History Main / ThatOneRule

11th Jun '16 10:31:47 AM gophergiggles
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* ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos'' had the Turn Timer. As you class up in the game (meaning you could hold more cards in your hand) a timer was introduced where if you didn't complete your turn in time, you'd forfeit it. It starts at 30 seconds but by end game you have only ''seven seconds'' to look at your cards and decide on a move. Unsurprisingly this was replaced with a better system in the sequel.
7th May '16 11:20:47 AM CorporalPie
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** Another caveat of this system which seldom comes into play, but is similarly poorly understood, is that the leader need not come from the party with the most seats in Parliament/the Legislature. This was most recently displayed in 2008, when the federal Conservative Party held the most seats in parliament, but not an outright majority. The Conservative Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, was nearly forced out of his job when the opposition parties - representing a majority of the seats in parliament - agreed to form a coalition government, supporting the Liberal leader for the Prime Ministerial post. Since the majority of parliament would have expressed confidence in the Liberal Leader over the Conservative one, this was technically legal, and the coalition members represented a majority of Canadians, giving it democratic mandate--at the end of the day, more Canadians had voted for the Liberals, NDP, and BQ together than had voted for the Conservatives (and considering the typical leanings of NDP and BQ voters, would probably prefer to have a generic Liberal PM over a generic Tory one if they had to pick between the two, although the personalities ''actually'' involved complicate matters considerably). However, the attempt to seize government generated significant protest from the electorate and ultimately the coalition collapsed before the vote could be held.

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** Another caveat of this system which seldom comes into play, but is similarly poorly understood, is that the leader need not come from the party with the most seats in Parliament/the Legislature. This was most recently displayed in 2008, when the federal Conservative Party held the most seats in parliament, but not an outright majority. The Conservative Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, was nearly forced out of his job when the opposition parties - representing a majority of the seats in parliament - agreed to form a coalition government, supporting the Liberal leader for the Prime Ministerial post. Since the majority of parliament would have expressed confidence in the Liberal Leader over the Conservative one, this was technically legal, and the coalition members represented a majority of Canadians, giving it democratic mandate--at the end of the day, more Canadians had voted for the Liberals, NDP, and BQ together than had voted for the Conservatives (and considering the typical leanings of NDP and BQ voters, would probably prefer to have a generic Liberal PM over a generic Tory one if they had to pick between the two, although the personalities ''actually'' involved complicate matters considerably). However, the attempt to seize government generated significant protest from the electorate and ultimately the coalition collapsed before the vote could be held. The furor over this was a significant factor in Conservative Stephen Harper's gaining a majority in the next election despite his lack of personal popularity.
1st May '16 5:51:22 PM louisXVI
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** The Governor General of Canada has the sole authority to inaugurate a prime minister yet decision-making role the governor general can or should play in arbitrating situations where the prime ministership is contested is vague, unwritten, and lacks much helpful precedent. In ordinary times, the governor general is supposed to be an obedient rubber-stamp and always obey the prime minister, but in situations where the prime minister's hold on power is being contested, such as in the coalition situation described above, it's hardly clear what he or she should do, and can actually create a sort of paradox. Since there is always an incumbent PM, and the incumbent PM was always installed through some sort of democratic process, it will always be possible for an incumbent PM to argue it would be a violation of Canada's democratic norms for the governor general to disobey him, and install a different prime minister even when the would-be alternate prime minister has a persuasive alternative argument regarding why the incumbent PM should be fired. Things get even more complicated when we consider the incumbent PM technically has the power to fire the governor general, a structural flaw some have described as "mutually assured dismissal." Technically the Queen could overrule the governor general ''and'' prime minister, but then we'd be in an entirely different can of worms.

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** The Governor General of Canada has the sole authority to inaugurate a prime minister yet the decision-making role the governor general can or should play in arbitrating situations where the prime ministership is contested is vague, unwritten, and lacks much helpful precedent. In ordinary times, the governor general is supposed to be an obedient rubber-stamp and always obey the prime minister, but in situations where the prime minister's hold on power is being contested, such as in the coalition situation described above, it's hardly clear what he or she should do, and can actually create a sort of paradox. Since there is always an incumbent PM, and the incumbent PM was always installed through some sort of democratic process, it will always be possible for an incumbent PM to argue it would be a violation of Canada's democratic norms for the governor general to disobey him, and install a different prime minister even when the would-be alternate prime minister has a persuasive alternative argument regarding why the incumbent PM should be fired. Things get even more complicated when we consider the incumbent PM technically has the power to fire the governor general, a structural flaw some have described as "mutually assured dismissal." Technically the Queen could overrule the governor general ''and'' prime minister, but then we'd be in an entirely different can of worms.
1st May '16 5:50:52 PM louisXVI
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** Since the Governor General of Canada has the sole authority to inaugurate a prime minister, the decision-making role the governor general can or should play in arbitrating situations where the prime ministership is contested is vague, unwritten, and lacks much helpful precedent. In ordinary times, the governor general is supposed to be an obedient rubber-stamp and always obey the prime minister, but in situations where the prime minister's hold on power is being contested, such as in the coalition situation described above, it's hardly clear what he or she should do, and can actually create a sort of paradox. Since there is always an incumbent PM, and the incumbent PM was always installed through some sort of democratic process, it will always be possible for an incumbent PM to argue it would be a violation of Canada's democratic norms for the governor general to disobey him, and install a different prime minister even when the would-be alternate prime minister has a persuasive alternative argument regarding why the incumbent PM should be fired. Things get even more complicated when we consider the incumbent PM technically has the power to fire the governor general, a structural flaw the Australians have described as "mutually assured dismissal." Technically the Queen could overrule the governor general ''and'' prime minister, but then we'd be in an entirely different can of worms.

to:

** Since the The Governor General of Canada has the sole authority to inaugurate a prime minister, the minister yet decision-making role the governor general can or should play in arbitrating situations where the prime ministership is contested is vague, unwritten, and lacks much helpful precedent. In ordinary times, the governor general is supposed to be an obedient rubber-stamp and always obey the prime minister, but in situations where the prime minister's hold on power is being contested, such as in the coalition situation described above, it's hardly clear what he or she should do, and can actually create a sort of paradox. Since there is always an incumbent PM, and the incumbent PM was always installed through some sort of democratic process, it will always be possible for an incumbent PM to argue it would be a violation of Canada's democratic norms for the governor general to disobey him, and install a different prime minister even when the would-be alternate prime minister has a persuasive alternative argument regarding why the incumbent PM should be fired. Things get even more complicated when we consider the incumbent PM technically has the power to fire the governor general, a structural flaw the Australians some have described as "mutually assured dismissal." Technically the Queen could overrule the governor general ''and'' prime minister, but then we'd be in an entirely different can of worms.
1st May '16 2:36:00 PM louisXVI
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[[folder:Politics: Other]]

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[[folder:Politics: Other]]Canada]]


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** Since the Governor General of Canada has the sole authority to inaugurate a prime minister, the decision-making role the governor general can or should play in arbitrating situations where the prime ministership is contested is vague, unwritten, and lacks much helpful precedent. In ordinary times, the governor general is supposed to be an obedient rubber-stamp and always obey the prime minister, but in situations where the prime minister's hold on power is being contested, such as in the coalition situation described above, it's hardly clear what he or she should do, and can actually create a sort of paradox. Since there is always an incumbent PM, and the incumbent PM was always installed through some sort of democratic process, it will always be possible for an incumbent PM to argue it would be a violation of Canada's democratic norms for the governor general to disobey him, and install a different prime minister even when the would-be alternate prime minister has a persuasive alternative argument regarding why the incumbent PM should be fired. Things get even more complicated when we consider the incumbent PM technically has the power to fire the governor general, a structural flaw the Australians have described as "mutually assured dismissal." Technically the Queen could overrule the governor general ''and'' prime minister, but then we'd be in an entirely different can of worms.
27th Apr '16 7:07:12 AM hyphz
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Diplomacy}}'' is normally a relatively simple game - there are four basic moves and rules for resolving their interactions - except that convoys, where an army moves between locations using a chain of naval units possibly owned by another player, are notorious for creating problems. This began with the discovery that a player could convoy another player's army without their knowledge or consent and continued into situations creating actual paradoxes. The tournament rule book at one point simply abandoned any attempt at making sense and spent several pages presenting a humanised version of the source code of the automated resolution system.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Diplomacy}}'' is normally a relatively simple game - there are four basic moves and rules for resolving their interactions - except that convoys, where an army moves between locations using a chain of naval units possibly owned by another player, are notorious for creating problems. This began with the discovery that a player could convoy another player's army without their knowledge or consent consent, and continued into situations creating actual paradoxes.paradoxes. For example, an army which travels via a convoy to kill another army which is cutting the support of a fleet which is attacking the same convoy; if the convoy succeeds, the support is not cut and the convoy defeated, so it ought to fail; but if the convoy fails, the support is cut and the convoy survives, so it ought to succeed. The tournament rule book at one point simply abandoned any attempt at making sense and spent several pages presenting a humanised version of the source code of the automated resolution system.
27th Apr '16 5:17:08 AM Gadjiltron
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* Summoning conditions in ''TabletopGame/YuGiOh'' in regards to reviving monsters. If a monster's effect says it can only be special summoned one way, can it be special summoned from the graveyard after being special summoned through that method? For some cards (Dark Necrofear, ritual monsters, most fusion monsters), yes. For others (Armed Dragon [=LVs=] 7 and 10, Rainbow Dragon, most Elemental Hero fusions), no.

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* Summoning conditions in ''TabletopGame/YuGiOh'' in regards to reviving monsters. If a monster's effect says it can only be special summoned one way, can it be special summoned from the graveyard after being special summoned through that method? For some cards (Dark Necrofear, ritual monsters, most fusion monsters), yes. For others (Armed Dragon [=LVs=] 7 and 10, Rainbow Dragon, most Elemental Hero fusions), no. The only way to distinguish between the two is whether the card reads "can" or "cannot... except..." while the rest of the Summon condition text is ''nearly identical''. While the text formatting for modern cards makes the difference more distinct[[note]]Cards that can't be revived with this method contain "...and cannot be Special Summoned by other ways"[[/note]], old cards that have yet to receive a reprint in this format are still subject to this problem.
25th Apr '16 12:32:52 PM VenomLancerHae
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*** It's "so-called" because infinite numbers aren't allowed. You must pick a specific (though very large) number. So if it's my turn, and I can prevent arbitrarily many damage (see what I did there?), I must decide how much to prevent before my opponent makes a decision. Assuming he can use his effect, he can deal as much or as little as he likes in response, and it will happen first, ignoring the prevention (Magic spells are last in, first out). If the damage guy goes first, he has to decide first, and the prevention guy can pick "that plus 100" and take no damage.
19th Apr '16 7:28:30 AM FurryKef
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** Regeneration was considered this for quite some time, including by the developers themselves. While it was relatively straightforward in the early days of Magic and the concept was simple - pay a cost and have a dying creature brought back to life - increasing complexity of the rules lead to plenty of confusion as to how it was supposed to work. It's been grandfathered in and clarified since, but WordOfGod has said that a rule like Regeneration never would have made it off the drawing board if it were thought up today and even now developers generally shy away from using it on new cards.

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** Regeneration was considered this for quite some time, including by the developers themselves. While it was relatively straightforward in the early days of Magic and the concept was simple - pay a cost and have a dying creature brought back to life - increasing complexity of the rules lead led to plenty of confusion as to how it was supposed to work. It's been grandfathered in and clarified since, but WordOfGod has said that a rule like Regeneration never would have made it off the drawing board if it were thought up today and even now developers generally shy away from using it on new cards.
26th Mar '16 9:58:09 AM nombretomado
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!! {{Cricket}}

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!! {{Cricket}}UsefulNotes/{{Cricket}}
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