History Main / TechnologyMarchesOn

15th Oct '17 6:50:22 AM Aquila89
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To clarify, an excellent example would be a scene in ''Series/{{Friends}}'' where Chandler gleefully describes all the awesome features of the brand-new laptop that he has received from his company. Then, it really was pretty impressive, the joke being that he'd just be using it to play computer games and type out lists. But ''now...''

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To clarify, an excellent example would be a scene in a 1995 episode of ''Series/{{Friends}}'' where Chandler gleefully describes all the awesome features of the brand-new laptop that he has received from his company. Then, it really was pretty impressive, the joke being that he'd just be using it to play computer games and type out lists. But ''now...''
12th Oct '17 7:30:18 AM HumanTorch2
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* Another thing people tend to forget these days is that before the year 2000, basic cable was both more prevalent (to the extent that roughly half of the households that even ''had'' cable in a given neighborhood only had the basic package) and didn't include major networks like Creator/USANetwork, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}, Creator/DisneyChannel, and Creator/CartoonNetwork (which was a big part of why, to name a random example, ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' [[Wrestling/MondayNightWars maintained its ratings stranglehold over]] ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw WWF Monday Night Raw]]'' for nearly two years, because Creator/{{TNT}} was on basic cable).

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* Another thing people tend to forget these days is that before the year 2000, basic cable was both more prevalent (to the extent that roughly half of the households that even ''had'' cable in a given neighborhood only had the basic package) and didn't include major networks like Creator/USANetwork, [[{{Creator/SyFy}} the Sci-Fi Channel]], Creator/ComedyCentral, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}, Creator/DisneyChannel, and Creator/CartoonNetwork (which was a big part of why, to name a random example, ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' [[Wrestling/MondayNightWars maintained its ratings stranglehold over]] ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw WWF Monday Night Raw]]'' for nearly two years, because Creator/{{TNT}} was on basic cable).
12th Oct '17 7:27:35 AM HumanTorch2
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* Another thing people tend to forget these days is that before the year 2000, basic cable was both more prevalent (to the extent that roughly half of the households that even ''had'' cable in a given neighborhood only had the basic package) and didn't include major networks like Creator/USANetwork (which was a big part of why, to name a random example, ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' [[Wrestling/MondayNightWars maintained its ratings stranglehold over]] ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw WWF Monday Night Raw]]'' for nearly two years, because Creator/{{TNT}} was on basic cable).

to:

* Another thing people tend to forget these days is that before the year 2000, basic cable was both more prevalent (to the extent that roughly half of the households that even ''had'' cable in a given neighborhood only had the basic package) and didn't include major networks like Creator/USANetwork Creator/USANetwork, Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}, Creator/DisneyChannel, and Creator/CartoonNetwork (which was a big part of why, to name a random example, ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' [[Wrestling/MondayNightWars maintained its ratings stranglehold over]] ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw WWF Monday Night Raw]]'' for nearly two years, because Creator/{{TNT}} was on basic cable).
7th Oct '17 6:10:25 PM Sharlee
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* A once-popular method of suicide that still occasionally comes up in fiction is sticking one's head in the oven. Young people might see this and get confused ("Is he going to ''cook'' himself to death?"), but older gas ranges didn't automatically light. Turning the nob simply released the gas, and you'd light it yourself. That is, unless you're suicidal, in which case you'd lay your head on the oven floor until you drifted off to eternal slumber.

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* A once-popular method of suicide that still occasionally comes up in fiction is sticking one's head in the oven. Young people might see this and get confused ("Is he going to ''cook'' himself to death?"), but older gas ranges didn't automatically light. Turning the nob simply released the gas, and you'd light it yourself. That is, unless you're suicidal, in which case you'd lay your head on the oven floor until you drifted off to eternal slumber. Presumably, locking one's self in the garage with the engine running will fall prey to this trope as well if electric cars ever fully supplant fueled ones.
5th Oct '17 7:20:15 AM batty3108
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Added DiffLines:

** In the UK, SOS call boxes on Motorways remain very much in use. They appear every mile, on either side of the carriageway, meaning you'll never have to walk more than half a mile to one. They have no keypad - you simply pick up the receiver and are immediately connected to a Highways Agency operator, who will be able to identify your location based on the phone that's being used. If you elect not to use one, but are within sight of it, they are marked with a location code which you can relay to the breakdown operator.
4th Oct '17 4:20:58 PM merotoker
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Somewhat related are those moments during not-so-old films where you realize the entire plot could be resolved with something the world takes for granted today -- cell phones, for instance. A perfect example of this would be Film/HomeAlone -- the film was originally released on November 16, 1990, however within twenty years, the entire movie likely would have lasted about half an hour at ''most'' once you realize that a power outage likely wouldn't have caused a cell phone's alarm clock to reset like an actual alarm clock would, and in post-9/11 America, the family would have had plenty of time to realize that Kevin was missing due to the ''very'' lengthy amount of time it takes to travel through American airports due to security screenings, baggage checks, and so on.[[note]]And "lengthy" is not an exaggeration in this instance -- it's often recommended that passengers arrive to the airport ''three hours'' before the flight even takes off for international flights, and all passengers should be at the boarding gate at least thirty minutes before departure. Since the family only had forty-five minutes to get from their house to the airport before the plane took off, they would have effectively missed the flight.[[/note]] And even if CellPhonesAreUseless, the fact that it's now stupidly easy to stay in touch with people these days means that someone could easily get in touch with Kevin at the touch of a button via Skype, social media, or email (among other methods) as opposed to having to go through the hassle of placing an international call Chicago PD to send an officer to the house to check on him.

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Somewhat related are those moments during not-so-old films where you realize the entire plot could be resolved with something the world takes for granted today -- cell phones, for instance. A perfect example of this would be Film/HomeAlone ''Film/HomeAlone'' -- the film was originally released on November 16, 1990, however within twenty years, the entire movie likely would have lasted about half an hour at ''most'' once you realize that a power outage likely wouldn't have caused a cell phone's alarm clock to reset like an actual alarm clock would, and in post-9/11 America, the family would have had plenty of time to realize that Kevin was missing due to the ''very'' lengthy amount of time it takes to travel through American airports due to security screenings, baggage checks, and so on.[[note]]And "lengthy" is not an exaggeration in this instance -- it's often recommended that passengers arrive to the airport ''three hours'' before the flight even takes off for international flights, and all passengers should be at the boarding gate at least thirty minutes before departure. Since the family only had forty-five minutes to get from their house to the airport before the plane took off, they would have effectively missed the flight.[[/note]] And even if CellPhonesAreUseless, the fact that it's now stupidly easy to stay in touch with people these days means that someone could easily get in touch with Kevin at the touch of a button via Skype, social media, or email (among other methods) as opposed to having to go through the hassle of placing an international call Chicago PD to send an officer to the house to check on him.



* ''Film/{{Clueless}}'' (released in 1995) is a bit of an odd example: The teen protagonist and her friends all have cellphones... which was meant to show how ridiculously ''wealthy and privileged they were''. Since nowadays every teenager regardless of social class has a cell phone, anyone watching the film today would simply comment on how dated the phones look. Likewise, the scene where the girls are [[ShortDistancePhoneCall talking to each other on the phone while walking side-by-side]] isn't quite so hilarious because, even if they're overwhelmingly texting each other rather than talking nowadays, it's entirely possible to see people doing this ''in real life''.

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* ''Film/{{Clueless}}'' (released in 1995) is a bit of an odd example: The the teen protagonist and her friends all have cellphones... which was meant to show how ridiculously ''wealthy and privileged they were''. Since nowadays every teenager regardless of social class has a cell phone, anyone watching the film today would simply comment on how dated the phones look. Likewise, the scene where the girls are [[ShortDistancePhoneCall talking to each other on the phone while walking side-by-side]] isn't quite so hilarious because, even if they're overwhelmingly texting each other rather than talking nowadays, it's entirely possible to see people doing this ''in real life''.



* One major plot point in the 80's film ''Film/{{Madhouse}}'' is that one character's doctor can't get through due to a PhoneAholicTeenager constantly using the only phone line, to the extent that said doctor finally getting through to leave an answering machine message kicks off the climax. These days, the doctor would have multiple cell phone lines he could probably call, the teen probably would have had her own phone so as to not clog other lines, the doctor could leave voice mail even if the line in question was in use, and a growing number of practitioners have a secure website for patients to check a diagnosis without even needing to speak directly to the doctor.

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* One major plot point in the 80's film ''Film/{{Madhouse}}'' is that one character's doctor can't get through due to a PhoneAholicTeenager PhoneaholicTeenager constantly using the only phone line, to the extent that said doctor finally getting through to leave an answering machine message kicks off the climax. These days, the doctor would have multiple cell phone lines he could probably call, the teen probably would have had her own phone so as to not clog other lines, the doctor could leave voice mail even if the line in question was in use, and a growing number of practitioners have a secure website for patients to check a diagnosis without even needing to speak directly to the doctor.



* In ''Back to Methuselah,'' written in 1918-20, the 21st century has videophones, but in the far future people communicate at a distance by holding a tuning fork by their head and speaking at the same pitch. No hint how it works: It's future tech, it's meant to be baffling.

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* In ''Back to Methuselah,'' written in 1918-20, the 21st century has videophones, but in the far future people communicate at a distance by holding a tuning fork by their head and speaking at the same pitch. No hint how it works: It's it's future tech, it's meant to be baffling.



** The titular device is an electronic book, a revolutionary idea in 1978. It's a self-contained device with only one purpose: To serve as an electronic travel encyclopedia. Ford was researching the new edition. [[Creator/DouglasAdams The author]] anticipated over-the-air downloads, as Ford eventually downloads an update [[spoiler:and finds that the original, longer entry on Earth he wrote exists in the plural sector he was visiting]]. However, today the Guide would be a website on the galactic Internet or an app, and the device itself would be something like a smartphone or tablet. Ford would be able to send electronic messages (email, text) after getting stranded, but probably wouldn't get help anyway because most of the people he knows hate him. Even if it was a single electronic book, it wouldn't be as expensive as is hinted[[note]]''Mostly Harmless'' mentions that the publisher is getting frustrated at the fact that the book, which is aimed at hitchhikers who are usually broke vagabonds, aren't able pay enough to cover the cost of operations. So they try to retool it as a toy for rich kids "slumming it".[[/note]]. Real stand-alone electronic books are usually reference books or religious material, made from the same (obsolete) tech as ''[=PDAs=]''.

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** The titular device is an electronic book, a revolutionary idea in 1978. It's a self-contained device with only one purpose: To to serve as an electronic travel encyclopedia. Ford was researching the new edition. [[Creator/DouglasAdams The author]] anticipated over-the-air downloads, as Ford eventually downloads an update [[spoiler:and finds that the original, longer entry on Earth he wrote exists in the plural sector he was visiting]]. However, today the Guide would be a website on the galactic Internet or an app, and the device itself would be something like a smartphone or tablet. Ford would be able to send electronic messages (email, text) after getting stranded, but probably wouldn't get help anyway because most of the people he knows hate him. Even if it was a single electronic book, it wouldn't be as expensive as is hinted[[note]]''Mostly Harmless'' mentions that the publisher is getting frustrated at the fact that the book, which is aimed at hitchhikers who are usually broke vagabonds, aren't able pay enough to cover the cost of operations. So they try to retool it as a toy for rich kids "slumming it".[[/note]]. Real stand-alone electronic books are usually reference books or religious material, made from the same (obsolete) tech as ''[=PDAs=]''.



** The show itself caused this: Quite a few segments showed people in distress because their local region did not have 911 as an emergency number and the person making the titular call would have to find the phone number for their service. The popularity of the show caused the system to become universal in the United States.

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** The show itself caused this: Quite quite a few segments showed people in distress because their local region did not have 911 as an emergency number and the person making the titular call would have to find the phone number for their service. The popularity of the show caused the system to become universal in the United States.



* Sheeler & Sheeler's 1990 parody of "Convoy", "Car Phone," is doubly dated: Not only does it praise a type of phone which is long since obsolete, but it describes people freely using them while driving -- even to ''call the highway patrol and report a drunk driver'' -- without any suspicion that doing so will soon be illegal.

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* Sheeler & Sheeler's 1990 parody of "Convoy", "Car Phone," is doubly dated: Not not only does it praise a type of phone which is long since obsolete, but it describes people freely using them while driving -- even to ''call the highway patrol and report a drunk driver'' -- without any suspicion that doing so will soon be illegal.



* ''Website/{{Cracked}}'''s [[http://www.cracked.com/article_19325_6-technologies-conspicuously-absent-from-sci-fi-movies.html 6 Technologies Conspicuously Absent From Sci-Fi Movies]] explores technologies widely available when several well-known science fiction films were first published that would have completely [[TropeBreaker broken]] their plots: Bicycles, night vision goggles, unmanned combat vehicles, Wi-Fi, GPS, and cell phones.

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* ''Website/{{Cracked}}'''s [[http://www.cracked.com/article_19325_6-technologies-conspicuously-absent-from-sci-fi-movies.html 6 Technologies Conspicuously Absent From Sci-Fi Movies]] explores technologies widely available when several well-known science fiction films were first published that would have completely [[TropeBreaker broken]] their plots: Bicycles, bicycles, night vision goggles, unmanned combat vehicles, Wi-Fi, GPS, and cell phones.



** This point is raised in Polly Toynbee's book ''Hard Work'', about minimum wage jobs in the UK, in relation to unemployed people having mobile phones. She points out that if you're looking for work you need to have access to your phone at all times: One missed call from an employment agency and a potential job opportunity is lost.

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** This point is raised in Polly Toynbee's book ''Hard Work'', about minimum wage jobs in the UK, in relation to unemployed people having mobile phones. She points out that if you're looking for work you need to have access to your phone at all times: One one missed call from an employment agency and a potential job opportunity is lost.



* In the past in North America, apartment buildings were equipped with buzzers that were basically columns of buttons: Each button was hard-wired to a console in one of the apartments, where tenants would be advised of visitors by a literal buzz coming from the console. (You can see this in ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys''.) As buildings became larger (and as tenants balked at the ugly plastic consoles that disfigured their walls), a new system was devised whereby the buzzer on the main floor was instead connected to a telephone line and would send the buzz instead directly to the tenant's telephone. (Still used in many gated communities and apartment complexes.) Unfortunately, tenants don't always have landlines, so the buzzer would often be connected to a cellphone number -- which could be both expensive and insecure if the tenant were out of town or had an out-of-town cellphone number. This is why landlords often specify that tenants must have landline phones. (Apartment buildings outside of North America may still have the old style of buzzer due not just to the above problems but also because in many countries it can take months to get a landline telephone installed.)

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* In the past in North America, apartment buildings were equipped with buzzers that were basically columns of buttons: Each each button was hard-wired to a console in one of the apartments, where tenants would be advised of visitors by a literal buzz coming from the console. (You can see this in ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys''.) As buildings became larger (and as tenants balked at the ugly plastic consoles that disfigured their walls), a new system was devised whereby the buzzer on the main floor was instead connected to a telephone line and would send the buzz instead directly to the tenant's telephone. (Still used in many gated communities and apartment complexes.) Unfortunately, tenants don't always have landlines, so the buzzer would often be connected to a cellphone number -- which could be both expensive and insecure if the tenant were out of town or had an out-of-town cellphone number. This is why landlords often specify that tenants must have landline phones. (Apartment buildings outside of North America may still have the old style of buzzer due not just to the above problems but also because in many countries it can take months to get a landline telephone installed.)



** The chimes, themselves, were the descendants of an even older obsolete technology: The use of differently pitched bell-pulls to summon household servants in wealthy homes. Household intercoms and/or cell calls are the norm now.

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** The chimes, themselves, were the descendants of an even older obsolete technology: The the use of differently pitched bell-pulls to summon household servants in wealthy homes. Household intercoms and/or cell calls are the norm now.



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* ''[[Literature/MakeRoomMakeRoom Make Room! Make Room!]]'' (the book on which ''Film/SoylentGreen'' is loosely based): The year is 1999. As stated in the book:

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* ''[[Literature/MakeRoomMakeRoom Make Room! Make Room!]]'' (the book on which ''Film/SoylentGreen'' is loosely based): The the year is 1999. As stated in the book:



** The second is that fluorescent and some older LED bulbs flicker: Fluorescent tubes glow very briefly and need a constant hammering of electrons to stay "constant", while older LED type bulbs are driven by pulse width modulation (PWM), where the LED shifts rapidly between on and off, the proportions of which give off a certain level of light. For some more sensitive people, this causes headaches, and it can be very irritating to many people on the autism spectrum, who can see the flicker and hear the constant humming. The flickering of fluorescent and LED bulbs is dangerous for machines that reciprocate or rotate. If the machine is going at the correct frequency, it may appear to be going slower than it really is, or in the opposite direction, a phenomenon called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagon_wheel_effect Wagon-Wheel Effect]]. This problem is made worse by the fact that some electric motor designs want to spin at a speed directly related to the AC power line frequency (which is what LED and fluorescent lights normally flicker at). While all three can also be made to not flicker at the line frequency, it takes extra components (and extra cost) so it's not normally done unless there's a reason.
** However, [[TitleDrop Tech Marches On]] once again: Newer [=LEDs=] are current-controlled and as such flicker-free save for minimal amounts of noise, PWM technology has been improved to the point where the pulses vary at tens of thousands of hertz, far above the most sensitive human's perception. CRI has also been taken into account, and LED's can come in colors varying from a milder version of fluorescent lighting (cool white) all the way to a 60w incandescent bulb's (warm white).

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** The second is that fluorescent and some older LED bulbs flicker: Fluorescent fluorescent tubes glow very briefly and need a constant hammering of electrons to stay "constant", while older LED type bulbs are driven by pulse width modulation (PWM), where the LED shifts rapidly between on and off, the proportions of which give off a certain level of light. For some more sensitive people, this causes headaches, and it can be very irritating to many people on the autism spectrum, who can see the flicker and hear the constant humming. The flickering of fluorescent and LED bulbs is dangerous for machines that reciprocate or rotate. If the machine is going at the correct frequency, it may appear to be going slower than it really is, or in the opposite direction, a phenomenon called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagon_wheel_effect Wagon-Wheel Effect]]. This problem is made worse by the fact that some electric motor designs want to spin at a speed directly related to the AC power line frequency (which is what LED and fluorescent lights normally flicker at). While all three can also be made to not flicker at the line frequency, it takes extra components (and extra cost) so it's not normally done unless there's a reason.
** However, [[TitleDrop Tech Marches On]] once again: Newer newer [=LEDs=] are current-controlled and as such flicker-free save for minimal amounts of noise, PWM technology has been improved to the point where the pulses vary at tens of thousands of hertz, far above the most sensitive human's perception. CRI has also been taken into account, and LED's can come in colors varying from a milder version of fluorescent lighting (cool white) all the way to a 60w incandescent bulb's (warm white).



** The editing is cheaper than it might appear. Editing on film requires large quantities of film, lots of chemistry, and lots of time. In contrast, you can do a year's worth of film editing in two weeks on digital editing equipment, meaning you can quite feasibly rent the editing rig instead of buying it, and the film processing lab, and hiring all the support staff needed for it, and come out ahead, even if you don't already have a more-or-less finished idea of how the film needs to come together (which is almost a necessity in editing on film). Home [=PCs=] are to the point now where there's really only two things inhibiting private production of Hollywood-quality feature films: It's hard to get hold of the specialized video cards needed for the special image format used in high-end digital movie editing, and the cameras available on the home market usually have tricky restrictions built into the licensing agreements for the video and audio [=CODEC=]s they use.

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** The editing is cheaper than it might appear. Editing on film requires large quantities of film, lots of chemistry, and lots of time. In contrast, you can do a year's worth of film editing in two weeks on digital editing equipment, meaning you can quite feasibly rent the editing rig instead of buying it, and the film processing lab, and hiring all the support staff needed for it, and come out ahead, even if you don't already have a more-or-less finished idea of how the film needs to come together (which is almost a necessity in editing on film). Home [=PCs=] are to the point now where there's really only two things inhibiting private production of Hollywood-quality feature films: It's it's hard to get hold of the specialized video cards needed for the special image format used in high-end digital movie editing, and the cameras available on the home market usually have tricky restrictions built into the licensing agreements for the video and audio [=CODEC=]s they use.



* Another thing people tend to forget these days is that before the year 2000, basic cable was both more prevalent (to the extent that roughly half of the households that even ''had'' cable in a given neighborhood only had the basic package) and didn't include major networks like Creator/USANetwork (which was a big part of why, to name a random example, Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro [[{{Wrestling/MondayNightWars}} maintained its ratings stranglehold over]] [[{{Wrestling/WWERaw}} WWF Monday Night Raw]] for nearly two years, because Creator/{{TNT}} was on basic cable).

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* Another thing people tend to forget these days is that before the year 2000, basic cable was both more prevalent (to the extent that roughly half of the households that even ''had'' cable in a given neighborhood only had the basic package) and didn't include major networks like Creator/USANetwork (which was a big part of why, to name a random example, Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro [[{{Wrestling/MondayNightWars}} ''Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro'' [[Wrestling/MondayNightWars maintained its ratings stranglehold over]] [[{{Wrestling/WWERaw}} ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw WWF Monday Night Raw]] Raw]]'' for nearly two years, because Creator/{{TNT}} was on basic cable).



** As the 1955 Doc looks at Marty's camcorder, he says "Now this is truly amazing: A portable television studio. No wonder [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan your president is an actor]], he's got to look good on television!"

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** As the 1955 Doc looks at Marty's camcorder, he says "Now this is truly amazing: A a portable television studio. No wonder [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan your president is an actor]], he's got to look good on television!"



* {{Lampshaded}} in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' when Hank is showing off his device that enables him to record ''...[[{{Creator/CBS}} all]] [[{{Creator/NBC}} three]] [[{{Creator/ABC}} networks]] [[{{MyFriendsAndZoidberg}} and]] Creator/{{PBS}}."
-->'''[[{{FishOutOfTemporalWater}} Logan]]''' ''(Sarcasticly)'': All three? Wow!

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* {{Lampshaded}} {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' when Hank is showing off his device that enables him to record ''...[[{{Creator/CBS}} all]] [[{{Creator/NBC}} three]] [[{{Creator/ABC}} networks]] [[{{MyFriendsAndZoidberg}} [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and]] Creator/{{PBS}}."
-->'''[[{{FishOutOfTemporalWater}} Logan]]''' ''(Sarcasticly)'': ''(Sarcastically)'': All three? Wow!



* In ''Literature/RedDragon'', the killer works as a film developer for home movies, a profession now decades obsolete. The film updates this to him working in film-to-video transfer... ''another'' profession that, if not yet ''completely'' obsolete, is now so obscure that it's a story-breaker: If ''both'' victimized families had been having old filmstrips transferred to video, the FBI's investigators would have noted this incongruity as an immediate common link without the profilers' help.
* At one point in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', Dudley is complaining about the fact that Vernon taking the household to a rickety old shack on an offshore rock in an [[ItWasHisSled ultimately futile attempt to throw off pursuit by Hagrid]] means he'll miss one of his favorite TV shows. This happens in late July of 1991. If it were set today, while Dudley, being [[{{SpoiledBrat}} Dudley]], would still complain, it wouldn't mean quite as much. If anything, a first-time reader (especially if they aren't aware of the time-frame, which wasn't firmly established until ''Deathly Hallows'') will simply be confused about why Dudley is so upset at all.
* The Beverly Cleary novel ''Literature/MitchAndAmy'', which is set in the 1950s, features a number of diatribes from the title characters' father. He not only takes a great deal of issue with his children watching television, he seems to object to the fact that the family ''owns'' one. Viewed through a modern lens, this comes across as exceedingly strange.

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* In ''Literature/RedDragon'', the killer works as a film developer for home movies, a profession now decades obsolete. The film updates this to him working in film-to-video transfer... ''another'' profession that, if not yet ''completely'' obsolete, is now so obscure that it's a story-breaker: If if ''both'' victimized families had been having old filmstrips transferred to video, the FBI's investigators would have noted this incongruity as an immediate common link without the profilers' help.
* At one point in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', Dudley is complaining about the fact that Vernon taking the household to a rickety old shack on an offshore rock in an [[ItWasHisSled ultimately futile attempt to throw off pursuit by Hagrid]] Hagrid means he'll miss one of his favorite TV shows. This happens in late July of 1991. If it were set today, while Dudley, being [[{{SpoiledBrat}} [[SpoiledBrat Dudley]], would still complain, it wouldn't mean quite as much. If anything, a first-time reader (especially if they aren't aware of the time-frame, which wasn't firmly established until ''Deathly Hallows'') will simply be confused about why Dudley is so upset at all.
* The Beverly Cleary Creator/BeverlyCleary novel ''Literature/MitchAndAmy'', which is set in the 1950s, features a number of diatribes from the title characters' father. He not only takes a great deal of issue with his children watching television, he seems to object to the fact that the family ''owns'' one. Viewed through a modern lens, this comes across as exceedingly strange.



* In a ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' article about the fifty worst things about the internet, one panel showed a family huddled around their computer watching a movie on Netflix on their tiny monitor, while their large beautiful flatscreen TV sat in the background unused. The issue came out in 2009; nowadays there are several ways to watch streaming sites through your TV (even back then, the family could have used an HDMI cable to plug the computer into the TV if they ''really'' wanted to). Hell, many [=TVs=] now have online connectivity, eliminating the need for a middleman altogether.

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* In a ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' article about the fifty worst things about the internet, Internet, one panel showed a family huddled around their computer watching a movie on Netflix on their tiny monitor, while their large beautiful flatscreen TV sat in the background unused. The issue came out in 2009; nowadays there are several ways to watch streaming sites through your TV (even back then, the family could have used an HDMI cable to plug the computer into the TV if they ''really'' wanted to). Hell, many [=TVs=] now have online connectivity, eliminating the need for a middleman altogether.



* In April 2016, the National Weather Service [[http://www.noaa.gov/national-weather-service-will-stop-using-all-caps-its-forecasts announced that they would stop "shouting" at viewers]]. For decades, they transmitted their weather reports using teletype, essentially a typewriter connected to a phone line, which only allowed for all-caps, MEANING THEIR FORECASTS WOULD ALWAYS LOOK LIKE THIS. It worked fine for most of the 20th century, but once the internet took off in the '90s and teletype became obsolete, using all caps implied yelling, especially in forecasts posted to social media. They ''wanted'' to start using mixed cases back then, but unsurprisingly for a government agency, it took them an extra twenty years to completely phase out the old equipment that only accepted teletype.

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* In April 2016, the National Weather Service [[http://www.noaa.gov/national-weather-service-will-stop-using-all-caps-its-forecasts announced that they would stop "shouting" at viewers]]. For decades, they transmitted their weather reports using teletype, essentially a typewriter connected to a phone line, which only allowed for all-caps, MEANING THEIR FORECASTS WOULD ALWAYS LOOK LIKE THIS. It worked fine for most of the 20th century, but once the internet Internet took off in the '90s and teletype became obsolete, using all caps implied yelling, especially in forecasts posted to social media. They ''wanted'' to start using mixed cases back then, but unsurprisingly for a government agency, it took them an extra twenty years to completely phase out the old equipment that only accepted teletype.



* ''VideoGame/{{Resident Evil|1}}'' has typewriters acting as save points and a slide projection for a puzzle hint. The game takes place in 1998, which wouldn't make typewriters and slides look too out of place, but typewriters had already fallen out of common use by that point. It makes sense in the setting of the first game though, which took place in a seemingly abandoned old mansion, but the franchise kept using typewriters throughout the sequels, with many of them spread out throughout Raccoon City in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' and ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil3''. ''ResidentEvil5'' would be the first game to abandon the typewriter system in favor of simply having auto-saves after each checkpoint.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Resident Evil|1}}'' has typewriters acting as save points and a slide projection for a puzzle hint. The game takes place in 1998, which wouldn't make typewriters and slides look too out of place, but typewriters had already fallen out of common use by that point. It makes sense in the setting of the first game though, which took place in a seemingly abandoned old mansion, but the franchise kept using typewriters throughout the sequels, with many of them spread out throughout Raccoon City in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' and ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil3''. ''ResidentEvil5'' ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' would be the first game to abandon the typewriter system in favor of simply having auto-saves after each checkpoint.
1st Oct '17 4:15:59 AM ClintEastwood
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* The first episode of the '60s series ''Series/ThePrisoner'' uses a cordless phone as an eerie, impossible-seeming device that the protagonist does a double take at. Though it does still have an odd {{Zeerust}} design so nowadays it can seem like that's what he's noticing.

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* The first episode of the '60s series ''Series/ThePrisoner'' ''Series/ThePrisoner1967'' uses a cordless phone as an eerie, impossible-seeming device that the protagonist does a double take at. Though it does still have an odd {{Zeerust}} design so nowadays it can seem like that's what he's noticing.
30th Sep '17 4:06:29 PM DesertDragon
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* The folk-legend that [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires don't show up in mirrors or photography]] is because mirrors used to consist of a thin sheet of silver protected by glass, and silver compounds were used in film, in addition to the reflex mirror inside the camera. [[SilverBullet Silver is considered a holy substance]], hence why nothing undead would show up in it. But mirrors nowadays use cheaper aluminum for its reflective surface, a much less "picky" metal, and digital photography has all but replaced film and the silver-based emulsion fluids that went with it. There's also the fact that a vampire who doesn't appear on camera means not appearing in security footage, smartphones, or the media, which would remove the dramatic tension of maintaining the {{Masquerade}}. As a result, this has become a ForgottenTrope in modern-day vampire fiction.
* A once-popular method of suicide that still occasionally comes up in fiction is sticking one's head in the oven. Young people might see this and get confused ("Is he going to ''cook'' himself to death?"), but older gas ranges didn't automatically light. Turning the nob simply released the gas, and you'd light it yourself. That is, unless you're suicidal, in which case you'd lay your head on the oven floor until you drifted off to eternal slumber. And if you're wondering how they could tolerate the smell, carbon monoxide is naturally odorless; gas companies started adding that distinctive scent in the 90's as a safety measure to alert people when there's a leak.

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* The folk-legend that [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires don't show up in mirrors or photography]] is because mirrors used to consist of a thin sheet of silver protected by glass, and silver compounds were used in film, in addition to the reflex mirror inside the camera. [[SilverBullet Silver is considered a holy substance]], hence why nothing undead would show up in it. But mirrors nowadays use cheaper aluminum for its reflective surface, a much less "picky" metal, and digital photography has all but replaced film and the silver-based emulsion fluids that went with it. There's also the fact that a vampire who doesn't appear on camera means not appearing in security footage, smartphones, or the media, which would remove the dramatic tension of maintaining the {{Masquerade}}. {{Masquerade}} in the modern day. As a result, this has become a ForgottenTrope in modern-day vampire fiction.
* A once-popular method of suicide that still occasionally comes up in fiction is sticking one's head in the oven. Young people might see this and get confused ("Is he going to ''cook'' himself to death?"), but older gas ranges didn't automatically light. Turning the nob simply released the gas, and you'd light it yourself. That is, unless you're suicidal, in which case you'd lay your head on the oven floor until you drifted off to eternal slumber. And if you're wondering how they could tolerate the smell, carbon monoxide is naturally odorless; gas companies started adding that distinctive scent in the 90's as a safety measure to alert people when there's a leak.
22nd Sep '17 6:19:37 PM DesertDragon
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* The folk-legend that [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires don't show up in mirrors or photography]] is because mirrors used to consist of a thin sheet of silver protected by glass, and silver compounds were used in film, in addition to the reflex mirror inside the camera. [[SilverBullet Silver is considered a "pure" substance]], hence why nothing undead would show up in it. But mirrors nowadays use cheaper aluminum for its reflective surface, a much less "picky" metal, and digital photography has all but replaced film and the silver-based emulsion fluids that went with it. There's also the fact that a vampire who doesn't appear on camera means not appearing in security footage, smartphones, the media, and so on, which would make maintaining the {{Masquerade}} far too easy in this day and age. As a result, this has become a ForgottenTrope for modern-day vampire fiction.

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* The folk-legend that [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires don't show up in mirrors or photography]] is because mirrors used to consist of a thin sheet of silver protected by glass, and silver compounds were used in film, in addition to the reflex mirror inside the camera. [[SilverBullet Silver is considered a "pure" holy substance]], hence why nothing undead would show up in it. But mirrors nowadays use cheaper aluminum for its reflective surface, a much less "picky" metal, and digital photography has all but replaced film and the silver-based emulsion fluids that went with it. There's also the fact that a vampire who doesn't appear on camera means not appearing in security footage, smartphones, or the media, and so on, which would make remove the dramatic tension of maintaining the {{Masquerade}} far too easy in this day and age. {{Masquerade}}. As a result, this has become a ForgottenTrope for in modern-day vampire fiction.fiction.
* A once-popular method of suicide that still occasionally comes up in fiction is sticking one's head in the oven. Young people might see this and get confused ("Is he going to ''cook'' himself to death?"), but older gas ranges didn't automatically light. Turning the nob simply released the gas, and you'd light it yourself. That is, unless you're suicidal, in which case you'd lay your head on the oven floor until you drifted off to eternal slumber. And if you're wondering how they could tolerate the smell, carbon monoxide is naturally odorless; gas companies started adding that distinctive scent in the 90's as a safety measure to alert people when there's a leak.
20th Sep '17 8:41:24 PM LadyNorbert
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* ''Film/{{Zoolander}}'' (2001) is an odd half-example. The joke is that Derek's cell phone is teeny-tiny, less than an inch long, again in reference to his pampered lifestyle and expensive tastes. But it's still [[TheAestheticsOfTechnology a black, only slightly flattened brick]], with its little antenna. It [[HilariousInHindsight failed to anticipate]] that the advent of smart phones would stop dead the trend they were exaggerating.

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* ''Film/{{Zoolander}}'' (2001) is an odd half-example. The joke is that Derek's cell phone is teeny-tiny, less than an inch long, again in reference to his pampered lifestyle and expensive tastes. But it's still [[TheAestheticsOfTechnology a black, only slightly flattened brick]], with its little antenna. It [[HilariousInHindsight failed to anticipate]] that the advent of smart phones smartphones would stop dead the trend they were exaggerating.



* ''Film/{{Clueless}}'' (released in 1995) is a bit of an odd example: The teen protagonist and her friends all have cellphones...which was meant to show how ridiculously ''wealthy and privileged they were''. Since nowadays every teenager regardless of social class has a cell phone, anyone watching the film today would simply comment on how dated the phones look. Likewise, the scene where the girls are [[ShortDistancePhoneCall talking to each other on the phone while walking side-by-side]] isn't quite so hilarious because, even if they're overwhelmingly texting each other rather than talking nowadays, it's entirely possible to see people doing this ''in real life''.

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* ''Film/{{Clueless}}'' (released in 1995) is a bit of an odd example: The teen protagonist and her friends all have cellphones... which was meant to show how ridiculously ''wealthy and privileged they were''. Since nowadays every teenager regardless of social class has a cell phone, anyone watching the film today would simply comment on how dated the phones look. Likewise, the scene where the girls are [[ShortDistancePhoneCall talking to each other on the phone while walking side-by-side]] isn't quite so hilarious because, even if they're overwhelmingly texting each other rather than talking nowadays, it's entirely possible to see people doing this ''in real life''.



* In ''Film/TheRef'', the OneLastJob of cat burglar Gus goes badly wrong, and he forces a local upper middle class couple to hide him from police patrols in their house. There's a problem though: It's Christmas Eve, and the extended family is already on the road, so there's no possible way to cancel them coming over now! Instead they have to improvise by having Gus pretend to be the dysfunctional couple's marriage counselor, pretending to attend the dinner with them. The film came out in '94; it's a pretty safe bet that within the next five years or so the extended family would have had cell phones and could have been called off with a convincing lie.

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* In ''Film/TheRef'', the OneLastJob of cat burglar Gus goes badly wrong, and he forces a local upper middle class couple to hide him from police patrols in their house. There's a problem though: It's it's Christmas Eve, and the extended family is already on the road, so there's no possible way to cancel them coming over now! Instead they have to improvise by having Gus pretend to be the dysfunctional couple's marriage counselor, pretending to attend the dinner with them. The film came out in '94; it's a pretty safe bet that within the next five years or so the extended family would have had cell phones and could have been called off with a convincing lie.



* In the original Literature/NancyDrew and Literature/HardyBoys books, there was almost always a scene of someone ''scrambling'' to find a pay phone to call for help. In the newest books, they just zip off text messages. It makes trying to get a kid interested in the old books difficult when they keep asking "what's a payphone?"

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* In the original Literature/NancyDrew and Literature/HardyBoys books, there was almost always a scene of someone ''scrambling'' to find a pay phone to call for help. In the newest books, they just zip off text messages. It makes trying to get a kid interested in the old books difficult when they keep asking "what's "What's a payphone?"pay phone?"



* In ''Literature/TheBabySittersClub'', published in the late '80s-early '90s, a big deal is made of Claudia's having her own phone line so that they can use it as the Babysitter's Club number.

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* In ''Literature/TheBabySittersClub'', published in the late '80s-early '90s, a big deal is made of Claudia's having her own phone line so that they can use it as the Babysitter's Club number.Club's number. Nowadays, of course, the girls would all have their own phones.



* One of the frustrations with Mr. Quimby's unemployment in ''[[Literature/RamonaQuimby Ramona and Her Father]]'' is the fact that he, and by extension, Ramona has to stick close to the phone for calls about job interviews, making for many boring afternoons with a cranky father.

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* One of the frustrations with Mr. Quimby's unemployment in ''[[Literature/RamonaQuimby Ramona and Her Father]]'' is the fact that he, and he (and, by extension, Ramona Ramona) has to stick close to the phone for calls about job interviews, making for many boring afternoons with a cranky father.



* In ''Literature/TigerEyes'', the FramingDevice for the entire novel is the death of protagonist Davey's father. He dies while waiting for an ambulance to arrive, and part of the reason it takes so long for the ambulance to get there is because it has to be called from a pay phone due to their location. If the book were being written today, the entire situation would have to be done completely differently.



* In the short-lived Creator/MayimBialik vehicle ''Molloy'', the title character's father buys a fancy sports car. Part of the big excitement about the vehicle is the fact that the car has its own phone; Molloy's selfish stepsister even calls the house on it and tries to get her mother to bring breakfast out ''to'' the car.



* Sheeler & Sheeler's 1990 parody of "Convoy", "Car Phone", is doubly dated: Not only does it praise a type of phone which is long since obsolete, but it describes people freely using them while driving -- even to ''call the highway patrol and report a drunk driver'' -- without any suspicion that doing so will soon be illegal.
* The coke dealer who narrates Music/SteelyDan's 1980 song "Glamour Profession" subtly brags about having a car phone ("''When it's all over / We'll make some calls from my car / We're a star''"), as a benefit of having high-end customers like pro athletes. By the late 1990s even street-level dealers had their own cellphones.

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* Sheeler & Sheeler's 1990 parody of "Convoy", "Car Phone", Phone," is doubly dated: Not only does it praise a type of phone which is long since obsolete, but it describes people freely using them while driving -- even to ''call the highway patrol and report a drunk driver'' -- without any suspicion that doing so will soon be illegal.
* The coke dealer who narrates Music/SteelyDan's 1980 song "Glamour Profession" subtly brags about having a car phone ("''When it's all over / We'll make some calls from my car / We're a star''"), as a benefit of having high-end customers like pro athletes. By the late 1990s 1990s, even street-level dealers had their own cellphones.



** The earlier episode "Bart Gets Famous" (1994) had Bart given one only because he was Krusty's assistant. If the episode aired today the joke of an elementary school student answering a phone in class wouldn't be as funny.

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** The earlier episode "Bart Gets Famous" (1994) had Bart given one only because he was Krusty's assistant. If the episode aired today today, the joke of an elementary school student answering a phone in class wouldn't be as funny.



* This was mentioned in a true-crime documentary about an unsolved homicide of a taxi driver near Edinburgh in 1983. Two teenage witnesses who saw the crime in progress cycled two miles to a nearby hotel to get to a telephone. One of the original case detectives observed that had mobile telephones been common then the police would have been alerted much sooner and the perpetrator perhaps would've been caught.
* Many older humans mention that if someone got on the wrong train or off at the wrong bus stop they'd have to hope that the person they missed either waited for them or followed them to the right station or stop. Could go very very wrong if people's instincts were different.

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* This was mentioned in a true-crime documentary about an unsolved homicide of a taxi driver near Edinburgh in 1983. Two teenage witnesses who saw the crime in progress cycled two miles to a nearby hotel to get to a telephone. One of the original case detectives observed that had mobile telephones been common then then, the police would have been alerted much sooner and the perpetrator perhaps would've been caught.
* Many older humans mention that if someone got on the wrong train or off at the wrong bus stop stop, they'd have to hope that the person they missed either waited for them or followed them to the right station or stop. Could go very very wrong if people's instincts were different.



* For people that work in facilities that deal with confidential information there is actually a battle to get CD players. Since facilities trying to protect confidential information may not allow phones or MP3 players, for fear of someone saving information on them and walking out the door with it, but generally will allow older cd and tape players. The problem is some areas no longer stock CD players, so if you want to be able to listen to music at your office you're going to have to find an old player that still works. If your office is large you may be fighting hundreds of other people who are also stalking the local thrift stores for this outdated technology. Still, it's a pretty niche need.

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* For people that work in facilities that deal with confidential information there is actually a battle to get CD players. Since facilities trying to protect confidential information may not allow phones or MP3 players, for fear of someone saving information on them and walking out the door with it, but generally will allow older cd CD and tape players. The problem is some areas no longer stock CD players, so if you want to be able to listen to music at your office you're going to have to find an old player that still works. If your office is large you may be fighting hundreds of other people who are also stalking the local thrift stores for this outdated technology. Still, it's a pretty niche need.



** First, when Marty dines with his future maternal family in 1955, Lorraine asks whether his family owns a television set, to which Marty says "Yeah, you know we have two of 'em...", making her younger brother say "Wow, you must be rich!", to which their mother says "Oh, honey, he's just teasing you. Nobody owns two television sets!"

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** First, when Marty dines with his future maternal family in 1955, Lorraine asks whether his family owns a television set, to which Marty says says, "Yeah, you know we have two of 'em...", making her younger brother say "Wow, you must be rich!", to which their mother says says, "Oh, honey, he's just teasing you. Nobody owns two television sets!"



* In ''Literature/RedDragon'', the killer works as a film developer for home movies, a profession now decades obsolete. The film updates this to him working in film-to-video transfer ... ''another'' profession that, if not yet ''completely'' obsolete, is now so obscure that it's a story-breaker: If ''both'' victimized families had been having old filmstrips transferred to video, the FBI's investigators would have noted this incongruity as an immediate common link without the profilers' help.
* At one point in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', Dudley is complaining about the fact that Vernon taking the household to a rickety old shack on an offshore rock in an [[{{ItWasHisSled}} ultimately futile attempt to throw off pursuit by Hagrid]] means he'll miss one of his favorite TV shows. This happens in late July of 1991. If it were set today, while Dudley, being [[{{SpoiledBrat}} Dudley]], would still complain, it wouldn't mean quite as much. If anything, a first-time reader (especially if they aren't aware of the time-frame, which wasn't firmly established until ''Deathly Hallows'') will simply be confused about why Dudley is so upset at all.

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* In ''Literature/RedDragon'', the killer works as a film developer for home movies, a profession now decades obsolete. The film updates this to him working in film-to-video transfer ...transfer... ''another'' profession that, if not yet ''completely'' obsolete, is now so obscure that it's a story-breaker: If ''both'' victimized families had been having old filmstrips transferred to video, the FBI's investigators would have noted this incongruity as an immediate common link without the profilers' help.
* At one point in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', Dudley is complaining about the fact that Vernon taking the household to a rickety old shack on an offshore rock in an [[{{ItWasHisSled}} [[ItWasHisSled ultimately futile attempt to throw off pursuit by Hagrid]] means he'll miss one of his favorite TV shows. This happens in late July of 1991. If it were set today, while Dudley, being [[{{SpoiledBrat}} Dudley]], would still complain, it wouldn't mean quite as much. If anything, a first-time reader (especially if they aren't aware of the time-frame, which wasn't firmly established until ''Deathly Hallows'') will simply be confused about why Dudley is so upset at all.all.
* The Beverly Cleary novel ''Literature/MitchAndAmy'', which is set in the 1950s, features a number of diatribes from the title characters' father. He not only takes a great deal of issue with his children watching television, he seems to object to the fact that the family ''owns'' one. Viewed through a modern lens, this comes across as exceedingly strange.



* One of ''Series/{{MADtv}}'s'' earliest regular sketches was "Lowered Expectations", a video dating service for EXTREMELY maladjusted individuals. Despite being hilarious, the sketches quickly became dated due to the rise of [[DatingServiceDisaster online dating]], which rendered video dating services obsolete. As a result, the sketch was quietly retired by the late '90s.

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* One of ''Series/{{MADtv}}'s'' earliest regular sketches was "Lowered Expectations", a video dating service for EXTREMELY ''extremely'' maladjusted individuals. Despite being hilarious, the sketches quickly became dated due to the rise of [[DatingServiceDisaster online dating]], which rendered video dating services obsolete. As a result, the sketch was quietly retired by the late '90s.



* In a ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' article about the fifty worst things about the internet, one panel showed a family huddled around their computer watching a movie on Netflix on their tiny monitor, while their large beautiful flatscreen TV sat in the background unused. The issue came out in 2009; nowadays there are several ways to watch streaming sites through your TV (even back then, the family could have used an HDMI cable to plug the computer into the TV if they ''really'' wanted to). Hell, many TV's now have online connectivity, eliminating the need for a middleman altogether.

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* In a ''Magazine/{{Mad}}'' article about the fifty worst things about the internet, one panel showed a family huddled around their computer watching a movie on Netflix on their tiny monitor, while their large beautiful flatscreen TV sat in the background unused. The issue came out in 2009; nowadays there are several ways to watch streaming sites through your TV (even back then, the family could have used an HDMI cable to plug the computer into the TV if they ''really'' wanted to). Hell, many TV's [=TVs=] now have online connectivity, eliminating the need for a middleman altogether.



* From ''Music/TheWall'' the alienated rockstar complains he's "Got thirteen channels of shit on the T.V. to choose from." Music/BruceSpringsteen claims "57 channels and nothin' on." These days it's more likely to be hundreds of channels of shit.

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* From ''Music/TheWall'' the alienated rockstar complains he's "Got thirteen channels of shit on the T.V. TV to choose from." Music/BruceSpringsteen claims "57 channels and nothin' on." These days it's more likely to be hundreds of channels of shit.



* ''Radio/OurMissBrooks'': A particularly glaring example of "Technology Marches On" occurs in the episode "The Tape Recorder". Walter Denton causes trouble by purchasing an outrageously expensive tape recorder ($385 in 1950 funds!) for Madison High School -- in the grips of Mr. Conklin's latest economy drive. [[http://www.prestohistory.com/Presto5.html A circa 1950 tape recorder, incidentally, isn't a small device, but one of the huge reel-to-reel affairs seen here]]. HilarityEnsues as Miss Brooks and Mr. Conklin are forced to explain the purchase to school board head Mr. Stone. Even more HilarityEnsues when the records Walter Denton made are played back in a mixed-up state.

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* ''Radio/OurMissBrooks'': A particularly glaring example of "Technology Technology Marches On" On occurs in the episode "The Tape Recorder". Walter Denton causes trouble by purchasing an outrageously expensive tape recorder ($385 in 1950 funds!) for Madison High School -- in the grips of Mr. Conklin's latest economy drive. [[http://www.prestohistory.com/Presto5.html A circa 1950 tape recorder, incidentally, isn't a small device, but one of the huge reel-to-reel affairs seen here]]. HilarityEnsues as Miss Brooks and Mr. Conklin are forced to explain the purchase to school board head Mr. Stone. Even more HilarityEnsues when the records Walter Denton made are played back in a mixed-up state.
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