History Main / TemporaryPlatform

9th Jul '17 3:16:41 AM ShorinBJ
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* '''Crumbling platforms''' appear solid at first, but once the player steps on top of one it will shake, sag, descend, (etc.) and after a few seconds disappear entirely -- the player must locate the next safe footing, and ''fast''. These usually have some kind of visual cue (cracks, etc.) to warn the player of their unstable nature, but not always. A SubTrope of this is the FakePlatform, which affords no warning or time for the player to leap off of it, instead immediately crumbling/falling/exploding/vanishing upon contact. Sometimes, the platform will inexplicably reform on its own, whether some time later, or when it goes offscreen (especially if it's necessary to prevent an {{Unwinnable}} situation where permanent disappearance of platforms would prevent you from reaching your goals.)

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* '''Crumbling platforms''' appear solid at first, but once the player steps on top of one it will shake, sag, descend, (etc.) and after a few seconds disappear entirely -- the player must locate the next safe footing, and ''fast''. These usually have some kind of visual cue (cracks, etc.) to warn the player of their unstable nature, but not always. A SubTrope of this is the FakePlatform, which affords no warning or time for the player to leap off of it, instead immediately crumbling/falling/exploding/vanishing upon contact. Sometimes, the platform will inexplicably reform on its own, whether some time later, or when it goes offscreen (especially if it's necessary to prevent an {{Unwinnable}} situation where permanent disappearance of platforms would prevent you from reaching your goals.)
) The platform may also crumble in sections.
23rd Jun '17 1:17:46 AM Thepenguinking2
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A TemporaryPlatform is an infamous variation of the FloatingPlatforms that exist primarily in 2D platform games, which can only be used for limited durations at a time. These come in a few distinct varieties:

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A TemporaryPlatform temporary platform is an infamous variation of the FloatingPlatforms that exist primarily in 2D platform games, which can only be used for limited durations at a time. These come in a few distinct varieties:



* Most ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games have them, though the series isn't as fond of them as Mario. The first game enjoyed some [[NintendoHard Sega Hard]] FakeDifficulty in the Marble Zone, when the TemporaryPlatform and stable platform that moved up and down used the ''same sprite''. The Wii-exclusive Blue Wisp from ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' allows Sonic to temporarily turn blue rings into blocks and vice versa, similar to a P-switch.

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* Most ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games have them, though the series isn't as fond of them as Mario. The first game enjoyed some [[NintendoHard Sega Hard]] FakeDifficulty in the Marble Zone, when the TemporaryPlatform temporary platform and stable platform that moved up and down used the ''same sprite''. The Wii-exclusive Blue Wisp from ''VideoGame/SonicColors'' allows Sonic to temporarily turn blue rings into blocks and vice versa, similar to a P-switch.
28th May '17 6:02:19 AM Medinoc
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Added DiffLines:

* ''[[VideoGame/{{Prehistorik}} Prehistorik Man]]'' has a few platforms that drop after some time. They fall faster than you, so if you're still on the platform when it drops, then it's too late to jump off it.
11th Apr '17 10:27:48 AM erforce
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* In ''AngryVideoGameNerdAdventures'' has the appearing and disappearing [[DeadlyWalls Death Blocks]], which kill the player. There are also standard ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' style disappearing and breakaway blocks, as well as block snakes similar to ''SuperMarioWorld''.

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* In ''AngryVideoGameNerdAdventures'' ''VideoGame/TheAngryVideoGameNerdAdventures'' has the appearing and disappearing [[DeadlyWalls Death Blocks]], which kill the player. There are also standard ''VideoGame/MegaMan'' ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'' style disappearing and breakaway blocks, as well as block snakes similar to ''SuperMarioWorld''.''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld''.
27th Mar '17 7:04:30 PM Korval
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* The ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' universe generally prefers {{Fake Platform}}s over true Temporary Platforms. Floor tiles that crumble underneath Samus's weight were frequently used to create corridors that required a Speed Booster dash to traverse.

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* The 2D entries in the ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' universe generally prefers {{Fake series tend to have two types of these. There are floor tiles that will collapse, but take a half-second to do so. And then there are near-{{Fake Platform}}s over true Temporary Platforms. Floor tiles that crumble underneath Samus's weight were frequently collapse almost instantly. The "near" part is important, as there is just enough time to be able to jump off of them if you're ''really'' fast. The latter are usually used to create corridors that required a Speed Booster dash to traverse.traverse, but they also make for convenient one-way passages.
24th Jan '17 2:31:09 AM KBABZ
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* ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' has tons of these, combined in every way possible with floating platforms that alternate in and out of existence on their own.

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* ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' has tons of these, combined in every way possible with floating platforms that alternate in and out of existence on their own. The original game likes making these out of boxes, and Slippery Climb in particular is [[ThatOneLevel infamous]] for using ''enemies'' as one-shot [[GoombaSpringboard Goomba Springboards]].



* ''{{VideoGame/Guacamelee}}'' has a cave with a bunch of these, over a bottomless chasm. The problem with these is that they are from the "timed" variety, and they don't fade in or out, they simply instantly dissapear after a second or so while others appear nearby at the same time, giving you no time to react. Furthermore, except for the very first few ones, there's no real rhyme or reason to their location, so you have to randomly jump on any that appears and pray that you don't get confused about which side to jump to next. You need ridiculously good reflexes to at least lower the frustration a bit. And while the item at the end of the cave isn't necessary to complete the game, it is needed to get the good ending.
* Getting across water in ''Arc Doors'' typically requires leaping across a row of lily pads, which keep sinking and resurfacing. There are also bubbles which, once stepped on, vanish after a moment.

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* ''{{VideoGame/Guacamelee}}'' has a cave with a bunch of these, over a bottomless chasm. The problem with these is that they are from the "timed" variety, and they don't fade in or out, they simply instantly dissapear disappear after a second or so while others appear nearby at the same time, giving you no time to react. Furthermore, except for the very first few ones, there's no real rhyme or reason to their location, so you have to randomly jump on any that appears and pray that you don't get confused about which side to jump to next. You need ridiculously good reflexes to at least lower the frustration a bit. And while the item at the end of the cave isn't necessary to complete the game, it is needed to get the good ending.
* Getting across water in ''Arc Doors'' typically requires leaping across a row of lily pads, which keep sinking and resurfacing. There are also bubbles which, once stepped on, vanish after a moment. moment.
* ''VideoGame/Croc'', being based off of ''VideoGame/SuperMario64'' and ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'', naturally has these.
4th Dec '16 5:21:08 PM MyFinalEdits
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** The Donut Lifts from ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' and subsequent games fall after a couple of seconds of Mario standing on them. Also in many games since ''Super Mario Bros. 3'' are moving platforms on rails, some of which are on open-ended tracks that allow the platform to fall off at the end. Lastly, most 2D Mario games since the aforementioned 1990 title have coins that turn into temporary platforms (as well as permanent ones that turn into coins) when you step on a P Switch.

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** The Donut Lifts from ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'' and subsequent games fall after a couple of seconds of Mario standing on them. Also in many games since ''Super Mario Bros. 3'' are moving platforms on rails, some of which are on open-ended tracks that allow the platform to fall off at the end. Lastly, most 2D Mario games since the aforementioned 1990 1988 title have coins that turn into temporary platforms (as well as permanent ones that turn into coins) when you step on a P Switch.



** The majority of the levels in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryReturns'' contain these in some form. If you aren't [[IndyEscape running from]] boulders, spiders, or other stuff, whatever is under your feet is often either crumbling, sinking, or a [[MinecartMadness minecart]]. A notable example is the aptly-named "Platform Panic", where the level terrain appears only at close range, then shakes and starts falling when the player touches it.

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** The majority of the levels in ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryReturns'' contain these in some form. If you aren't [[IndyEscape running from]] boulders, spiders, or other stuff, whatever is under your feet is often either crumbling, sinking, or a [[MinecartMadness minecart]]. A notable example is the aptly-named "Platform Panic", where the level terrain appears only at close range, then shakes and starts falling when the player touches it. This also holds true for ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryTropicalFreeze'', which in addition has a level where many platforms fall down while having a vertical position through magnetic rails but switch to horizontal position when they go through the lit segments of the rails; the huge difficulty of this level due to the requirement of quick reflexes is why it happens to be one of the game's {{Brutal Bonus Level}}s.



* The ''{{Metroid}}'' universe generally prefers {{Fake Platform}}s over true Temporary Platforms. Floor tiles that crumble underneath Samus's weight were frequently used to create corridors that required a Speed Booster dash to traverse.

to:

* The ''{{Metroid}}'' ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' universe generally prefers {{Fake Platform}}s over true Temporary Platforms. Floor tiles that crumble underneath Samus's weight were frequently used to create corridors that required a Speed Booster dash to traverse.



* ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' has loose floor tiles that dislodge and fall moments after the [[NoNameGiven Prince character]] ran across them. Nearby vibrations (from you jumping up and down, for instance) will cause them to shake a little, allowing the player to identify them from a distance. They are useful on occasion for making running jumps off, and permanently holding down {{Pressure Plate}}s where they landed. They can also be dislodged by jumping from underneath, to access secret parts of levels, though standing below falling ones will hurt you if you don't duck. In the sequel ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2: The Shadow and the Flame'', they can kill {{Mook}}s and destroy potions.

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* ''Franchise/PrinceOfPersia'':
**
''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' has loose floor tiles that dislodge and fall moments after the [[NoNameGiven Prince character]] ran across them. Nearby vibrations (from you jumping up and down, for instance) will cause them to shake a little, allowing the player to identify them from a distance. They are useful on occasion for making running jumps off, and permanently holding down {{Pressure Plate}}s where they landed. They can also be dislodged by jumping from underneath, to access secret parts of levels, though standing below falling ones will hurt you if you don't duck. In the sequel ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2: The Shadow and the Flame'', they can kill {{Mook}}s and destroy potions.



* ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'' has no end of {{Temporary Platform}}s, usually situated near SpikesOfDoom. Since it's a PlatformHell pastiche of NES games, it takes the disappearing blocks from Heat Man's stage in ''VideoGame/MegaMan2'' to new heights of frustration, as the player must use JumpPhysics to stay on a single block that teleports around over a spiked floor.

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* ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'' ''VideoGame/IWannaBeTheGuy'':
** The game
has no end of {{Temporary Platform}}s, usually situated near SpikesOfDoom. Since it's a PlatformHell pastiche of NES games, it takes the disappearing blocks from Heat Man's stage in ''VideoGame/MegaMan2'' to new heights of frustration, as the player must use JumpPhysics to stay on a single block that teleports around over a spiked floor.
4th Dec '16 10:39:30 AM Korodzik
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* Getting across water in ''Arc Doors'' typically requires leaping across a row of water lily leaves, which keep sinking and resurfacing. There are also bubbles which, once stepped on, vanish after a moment.

to:

* Getting across water in ''Arc Doors'' typically requires leaping across a row of water lily leaves, pads, which keep sinking and resurfacing. There are also bubbles which, once stepped on, vanish after a moment.
3rd Dec '16 1:56:56 AM Korodzik
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* {{VideoGame/Guacamelee}} has a cave with a bunch of these, over a bottomless chasm. The problem with these is that they are from the "timed" variety, and they don't fade in or out, they simply instantly dissapear after a second or so while others appear nearby at the same time, giving you no time to react. Furthermore, except for the very first few ones, there's no real rhyme or reason to their location, so you have to randomly jump on any that appears and pray that you don't get confused about which side to jump to next. You need ridiculously good reflexes to at least lower the frustration a bit. And while the item at the end of the cave isn't necessary to complete the game, it is needed to get the good ending.

to:

* {{VideoGame/Guacamelee}} ''{{VideoGame/Guacamelee}}'' has a cave with a bunch of these, over a bottomless chasm. The problem with these is that they are from the "timed" variety, and they don't fade in or out, they simply instantly dissapear after a second or so while others appear nearby at the same time, giving you no time to react. Furthermore, except for the very first few ones, there's no real rhyme or reason to their location, so you have to randomly jump on any that appears and pray that you don't get confused about which side to jump to next. You need ridiculously good reflexes to at least lower the frustration a bit. And while the item at the end of the cave isn't necessary to complete the game, it is needed to get the good ending.ending.
* Getting across water in ''Arc Doors'' typically requires leaping across a row of water lily leaves, which keep sinking and resurfacing. There are also bubbles which, once stepped on, vanish after a moment.
19th Nov '16 5:09:01 PM Dreadjaws
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* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/Guacamelee Guacamelee!]] has a cave with a bunch of these, over a bottomless chasm. The problem with these is that they are from the "timed" variety, and they don't fade in or out, they simply instantly dissapear after a second or so while others appear nearby at the same time, giving you no time to react. Furthermore, except for the very first few ones, there's no real rhyme or reason to their location, so you have to randomly jump on any that appears and pray that you don't get confused about which side to jump to next. You need ridiculously good reflexes to at least lower the frustration a bit. And while the item at the end of the cave isn't necessary to complete the game, it is needed to get the good ending.

to:

* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/Guacamelee Guacamelee!]] {{VideoGame/Guacamelee}} has a cave with a bunch of these, over a bottomless chasm. The problem with these is that they are from the "timed" variety, and they don't fade in or out, they simply instantly dissapear after a second or so while others appear nearby at the same time, giving you no time to react. Furthermore, except for the very first few ones, there's no real rhyme or reason to their location, so you have to randomly jump on any that appears and pray that you don't get confused about which side to jump to next. You need ridiculously good reflexes to at least lower the frustration a bit. And while the item at the end of the cave isn't necessary to complete the game, it is needed to get the good ending.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TemporaryPlatform