History Main / ThatOldTimePrescription

24th Apr '18 9:17:52 PM teddybear334
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* In the novel ''Literature/{{Outlander}}'', Claire Beauchamp demonstrates even more knowledge that most examples of this trope, when she comments that willow bark tea can make bleeding take longer to stop while discussing the healing properties of herbs with the keeper of Castle Leoch's herb garden.

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* In the novel ''Literature/{{Outlander}}'', ''Literature/{{Outlander}}'' series, Claire Beauchamp demonstrates even more is a former World War II nurse (and later surgeon) with an amateur interest in botany who travels back to the 18th century. Consequently, she has a broad knowledge of modern medicine and a rudimentary knowledge of herbs. Her knowledge of modern medicine leads her to creative solutions, like packing a wound with Roquefort cheese (which contains Penicillin) or making homemade ether to use as anesthesia. However, she herself notes that most examples of this trope, when she comments her higher-than-average patient success rate is in part due to her rigorous hygiene standards, something that willow bark tea can make bleeding take longer to stop while discussing would be anachronistic if she weren't from the healing properties of herbs with the keeper of Castle Leoch's herb garden.20th century.
21st Apr '18 10:32:09 PM nombretomado
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* Willow tea is also present in the ''Literature/TortallUniverse''. Female characters often use it to deal with menstrual cramps. This isn't an {{egregious}} case, though, since every RealLife culture that had access to willows managed to figure out its analgesic properties.

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* Willow tea is also present in the ''Literature/TortallUniverse''. Female characters often use it to deal with menstrual cramps. This isn't an {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} case, though, since every RealLife culture that had access to willows managed to figure out its analgesic properties.
19th Apr '18 9:02:25 AM Jarl
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* ''Series/TheFrankensteinChronicles'' zig-zags this. The main character suffers from syphilis, and a healer considered to be a quack by the medical establishment gives him a cure derived from bread mold. His symptoms seem to get worse afterward, suggesting it might be [[SlippingAMickey that ''other'' thing]] that's derived from bread mold, but ultimately [[spoilers: it's neither penicillin nor ergot, it's fetal stem cells, gathered and administered in a way that's still in keeping with the trope.]]

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* ''Series/TheFrankensteinChronicles'' zig-zags this. The main character suffers from syphilis, and a healer considered to be a quack by the medical establishment gives him a cure derived from bread mold. His symptoms seem to get worse afterward, suggesting it might be [[SlippingAMickey that ''other'' thing]] ''[[SlippingAMickey other]]'' thing that's derived from bread mold, but ultimately [[spoilers: [[spoiler: it's neither penicillin nor ergot, it's fetal stem cells, gathered and administered in a way that's still in keeping with the trope.]]
15th Apr '18 5:47:06 AM Jarl
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* ''Series/TheFrankensteinChronicles zig-zags this. The main character suffers from syphilis, and a healer considered to be a quack by the medical establishment gives him a cure derived from bread mold. His symptoms seem to get worse afterward, suggesting it might be [[SlippingAMickey that ''other'' thing]] that's derived from bread mold, but ultimately [[spoilers: it's neither penicillin nor ergot, it's fetal stem cells, gathered and administered in a way that's still in keeping with the trope.]]

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* ''Series/TheFrankensteinChronicles ''Series/TheFrankensteinChronicles'' zig-zags this. The main character suffers from syphilis, and a healer considered to be a quack by the medical establishment gives him a cure derived from bread mold. His symptoms seem to get worse afterward, suggesting it might be [[SlippingAMickey that ''other'' thing]] that's derived from bread mold, but ultimately [[spoilers: it's neither penicillin nor ergot, it's fetal stem cells, gathered and administered in a way that's still in keeping with the trope.]]
15th Apr '18 5:44:58 AM Jarl
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* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', maesters (essentially doctors, though they have other duties) commonly prescribe "milk of the poppy" (that is, opium) to anyone suffering from a particularly painful injury. [[note]]Given that it's described as a liquid it might also be [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laudanum laudanum]], which is opium dissolved in alcohol.[[/note]] They're also known to dispense tansy tea as an abortifacient upon request. {{Zigzagged}} as many of them are also big believers in leeching (though leeches ''have'' been found to be helpful by draining excess blood from reattached body parts whose veins aren't fully healed yet).

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* In ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', maesters *''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''
** Maesters
(essentially doctors, though they have other duties) commonly prescribe "milk of the poppy" (that is, opium) to anyone suffering from a particularly painful injury. [[note]]Given that it's described as a liquid it might also be [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laudanum laudanum]], which is opium dissolved in alcohol.[[/note]] They're also known to dispense tansy tea as an abortifacient upon request. {{Zigzagged}} as many of them are also big believers in leeching (though leeches ''have'' been found to be helpful by draining excess blood from reattached body parts whose veins aren't fully healed yet).yet).
** The miracle that resurrects the drowned Ironborn ("What is dead may never die") is identifiable as CPR.



* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Milk of the poppy (that is, opium) is regularly prescribed for painful injuries.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
**
Milk of the poppy (that is, opium) is regularly prescribed for painful injuries.injuries.
** Resident MadScientist Qyburn treats the Mountain, who has been poisoned and is comatose, with something that looks distressingly like pre-industrial ''dialysis'', rigged up halfway between BambooTechnology and BioPunk.




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* ''Series/TheFrankensteinChronicles zig-zags this. The main character suffers from syphilis, and a healer considered to be a quack by the medical establishment gives him a cure derived from bread mold. His symptoms seem to get worse afterward, suggesting it might be [[SlippingAMickey that ''other'' thing]] that's derived from bread mold, but ultimately [[spoilers: it's neither penicillin nor ergot, it's fetal stem cells, gathered and administered in a way that's still in keeping with the trope.]]
* ''Series/TheMusketeers'' features a 17th century doctor who always boils his (steel and silver) tools before performing surgery because he finds it reduces the rate of infection afterwards. "[[HandWave I believe it's a gift from God.]]"
11th Mar '18 10:15:42 AM Antigone3
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* ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'': One story in the first ''Ring of Fire'' anthology features a herbalist who's been secretly dosing her husband with foxglove extract to keep a heart issue under control.
23rd Oct '17 12:59:54 PM Sharlee
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While most medications are a mystery to most audiences, there are a few whose native source is more familiar. Willow bark as a precursor to aspirin, or bread mold as that of penicillin, are the usual examples; others, such as poppy extract for a sedative or foxglove extract for heart trouble, are more obscure, but still recognizable to viewers who take an interest. Some, however, are still in use in less developed countries, such as mustard poultices (counterirritant and somewhat effective in dealing with respiratory infections), or propolis (honey bee glue, which is an effective antimicrobial agent).

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While most medications are a mystery to most audiences, there are a few whose native source is more familiar. Willow bark as a precursor to aspirin, or bread mold as that of penicillin, are the usual examples; others, such as poppy extract for a sedative or foxglove extract for heart trouble, are more obscure, but still recognizable to viewers who take an interest. Some, however, are still in use in less developed countries, such as mustard poultices (counterirritant and somewhat effective in dealing with respiratory infections), or propolis (honey bee glue, which is an effective antimicrobial agent).
interest.
29th Apr '17 11:32:37 AM eowynjedi
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** The moldy bread poultice is one of Magrat Garlick's specialties. In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', Magrat also makes willow bark tablets for headaches.

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** The moldy bread poultice is one of Magrat Garlick's specialties. In ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'', Magrat also makes willow bark tablets for headaches. She apprenticed under another herbalist witch who did careful experimentation (and so knew the ''kind'' of apple and knife to use in that old story about getting your future husband's name from the peel) and often gets frustrated with Granny's constant use of "sucrose and aqua" as a placebo.
27th Mar '17 5:36:12 AM Ion288
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* They also [[http://www.rhjunior.com/the-journal-of-ennias-longscript-0042/ grow hemp]] as a major agricultural crop for its many uses, including medicinal.

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* ** They also [[http://www.rhjunior.com/the-journal-of-ennias-longscript-0042/ grow hemp]] as a major agricultural crop for its many uses, including medicinal.
5th Mar '17 7:12:11 AM gb00393
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Milk of the poppy (that is, opium) is regularly prescribed for painful injuries.
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