History Main / Teletext

18th Jun '18 9:21:06 PM RAMChYLD
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In the late 90s, an updated version of Teletext was introduced. Called Hi-Text, it finally caught up with the NABTS and Moji2 system in that it offered a higher resolution display and vector graphics support. However, the system faced stiff competition from the Internet and waning interests in teletext technology, and thus was only adopted by several North European countries.

to:

In the late 90s, an updated version of Teletext was introduced. Called Hi-Text, it finally caught up with the NABTS and Moji2 system [=Moji2=] systems in that it offered a higher resolution display and vector graphics support. However, the system faced stiff competition from the Internet and waning interests in teletext technology, and thus was only adopted by several North European countries.
18th Jun '18 9:20:29 PM RAMChYLD
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In the late 90s, an updated version of Teletext was introduced. Called Hi-Text, it faced stiff competition from the Internet and waning interests in teletext technology, and thus was only adopted by several North European countries.

to:

In the late 90s, an updated version of Teletext was introduced. Called Hi-Text, it finally caught up with the NABTS and Moji2 system in that it offered a higher resolution display and vector graphics support. However, the system faced stiff competition from the Internet and waning interests in teletext technology, and thus was only adopted by several North European countries.
17th Jun '18 8:21:02 PM RAMChYLD
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Teletext never really took off in the US- TBS, CBS and NBC made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS and NBC called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system, which is what the Ceefax system is known as outside of the UK). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.

to:

Teletext never really took off in the US- TBS, CBS and NBC made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS and NBC called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system, which is what the Ceefax system is known as outside of the UK). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU.CPU for decoding the graphics and text. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.
17th Jun '18 8:17:46 PM RAMChYLD
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Teletext never really took off in the US- CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS and NBC called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system, which is what the Ceefax system is known as outside of the UK). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.

to:

Teletext never really took off in the US- TBS, CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS and NBC called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system, which is what the Ceefax system is known as outside of the UK). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.
11th Jun '18 1:53:16 AM RAMChYLD
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As TV becomes increasingly digital, these services are either becoming defunct or moving to a less enjoyable digital format. Creator/{{ITV}}, Creator/{{Channel 4}} and Creator/ChannelFive ended their service on December 15, 2009, more than two years before the analogue cutoff.



Teletext never really took off in the US- CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS and NBC called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.

to:

Teletext never really took off in the US- CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS and NBC called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system).system, which is what the Ceefax system is known as outside of the UK). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.



Side note: Teletext never really died, it just evolved. The successor to Teletext is made out of several digital text standards (mostly DVB-TXT, DVB being the digital standard that replaced PAL and SECAM which were used in countries where Teletext was popular, and MHEG-5, the markup language used to design a digital teletext page). Signals can be found transmitted by several broadcasters in North Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong.

to:

Side note: Teletext never really died, it just evolved. The successor to Teletext is made out of several digital text standards (mostly DVB-TXT, DVB being the digital standard that replaced PAL and SECAM which were used in countries where Teletext was popular, and MHEG-5, the markup language used to design a digital teletext page). Signals can be found transmitted by As TV becomes increasingly digital, these services moved to a richer-experience albeit less enjoyable digital format, if not discontinued outright. Creator/{{ITV}}, Creator/{{Channel 4}} and Creator/ChannelFive ended their service on December 15, 2009, more than two years before the analogue cutoff. However, the digital format is still in use in several broadcasters Northern European countries as well as in North Europe, Australia, New Zealand Australia and Hong Kong.
11th Jun '18 1:45:43 AM RAMChYLD
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Most notable for its limited number of characters, the general UsefulNotes/BBCMicro-ish look of the thing [[note]]which it came by honestly; Teletext pages were created using one[[/note]] and the fact that you'd at times have to wait for several pages to load, Teletext doesn't crash under heavy user demand[[note]]However, if you have poor television reception, the service may be tenuous to use- the readability of the service correlates directly with how clear your TV reception is, and not having a good reception results in garbled or missing text, if anything comes up at all.[[/note]]. Before the Internet, this was the way you got the footy scores [[note]]Or if you're in Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong, stock market information[[/note]]. Memorably described as ''a pound-shop version of the Internet''.

to:

Most notable for its limited number of characters, the general UsefulNotes/BBCMicro-ish look of the thing [[note]]which it came by honestly; Teletext pages were created using one[[/note]] and the fact that you'd at times have to wait for several pages to load, Teletext doesn't crash under heavy user demand[[note]]However, if you have poor television reception, the service may be tenuous to use- the readability of the service correlates directly with how clear your TV reception is, and not having a good reception results in garbled or missing text, if anything comes up at all.[[/note]]. Before the Internet, this was the way you got the footy scores [[note]]Or if you're in Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong, stock market information[[/note]].information and lottery results[[/note]]. Memorably described as ''a pound-shop version of the Internet''.
10th Jun '18 3:55:48 AM YurikaT
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* Major Polish television stations still use this, but this gets little love from the production team.

to:

* Major Polish television stations still use this, but this gets little love from the production team. [[note]]Most of the things you find there, other than news and (in some stations) closed captioning, revolves around hookup offers.[[/note]]
** At least it survived the switch to digital and is still active as of June 2018!
28th May '18 1:05:19 AM RAMChYLD
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28th May '18 12:49:01 AM RAMChYLD
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Teletext never really took off in the US- CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS and NBC both used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.

to:

Teletext never really took off in the US- CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS and NBC called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS and NBC both used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the waning of interests in the feature.
24th May '18 1:35:19 AM RAMChYLD
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Teletext never really took off in the US- CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS and NBC both used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both quickly sounded the death knell of the services in the US.

to:

Teletext never really took off in the US- CBS and NBC both made attempts, but failed. Creator/{{TBS}} had a service called ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electra_(teletext) Electra]]'' for a while in the 80s, but it was shut down due to lack of interest and funding (the other partners in the venture, Zenith Electronics and Taft Broadcasting had stopped making Teletext-capable TV sets and undergone corporate buyouts, respectively). Complicating matters was that a competing, incompatible Teletext system backed by CBS called NABTS (North American Broadcast Teletext System) was also pushed to the market (TBS and NBC both used modified-for-NTSC versions of the World Standard Teletext system). NABTS was superior to WST in that it could display advanced graphics, but that only drove the cost of receivers and TV sets up as it required a far more powerful CPU. Adding to that, the fact that TV sets only supported one or the other but not both quickly sounded made choosing a Teletext-capable TV even harder and contributed to the death knell waning of the services interests in the US.
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