History Main / TalkToEveryone

21st Nov '16 8:26:11 AM Morgenthaler
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* The ''LittleBigAdventure'' games make use of this, since friendly [=NPC=]s can provide useful info, including tips on [[MediumAwareness what Twinsen is capable of doing as a]] PlayerCharacter. When you have a specific objective, Twinsen will usually ask about it, and if you're talking to the right person, chances are you'll be given some clues -- or at least a reminder of [[NowWhereWasIGoingAgain what you were going to do when you left the game the last time several weeks ago]].

to:

* The ''LittleBigAdventure'' ''VideoGame/LittleBigAdventure'' games make use of this, since friendly [=NPC=]s can provide useful info, including tips on [[MediumAwareness what Twinsen is capable of doing as a]] PlayerCharacter. When you have a specific objective, Twinsen will usually ask about it, and if you're talking to the right person, chances are you'll be given some clues -- or at least a reminder of [[NowWhereWasIGoingAgain what you were going to do when you left the game the last time several weeks ago]].



* The ''BrokenSword'' games often fall into this, with the additional complication that you may have to talk to everyone [[CombinatorialExplosion about each and every item in your inventory]] before you find the relevant dialogue tree.

to:

* The ''BrokenSword'' ''VideoGame/BrokenSword'' games often fall into this, with the additional complication that you may have to talk to everyone [[CombinatorialExplosion about each and every item in your inventory]] before you find the relevant dialogue tree.
30th Jul '16 3:40:28 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''UltimaIII'', you'll eventually run into someone who will say "You should go to bed! It's too late to be playing Ultima!"

to:

* In ''UltimaIII'', ''VideoGame/UltimaIII'', you'll eventually run into someone who will say "You should go to bed! It's too late to be playing Ultima!"
8th Mar '16 11:20:11 PM Sabrewing
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/SwordOfVermilion'' often makes you talk to most of the townspeople to acquire maps of the wilderness and caves in your current town, or for quest items that you'll need fairly soon.
5th Feb '16 4:30:48 PM Prfnoff
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Failure to ''follow'' this advice, particularly in older games, can often lead to a GuideDangIt scenario. More than one game has a seemingly-obtuse puzzle that is fairly easily solved if you've collected enough information from someone nearby. Then there are games that [[PlayingWithATrope complicate this further]] where talking to a certain random someone can actually cause an optional item to become LostForever if you didn't get the item first.

to:

Failure to ''follow'' this advice, particularly in older Japanese-made games, can often lead to a GuideDangIt scenario. More than one game has a seemingly-obtuse puzzle that is fairly easily solved if you've collected enough information from someone nearby. Then there are games that [[PlayingWithATrope complicate this further]] where talking to a certain random someone can actually cause an optional item to become LostForever if you didn't get the item first.
first, or require you to talk to certain [=NPCs=] ''twice'' to get them to do something helpful.
17th Jan '16 6:10:55 PM jormis29
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall will have anything new to say.

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' are worse in use of the database dialogue, as only quest-important [=NPC=]s will have anything new to say.
17th Jan '16 6:09:37 PM jormis29
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' are worse in use of the database dialogue, as only quest-important [=NPC=]s

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' are worse in use will have anything new to say.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' has improved giving all characters a unique piece
of the database dialogue, as but almost all of these are uninformative and very, ''very'' limited in both number and length.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' has further improved the system, adding a large number more context-sensitive and unique dialogue. Even better, they can now have meaningful conversations with each other. The downside is that everyone will be trying to talk to you at once, since dialogue no longer freezes time, and one NPC will frequently be drowned out by three others blathering at you.
*** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim's]]'' got a particularly ugly one: if you don't talk to a certain Argonian just ''outside'' Riften, who's almost never referenced by anyone else, and help her out, ''then talk with her again'', you'll never be able to buy the town's manor.
* Some situations in ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' and ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' require you to talk to everyone... literally. Or at least most of the people in an area.
* This advice is given to the player in ''VideoGame/SunsetOverImdahl'', then justified: [[spoiler:your character unknowingly has ThePlague, and the advice-giver wants you to spread it and wipe out your hometown.]]
* In ''UltimaIII'', you'll eventually run into someone who will say "You should go to bed! It's too late to be playing Ultima!"
* ''[[VideoGame/RealmsOfArkania Star Trail]]'' was particularly bad about this. There are at least a few quests that can
only quest-important [=NPC=]sbe solved by checking every single house in 300 house town, where 298 of the people in those houses will tell you to go away.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' scatters its {{Fetch Quest}}s across the [[NonPlayerCharacter [=NPC=]s]] in town and at school, such that you'll want to either talk to everyone regularly (at least once per in-game month) or [[GuideDangIt consult a guide]] to catch all the quests.
* Sailor Venus's route in Chapter 2 of ''VideoGame/SailorMoonAnotherStory'' requires you to talk to ''every single person'' in the streets of the Rias Village in order to proceed - for no better reason than just having to spend some time waiting for some ceremony to start.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Simulation Game]]
* ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'':
** You ''must'' speak to all of the townspeople to get all of the basic farming equipment that previous games have given you from the beginning, much to the chagrin of the player. Without an FAQ, some of the tools are very difficult to find. The game requires you to talk to everyone in town in order to start your next day on the farm.
** In ''VideoGame/RuneFactory3'', your first quest is, quite literally, to introduce yourself to everyone in town.
* ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'':
** ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonBackToNature'' for the Playstation presented the choice to whether or not to let the mayor take you around and talk to everyone. Accepting, actually has him do this in cutscene form similar to the introduction cutscene so not only do you not have to be on the lookout for them, you also can't stop midway.
** ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'' has Takakura showing you around town and talking to most of the villagers through cutscene. In ''Special Edition'' you can skip this by insisting on doing it alone, which has you go around introducing yourself offscreen.
* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' has the tradition of forcing the player in their first job at the beginning of the game to talk to every single person in their town. Mind you, you usually don't have a map handy unless you go to the postboards of it. Sometimes you can easily find them in their house, but often they will be outside wandering. This is even worse in the more recent games as the map is no longer divided into screens, and animals are free to wander the ''whole'' town. Even moreso, pity the person who joins in on another player's file, and the town has up to 15 residents if it's on the Cube. Oh, did I mention they don't tell you who you have, and have not talked to? Hope you have good memory.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn Based Strategy]]
* In ''ShiningForce II'', talking to random people proves ridiculously useful. Kiwi and May join your party, completely out of the blue, just because you talked to them in Granseal and Rubble, respectively. Then again, this game is notorious for having people join you for the silliest reasons.
* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', a standard tactic to use when in the RPG worlds is to talk to everyone.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Visual Novel]]
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'': The entire exploration/investigation part of the series is made of this trope. Basically, to advance in the plot, you need to talk to everyone and choose every dialogue option.
* ''VisualNovel/FleuretBlanc'' takes this UpToEleven. Characters have literally over a ''dozen'' generic lines of dialogue, and have a comment to make on every single gossip topic (sometimes providing something different if you've advanced the relevant subplot). Some of this is fluff, but most of it provides important information needed to solve the mysteries.
[[/folder]]

!!Non-video game examples:

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* This trope is derided in pen and paper roleplaying games where, thanks to the presence of a GM, you ''really'' can talk to all 130,000 inhabitants of New Gundark if you really want to. The movie ''The Gamers: Dorkness Rising'' lampshades this by depicting the new player talking to the first person she comes across (a merchant) and trying to gain intelligence about the plot from a lowly NPC. The other players incinerate the merchant to discourage her from doing this. Much to the chagrin of the DM, who was about to give them the information they needed through the mouth of the NPC. In this particular case, it was less "talk to everyone" that the other players hated, so much as "talk to ''anyone''"...
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://www.nuklearpower.com/2007/02/20/episode-810-efficient-use-of-time/ Mocked]] in ''[[WebComic/EightBitTheater 8-Bit Theater]]'' -- specifically, the version of this trope where you ''have'' to talk to someone non-obvious to advance the plot. This happens a time or two in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'', the game on which the comic is based. For instance, learning to speak Lefeinish requires you to go find the Slab (a.k.a. Rosetta Stone), then take it to the random NPC Dr. Unne so he can interpret it for you... apparently just on the evidence that he's a doctor. Though he did mention that he was studying their race...
** The ''real'' problem with the Dr. Unne quest is that you meet Dr. Unne in Melmond, at the beginning of the second act, in which he introduces himself and expresses incredulity that you've never heard of him before. The next mention of him is in Onrac, at the beginning of the ''third'' act, by a random NPC who mentions the good doctor is studying the Lefeinish language. You then get the slab from the dungeon nearby, and have to remember where you saw Dr. Unne in order to learn the language. The problem is that the time between meeting Dr. Unne and getting the slab can be as much as 10 ''hours'' of gameplay, with ''four'' dungeons in between, and several towns with their own multitude of [=NPC=]s.
* The [=NPC=]s in ''WebComic/GoldCoinComics'' really want the main character to [[http://www.goldcoincomics.com/?id=58 go to the tavern]].
[[/folder]]
----
17th Jan '16 5:45:15 PM nombretomado
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* ''StarControl 2'': Talking to everyone repeatedly is ''extremely'' important. Since the star map is huge, you need hints from the dialogue to have any idea where to go next. Some of these can be very obscure and easy to miss, and you'd better take notes on paper, because you cannot review past conversations. Thankfully, the game has truly excellent writing, so this is not boring, though talking to hostile alien races can get tricky.

to:

* ''StarControl 2'': * ''VideoGame/StarControlII'': Talking to everyone repeatedly is ''extremely'' important. Since the star map is huge, you need hints from the dialogue to have any idea where to go next. Some of these can be very obscure and easy to miss, and you'd better take notes on paper, because you cannot review past conversations. Thankfully, the game has truly excellent writing, so this is not boring, though talking to hostile alien races can get tricky.



** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' are worse in use of the database dialogue, as only quest-important [=NPC=]s will have anything new to say.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' has improved giving all characters a unique piece of dialogue, but almost all of these are uninformative and very, ''very'' limited in both number and length.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' has further improved the system, adding a large number more context-sensitive and unique dialogue. Even better, they can now have meaningful conversations with each other. The downside is that everyone will be trying to talk to you at once, since dialogue no longer freezes time, and one NPC will frequently be drowned out by three others blathering at you.
*** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim's]]'' got a particularly ugly one: if you don't talk to a certain Argonian just ''outside'' Riften, who's almost never referenced by anyone else, and help her out, ''then talk with her again'', you'll never be able to buy the town's manor.
* Some situations in ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' and ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' require you to talk to everyone... literally. Or at least most of the people in an area.
* This advice is given to the player in ''VideoGame/SunsetOverImdahl'', then justified: [[spoiler:your character unknowingly has ThePlague, and the advice-giver wants you to spread it and wipe out your hometown.]]
* In ''UltimaIII'', you'll eventually run into someone who will say "You should go to bed! It's too late to be playing Ultima!"
* ''[[VideoGame/RealmsOfArkania Star Trail]]'' was particularly bad about this. There are at least a few quests that can only be solved by checking every single house in 300 house town, where 298 of the people in those houses will tell you to go away.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' scatters its {{Fetch Quest}}s across the [[NonPlayerCharacter [=NPC=]s]] in town and at school, such that you'll want to either talk to everyone regularly (at least once per in-game month) or [[GuideDangIt consult a guide]] to catch all the quests.
* Sailor Venus's route in Chapter 2 of ''VideoGame/SailorMoonAnotherStory'' requires you to talk to ''every single person'' in the streets of the Rias Village in order to proceed - for no better reason than just having to spend some time waiting for some ceremony to start.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Simulation Game]]
* ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'':
** You ''must'' speak to all of the townspeople to get all of the basic farming equipment that previous games have given you from the beginning, much to the chagrin of the player. Without an FAQ, some of the tools are very difficult to find. The game requires you to talk to everyone in town in order to start your next day on the farm.
** In ''VideoGame/RuneFactory3'', your first quest is, quite literally, to introduce yourself to everyone in town.
* ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'':
** ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonBackToNature'' for the Playstation presented the choice to whether or not to let the mayor take you around and talk to everyone. Accepting, actually has him do this in cutscene form similar to the introduction cutscene so not only do you not have to be on the lookout for them, you also can't stop midway.
** ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'' has Takakura showing you around town and talking to most of the villagers through cutscene. In ''Special Edition'' you can skip this by insisting on doing it alone, which has you go around introducing yourself offscreen.
* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' has the tradition of forcing the player in their first job at the beginning of the game to talk to every single person in their town. Mind you, you usually don't have a map handy unless you go to the postboards of it. Sometimes you can easily find them in their house, but often they will be outside wandering. This is even worse in the more recent games as the map is no longer divided into screens, and animals are free to wander the ''whole'' town. Even moreso, pity the person who joins in on another player's file, and the town has up to 15 residents if it's on the Cube. Oh, did I mention they don't tell you who you have, and have not talked to? Hope you have good memory.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn Based Strategy]]
* In ''ShiningForce II'', talking to random people proves ridiculously useful. Kiwi and May join your party, completely out of the blue, just because you talked to them in Granseal and Rubble, respectively. Then again, this game is notorious for having people join you for the silliest reasons.
* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', a standard tactic to use when in the RPG worlds is to talk to everyone.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Visual Novel]]
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'': The entire exploration/investigation part of the series is made of this trope. Basically, to advance in the plot, you need to talk to everyone and choose every dialogue option.
* ''VisualNovel/FleuretBlanc'' takes this UpToEleven. Characters have literally over a ''dozen'' generic lines of dialogue, and have a comment to make on every single gossip topic (sometimes providing something different if you've advanced the relevant subplot). Some of this is fluff, but most of it provides important information needed to solve the mysteries.
[[/folder]]

!!Non-video game examples:

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* This trope is derided in pen and paper roleplaying games where, thanks to the presence of a GM, you ''really'' can talk to all 130,000 inhabitants of New Gundark if you really want to. The movie ''The Gamers: Dorkness Rising'' lampshades this by depicting the new player talking to the first person she comes across (a merchant) and trying to gain intelligence about the plot from a lowly NPC. The other players incinerate the merchant to discourage her from doing this. Much to the chagrin of the DM, who was about to give them the information they needed through the mouth of the NPC. In this particular case, it was less "talk to everyone" that the other players hated, so much as "talk to ''anyone''"...
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://www.nuklearpower.com/2007/02/20/episode-810-efficient-use-of-time/ Mocked]] in ''[[WebComic/EightBitTheater 8-Bit Theater]]'' -- specifically, the version of this trope where you ''have'' to talk to someone non-obvious to advance the plot. This happens a time or two in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'', the game on which the comic is based. For instance, learning to speak Lefeinish requires you to go find the Slab (a.k.a. Rosetta Stone), then take it to the random NPC Dr. Unne so he can interpret it for you... apparently just on the evidence that he's a doctor. Though he did mention that he was studying their race...
** The ''real'' problem with the Dr. Unne quest is that you meet Dr. Unne in Melmond, at the beginning of the second act, in which he introduces himself and expresses incredulity that you've never heard of him before. The next mention of him is in Onrac, at the beginning of the ''third'' act, by a random NPC who mentions the good doctor is studying the Lefeinish language. You then get the slab from the dungeon nearby, and have to remember where you saw Dr. Unne in order to learn the language. The problem is that the time between meeting Dr. Unne and getting the slab can be as much as 10 ''hours'' of gameplay, with ''four'' dungeons in between, and several towns with their own multitude of [=NPC=]s.
* The [=NPC=]s in ''WebComic/GoldCoinComics'' really want the main character to [[http://www.goldcoincomics.com/?id=58 go to the tavern]].
[[/folder]]
----

to:

** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' are worse in use of the database dialogue, as only quest-important [=NPC=]s will have anything new to say.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'' has improved giving all characters a unique piece of dialogue, but almost all of these are uninformative and very, ''very'' limited in both number and length.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'' has further improved the system, adding a large number more context-sensitive and unique dialogue. Even better, they can now have meaningful conversations with each other. The downside is that everyone will be trying to talk to you at once, since dialogue no longer freezes time, and one NPC will frequently be drowned out by three others blathering at you.
*** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim's]]'' got a particularly ugly one: if you don't talk to a certain Argonian just ''outside'' Riften, who's almost never referenced by anyone else, and help her out, ''then talk with her again'', you'll never be able to buy the town's manor.
* Some situations in ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' and ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' require you to talk to everyone... literally. Or at least most of the people in an area.
* This advice is given to the player in ''VideoGame/SunsetOverImdahl'', then justified: [[spoiler:your character unknowingly has ThePlague, and the advice-giver wants you to spread it and wipe out your hometown.]]
* In ''UltimaIII'', you'll eventually run into someone who will say "You should go to bed! It's too late to be playing Ultima!"
* ''[[VideoGame/RealmsOfArkania Star Trail]]'' was particularly bad about this. There are at least a few quests that can only be solved by checking every single house in 300 house town, where 298 of the people in those houses will tell you to go away.
* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' scatters its {{Fetch Quest}}s across the [[NonPlayerCharacter [=NPC=]s]] in town and at school, such that you'll want to either talk to everyone regularly (at least once per in-game month) or [[GuideDangIt consult a guide]] to catch all the quests.
* Sailor Venus's route in Chapter 2 of ''VideoGame/SailorMoonAnotherStory'' requires you to talk to ''every single person'' in the streets of the Rias Village in order to proceed - for no better reason than just having to spend some time waiting for some ceremony to start.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Simulation Game]]
* ''VideoGame/RuneFactory'':
** You ''must'' speak to all of the townspeople to get all of the basic farming equipment that previous games have given you from the beginning, much to the chagrin of the player. Without an FAQ, some of the tools are very difficult to find. The game requires you to talk to everyone in town in order to start your next day on the farm.
** In ''VideoGame/RuneFactory3'', your first quest is, quite literally, to introduce yourself to everyone in town.
* ''VideoGame/HarvestMoon'':
** ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonBackToNature'' for the Playstation presented the choice to whether or not to let the mayor take you around and talk to everyone. Accepting, actually has him do this in cutscene form similar to the introduction cutscene so not only do you not have to be on the lookout for them, you also can't stop midway.
** ''VideoGame/HarvestMoonAWonderfulLife'' has Takakura showing you around town and talking to most of the villagers through cutscene. In ''Special Edition'' you can skip this by insisting on doing it alone, which has you go around introducing yourself offscreen.
* ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' has the tradition of forcing the player in their first job at the beginning of the game to talk to every single person in their town. Mind you, you usually don't have a map handy unless you go to the postboards of it. Sometimes you can easily find them in their house, but often they will be outside wandering. This is even worse in the more recent games as the map is no longer divided into screens, and animals are free to wander the ''whole'' town. Even moreso, pity the person who joins in on another player's file, and the town has up to 15 residents if it's on the Cube. Oh, did I mention they don't tell you who you have, and have not talked to? Hope you have good memory.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Turn Based Strategy]]
* In ''ShiningForce II'', talking to random people proves ridiculously useful. Kiwi and May join your party, completely out of the blue, just because you talked to them in Granseal and Rubble, respectively. Then again, this game is notorious for having people join you for the silliest reasons.
* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', a standard tactic to use when in the RPG worlds is to talk to everyone.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Visual Novel]]
* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'': The entire exploration/investigation part of the series is made of this trope. Basically, to advance in the plot, you need to talk to everyone and choose every dialogue option.
* ''VisualNovel/FleuretBlanc'' takes this UpToEleven. Characters have literally over a ''dozen'' generic lines of dialogue, and have a comment to make on every single gossip topic (sometimes providing something different if you've advanced the relevant subplot). Some of this is fluff, but most of it provides important information needed to solve the mysteries.
[[/folder]]

!!Non-video game examples:

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* This trope is derided in pen and paper roleplaying games where, thanks to the presence of a GM, you ''really'' can talk to all 130,000 inhabitants of New Gundark if you really want to. The movie ''The Gamers: Dorkness Rising'' lampshades this by depicting the new player talking to the first person she comes across (a merchant) and trying to gain intelligence about the plot from a lowly NPC. The other players incinerate the merchant to discourage her from doing this. Much to the chagrin of the DM, who was about to give them the information they needed through the mouth of the NPC. In this particular case, it was less "talk to everyone" that the other players hated, so much as "talk to ''anyone''"...
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Web Comics]]
* [[http://www.nuklearpower.com/2007/02/20/episode-810-efficient-use-of-time/ Mocked]] in ''[[WebComic/EightBitTheater 8-Bit Theater]]'' -- specifically, the version of this trope where you ''have'' to talk to someone non-obvious to advance the plot. This happens a time or two in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'', the game on which the comic is based. For instance, learning to speak Lefeinish requires you to go find the Slab (a.k.a. Rosetta Stone), then take it to the random NPC Dr. Unne so he can interpret it for you... apparently just on the evidence that he's a doctor. Though he did mention that he was studying their race...
** The ''real'' problem with the Dr. Unne quest is that you meet Dr. Unne in Melmond, at the beginning of the second act, in which he introduces himself and expresses incredulity that you've never heard of him before. The next mention of him is in Onrac, at the beginning of the ''third'' act, by a random NPC who mentions the good doctor is studying the Lefeinish language. You then get the slab from the dungeon nearby, and have to remember where you saw Dr. Unne in order to learn the language. The problem is that the time between meeting Dr. Unne and getting the slab can be as much as 10 ''hours'' of gameplay, with ''four'' dungeons in between, and several towns with their own multitude of [=NPC=]s.
* The [=NPC=]s in ''WebComic/GoldCoinComics'' really want the main character to [[http://www.goldcoincomics.com/?id=58 go to the tavern]].
[[/folder]]
----
19th Nov '15 5:35:19 PM nombretomado
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* ''Franchise/RuneFactory'':

to:

* ''Franchise/RuneFactory'':''VideoGame/RuneFactory'':
19th Nov '15 5:30:37 PM nombretomado
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** In ''RuneFactory3'', your first quest is, quite literally, to introduce yourself to everyone in town.

to:

** In ''RuneFactory3'', ''VideoGame/RuneFactory3'', your first quest is, quite literally, to introduce yourself to everyone in town.
22nd Jul '15 5:03:16 PM nombretomado
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* Some situations in ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' and ''MegaManBattleNetwork'' require you to talk to everyone... literally. Or at least most of the people in an area.

to:

* Some situations in ''VideoGame/CustomRobo'' and ''MegaManBattleNetwork'' ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' require you to talk to everyone... literally. Or at least most of the people in an area.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.TalkToEveryone