History Main / TallPoppySyndrome

23rd Sep '17 12:37:46 PM nombretomado
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* "The Trees" by Music/{{Rush}} is this trope by way of AynRand, although lyricist Neil Peart claims the song [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical wasn't intended to have a political interpretation]].

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* "The Trees" by Music/{{Rush}} is this trope by way of AynRand, Creator/AynRand, although lyricist Neil Peart claims the song [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotPolitical wasn't intended to have a political interpretation]].
8th Sep '17 11:07:43 PM thatother1dude
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** Homer's hatred of Flanders stems from not being able to stand how satisfied he is with his life, whether or not he's succeeding.

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** Homer's hatred of Ned Flanders stems from not being able to stand how satisfied he is with his life, [[ThePollyanna whether or not he's succeeding.succeeding]]. The rare moments Homer [[PetTheDog will empathize with him]] are usually when Ned experiences something even he can't stand.
8th Aug '17 7:24:22 PM kquinn0830
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* Invoked and subverted in ''Film/TheWolfOfWallStreet.'' Jordan is disdainful of the idea of FBI Agent Denham investigating Stratton-Oakmont's rise to Wall Street stardom, pointing out that Denham had tried and failed to get his broker's license and is now only taking out his frustrations by ruining the accomplishments of people who pulled it off. He even remarks "Every time someone rises up in this world, there's always gonna be some asshole trying to drag him down." But in actuality, this is only because [[UnreliableNarrator Jordan is the narrator]], and the film makes it clear he's a hedonistic, morally-bankrupt scumbag whose rise to power was accomplished by illegal means, so Denham is justified in taking him down.

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* Invoked and subverted in ''Film/TheWolfOfWallStreet.'' Jordan is disdainful of the idea of FBI Agent Denham investigating Stratton-Oakmont's rise to Wall Street stardom, pointing out that Denham had tried and failed to get his broker's license and is now only taking out his frustrations by ruining the accomplishments of people who pulled it off. He even remarks "Every time someone rises up in this world, there's always gonna be some asshole trying to drag him down." But in actuality, this is only because [[UnreliableNarrator Jordan is the narrator]], and the film makes it clear he's a hedonistic, morally-bankrupt scumbag whose rise to power was accomplished by illegal means, so Denham Denham, as an FVI Agent, is just doing his job and is justified in taking him down.
28th Jul '17 2:46:30 AM kome360
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[[folder: Webcomics]]
* ''WebComic/QuentynQuinnSpaceRanger'': The Empire of the Seven Stars can give eternal life, a near-endless supply of energy and resources, and a general end to poverty. But even if you can give everyone "a magic box that provides anything you can think of", a few people just want to make others miserable for having something. Like the Sho'faxti, a terrorist nation plagued with famine and civil unrest, while the rest of the world was green and flourishing (but broke as hell); when they finally got their hands on matter replication technology, instead of finally ending world hunger in their country, they performed a ColonyDrop.
[[/folder]]
20th Jul '17 9:06:17 PM theLibrarian
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* In the ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'' tie-in novel ''Icarus Effect'', the title effect is described as a biological as well as a social phenomenon where, to maintain "stability", if a small number out of a large group attains some distinct advantage, those lacking that advantage will attack the abberants until that advantage is gone. This is part of the reason that everything goes to hell in the actual game as well. Augmented people are discriminated against in society because they're both seen as "unnatural" due to supposedly going against the natural order, and with their abilities being superior to those of a regular human.

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* In the ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'' tie-in novel ''Icarus Effect'', the title effect is described as a biological as well as a social phenomenon where, to maintain "stability", if a small number out of a large group attains some distinct advantage, those lacking that advantage will attack the abberants until that advantage is gone. This is part of the reason that everything goes to hell in the actual game as well. Augmented people are discriminated against in society because they're both seen as "unnatural" due to supposedly going against the natural order, and with their abilities being superior to those of a regular human. This even extends to people who ''need those augmentations to live.''
20th Jul '17 9:04:23 PM theLibrarian
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* In the StarWarsLegends continuity, the book ''The Truce at Bakura'' introduces a religion called the "Cosmic Balance", which essentially advocates this, as if you attempt to better yourself a great deal then other people will suffer to keep the balance. The religion doesn't like the Jedi due to their practice of attempting to immerse themselves fully in the Force.
16th Jul '17 9:13:58 PM WillBGood
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* Repeatedly touched on in ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'' and ''UsefulNotes/{{Objectivism}}'' as ObviouslyEvil, with repeated connections to Marx's slogan, which the novels' government and Twentieth Century Motor Company, who implement Tall Poppy policies, interpret as "punish those with ability, and reward those without."

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* Repeatedly touched on in ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'' and ''UsefulNotes/{{Objectivism}}'' as ObviouslyEvil, with repeated connections to Marx's slogan, which the novels' novel's government and Twentieth Century Motor Company, who implement Tall Poppy policies, Company interpret as "punish those with ability, and reward those without."
14th Jul '17 9:04:07 AM littlebeeper
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* The Imperial Order from the Literature/SwordOfTruth series is a very literal embodiment of this trope. Under their belief, everyone is meant to give to those who have less than them, and anyone who doesn't should be put to death. They want to kill all who can use magic because there are many who can't. They sack entire cities because the people who live there just want to live their own lives rather than join the Order. Though the leaders often openly contradict their own beliefs (just being leaders shows they think they are superior and, by their own ideals, should give up thethe r authorit's) it is often a society run by mob rule. As Nikki eloquently puts it, "The Order teaches us that to be better than someone is to be worse than everyone."

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* The Imperial Order from the Literature/SwordOfTruth ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series is a very literal embodiment of this trope. Under their belief, everyone is meant to give to those who have less than them, and anyone who doesn't should be put to death. They want to kill all who can use magic because there are many who can't. They sack entire cities because the people who live there just want to live their own lives rather than join the Order. Though the leaders often openly contradict their own beliefs (just being leaders shows they think they are superior and, by their own ideals, should give up thethe r authorit's) it is often a society run by mob rule. As Nikki eloquently puts it, "The Order teaches us that to be better than someone is to be worse than everyone."
14th Jul '17 9:02:26 AM littlebeeper
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* The Imperial Order from The Sword of Truth series is a very literal embodiment of this trope. Under their belief, everyone is meant to give to those who have less than them, and anyone who doesn't should be put to death. They want to kill all who can use magic because there are many who can't. They sack entire cities because the people who live there just want to live their own lives rather than join the Order. Though the leaders often openly contradict their own beliefs (just being leaders shows they think they are superior and, by their own ideals, should give up thethe r authorit's) it is often a society run by mob rule. As Nikki eloquently puts it, "The Order teaches us that to be better than someone is to be worse than everyone."

to:

* The Imperial Order from The Sword of Truth the Literature/SwordOfTruth series is a very literal embodiment of this trope. Under their belief, everyone is meant to give to those who have less than them, and anyone who doesn't should be put to death. They want to kill all who can use magic because there are many who can't. They sack entire cities because the people who live there just want to live their own lives rather than join the Order. Though the leaders often openly contradict their own beliefs (just being leaders shows they think they are superior and, by their own ideals, should give up thethe r authorit's) it is often a society run by mob rule. As Nikki eloquently puts it, "The Order teaches us that to be better than someone is to be worse than everyone."
28th Jun '17 3:42:10 AM Hanz
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* In the ''Dead Money'' [[DownloadableContent DLC]] of ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', the reason Dean Domino tried to ruin Frederick Sinclair is because he was happier and more successful than him, which Dean interpreted as Sinclair showing off and thinking he was better than everyone else. If you pass specific skill checks that lets you one-up him and don't placate his ego, he'll develop similar feelings towards you as well and turn on you, requiring you to kill him in order to proceed. If he doesn't betray you and therefore survives the DLC, he'll learn about the final fates of Sinclair and his love interest Vera Keyes, and [[HeelRealization feel a bit sad]] [[EvilCannotComprehendGood for some strange reason he cannot identify]], [[IgnoredEpiphany so he puts it out of his mind and decides to head to New Vegas]].

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* In the ''Dead Money'' [[DownloadableContent DLC]] of ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', the reason Dean Domino [[spoiler:Dean Domino]] tried to ruin Frederick Sinclair is because he was happier and more successful than him, which Dean [[spoiler:Dean]] interpreted as Sinclair showing off and thinking he was better than everyone else. If [[spoiler:If you pass specific skill checks that lets you one-up him and don't go out of your way to placate his ego, he'll develop similar feelings towards you as well and turn on you, requiring you to kill him in order to proceed. If he doesn't betray you and therefore survives the DLC, he'll learn about the final fates of Sinclair and his love interest Vera Keyes, and [[HeelRealization feel a bit sad]] [[EvilCannotComprehendGood for some strange reason he cannot identify]], [[IgnoredEpiphany so he puts it out of his mind and decides to head to New Vegas]].Vegas]]]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TallPoppySyndrome