History Main / TextbookHumor

9th Sep '17 3:56:09 PM nombretomado
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* Paul Krugman, known at least as much for his acerbic and usually hilarious political opinion columns (in ''[[AmericanNewspapers The New York Times]]'') as for the economics work that won him a [[ArtisticLicenseAwards Nobel Prize]], is noted for this kind of thing.

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* Paul Krugman, known at least as much for his acerbic and usually hilarious political opinion columns (in ''[[AmericanNewspapers ''[[UsefulNotes/AmericanNewspapers The New York Times]]'') as for the economics work that won him a [[ArtisticLicenseAwards Nobel Prize]], is noted for this kind of thing.
9th Sep '17 2:27:19 PM nombretomado
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* A somewhat indirect example: In [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw common-law]] countries, law students tend to learn via the casebook method--i.e. rather than have a textbook go through the principles of the law, the student is presented with actual appellate judicial decisions, plus a limited amount of commentary from the author/editors. Appellate judges are generally intelligent people, and they often run into cases that are (1) indescribably boring, (2) completely ridiculous, (3) involve ludicrous asshattery, (4) involve ludicrous douchebaggery, or (5) some combination of the above. Naturally, they insert dry humor into their opinions wherever possible. Certain judges are particularly noted for their dry humor; for instance, in contemporary American casebooks, Judge Richard Posner (of the UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}-based federal Seventh Circuit, whose opinions are often included in casebooks because of his clear writing style and his association with the unique logic of the law and economics movement), Judge Alex Kozinski (of the Ninth Circuit, who famously wrote "[[SophisticatedAsHell The parties are advised to chill]]" in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mattel_v._MCA_Records his most famous opinion]]), Justice Antonin Scalia (of the federal [[AmericanCourts Supreme Court]], whose opinions are often included in casebooks because even if you disagree with him he's ActuallyPrettyFunny, and also did we mention he's a freakin' Supreme Court justice), Justice Elena Kagan (ditto, except that she's a liberal), and Justice John Paul Stevens (who held Kagan's seat before her appointment, and whose style is best described as "[[Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion Garrison Keillor]] as a jurist"[[note]]This is particularly odd, as Stevens' time on the Court saw Warren Burger and William Rehnquist--the former actually from Minnesota, the latter actually Swedish and from nearby Wisconsin--as Chief Justice, yet neither evinced the same kind of understated, common-sense-based Midwestern humor that the Chicagoan Stevens did.[[/note]]) have earned reputations for opinions that lawyers, judges, and students love to read for the jokes/dry humor (and in Scalia's case, the inimitable snark), even as they shout "no, you're wrong!" at the content.

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* A somewhat indirect example: In [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw common-law]] countries, law students tend to learn via the casebook method--i.e. rather than have a textbook go through the principles of the law, the student is presented with actual appellate judicial decisions, plus a limited amount of commentary from the author/editors. Appellate judges are generally intelligent people, and they often run into cases that are (1) indescribably boring, (2) completely ridiculous, (3) involve ludicrous asshattery, (4) involve ludicrous douchebaggery, or (5) some combination of the above. Naturally, they insert dry humor into their opinions wherever possible. Certain judges are particularly noted for their dry humor; for instance, in contemporary American casebooks, Judge Richard Posner (of the UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}-based federal Seventh Circuit, whose opinions are often included in casebooks because of his clear writing style and his association with the unique logic of the law and economics movement), Judge Alex Kozinski (of the Ninth Circuit, who famously wrote "[[SophisticatedAsHell The parties are advised to chill]]" in [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mattel_v._MCA_Records his most famous opinion]]), Justice Antonin Scalia (of the federal [[AmericanCourts [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts Supreme Court]], whose opinions are often included in casebooks because even if you disagree with him he's ActuallyPrettyFunny, and also did we mention he's a freakin' Supreme Court justice), Justice Elena Kagan (ditto, except that she's a liberal), and Justice John Paul Stevens (who held Kagan's seat before her appointment, and whose style is best described as "[[Radio/APrairieHomeCompanion Garrison Keillor]] as a jurist"[[note]]This is particularly odd, as Stevens' time on the Court saw Warren Burger and William Rehnquist--the former actually from Minnesota, the latter actually Swedish and from nearby Wisconsin--as Chief Justice, yet neither evinced the same kind of understated, common-sense-based Midwestern humor that the Chicagoan Stevens did.[[/note]]) have earned reputations for opinions that lawyers, judges, and students love to read for the jokes/dry humor (and in Scalia's case, the inimitable snark), even as they shout "no, you're wrong!" at the content.
23rd Aug '17 4:37:34 AM RagnhildK
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** And some improvements have since been made: The upper bound is now 2↑↑↑6, a number with "only" 6×10¹⁹⁷
8th Jul '17 11:52:50 AM nombretomado
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* OlderThanRadio: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Johnson%27s_Dictionary Dr Johnson]] inserted some "easter eggs" into his Dictionary. Part of TheOtherWiki article details some of this concealed wit.

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* OlderThanRadio: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr._Johnson%27s_Dictionary Dr Johnson]] inserted some "easter eggs" into his Dictionary. Part of TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki article details some of this concealed wit.
23rd Jun '17 11:11:41 AM eritain
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* ''A Russian Course'' by Alexander Lipson and Steven Molinsky is stuffed with this. The practice dialogue for greetings is followed by the notation "awkward pause," then the dialogue for farewells. Another exercise covers "Four ways to avoid answering a question." Cassette tapes supplied listening material, including among other things a pompous choral anthem for a cement factory that celebrates cement the way Monty Python celebrated spam. Early readings outline the ways of shock-workers and loafers: "Shock-workers live well. In factories they work with enthusiasm. In parks they think about life. About what life? About life in factories. How do loafers live? At work they steal pencils. In parks they conduct themselves badly. Shock-workers are often cultured people. Cultured people read books. And they wash every day. Loafers are often uncultured people. As far as I know, uncultured people don't wash. Never? Yes, they never wash. And they like to smoke in trolleybuses." Later readings reach so far as the mysteries of the uncultured psyche ("I don't like to conduct myself badly. God only knows why I conduct myself badly. I'm not a bad person. *he weeps*") and the meanings of happiness and decadence ("Happiness is to sit by the Great Blinsk Sea and build hydroelectric power stations. Decadence is to lie on the beach by the Great Blinsk Swamp and watch television. In tuxedos").
30th Apr '17 11:13:38 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* Page 205 ''Introduction to Psychology'' by James W. Kalat uses hilariously off-model ''{{Pokemon}}'' ersatzes to illustrate the effects of classical conditioning.

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* Page 205 ''Introduction to Psychology'' by James W. Kalat uses hilariously off-model ''{{Pokemon}}'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' ersatzes to illustrate the effects of classical conditioning.
30th Apr '17 11:13:23 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* [[http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/9412/0014540181.jpg This page from a psychology textbook]] uses hilariously off-model ''{{Pokemon}}'' ersatzes to illustrate the effects of classical conditioning.

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* [[http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/9412/0014540181.jpg This page from a psychology textbook]] Page 205 ''Introduction to Psychology'' by James W. Kalat uses hilariously off-model ''{{Pokemon}}'' ersatzes to illustrate the effects of classical conditioning.
6th Apr '17 2:17:50 PM DarkHunter
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** Page 314 in ''[[https://www.reddit.com/r/mildlyinteresting/comments/5dbhi3/page_314_is_100%CF%80_in_my_math_textbook/ Precalculus: A Prelude to Calculus]]'' and ''Linear Algebra Done Right'' instead have instead "≈ 100π" as the page number. Other alternative page numbers include "2
", "≈ 7π", "≈ 100 ''e''", and "100√2".

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** Page 314 in ''[[https://www.reddit.com/r/mildlyinteresting/comments/5dbhi3/page_314_is_100%CF%80_in_my_math_textbook/ Precalculus: A Prelude to Calculus]]'' and ''Linear Algebra Done Right'' instead have instead "≈ 100π" as the page number. Other alternative page numbers include "2
",
"2", "≈ 7π", "≈ 100 ''e''", and "100√2".
20th Mar '17 3:19:05 PM SonicLover
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* On [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cetaceans the list of cetaceans]], missing pictures are labeled with "cetacean needed", a spoof of the more commonly seen tag "citation needed".

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* On [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cetaceans the list of cetaceans]], missing pictures are labeled with "cetacean needed", a spoof of the more commonly seen tag "citation needed". Perhaps they picked it up from ''Blog/WhatIf'', which has made many puns of that nature (including that very one).
20th Mar '17 11:08:34 AM pointillist
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Added DiffLines:

* On [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cetaceans the list of cetaceans]], missing pictures are labeled with "cetacean needed", a spoof of the more commonly seen tag "citation needed".
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