History Main / TechnoBabble

20th Jul '16 7:17:27 PM skidoo23
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*** Also:

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*** Also:Also, an example that is crossbred with BuffySpeak:


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** The Twelfth Doctor continues Steven Moffat's general aversion to techno babble, such as in "Flatline" when he invents a gadget for dealing with a group of two-dimensional aliens that he names the "Two-dis" (a pun on TARDIS).
*** In "The Girl Who Died," he confirms a long-held fan suspicion by confirming that the phrase "reverse the polarity of the neutron flow" is indeed meaningless.
20th Jul '16 7:32:36 AM Gosicrystal
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* Subverted completely with ''VisualNove/NineHoursNinePersonsNieDoors'' and the sequel, ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward''. The abilities of espers and those who throw their consciousnesses through time could have easily been handwaved with vague explanations about telepathy and mental time travel. Instead, everything is explained in complete length, pulling from real world scientific theories and phenomena, such as morphegenetic field theory, Minkowski space, the many-worlds interpretation, and schrodinger's cat, to name a few. In the end, everything is series seems to have gone out of it's way to purposefully avoid using techno-babble at pretty much any point, despite it being a highly sci-fi in nature.


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[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* Subverted completely with ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'' and the sequel, ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward''. The abilities of espers and those who throw their consciousnesses through time could have easily been handwaved with vague explanations about telepathy and mental time travel. Instead, everything is explained in complete length, pulling from real world scientific theories and phenomena, such as morphegenetic field theory, Minkowski space, the many-worlds interpretation, and schrodinger's cat, to name a few. In the end, everything in the series seems to have gone out of its way to purposefully avoid using technobabble at pretty much any point, despite it being very sci-fi-like in nature.
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20th Jul '16 3:15:47 AM SurroundedByPerverts
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* The infamous "flux capacitor" from ''Film/BackToTheFuture''. A capacitor is a circuit component that maintains a voltage through a charge differential: most simply, two plates of metal separated at a small distance by an electrical insulator. Flux is the integral of a vector field over a surface. Unless the doctor is making up terms and the name itself means nothing, no amount of FanWank could possibly reconcile the two concepts

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* The infamous "flux capacitor" from ''Film/BackToTheFuture''. A capacitor is a circuit component that maintains a voltage through a charge differential: most simply, two plates of metal separated at a small distance by an electrical insulator. Flux is the integral of a vector field over a surface. Unless the doctor is making up terms and the name itself means nothing, no amount of FanWank could possibly reconcile the two concepts concepts.[[note]]This could actually count as a GeniusBonus, as the ''Back to the Future'' movies often make use of oxymorons (e.g. the title of the films themselves and the name of the setting, Hill Valley), and the conjunctive use of contradictory terms like "flux" and "capacitor" in the name of this device would be an example.[[/note]]
13th Jul '16 3:10:15 PM MarkWilder
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* In the Franchise/Star Trek franchise, this trend was [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness nearly totally absent in early installments]] like ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. Instead, every device in the series [[MagicAIsMagicA had straightforward and specific abilities]] which were never altered except by [[TimTaylorTechnology amplification]] or breakage, and any device used outside it's intended function had a logical reasons for being used in that way. (Such as taking the batteries of [[RayGun phaser pistols]] and MacGyvering a working alternative to a depleted [[PowerSource power supply]] in the episode, ''The Galileo Seven'') The technobabble truly started with ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' and hasn't stopped since, with later installments in the franchise [[{{Flanderization}} making it progressively more and more common,]] as well as [[DenserAndWackier more absurd.]] Eventually, the various bits of jargon became standardized to the point of being [[StockPhrase repetitious,]] with such things as "Running a Level 3 Diagnostic", and "Realign the Phase Inverters" becoming stock phrases for the introduction of almost any new plot device. [[ReversePolarity Reversing the Polarity]]" was little more than an excuse for [[DeusExMachina arbitrarily fixing any device.]]

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* In the Franchise/Star Franchise/StarTrek Trek franchise, this trend was [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness nearly totally absent in early installments]] like ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. Instead, every device in the series [[MagicAIsMagicA had straightforward and specific abilities]] which were never altered except by [[TimTaylorTechnology amplification]] or breakage, and any device used outside it's intended function had a logical reasons for being used in that way. (Such as taking the batteries of [[RayGun phaser pistols]] and MacGyvering a working alternative to a depleted [[PowerSource power supply]] in the episode, ''The Galileo Seven'') The technobabble truly started with ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' and hasn't stopped since, with later installments in the franchise [[{{Flanderization}} making it progressively more and more common,]] as well as [[DenserAndWackier more absurd.]] Eventually, the various bits of jargon became standardized to the point of being [[StockPhrase repetitious,]] with such things as "Running a Level 3 Diagnostic", and "Realign the Phase Inverters" becoming stock phrases for the introduction of almost any new plot device. [[ReversePolarity Reversing the Polarity]]" was little more than an excuse for [[DeusExMachina arbitrarily fixing any device.]]
13th Jul '16 3:09:09 PM MarkWilder
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* Popular in all incarnations of ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Dubbed "Treknobabble", stalwarts include such things as "Running a Level 3 Diagnostic" and "Compensating for minor ging-gangs in the starboard warp transgobbler". "[[ReversePolarity Reversing the Polarity]]" was a catch-all cure that the writers commonly employed. Throwing in physics terms that have already entered pop science usage is strongly encouraged, which is why Geordi spends every second episode of ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' babbling about neutrino flux.
** Scripts for ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' were usually written with "[Tech]" as a placeholder; a second set of writers would come in and replace the placeholders with actual TechnoBabble, referring to the right AppliedPhlebotinum for the job.

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* Popular In the Franchise/Star Trek franchise, this trend was [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness nearly totally absent in all incarnations of ''Franchise/StarTrek''. Dubbed "Treknobabble", stalwarts include such things as "Running a Level 3 Diagnostic" and "Compensating for minor ging-gangs early installments]] like ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries''. Instead, every device in the starboard warp transgobbler". "[[ReversePolarity Reversing the Polarity]]" was a catch-all cure that the writers commonly employed. Throwing in physics terms that have already entered pop science usage is strongly encouraged, series [[MagicAIsMagicA had straightforward and specific abilities]] which is why Geordi spends every second episode of ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' babbling about neutrino flux.
** Scripts
were never altered except by [[TimTaylorTechnology amplification]] or breakage, and any device used outside it's intended function had a logical reasons for being used in that way. (Such as taking the batteries of [[RayGun phaser pistols]] and MacGyvering a working alternative to a depleted [[PowerSource power supply]] in the episode, ''The Galileo Seven'') The technobabble truly started with ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' were usually written and hasn't stopped since, with "[Tech]" as a placeholder; a second set of writers would come later installments in the franchise [[{{Flanderization}} making it progressively more and replace more common,]] as well as [[DenserAndWackier more absurd.]] Eventually, the placeholders with actual TechnoBabble, referring various bits of jargon became standardized to the right AppliedPhlebotinum point of being [[StockPhrase repetitious,]] with such things as "Running a Level 3 Diagnostic", and "Realign the Phase Inverters" becoming stock phrases for the job.introduction of almost any new plot device. [[ReversePolarity Reversing the Polarity]]" was little more than an excuse for [[DeusExMachina arbitrarily fixing any device.]]



** And then, there is the episode "Rascals", where Riker plays with this trope in a very interesting way. He reads verbatim from the RealLife ''TNG Technical Manual'' to distract a hostile Ferengi while he secretly taps out a coded message. Just watch [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTUVPd-tyQY this clip]] from 2:00 onwards.
*** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwu2C91YMT4 same episode]] also has examples of "archeology babble" and "biology babble" in the beginning.
** The TNG episode "Where No One Has Gone Before" involves Kosinski, a warp drive "expert" who applies nonsensical adjustments (Riker describes his paper as gibberish) to the warp engines of star ships; they only appear to work because his "assistant" is secretly a Traveller who in some way manipulates warp fields with his mind. It is clear from the start that Kosinski does not know what he is talking about because he mostly brags about his excellence instead of speaking fluid technobabble. When he does attempt technobabble, his audience appears unimpressed (and are utterly baffled, at first, that the in-universe gibberish he's spouting seems to work anyway).



** Funnily enough, this was [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness usually avoided]] in ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries TOS]]'', which rarely explained things beyond "Some part of the ship is damaged/malfunctioning, [[MrFixit Scotty]] and/or [[TheSpock Spock]] have to fix it, and then they do in the nick of time." An example of a technobabble-heavy episode by TOS standards is "The Doomsday Machine", which throws around terms like "anti-proton" and "inverse phasing", but in execution is still very straightforward when compared to the more modern ''Trek'' shows.
*** In its earlier seasons, TNG also avoided technobabble. It didn't turn into the quantum-phase-modulating-fest we all know and love until two things happened: (1) Gene Roddenberry died, and (2) the ''Star Trek: The Next Generation Technical Manual'' was published, which contained more technobabble than you could shake a 9-Cochrane warp nacelle at.

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** Funnily enough, this was [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness usually avoided]] in ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries TOS]]'', which rarely explained things beyond "Some part of the ship is damaged/malfunctioning, [[MrFixit Scotty]] and/or [[TheSpock Spock]] have to fix it, and then they do in the nick of time." An example of a technobabble-heavy episode by TOS standards is "The Doomsday Machine", which throws around terms like "anti-proton" and "inverse phasing", but in execution is still very straightforward when compared to the more modern ''Trek'' shows.
***
In its earlier seasons, TNG also avoided technobabble. It didn't turn into the quantum-phase-modulating-fest we all know and love until two things happened: (1) Gene Roddenberry died, and (2) the ''Star Trek: The Next Generation Technical Manual'' was published, which contained more technobabble than you could shake a 9-Cochrane warp nacelle at.
10th Jul '16 1:30:57 PM gewunomox
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* The low-budget sci-fi movie ''Film/{{ROTOR}}'' is filled with this, and it's all worse than you can imagine. "Is there some [[Music/BeachBoys good vibration]] to its molecular tonality that you can utilize?" and "I canít run a sequential circuitry test without the impulse feed chain." are just two examples.

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* The low-budget sci-fi movie ''Film/{{ROTOR}}'' is filled with this, and it's all worse than you can imagine. "Is there some [[Music/BeachBoys [[Music/TheBeachBoys good vibration]] to its molecular tonality that you can utilize?" and "I canít run a sequential circuitry test without the impulse feed chain." are just two examples.
8th Jun '16 5:17:25 PM Tuckerscreator
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** They lampshade it occasionally with the mayor remarking, "Does anybody here speak English?" in ''Film/GhostbustersII'' or with Venkman's "important safety tip" line in the [[Film/Ghostbusters 1984}} first movie]].

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** They lampshade it occasionally with the mayor remarking, "Does anybody here speak English?" in ''Film/GhostbustersII'' or with Venkman's "important safety tip" line in the [[Film/Ghostbusters [[Film/{{Ghostbusters 1984}} first movie]].
28th May '16 8:23:41 AM Tron80
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* ''Fanfic/LastChildOfKrypton'': Among the giant robot show elements and the sci-fi-oriented super-hero comic-book elements there is plenty of jargon around. And in the first chapter Rei very nearly calls the trope by name:
-->''She held her breath to dull the pain, and for the second day there was light, oh so much light, and she heard the technicians babbling their coded language of feedback loops and neural connections and the Eva went dark, overwhelmed.''



--> '''Sherman:''' OK, this chip has an automatic upgrading system. It will use an intergalactic...
--> '''Calvin:''' Yeah, yeah, yeah... big complicated words. They're all the same!

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--> '''Sherman:''' OK, this chip has an automatic upgrading system. It will use an intergalactic...
-->
intergalactic...\\
'''Calvin:''' Yeah, yeah, yeah... big complicated words. They're all the same!
20th May '16 5:45:11 AM erforce
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* The ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' films have some of the best techno-babble ever. They lampshade it occasionally with the mayor remarking, "Does anybody here speak English?" or with Venkman's "important safety tip" line.
-->'''Stantz:''' [[Funny/{{Ghostbusters}} Tell him about the Twinkie]].
** Dan Aykroyd, who developed the concept, strove to keep the paranormal jargon accurate, as his father and grandfather were both heavily interested in the supernatural/paranormal.

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* The ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' ''Franchise/{{Ghostbusters}}'' films have some of the best techno-babble ever. ever.
**
They lampshade it occasionally with the mayor remarking, "Does anybody here speak English?" in ''Film/GhostbustersII'' or with Venkman's "important safety tip" line.
line in the [[Film/Ghostbusters 1984}} first movie]].
-->'''Stantz:''' [[Funny/{{Ghostbusters}} Tell him about the Twinkie]].
Twinkie.
** Dan Aykroyd, Creator/DanAykroyd, who developed the concept, strove to keep the paranormal jargon accurate, as his father and grandfather were both heavily interested in the supernatural/paranormal.
17th May '16 11:21:57 AM Sombrefloe
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*''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' has numerous examples of this, mostly in mission briefings. An example is a mission from Patricia Tannis:
-->"Tannis needs more parts to ensure the protection grid holds on her deviceís ecto-containment unit, safeguarding against total protonic reversal, which would be extraordinarily bad"
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