History Main / SuperPersistentPredator

4th Jul '17 11:11:12 AM infernape612
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-->-- '''[[Blog/TetrapodZoology Darren Naish]]''' [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/01/14/creatures-of-avatar/ in his review of]] ''Film/{{Avatar}}''.

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-->-- '''[[Blog/TetrapodZoology Darren Naish]]''' [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2010/01/14/creatures-of-avatar/ in his review of]] ''Film/{{Avatar}}''.
''Film/{{Avatar}}''
24th Jun '17 9:26:47 PM BattleMaster
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* The polar bears in ''VideoGame/NeverAlone''. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]]. given that they're [[BearsAreBadNews polar bears]], which really will stalk humans for miles due to how scares food is in the arctic.
22nd Jun '17 10:55:03 AM Gosicrystal
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* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' inverts this. Most large monsters tend to flee from the player after exhausting themselves or sustaining large amounts of damage, and usually have to be chased in order to be taken down. In other words, the ''player'' is an example.
** Also, when hungry, monsters will leave to find easier game, generally going for the easiest to kill herbivores available or even scavenging, than the heavily armed human in front of them. They will also revert to a neutral state if you leave an area to heal up. All in all, monsters in Monster Hunter really want nothing to do with the hunter at all and will make any effort to scare him/her away or flee themselves. [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters Quite sad, really]].
*** And that's the civilization that ''respects'' nature.

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* ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' inverts this. Most large monsters tend to flee from the player after exhausting themselves or sustaining large amounts of damage, and usually have to be chased in order to be taken down. In other words, the ''player'' is an example.
**
example. Also, when hungry, monsters will leave to find easier game, generally going for the easiest to kill herbivores available or even scavenging, than the heavily armed human in front of them. They will also revert to a neutral state if you leave an area to heal up. All in all, monsters in Monster Hunter really want nothing to do with the hunter at all and will make any effort to scare him/her away or flee themselves. [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters Quite sad, really]].
***
really]]. And that's the civilization that ''respects'' nature.



* ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' has the SA-X, Samus' Power Suit taken over by an X-parasite which chases you through the entire game with no way to stop it. (The SA-X is fairly easy to fool, though, not being able to find Samus should she slip out of immediate view.) On the other hand, since Metroids ''eat'' X-parasites, Samus effectively plays the role of Super Persistent Predator in the game itself.
** Although technically Samus is [[BerserkButton also a Metroid in this game]], [[AccidentallyAccurate and only this one]].
*** And the SA-X has some of Samus's insticts, such as [[OhCrap eliminating all Metroids]].

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* ''VideoGame/MetroidFusion'' has the SA-X, Samus' Power Suit taken over by an X-parasite which chases you through the entire game with no way to stop it. (The SA-X is fairly easy to fool, though, not being able to find Samus should she slip out of immediate view.) On the other hand, since Metroids ''eat'' X-parasites, Samus effectively plays the role of Super Persistent Predator in the game itself.
**
itself. Although technically Samus is [[BerserkButton also a Metroid in this game]], [[AccidentallyAccurate and only this one]].
***
one]]. And the SA-X has some of Samus's insticts, such as [[OhCrap eliminating all Metroids]].



* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}''

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':



** While never specified to be a predator, Primeape fits the persistent part because it ''never'' gives up chasing whoever angers it till it has beaten them up. This happens a lot, because the Pokémon has such a extreme HairTriggerTemper it's near constantly in a UnstoppableRage.
*** Possibly averted in Sun and Moon, where a Pokédex entry notes that it has been known to become so angry that it ''dies''.

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** While never specified to be a predator, Primeape fits the persistent part because it ''never'' gives up chasing whoever angers it till it has beaten them up. This happens a lot, because the Pokémon has such a extreme HairTriggerTemper it's near constantly in a UnstoppableRage.
***
UnstoppableRage. Possibly averted in Sun and Moon, where a Pokédex entry notes that it has been known to become so angry that it ''dies''.
16th Jun '17 4:05:38 AM morane
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* Man-eater animals (that is, animals that have made humans part of their regular diet) behave like this, that's because compared to other animals, humans are ridiculously easy to kill, and once a predator learns that, it will tend to keep hunting the "easy meat". See the individual examples below.
* Many predators really do behave this way, though not to the ridiculous extents often depicted in fiction (usually employed by a group of smaller predators pursuing one large prey animal, whereas many movies and TV shows have it reversed). The constant pursuit denies the prey a chance to feed, drink, or rest. Eventually the prey will either collapse or be too weak to defend itself. This can easily be sped up by injuring the prey or forcing them into dangerous terrain. These tactics can allow a slower, weaker predator to take down big game. The predator runs the same risks, so this can often be a [[DeathOrGloryAttack make-it or break-it tactic.]]
* ''Humans'' are perhaps the most successful example of this trope, called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persistence_hunting Persistence Hunting]]. We are nearly tireless by the standards of most other animals, though hardly fast animals -- in our hunter-gatherer days, our favored tactic seems to have been following an animal at a jog until it simply dropped of exhaustion and heatstroke and either died there or had its head bashed in with a rock. This is still practiced by many African tribes. (Before you try it on your local whitetails, though, remember that these people are hunting in vast expanses of flat land; there's no forests for the animal to hide in or hills for it to vanish over.)

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* Man-eater animals (that is, animals that have made humans part of their regular diet) behave like this, that's because compared to other animals, humans are ridiculously easy to kill, and once a predator learns that, it will tend to keep hunting the "easy meat". See the individual examples below.
* Many predators really do behave this way, though not to the ridiculous extents often depicted in fiction (usually employed by a group of smaller predators pursuing one large prey animal, whereas many movies and TV shows have it reversed). The constant pursuit denies the prey a chance to feed, drink, or rest. Eventually the prey will either collapse or be too weak to defend itself. This can easily be sped up by injuring the prey or forcing them into dangerous terrain. These tactics can allow a slower, weaker predator to take down big game. The predator runs the same risks, so this can often be a [[DeathOrGloryAttack make-it or break-it tactic.]]
* ''Humans'' are perhaps [[TropeMaker the most successful example of this trope, trope]], called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persistence_hunting Persistence Hunting]]. We are nearly tireless by the standards of most other animals, though hardly fast animals -- in our hunter-gatherer days, our favored tactic seems to have been following an animal at a jog until it simply dropped of exhaustion and heatstroke and either died there or had its head bashed in with a rock. This is still practiced by many African tribes. (Before you try it on your local whitetails, though, remember that these people are hunting in vast expanses of flat land; there's no forests for the animal to hide in or hills for it to vanish over.)



* Many predators really do behave this way, though not to the ridiculous extents often depicted in fiction (usually employed by a group of smaller predators pursuing one large prey animal, whereas many movies and TV shows have it reversed). The constant pursuit denies the prey a chance to feed, drink, or rest. Eventually the prey will either collapse or be too weak to defend itself. This can easily be sped up by injuring the prey or forcing them into dangerous terrain. These tactics can allow a slower, weaker predator to take down big game. The predator runs the same risks, so this can often be a [[DeathOrGloryAttack make-it or break-it tactic.]]



* The Tsavo man-eaters, a pair of maneless Tsavo lions, killed/consumed between 35/135 Indian laborers working on the Tsavo railway bridge in British East Africa. Even lighting campfires and building redoubts out of thorns didn't stop them. Eventually, Col. John Henry Patterson, a real-life GreatWhiteHunter, set off to kill them. He shot the first, but it escaped, then started stalking him. He shot it four more times, and it eventually died of its wounds. He found it lying dead in an ambush position where it had been waiting for him. He ambushed the second lion, shooting it five times. ''[[{{Determinator}} It got up and charged him.]]'' Three more bullets put it down. Patterson claimed it died trying to leap over a fallen tree branch, ''still trying to charge him.'' [[WhosLaughingNow Then they spent 25 years as a rug.]] A modern analysis of the attacks shows that the lions may actually have been an ''aversion'' to the trope: the reported attacks were all during the dry period when the lions' normal prey was scarce. During the rainy season, when herd animals were more common, they actually stopped attacking humans.
** These two were more recently turned into a museum exhibit (with one of them lying down, since the rug didn't include his belly). See the Movies entree for the movie based (somewhat loosely) on the event.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustave_(crocodile) Gustave]]. What's scarier than an enormous Nile crocodile? An enormous Nile crocodile that not only has a taste for eating humans, but enjoys torturing them too. This bastard is reckoned to be nearly 70 years old, and, thanks to hundreds of human corpses dumped in the Rizizi river during Burundi's civil war, he has a taste for ''Homo sapiens''. He is believed to have killed nearly 300 people, and according to locals, doesn't eat them all - he kills because he enjoys it. Also, [[NightmareFuel this horrific abomination is still out there.]] A National Geographic expedition tried to capture him using a steel cage and a live goat. After the camera went out one stormy night, they found the cage the next morning, the goat gone, smashed to pieces at the bottom of a lakebed. So what makes him "super-persistent?" Well, apart from his enormous size, his other distinguishing features are machine gun scars, a grenade wound, and ''having an enormous bullet hole in the middle of his face.'' [[MadeOfIron And he's still going]]...
* Komodo Dragons fit the bill; they first take a bite out of their prey, and through a combination of mild anticoagulant venom (ie, the wound bleeds out) and severe laceration from the teeth, it's only a matter of time before the animal drops from blood loss, trauma, paralysis, and infection. And if it doesn't die in minutes, the dragon will attack again and again until it drops. Most depictions have long-distance tracking as the norm, but in reality they simply keep chasing and biting it until it falls. They also usually shred the legs and ankles to keep prey from running.

to:

* Man-eater animals (that is, animals that have made humans part of their regular diet) behave like this, that's because compared to other animals, humans are ridiculously easy to kill, and once a predator learns that, it will tend to keep hunting the "easy meat". See the individual examples below.
**
The Tsavo man-eaters, a pair of maneless Tsavo lions, killed/consumed between 35/135 Indian laborers working on the Tsavo railway bridge in British East Africa. Even lighting campfires and building redoubts out of thorns didn't stop them. Eventually, Col. John Henry Patterson, a real-life GreatWhiteHunter, set off to kill them. He shot the first, but it escaped, then started stalking him. He shot it four more times, and it eventually died of its wounds. He found it lying dead in an ambush position where it had been waiting for him. He ambushed the second lion, shooting it five times. ''[[{{Determinator}} It got up and charged him.]]'' Three more bullets put it down. Patterson claimed it died trying to leap over a fallen tree branch, ''still trying to charge him.'' [[WhosLaughingNow Then they spent 25 years as a rug.]] A modern analysis of the attacks shows that the lions may actually have been an ''aversion'' to the trope: the reported attacks were all during the dry period when the lions' normal prey was scarce. During the rainy season, when herd animals were more common, they actually stopped attacking humans.
** *** These two were more recently turned into a museum exhibit (with one of them lying down, since the rug didn't include his belly). See the Movies entree for the movie based (somewhat loosely) on the event.
* ** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustave_(crocodile) Gustave]]. What's scarier than an enormous Nile crocodile? An enormous Nile crocodile that not only has a taste for eating humans, but enjoys torturing them too. This bastard is reckoned to be nearly 70 years old, and, thanks to hundreds of human corpses dumped in the Rizizi river during Burundi's civil war, he has a taste for ''Homo sapiens''. He is believed to have killed nearly 300 people, and according to locals, doesn't eat them all - he kills because he enjoys it. Also, [[NightmareFuel this horrific abomination is still out there.]] A National Geographic expedition tried to capture him using a steel cage and a live goat. After the camera went out one stormy night, they found the cage the next morning, the goat gone, smashed to pieces at the bottom of a lakebed. So what makes him "super-persistent?" Well, apart from his enormous size, his other distinguishing features are machine gun scars, a grenade wound, and ''having an enormous bullet hole in the middle of his face.'' [[MadeOfIron And he's still going]]...
* ** Komodo Dragons fit the bill; they first take a bite out of their prey, and through a combination of mild anticoagulant venom (ie, the wound bleeds out) and severe laceration from the teeth, it's only a matter of time before the animal drops from blood loss, trauma, paralysis, and infection. And if it doesn't die in minutes, the dragon will attack again and again until it drops. Most depictions have long-distance tracking as the norm, but in reality they simply keep chasing and biting it until it falls. They also usually shred the legs and ankles to keep prey from running.



*** Great white sharks still use that strategy to prey on elephant seals. This may also be the real reason sharks release human victims (so they die of blood loss).
** Gila Monsters of the American Southwest use many of the same methods of the Komodo Dragon (infectious bites and all). However, instead of biting multiple times, Gila Monsters will bite and ''mechanically latch their jaws shut''. However, this is primarily a defensive attack, as gila monsters and their close cousins the Mexican beaded lizard subsist primarily on a diet of eggs.

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*** ** Great white sharks still use that strategy to prey on elephant seals. This may also be the real reason sharks release human victims (so they die of blood loss).
** * Gila Monsters of the American Southwest use many of the same methods of the Komodo Dragon (infectious bites and all). However, instead of biting multiple times, Gila Monsters will bite and ''mechanically latch their jaws shut''. However, this is primarily a defensive attack, as gila monsters and their close cousins the Mexican beaded lizard subsist primarily on a diet of eggs.
15th May '17 9:13:39 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* The Graboids in ''Film/{{Tremors}}''. Earl compares their patience to that of Job. They track prey endlessly, and if the prey is somewhere they can't reach, they wait it out. Victims often starve long before they go away.
9th Apr '17 7:41:28 PM PeppertheFatboyTabby
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* Briefly in ''WesternAnimation/FindingDory'': the three heroes are pursued by a Humboldt squid, eventually managing to trick it into getting stuck in a huge shipping container. Rather than make any attempt to escape from its predicament, the squid continues to focus its energy on trying to eat Nemo.

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* Briefly in ''WesternAnimation/FindingDory'': the three heroes are pursued by a Humboldt giant squid, eventually managing to trick it into getting stuck in a huge shipping container. Rather than make any attempt to escape from its predicament, the squid continues to focus its energy on trying to eat Nemo.
22nd Mar '17 12:59:05 PM BeerBaron
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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', every enemy is this. That mountain lion, that wolf, that troll, that ''rat'' will chase you down to the ends of the earth in order to maul/feast upon your flesh. They will come after you through villages, forests, rivers, lakes, mountains, and plains, from the farthest western point of the map to to the farthest eastern point, in an all-consuming, single-minded drive to wreak vengeance on you for entering their line of sight.
** The King of Miscarcand (a powerful undead boss fought in the main questline) has the trademark persistence of an Oblivion enemy, but (due to a bug) he never loses track of the player's position, and he's not afraid of entering crowded cities.
** Let's not forget the [[GoddamnBats Cliff Racers]] from ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind''. I hope you have ranged weapons with you.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', every ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' and its ''Bloodmoon'' expansion play this straight. Both Vvardenfell and Solstheim feature MorePredatorsThanPrey, and it's quite difficult to lose an enemy creature if aggro'd. However, the [[GodDamnBats notorious Cliff Racers]] are even more difficult to lose thanks to their [[AirborneMook ability to fly]].
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]''
*** ''Every''
enemy is this. That mountain lion, that wolf, that troll, that ''rat'' ''rat''... will chase you down to the ends of the earth in order to maul/feast upon your flesh. They will come after you through villages, forests, rivers, lakes, mountains, and plains, from the farthest western point of the map to to the farthest eastern point, in an all-consuming, single-minded drive to wreak vengeance on you for entering their line of sight.
** *** The King of Miscarcand (a powerful undead boss fought in the main questline) has the trademark persistence of an Oblivion ''Oblivion'' enemy, but (due to a bug) he [[TheAllSeeingAI never loses track of the player's position, position]], and he's not afraid of entering crowded cities.
** Let's not forget the [[GoddamnBats Cliff Racers]] from ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind''. I hope you have ranged weapons with you.
cities.
14th Mar '17 8:07:36 PM Tuckerscreator
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* It from ''Film/ItFollows'' [[spoiler: how did this not get mentioned earlier?]] The closest definition of the trope that you can get. Once it targets you, it never gives up. It will always hunt you and will always find you. It cannot be killed or trapped. The only way to stave it off, is to have sex with someone else, but when It targets and kills them, it comes right back after you...

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* It from ''Film/ItFollows'' [[spoiler: how did this not get mentioned earlier?]] The ''Film/ItFollows'', the closest definition of the trope that you can get. Once it targets you, it never gives up. It will always hunt you and will always find you. It cannot be killed or trapped. The only way to stave it off, is to have sex with someone else, but when It targets and kills them, it comes right back after you...
28th Feb '17 4:46:57 PM Shadeblade11
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* Petshop, a hawk with ice powers from ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' Part 3. If you enter the grounds of BigBad Dio's mansion, Pet Shop will not stop chasing you until it has removed you as a threat. His ultimate opponent ends up being another animal, who has internal monologue about this behavior being frightening and unusual.

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* Petshop, a hawk with ice powers from ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' Part 3. has a couple of these:
** Pet Shop, a hawk with ice powers from ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStardustCrusaders Stardust Crusaders]]''.
If you enter the grounds of BigBad Dio's [=DIO's=] mansion, Pet Shop will not stop chasing you until it has removed you as a threat. His ultimate opponent ends up being another animal, who has internal monologue about this behavior being frightening and unusual.unusual.
** In ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureJoJolion JoJolion]]'', there's a Stand called Blue Hawaii. [[spoiler:It infects the victim with a mindless, relentless pursuit of the intended target upon contact with a part of the User, ignoring their own safety to a horrifying degree. What makes this power terrifying is that it ironically still works well with groups, despite the fact it can only work on one person at a time]].
16th Feb '17 6:26:50 PM TroperBeDoper
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* The VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}} mission "The Devil's Due" introduces possibly the most persistent Deathclaw in history. Who tracks a group of Gunners across a huge swath of territory to [[spoiler: retrieve its stolen egg.]]
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