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History Main / SweetAndSourGrapes

11th May '16 9:44:00 AM Gravidef
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* This trope is thoroughly [[DeconstructedTrope deconstructed]] in "The Parable of the Beggar and the Diamond," a Hindu myth. One day, Parvati, wife of the god Shiva, becomes distressed when she sees an old beggar named Ramu being tormented by children on the streets; Ramu becomes so distressed that he curses his fate. Parvati begs Shiva to aid Ramu, and he does so by summoning a gigantic diamond--big enough to ensure the man's wealth for generations--and dropping it into his path. However, by this point Ramu has had some time to reconsider his rash prayer, and begins listing all of the things that ''aren't'' wrong with him--for instance, he still has his sight. To appreciate that gift, he shuts his eyes and walks for a little while...moving right past the giant diamond. Ramu then opens his eyes and praises the gods for his ability to see, then continues on his merry way; Shiva puts the diamond back where it came from and instead places a sturdy stick in Ramu's path, knowing that he'll find it.
11th May '16 9:32:46 AM Gravidef
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* This is a ''huge'' problem on ''Series/FullHouse'', especially in later seasons when the writers began focusing on [[TheScrappy Michelle]]. But the seeds were there from the beginning:
** In one Season 2 episode, the main cast ends up stuck in an airport on Christmas Eve, and their airline loses the luggage containing the girls' presents. Everyone complains about this, but Jesse inspires everyone to change their minds by pointing out that Christmas is based on feelings, not material things...and then he starts comparing the items in the airport to ''material things'' (a vending machine becomes a Christmas dinner, for example). To make matters worse, the next day, [[RealAfterAll the real Santa Claus]] shows up and uses his magic to make the lost luggage appear, so the girls get their gifts anyway.
** A similar treatment became even worse later in the show: Jesse notices that Stephanie and Michelle are being especially greedy one Christmas season, so he promises them a great present. The present turns out to be their spending time volunteering at a local homeless shelter, so they can get an idea of how lucky they are. Unfortunately, not only do the girls still get a good pile of presents, ''we never see them volunteering''--they just come home and talk about what an eye-opening experience it was. That's all kinds of wrong.
** In "The Day of the Rhino," Michelle sends away for a toy advertised by Rigby the Rhino, a [[Series/BarneyAndFriends Barney]] {{Expy}}. When the toy turns out to be much smaller than advertised, she, her friend Denise, Joey, and Stephanie all travel to the mall during a Rigby performance and angrily protest. It seems as though they're unsuccessful, but Joey encourages Michelle to take heart: she may have been ripped off, but her good deed has kept other children from making the same mistake. Seconds later, the doorbell rings--it's Rigby, and he's so touched by Michelle's protests that he's decided to give everyone who ordered a toy a free large doll, starting with her.



* King Solomon is an interesting take on this trope. God offered him a gift of whatever he wanted, such as riches or lovers or what have you. Solomon, terrified that he's going to screw up while he's on the throne, asks God for wisdom instead. By choosing wisdom' he shows that he already possesses that quality, because with wisdom all the other offered things can be obtained, however none of the other things can impart wisdom itself. God is so impressed that he gives him all the things he ''didn't'' ask for, reasoning that a man whose first concern was to rule ''well'', rather than to surround himself with riches, was the sort of man who ''deserved'' riches.

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* King Solomon is an interesting take on this trope. God offered him a gift of whatever he wanted, such as riches or lovers or what have you. Solomon, terrified that he's going to screw up while he's on the throne, asks God for wisdom instead. By choosing wisdom' wisdom, he shows that he already possesses that quality, because with wisdom all the other offered things can be obtained, however none of the other things can impart wisdom itself. God is so impressed that he gives him all the things he ''didn't'' ask for, reasoning that a man whose first concern was to rule ''well'', rather than to surround himself with riches, was the sort of man who ''deserved'' riches.
19th Apr '16 8:16:09 AM Tron80
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* ''FanFic/TheSecondTry'': In this PeggySue fic Asuka and Shinji are initially on the verge of just letting the world die because coming back in time meant losing their daughter. They manage to overcome their sorrow and work hard to avert [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt Third Impact]] even knowing they'll never be able to see Aki again... and then in the second-to-last last chapter, we get a MeanwhileEpisode where Rei finds an inexplicably familiar young child wandering lost in Tokyo-3.

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* ''FanFic/TheSecondTry'': In this PeggySue fic Asuka and Shinji are initially on the verge of just letting the world die because coming back in time meant losing their daughter. They manage to overcome their sorrow and work hard to avert [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt Third Impact]] even knowing they'll never be able to see Aki again... and then in the second-to-last last chapter, we get a MeanwhileEpisode an episode where Rei finds an inexplicably familiar young child wandering lost in Tokyo-3.
16th Apr '16 12:58:51 PM Kytseo
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16th Apr '16 12:58:18 PM Kytseo
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* At the end of ''Anime/DragonballZ'', Vegeta caps off his CharacterDevelopment by admitting that Goku is more powerful than him. During ''Anime/DragonballZBattleOfGods'', which takes place after that admittance, he briefly surpasses Goku by [[ThePowerOfLove beating the crap out of Beerus after Beerus smacks Bulma]].
16th Apr '16 6:27:27 AM Andyroid
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* ''Film/TheMuppets'': The Muppets' attempt to [[SavingTheOrphanage save their theater and their name]] from the evil oil tycoon, Tex Richman, fails horribly as it turns out they didn't even come close to raising enough money. Kermit instead declares that it doesn't matter that they failed since they did their best and they'll move forward as a family regardless. They exit the theater to people applauding them for their efforts, seemingly averting this trope. Cue the end credits, when Gonzo accidentally beans Tex Richman in the head with a bowling ball. Thanks to the head injury, he gives them the theater and the name anyway, thus playing the trope perfectly straight in the end.

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* ''Film/TheMuppets'': The Muppets' attempt to [[SavingTheOrphanage save their theater and their name]] from the evil oil tycoon, Tex Richman, fails horribly as it turns out they didn't even come close to raising enough money. Kermit instead declares that it doesn't matter that they failed since they did their best and they'll move forward as a family regardless. They exit the theater to people applauding them for their efforts, seemingly averting this trope.efforts. Cue the end credits, when Gonzo accidentally beans Tex Richman in the head with a bowling ball. Thanks to the head injury, he injury finally giving him the ability to laugh, Richman gives them the theater and the name anyway, thus playing the trope perfectly straight in the end.anyway.
10th Apr '16 6:17:51 PM imadmagician
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* ''Film/WillyWonkaAndTheChocolateFactory'' has near the end a FriendOrIdolDecision [[spoiler: which is actually a SecretTestOfCharacter]] where Charlie had to choose between selling the Everlasting Gobstopper to Wonka's rival to get his family out of poverty, and keeping his promise to the Candy Tycoon along with his penniless status. It's easy to guess how it ends.
22nd Jan '16 9:51:57 PM Prfnoff
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* In Alfred Lord Tennyson's "Lady Clare", Clare is all ready to marry her [[KissingCousins cousin]], Lord Ronald. She finds out that she was SwitchedAtBirth, and that she's truly her nurse's daughter--the real Lady Clare is dead, and Ronald was next in line to inherit everything. Against her birth mother's advice, she casts off her position and dresses like a beggar, thinking that Ronald has been deprived of his right. It turns out that he still wants to marry her:
-->"If you are not the heiress born,
--> And I," said he, "the lawful heir,
--> We two will wed to-morrow morn,
--> And you shall still be Lady Clare."

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* In Alfred Lord Tennyson's Creator/AlfredLordTennyson's "Lady Clare", Clare is all ready to marry her [[KissingCousins cousin]], Lord Ronald. She finds out that she was SwitchedAtBirth, and that she's truly her nurse's daughter--the real Lady Clare is dead, and Ronald was next in line to inherit everything. Against her birth mother's advice, she casts off her position and dresses like a beggar, thinking that Ronald has been deprived of his right. It turns out that he still wants to marry her:
-->"If you are not the heiress born,
-->
born,\\
And I," said he, "the lawful heir,
-->
heir,\\
We two will wed to-morrow morn,
-->
morn,\\
And you shall still be Lady Clare."
5th Jan '16 1:09:14 AM DivineDeath
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': In "Lisa's First Word", Homer tries to get Maggie to talk, but his attempts fail miserably. After he decides that he would be better off if Maggie didn't talk and leaves Maggie alone in her room, she says her first word.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': In "Lisa's First Word", Homer tries to get Maggie to talk, but his attempts fail miserably. After he decides that he would be better off if Maggie didn't talk and leaves Maggie alone in her room, she says her first word. word: "Daddy."
29th Nov '15 1:56:23 AM Perey
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* This trope happened to athletic boater Lawrence Lemieux in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. During a race where Lemieux was in 2nd place and had a decent shot at a medal, he noticed that the Singapore team had capsized, were injured and were in serious danger of drowning. Obviously deciding that winning a medal was not worth letting people die when he could do something, Lemieux turned back to save them, which cost him the race. However, since the world saw this HeroicSacrifice, things worked out; the International Yacht Racing Union unanimously voted to officially award Lemieux with 2nd place in the race and he was later awarded the Pierre de Coubertin Medal, the supreme and rarest of all Olympic medals for exemplifying the spirit of the Olympic games at its finest.

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* This trope happened to athletic boater Lawrence Lemieux in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. During a race where Lemieux was in 2nd place and had a decent shot at a medal, all but guaranteed to advance to the medal round, he noticed that the Singapore team had capsized, were injured and were in serious danger of drowning. Obviously deciding that winning a medal was not worth letting people die when he could do something, Lemieux turned back to save them, which cost him the race. However, since the world saw this HeroicSacrifice, things worked out; the International Yacht Racing Union unanimously voted to officially award Lemieux with 2nd place in the race and race. In the end, he was later didn't get a medal for a top-three place in the medal round... but he ''was'' awarded the Pierre de Coubertin Medal, the supreme and rarest of all Olympic medals for exemplifying the spirit of the Olympic games at its finest.
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