History Main / SweetAndSourGrapes

19th Feb '17 7:35:12 PM SpectralTime
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* ''{{WesternAnimation/Moana}}'' has the hero Maui sacrificing his magical fishhook, which is the source of many of his powers, and to which he attaches a great deal of his self-worth, blocking a blow from the mad volcano demon to protect Moana and right a past wrong. In the end, [[spoiler: the goddess presents him with a new one as thanks for his service]].
11th Feb '17 1:16:16 PM KingClark
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* ''VideoGame/{{BioShock|1}}'' has an infamous example. Whenever you encounter a [[CreepyChild Little Sister]], you're given two options: "Harvest", which kills the Little Sister [[EvilPaysBetter but gives you more]] [[BioAugmentation ADAM]], or "Rescue", which cures the Little Sister of her [[BodyHorror sea slug]]-induced possession [[BeingGoodSucks but gives you less]]... ''in theory.'' [[MamaBear Dr. Tenenbaum]] will reward you for saving the Little Sisters with free [[PowersAsPrograms Plasmids]] and bonus ADAM; all things considered (see Second bullet for details) resisting temptation and playing the hero is ultimately just as rewarding, if not more so, than choosing the evil route.
** Harvesting every Little Sister grants 280 ADAM which is more than one will get for rescuing. However when you account for the free plasmids and gene tonics you get from Tenenbaum, some of which can only be acquired in this manner, the value of Harvesting disappears entirely; from a rewards perspective, virtue is the superior option. It's especially worth it when you consider the 100G Achievement that comes with rescuing every little sister.

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* ''VideoGame/{{BioShock|1}}'' has an infamous example. Whenever you encounter a [[CreepyChild Little Sister]], you're given two options: "Harvest", which kills the Little Sister [[EvilPaysBetter but gives you more]] [[BioAugmentation ADAM]], or "Rescue", which cures the Little Sister of her [[BodyHorror sea slug]]-induced possession [[BeingGoodSucks but gives you less]]... ''in theory.'' [[MamaBear Dr. Tenenbaum]] will reward you for saving the Little Sisters with free [[PowersAsPrograms Plasmids]] and bonus ADAM; all things considered (see Second bullet for details) considered, resisting temptation and playing the hero is ultimately just as rewarding, if not more so, than choosing the evil route.
**
route. Harvesting every Little Sister grants 280 ADAM which is more than one will get for rescuing. However when you account for the free plasmids and gene tonics you get from Tenenbaum, some of which can only be acquired in this manner, the value of Harvesting disappears entirely; from a rewards perspective, virtue is the superior option. It's especially worth it when you consider the 100G Achievement that comes with rescuing every little sister.
25th Dec '16 7:56:23 PM Kayube
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* ToBeAMaster shows frequently have this. This often plays out with a competitor who believes that [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers winning is more important than anything else]], while our considerably more casual protagonist tries to show him the error of his mentality. Usually by beating him in competition, thus resulting in the protagonist becoming the grand champion after all. It says something about the broken nature of this when protagonists who ''don't'' go on to win the overall competition (for example, in ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'', Ash Ketchum) are written off by fans as {{Failure Hero}}es. They seem to forget that he ''did'' win the Orange Islands League and Battle Frontier, even though they're on a lower tier than the major league competitions. When he won the latter and got a trophy for it, he turned down their offer to become a Frontier Brain so he could continue traveling. Nintendo doesn't seem to have a problem with him winning arcs that aren't adapted from the games.

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* ToBeAMaster shows frequently have this. This often plays out with a competitor who believes that [[SecondPlaceIsForLosers winning is more important than anything else]], while our considerably more casual protagonist tries to show him the error of his mentality. Usually by beating him in competition, thus resulting in the protagonist becoming the grand champion after all. It says something about the broken nature of this when protagonists who ''don't'' go on to win the overall competition (for example, in ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'', Ash Ketchum) are written off by fans as {{Failure Hero}}es. They seem to forget that he ''did'' win the Orange Islands League and Battle Frontier, even though they're on a lower tier than the major league competitions. When he won the latter and got a trophy for it, he turned down their offer to become a Frontier Brain so he could continue traveling. Nintendo doesn't seem to have a problem with him winning arcs that aren't adapted from the games.
25th Dec '16 3:21:28 PM quackytrope
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* Sometimes it's easier to find a good movie or television show on accident, rather than spend hours searching for one on streaming services or in stores.
20th Dec '16 2:36:03 PM dasuberkaiser
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* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': Aang interprets Guru Pathik's statement that he must "let go" of his attachment to Katara in order to intentionally enter his powerful Avatar State as meaning he must abandon his feelings for her if he wants access to all that power. Aang chooses [[ThePowerofLove love]], a move later applauded by Iroh (only in part, Iroh applauds choosing happiness over raw power, but does not have the answer as to whether or not this is a good choice for saving the world). Inverting the trope, once he is forced to let go anyway, he is immediately defeated. It's played straight by the end of the series when Aang has both mastered the Avatar State (enough to stop himself from landing a killing blow in self defense) and had his [[EarnYourHappyEnding happy ending]] with Katara. However, giving up on attachment is not actually the same thing as giving up on his actual feelings themselves, a distinction Aang may be too young to grasp.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': Aang interprets Guru Pathik's statement that he must "let go" of his attachment to Katara in order to intentionally enter his powerful Avatar State as meaning he must abandon his feelings for her if he wants access to all that power. Aang chooses [[ThePowerofLove [[ThePowerOfLove love]], a move later applauded by Iroh (only in part, Iroh applauds choosing happiness over raw power, but does not have the answer as to whether or not this is a good choice for saving the world). Inverting the trope, once he is forced to let go anyway, he is immediately defeated. It's played straight by the end of the series when Aang has both mastered the Avatar State (enough to stop himself from landing a killing blow in self defense) and had his [[EarnYourHappyEnding happy ending]] with Katara. However, giving up on attachment is not actually the same thing as giving up on his actual feelings themselves, a distinction Aang may be too young to grasp.
28th Nov '16 4:24:07 PM Morgenthaler
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** In one episode, Amy is left on an alien planet, dodging medical robots that will kill her unintentionally, until Rory and the Doctor can come and save her. Because of time travel, they find both her present-day self and her future self, who was abandoned for years and became a rather cynical {{badass}} as a result. Throughout the episode, the Doctor insists that both Amys can't be saved and Rory agonizes over which one to rescue, since he loves both and both love him in return. Finally, the Doctor figures out a way to rearrange the TARDIS so that both Amys can be saved. [[spoiler:And then it's horribly, horribly subverted when it turns out the Doctor was lying so he could trick Rory and the present-day Amy to go in the TARDIS and let him lock the future Amy out. Everyone's upset about this, but it's just impossible to save both. The future Amy ends up accepting this and lets the medical robots kill her, as she remembers Rory.]]

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** In one episode, Amy is left on an alien planet, dodging medical robots that will kill her unintentionally, until Rory and the Doctor can come and save her. Because of time travel, they find both her present-day self and her future self, who was abandoned for years and became a rather cynical {{badass}} badass as a result. Throughout the episode, the Doctor insists that both Amys can't be saved and Rory agonizes over which one to rescue, since he loves both and both love him in return. Finally, the Doctor figures out a way to rearrange the TARDIS so that both Amys can be saved. [[spoiler:And then it's horribly, horribly subverted when it turns out the Doctor was lying so he could trick Rory and the present-day Amy to go in the TARDIS and let him lock the future Amy out. Everyone's upset about this, but it's just impossible to save both. The future Amy ends up accepting this and lets the medical robots kill her, as she remembers Rory.]]
13th Oct '16 9:41:39 PM Jgamer
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* At the end of ''VisualNovel/SteinsGate'', [[spoiler: Okabe has saved the world and the woman he loves, but due to TimeTravel being involved, nobody but him will [[WistfulAmnesia (consciously)]] remember [[TheGreatestStoryNeverTold all the hardships and struggles he faced]] to EarnYourHappyEnding. Thus, he figures that Kurisu has probably went back to America and forgotten all about him. However, as he's accepting this since this means that she's alive and happy "doing her own thing", he runs into Kurisu in a chance encounter, Kurisu having stayed in Japan for the past month trying to find Okabe.]]
11th Oct '16 10:33:32 PM PaulA
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* ''Literature/MagicShop: Jennifer Murdley's Toad'', a children's lit novel by Creator/BruceCoville about an insecure and ugly little girl who adopts a talking frog sought out by a shallow, beauty-obsessed temptress, consciously [[AvertedTrope averts the trope]]. In early versions of the story, Jennifer became beautiful, but Coville realized that such a transformation broke the Aesop and instead went with an ending in which Jennifer just accepts herself for who she is.

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* ''Literature/MagicShop: Jennifer Murdley's Toad'', ''Literature/JenniferMurdleysToad'', a children's lit novel by Creator/BruceCoville about an insecure and ugly little girl who adopts a talking frog sought out by a shallow, beauty-obsessed temptress, consciously [[AvertedTrope averts the trope]]. In early versions of the story, Jennifer became beautiful, but Coville realized that such a transformation broke the Aesop and instead went with an ending in which Jennifer just accepts herself for who she is.
21st Aug '16 4:02:29 PM Valiona
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* In ''Zillions'' magazine (aka Consumer Reports for Kids), one episode of a recurring sitcom-like comic strip involves two girls trying out for cheerleading and basketball, with one girl wanting to do cheerleading and the other wanting to play basketball. Naturally, each one botches the tryouts for the one they wanted due to stressing over what to do, but they succeed in getting a spot on the other's team, leading the first girl to wonder why she couldn't do well when it mattered for her.



* ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog'': Dr. Facilier offers Tiana the restaurant she's always dreamed off, in exchange for his voodoo talisman. She almost gives in, but realizes that [[ThePowerOfLove those she loves]] are even more important than her dreams, so she smashes the talisman. After Charlotte's kiss fails, she and Naveen decide to marry anyway. However, since she has just married a prince, Tiana becomes a princess, and their kiss breaks the spell. Then, with a little "aggressive persuasion" from Louis, Tiana is able to buy her restaurant, and she and Naveen deck out the place in splendid fasion.

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* ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog'': Dr. Facilier offers Tiana the restaurant she's always dreamed off, in exchange for his voodoo talisman. She almost gives in, but realizes that [[ThePowerOfLove those she loves]] are even more important than her dreams, so she smashes the talisman. After Charlotte's kiss fails, she and Naveen decide to marry anyway. However, since she has just married a prince, Tiana becomes a princess, and their kiss breaks the spell. Then, with a little "aggressive persuasion" from Louis, Tiana is able to buy her restaurant, and she and Naveen deck out the place in splendid fasion.fashion.






* DiscussedTrope on ''Webcomic/QuestionableContent'' when [[http://questionablecontent.net/view.php?comic=882 Steve]] is trying to find a girl who said she might date him but didn't leave her name or number. .

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* DiscussedTrope on ''Webcomic/QuestionableContent'' when [[http://questionablecontent.net/view.php?comic=882 Steve]] is trying to find a girl who said she might date him but didn't leave her name or number. . number.
*In ''Webcomics/GeneralProtectionFault'', [[FoolishSiblingResponsibleSibling Justin Barker was a student at a military academy while his older brother Jason]] was a [[TheSlacker slacker]] college student with [[TheAlcoholic a drinking problem]]. When the UGA decided to kidnap Justin to test him as a potential agent, they accidentally got Jason instead, and even more incredibly, Jason passed with flying colors, so the UGA decided not to rectify the mistake. Justin didn't take it well, and [[TheResenter resented his brother for years]]. Fortunately, after talking with Fooker's friends, Justin reconciled with his brother, and eventually, Fooker managed to arrange for him to take his place in the UGA, since Fooker wanted to go back to his job, his friends and his girlfriend, making this a case in which both parties get what they want.
4th Jul '16 1:57:52 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': Aang interprets Guru Pathik's statement that he must "let go" of his attachment to Katara in order to intentionally enter his powerful Avatar State as meaning he must abandon his feelings for her if he wants access to all that power. Aang chooses [[ThePowerofLove love]], a move later applauded by [[TheObiWan Iroh]] (only in part, Iroh applauds choosing happiness over raw power, but does not have the answer as to whether or not this is a good choice for saving the world). Inverting the trope, once he is forced to let go anyway, he is immediately defeated. It's played straight by the end of the series when Aang has both mastered the Avatar State (enough to stop himself from landing a killing blow in self defense) and had his [[EarnYourHappyEnding happy ending]] with Katara. However, giving up on attachment is not actually the same thing as giving up on his actual feelings themselves, a distinction Aang may be too young to grasp.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'': Aang interprets Guru Pathik's statement that he must "let go" of his attachment to Katara in order to intentionally enter his powerful Avatar State as meaning he must abandon his feelings for her if he wants access to all that power. Aang chooses [[ThePowerofLove love]], a move later applauded by [[TheObiWan Iroh]] Iroh (only in part, Iroh applauds choosing happiness over raw power, but does not have the answer as to whether or not this is a good choice for saving the world). Inverting the trope, once he is forced to let go anyway, he is immediately defeated. It's played straight by the end of the series when Aang has both mastered the Avatar State (enough to stop himself from landing a killing blow in self defense) and had his [[EarnYourHappyEnding happy ending]] with Katara. However, giving up on attachment is not actually the same thing as giving up on his actual feelings themselves, a distinction Aang may be too young to grasp.
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