History Main / TechnologyMarchesOn

28th Jun '17 8:23:45 AM HumanTorch2
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* At one point in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', Dudley is complaining about the fact that Vernon taking the household to a rickety old shack on an offshore rock in an [[{{ItWasHisSled}} ultimately futile attempt to throw off pursuit by Hagrid]] means he'll miss one of his favorite TV shows. This happens in late July of 1991. If it were set today, while Dudley, being [[{{SpoiledBrat}} Dudley]], would still complain, it wouldn't mean quite as much. If anything, a first-time reader (especially if they aren't aware of the time-frame, which wasn't firmly established until ''Deathly Hallows'') will be more confused about why Dudley is so upset at all than anything.

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* At one point in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', Dudley is complaining about the fact that Vernon taking the household to a rickety old shack on an offshore rock in an [[{{ItWasHisSled}} ultimately futile attempt to throw off pursuit by Hagrid]] means he'll miss one of his favorite TV shows. This happens in late July of 1991. If it were set today, while Dudley, being [[{{SpoiledBrat}} Dudley]], would still complain, it wouldn't mean quite as much. If anything, a first-time reader (especially if they aren't aware of the time-frame, which wasn't firmly established until ''Deathly Hallows'') will simply be more confused about why Dudley is so upset at all than anything.all.
28th Jun '17 7:58:35 AM HumanTorch2
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* {{Lampsaded}} in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' when Hank is showing off his device that enables him to record ''...[[{{Creator/CBS}} all]] [[{{Creator/NBC}} three]] [[{{Creator/ABC}} networks]] [[{{MyFriendsAndZoidberg}} and]] Creator/{{PBS}}."

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* {{Lampsaded}} {{Lampshaded}} in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' when Hank is showing off his device that enables him to record ''...[[{{Creator/CBS}} all]] [[{{Creator/NBC}} three]] [[{{Creator/ABC}} networks]] [[{{MyFriendsAndZoidberg}} and]] Creator/{{PBS}}."
28th Jun '17 7:32:38 AM HumanTorch2
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'''Hank''' ''(Not getting it)'': And [=PBS=].

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'''Hank''' -->'''Hank''' ''(Not getting it)'': And [=PBS=].
28th Jun '17 7:30:31 AM HumanTorch2
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Lampsaded}} in ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'' when Hank is showing off his device that enables him to record ''...[[{{Creator/CBS}} all]] [[{{Creator/NBC}} three]] [[{{Creator/ABC}} networks]] [[{{MyFriendsAndZoidberg}} and]] Creator/{{PBS}}."
-->'''[[{{FishOutOfTemporalWater}} Logan]]''' ''(Sarcasticly)'': All three? Wow!
'''Hank''' ''(Not getting it)'': And [=PBS=].
28th Jun '17 7:18:10 AM HumanTorch2
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Added DiffLines:

* At one point in ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'', Dudley is complaining about the fact that Vernon taking the household to a rickety old shack on an offshore rock in an [[{{ItWasHisSled}} ultimately futile attempt to throw off pursuit by Hagrid]] means he'll miss one of his favorite TV shows. This happens in late July of 1991. If it were set today, while Dudley, being [[{{SpoiledBrat}} Dudley]], would still complain, it wouldn't mean quite as much. If anything, a first-time reader (especially if they aren't aware of the time-frame, which wasn't firmly established until ''Deathly Hallows'') will be more confused about why Dudley is so upset at all than anything.
22nd Jun '17 5:56:47 PM Quanyails
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* Literature/TheCavesOfSteel. Everyone lives in {{megacit|y}}ies, almost all the food is yeast, efficiency is necessary to the point of a personal cubicle in the communal bathroom being a luxury, and there is strict PopulationControl. Population? Eight billion.

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* Literature/TheCavesOfSteel.''Literature/TheCavesOfSteel''. Everyone lives in {{megacit|y}}ies, almost all the food is yeast, efficiency is necessary to the point of a personal cubicle in the communal bathroom being a luxury, and there is strict PopulationControl. Population? Eight billion.



* Literature/{{Foundation}}. Trantor needs twenty agricultural worlds to feed its forty billion people. Today, over half the population of Earth is urban, meaning the agriculture of a single planet should have little problem feeding four billion people who produce no food. If you take into account that later sources claim Trantor has significant artificial food production on its own...

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* Literature/{{Foundation}}.''Literature/{{Foundation}}''. Trantor needs twenty agricultural worlds to feed its forty billion people. Today, over half the population of Earth is urban, meaning the agriculture of a single planet should have little problem feeding four billion people who produce no food. If you take into account that later sources claim Trantor has significant artificial food production on its own...



* Literature/LuckyStarr: Earth has a population of six billion. Enough to be dependent on food imports from Mars and Venus.
* Literature/TheLatheOfHeaven. The year is 2002. A man can afford an egg maybe once a month, and it's been twenty years since any grain could be spared for making alcohol. Population, seven billion.

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* Literature/LuckyStarr: ''Literature/LuckyStarr'': Earth has a population of six billion. Enough to be dependent on food imports from Mars and Venus.
* Literature/TheLatheOfHeaven.''Literature/TheLatheOfHeaven''. The year is 2002. A man can afford an egg maybe once a month, and it's been twenty years since any grain could be spared for making alcohol. Population, seven billion.
21st Jun '17 6:32:30 PM alanh
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* Theater movies are still largely released on film, digital distribution (and even projection) still being rather new and expensive technology. Downloading a feature film at a high enough resolution that it doesn't appear blurry when projected onto a large screen is a large file download ''even by early 2010s standards.''

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* Theater movies are still largely released on film, digital In the mid-2010s, distribution (and even projection) still being rather new and expensive technology. Downloading of films on, uh, film, has pretty much died off. Copying a feature film at a high enough resolution that it doesn't appear blurry when projected file onto a large screen bunch of cheap terabyte hard drives is a large file download ''even by early 2010s standards.''much cheaper than printing thousands of reels of film. Theaters have had to upgrade to digital projectors or close due to movies no longer being distributed on film reels.
21st Jun '17 10:46:21 AM GastonRabbit
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* In the past in North America, apartment buildings were equipped with buzzers that were basically columns of buttons: Each button was hard-wired to a console in one of the apartments, where tenants would be advised of visitors by a literal buzz coming from the console. (You can see this in ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys''.) As buildings became larger (and as tenants balked at the ugly plastic consoles that disfigured their walls), a new system was devised whereby the buzzer on the main floor was instead connected to a telephone line and would send the buzz instead directly to the tenant's telephone. (Still used in many gated communities and apartment complexes.) Unfortunately, tenants don't always have landlines, so the buzzer would often be connected to a cellphone number -- which could be both expensive and insecure if the tenant were out of town or had an out-of-town cellphone number. This is why landlords often specify that tenants must have landline phones. (Apartment buildings outside of North America may still have the old style of buzzer due not just to the above problems but due to the fact that in many countries it can take months to get a landline telephone installed.)

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* In the past in North America, apartment buildings were equipped with buzzers that were basically columns of buttons: Each button was hard-wired to a console in one of the apartments, where tenants would be advised of visitors by a literal buzz coming from the console. (You can see this in ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys''.) As buildings became larger (and as tenants balked at the ugly plastic consoles that disfigured their walls), a new system was devised whereby the buzzer on the main floor was instead connected to a telephone line and would send the buzz instead directly to the tenant's telephone. (Still used in many gated communities and apartment complexes.) Unfortunately, tenants don't always have landlines, so the buzzer would often be connected to a cellphone number -- which could be both expensive and insecure if the tenant were out of town or had an out-of-town cellphone number. This is why landlords often specify that tenants must have landline phones. (Apartment buildings outside of North America may still have the old style of buzzer due not just to the above problems but due to the fact that also because in many countries it can take months to get a landline telephone installed.)



* Recently, many thrift and second-hand stores have stopped accepting Cathode Ray Tube televisions - and in some cases, video cassette recorders - because of their outdated technology and lack of interest by the public. Most of the old CRT [=TVs=] and [=VCRs=] sit on the shelves for months, unsold, before the stores wind up taking the items to an electronics recycling center (often at a financial loss to the thrift store), and signs at the stores often direct people wishing to make such donations to go to the nearest electronics recycling center. (Although most stores do still accept [=VHS=] videotapes, much like it's relatively easy to find eight-track tapes at thrift stores.)

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* Recently, many thrift and second-hand stores have stopped accepting Cathode Ray Tube cathode ray tube televisions - -- and in some cases, video cassette recorders - -- because of their outdated technology and lack of interest by the public. Most of the old CRT [=TVs=] and [=VCRs=] sit on the shelves for months, unsold, before the stores wind up taking the items to an electronics recycling center (often at a financial loss to the thrift store), and signs at the stores often direct people wishing to make such donations to go to the nearest electronics recycling center. (Although most stores do still accept [=VHS=] videotapes, much like it's relatively easy to find eight-track tapes at thrift stores.)
21st Jun '17 10:44:11 AM GastonRabbit
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** The second is that fluorescent and some older LED bulbs flicker: fluorescent tubes glow very briefly and need a constant hammering of electrons to stay "constant", while older LED type bulbs are driven by pulse width modulation (PWM), where the LED shifts rapidly between on and off, the proportions of which give off a certain level of light. For some more sensitive people, this causes headaches, and it can be very irritating to many people on the autism spectrum, who can see the flicker and hear the constant humming. The flickering of fluorescent and LED bulbs is dangerous for machines that reciprocate or rotate. If the machine is going at the correct frequency, it may appear to be going slower than it really is, or in the opposite direction, a phenomenon called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagon_wheel_effect Wagon-Wheel Effect]]. This problem is made worse by the fact that some electric motor designs want to spin at a speed directly related to the AC power line frequency (which is what LED and fluorescent lights normally flicker at). While all three can also be made to not flicker at the line frequency, it takes extra components (and extra cost) so it's not normally done unless there's a reason.

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** The second is that fluorescent and some older LED bulbs flicker: fluorescent Fluorescent tubes glow very briefly and need a constant hammering of electrons to stay "constant", while older LED type bulbs are driven by pulse width modulation (PWM), where the LED shifts rapidly between on and off, the proportions of which give off a certain level of light. For some more sensitive people, this causes headaches, and it can be very irritating to many people on the autism spectrum, who can see the flicker and hear the constant humming. The flickering of fluorescent and LED bulbs is dangerous for machines that reciprocate or rotate. If the machine is going at the correct frequency, it may appear to be going slower than it really is, or in the opposite direction, a phenomenon called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagon_wheel_effect Wagon-Wheel Effect]]. This problem is made worse by the fact that some electric motor designs want to spin at a speed directly related to the AC power line frequency (which is what LED and fluorescent lights normally flicker at). While all three can also be made to not flicker at the line frequency, it takes extra components (and extra cost) so it's not normally done unless there's a reason.



*** SchizoTech: there are many apps for modern smartphones which turn the magnetometer inside into a magnetic compass. Reason: data transmission needed for maps may fail or simply you're too far away from a cellphone tower, GPS signal may be too weak, but the Earth's magnetic field is still there.

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*** SchizoTech: there There are many apps for modern smartphones which turn the magnetometer inside into a magnetic compass. Reason: data Data transmission needed for maps may fail or simply you're too far away from a cellphone tower, GPS signal may be too weak, but the Earth's magnetic field is still there.



** As the 1955 Doc looks at Marty's camcorder, he says "Now this is truly amazing: a portable television studio. No wonder [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan your president is an actor]], he's got to look good on television!"

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** As the 1955 Doc looks at Marty's camcorder, he says "Now this is truly amazing: a A portable television studio. No wonder [[UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan your president is an actor]], he's got to look good on television!"



* In ''Literature/RedDragon'', the killer works as a film developer for home movies, a profession now decades obsolete. The film updates this to him working in film-to-video transfer ... ''another'' profession that, if not yet ''completely'' obsolete, is now so obscure that it's a story-breaker: if ''both'' victimized families had been having old filmstrips transferred to video, the FBI's investigators would have noted this incongruity as an immediate common link without the profilers' help.

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* In ''Literature/RedDragon'', the killer works as a film developer for home movies, a profession now decades obsolete. The film updates this to him working in film-to-video transfer ... ''another'' profession that, if not yet ''completely'' obsolete, is now so obscure that it's a story-breaker: if If ''both'' victimized families had been having old filmstrips transferred to video, the FBI's investigators would have noted this incongruity as an immediate common link without the profilers' help.



** Credit to comedian SteveHofstetter for trying to bring everyone forwards...

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** Credit to comedian SteveHofstetter Creator/SteveHofstetter for trying to bring everyone forwards...
21st Jun '17 10:40:05 AM GastonRabbit
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* In the ''Literature/MyTeacherIsAnAlien'' series, Peter is given an incredibly useful device called a URAT (Universal Reader And Translator) by the aliens, which just goes to show how amazing their tech is. It can be used as a video communicator, can look up pretty much any information, can give you directions to anywhere you want to go, and can even be used to order merchandise that will then be delivered to your home! In short, it is a smartphone, which sounded a lot more futuristic in the early 90s when the books were written. Considering that one of the major plot threads in the story is the aliens being afraid of how quickly the human race is advancing, this could be HilariousInHindsight.

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* In the ''Literature/MyTeacherIsAnAlien'' series, Peter is given an incredibly useful device called a URAT (Universal Reader And Translator) by the aliens, which just goes to show how amazing their tech is. It can be used as a video communicator, can look up pretty much any information, can give you directions to anywhere you want to go, and can even be used to order merchandise that will then be delivered to your home! In short, it is a smartphone, which sounded a lot more futuristic in the early 90s '90s when the books were written. Considering that one of the major plot threads in the story is the aliens being afraid of how quickly the human race is advancing, this could be HilariousInHindsight.



* In ''Literature/TheBabySittersClub'', published in the late 80s-early 90s, a big deal is made of Claudia's having her own phone line so that they can use it as the Babysitter's Club number.

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* In ''Literature/TheBabySittersClub'', published in the late 80s-early 90s, '80s-early '90s, a big deal is made of Claudia's having her own phone line so that they can use it as the Babysitter's Club number.



* The idea of the swingin' bachelor's "little black book" of women to call up was referenced in many 80s and 90s sitcoms, but this has been made obsolete by cell phone "contact lists". Which leaves the 2004 film ''Little Black Book'' with something of an ArtifactTitle for younger viewers, as the eponymous item is a [=PDA=], not an actual booklet.

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* The idea of the swingin' bachelor's "little black book" of women to call up was referenced in many 80s '80s and 90s '90s sitcoms, but this has been made obsolete by cell phone "contact lists". Which leaves the 2004 film ''Little Black Book'' with something of an ArtifactTitle for younger viewers, as the eponymous item is a [=PDA=], not an actual booklet.



** One episode shows a woman noticing people breaking into her house run to call 911. She at first grabs the rotary phone (still actually existed in the 90s!) but decides it takes too long, before going to the digital phone.

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** One episode shows a woman noticing people breaking into her house run to call 911. She at first grabs the rotary phone (still actually existed in the 90s!) '90s!) but decides it takes too long, before going to the digital phone.



* A 90s episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' had Muffy, the rich girl, the only character who had access to a cell phone. There was another episode from the same decade that had Arthur lost downtown, and unable to reach home since he had no money for a pay phone (and apparently didn't know how to call collect). Recent episodes of course have everyone with a cell.

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* A 90s '90s episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' had Muffy, the rich girl, the only character who had access to a cell phone. There was another episode from the same decade that had Arthur lost downtown, and unable to reach home since he had no money for a pay phone (and apparently didn't know how to call collect). Recent episodes of course have everyone with a cell.



When transistors came around in the 70s to do everything a vacuum tube could, it'd mean that the old vacuum tube would go the wayside, right? Or when integrated circuits came around, who needed a discrete transistor? Or hell, why are we even using electricity? Optics would be way cooler.

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When transistors came around in the 70s '70s to do everything a vacuum tube could, it'd mean that the old vacuum tube would go the wayside, right? Or when integrated circuits came around, who needed a discrete transistor? Or hell, why are we even using electricity? Optics would be way cooler.



** Apparently vacuum tubes also react to different harmonics than transistors, and overdriving a guitar on a tube amp sounds infinitely better than overdriving a transistor amp.

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** Apparently vacuum tubes also react to different harmonics than from transistors, and overdriving a guitar on a tube amp sounds infinitely better than overdriving a transistor amp.



** Tubes also amplify in a fundamentally different way than transistors. Tubes default to manipulating the current, while transistors default to manipulating the voltage. They both manipulate both, but the default is the primary way the output is manipulated for typical amplifier circuits. This means that tube and transistor amps sound different regardless of what you're doing with them, even if you aren't overdriving them.

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** Tubes also amplify in a fundamentally different way than from transistors. Tubes default to manipulating the current, while transistors default to manipulating the voltage. They both manipulate both, but the default is the primary way the output is manipulated for typical amplifier circuits. This means that tube and transistor amps sound different regardless of what you're doing with them, even if you aren't overdriving them.



** However, [[TitleDrop Tech Marches On]] once again: newer LED's are current-controlled and as such flicker-free save for minimal amounts of noise, PWM technology has been improved to the point where the pulses vary at tens of thousands of hertz, far above the most sensitive human's perception. CRI has also been taken into account, and LED's can come in colors varying from a milder version of fluorescent lighting (cool white) all the way to a 60w incandescent bulb's (warm white).

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** However, [[TitleDrop Tech Marches On]] once again: newer LED's Newer [=LEDs=] are current-controlled and as such flicker-free save for minimal amounts of noise, PWM technology has been improved to the point where the pulses vary at tens of thousands of hertz, far above the most sensitive human's perception. CRI has also been taken into account, and LED's can come in colors varying from a milder version of fluorescent lighting (cool white) all the way to a 60w incandescent bulb's (warm white).



* A TV without signal, even on most modern media, is shown with TV static. This has largely fallen out of favor due to the shift to digital TV, where one without signal is usually just given a "no signal" message (although it can still be seen if you try to get over-the-air analog stations). Even many analog [=TVs=] since the late 80s have the ability to mute static and blank the screen if there's no signal. Of course this can be partly justified, as it's much easier for the audience to notice an entire screen being covered in static, and they're of course conditioned to know that it's broken if that's what they see.

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* A TV without signal, even on most modern media, is shown with TV static. This has largely fallen out of favor due to the shift to digital TV, where one without signal is usually just given a "no signal" message (although it can still be seen if you try to get over-the-air analog stations). Even many analog [=TVs=] since the late 80s '80s have the ability to mute static and blank the screen if there's no signal. Of course this can be partly justified, as it's much easier for the audience to notice an entire screen being covered in static, and they're of course conditioned to know that it's broken if that's what they see.



* The trope page for PoorMansPorn has a whole section (Type C) dedicated to people trying to watch scrambled porn on TV. This is now outdated (except in 80s-90s period pieces), as newer television sets recognized the scrambled signal and replaced it with a blue screen, and nowadays you simply get a screen saying you do not get that particular adult video channel.

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* The trope page for PoorMansPorn has a whole section (Type C) dedicated to people trying to watch scrambled porn on TV. This is now outdated (except in 80s-90s '80s-'90s period pieces), as newer television sets recognized the scrambled signal and replaced it with a blue screen, and nowadays you simply get a screen saying you do not get that particular adult video channel.



* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', Psycho Mantis's television-breaking powers imitate the Video mode on a specific brand of 90s Sony CRT [=TVs=], making the holdover quite odd when they reappear with Mantis's [[TheCameo cameo]] in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidGroundZeroes'', a game released on consoles made primarily for [=HDMI=] output.

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* In ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', Psycho Mantis's television-breaking powers imitate the Video mode on a specific brand of 90s '90s Sony CRT [=TVs=], making the holdover quite odd when they reappear with Mantis's [[TheCameo cameo]] in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidGroundZeroes'', a game released on consoles made primarily for [=HDMI=] output.



* People are often told to cut the doors off refrigerators before throwing them away, to keep playful children from being locked inside and suffocating. However, this only applies to older fridges with latch handles that are impossible to open from the inside. Fridges built since the 80s, however, use magnetic strips to hold the door shut, which can be easily opened from either side.

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* People are often told to cut the doors off refrigerators before throwing them away, to keep playful children from being locked inside and suffocating. However, this only applies to older fridges with latch handles that are impossible to open from the inside. Fridges built since the 80s, '80s, however, use magnetic strips to hold the door shut, which can be easily opened from either side.



* The famous quote from ''Radio/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' that humans are so primitive "they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea." Funny in the late '70s, a bit baffling by the early 90s (they had marched on from being impractical high-tech gadgets to a commonplace item nobody would call "neat"), rather on-the-nose now.

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* The famous quote from ''Radio/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' that humans are so primitive "they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea." Funny in the late '70s, a bit baffling by the early 90s '90s (they had marched on from being impractical high-tech gadgets to a commonplace item nobody would call "neat"), rather on-the-nose now.
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