, and Postulate 1, describe how to use an unmarked straightedge[[/note]]. 3. To describe a circle with any center and radius. [[note]]You can draw a circle using a compass[[/note]] 4. That all right angles equal one another [[note]]Right angles, which are when a line is split so that the two formed angles are equal, are always equal to other right angles formed on other lines[[/note]]. 5. That, if a straight line falling on two straight lines makes the interior angles on the same side less than two right angles, the two straight lines, if produced indefinitely, meet on that side on which are the angles less than the two right angles. Called the Parallel Postulate, it says that if two lines intersect a third and make less than 180 (two "right angles") on one side, then the two lines will, if extended, eventually intersect on that side, to form a triangle. Euclid, and other mathematicians, tried for several thousand years to prove the Parallel postulate from the first four and their consequences, but eventually it was shown that there are geometries where the first four are true, but the fifth is not. [[/folder]]
30th Oct '15 12:50:11 AM KYCubbie
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There are more complications to soccer's onside rule.
!! [[TheBeautifulGame Association football (soccer)]]
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!! [[TheBeautifulGame [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball Association football (soccer)]]

!! [[TheBeautifulGame Association football (soccer)]]** Actually, there are a few more complications: *** If you were behind the ball when it was passed to you, you're onside regardless of where any defender was. *** The same is true if you were in your own half of the field when it was passed to you. *** A more common complication is that every offensive player is onside during a corner kick, goal kick, or throw-in until the ball is first touched by a player.

** Is most ludicrous when compared with the numerous sports that use a "zone" system for offside rules which have nice thick lines on the playing surface and linesmen with the sole job to observe when and how the line is crossed.
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** Is It's most ludicrous when compared with the numerous sports that use a "zone" system for offside rules which have nice thick lines on the playing surface and linesmen with the sole job to observe when and how the line is crossed.

** A batsman is out if he is hit by a legal delivery, which is not pitched outside the line of leg-stump, has not hit the bat and is going on to hit the stumps. If it strikes the batsman outside the line of off-stump he is not-out PROVIDED he was playing a shot at the time. Recent use of infa-red and computerised video replays to follow the line and trajectory of the ball has made it much easier for spectators to see if the decision is in fact out.
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** A batsman is out if he is hit by a legal delivery, which is not pitched outside the line of leg-stump, has not hit the bat and is going on to hit the stumps. If it strikes the batsman outside the line of off-stump he is not-out PROVIDED he was playing a shot at the time. Recent use of infa-red infrared and computerised video replays to follow the line and trajectory of the ball has made it much easier for spectators to see if the decision is in fact out.

* The "loser point" (also known as the "[[ButtMonkey Bettman]] point" - the two words are [[HateSink largely interchangeable in NHL fan circles]]), where teams that make it to overtime and lose still get a point in the standings, is widely hated by NHL fans, as it slows down close games in the third period (when teams will play defensive hockey to try and bank the point rather than risk going home emptyhanded), makes some games worth more than others, demonstrably makes the playoff races worse, and overall makes a mockery of the standings from a statistical point of view. Moreover, a key technical reason for the loser point was so that players would push for a win in overtime instead of playing defensively for a tie, but in 2005, shootouts were introduced, making ties impossible. Unfortunately, NHL executives love it, because it makes the playoff races ''look'' more exciting, so it's unlikely it's going anywhere any time soon.
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* The "loser point" (also known as the "[[ButtMonkey Bettman]] point" - the two words are [[HateSink largely interchangeable in NHL fan circles]]), where teams that make it to overtime and lose still get a point in the standings, is widely hated by NHL fans, as it slows down close games in the third period (when teams will play defensive hockey to try and bank the point rather than risk going home emptyhanded), empty-handed), makes some games worth more than others, demonstrably makes the playoff races worse, and overall makes a mockery of the standings from a statistical point of view. Moreover, a key technical reason for the loser point was so that players would push for a win in overtime instead of playing defensively for a tie, but in 2005, shootouts were introduced, making ties impossible. Unfortunately, NHL executives love it, because it makes the playoff races ''look'' more exciting, so it's unlikely it's going anywhere any time soon.
22nd Oct '15 1:21:50 PM case
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Added DiffLines:
** Trade - Technically, things like immunity from rent or selling buildings (on the trading partner's turn so they can buy the buildings you put back into stock) are not part of the game. They can be promised, but the promise isn't actually a part of the game. Money cannot be loaned to another player, but AintNoRule that says it can't be gifted.
22nd Oct '15 1:08:07 PM case
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** The mortgage interest rules seem simple enough. Mortgage a property, get cash from bank, can't collect rent. Pay 110% cash back to bank, collect rent again. But transferring a mortgaged property requires the recipient to pay that extra 10% immediately, whether they pay back the entire mortgage or not. (And if they don't, they have to pay it again later when they do.) The most common reason for mortgaging property is a lack of cash, a lack of cash causes players to go bankrupt, bankrupt players give all their possessions to their creditor... you can see where this is going. (In especially unusual cases, this could cause TakingYouWithMe between a pair of weak players.)
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** The mortgage interest rules seem simple enough. Mortgage a property, get cash from bank, can't collect rent. Pay 110% cash back to bank, collect rent again. But transferring a mortgaged property requires the recipient to pay that extra 10% immediately, whether they pay back the entire mortgage or not. (And if they don't, they have to pay it again later when they do.) The most common reason for mortgaging property is a lack of cash, a lack of cash causes players to go bankrupt, bankrupt players give all their possessions to their creditor... you can see where this is going. (In especially unusual cases, this could cause TakingYouWithMe between a pair of weak players.)[[note]]Player A lands on Player B's property, the cost of the rent causes Player A to be eliminated by Player B, Player B receives Player A's mortgaged properties, the bank charges 10% on them, Player B cannot afford the charges and is eliminated by the bank[[/note]])
22nd Oct '15 12:29:37 PM case
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* The NBA once had a technical foul for "illegal defense". Zone defenses were disallowed, since it allowed centers to simply camp under the basket. After a few years without this rule, they decided to make a rule that disallowed defensive players to be in the key (the painted area directly underneath and in front of the basket) for more than 3 seconds... which matched up nicely with the same rule for offensive players.
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* The NBA once had a technical foul for "illegal defense". Zone defenses were disallowed, since it allowed centers to simply camp under the basket. After a few years without this rule, they decided to make a rule that disallowed defensive players to be in the key (the painted area directly underneath and in front of the basket) for more than 3 seconds... [[ThePennyFarthingEffect which matched up nicely with the same rule for offensive players. players]].
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