History Main / SuetifulAllAlong

20th Sep '16 11:34:45 PM PuffPuff
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** At least her true name has been revealed to be the entirely un-exotic "Daisy Johnson".

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** At least her true name has been revealed to be the entirely un-exotic "Daisy Johnson". Unfortunately, along with the reveal that she's the MCU version of the comics' character Quake came the powers to go along with it, and she's now been confirmed as an Inhuman.
6th Aug '16 5:48:09 PM SomeoneElse17
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* May's Squirtle from {{Pokemon}}. Introduced as an untrained baby, May's Squirtle was able to pull off moves that it shouldn't have known, as well as win battles that a normal baby Pokemon never would've been able to. Also from Pokemon, Cilan is viewed by fans as this as he has almost more talents than there are Pokemon identified, coupled with "flaws" that are nearly always played only for laughs.

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* May's Squirtle from {{Pokemon}}. ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}''. Introduced as an untrained baby, May's Squirtle was able to pull off moves that it shouldn't have known, as well as win battles that a normal baby Pokemon Pokémon never would've been able to. Also from Pokemon, ''Pokémon'', Cilan is viewed by fans as this as he has almost more talents than there are Pokemon Pokémon identified, coupled with "flaws" that are nearly always played only for laughs.



* Amu Hinamori from Manga/ShugoChara is presented as a shy and awkward girl who puts on a 'cool girl' facade because she's not brave enough to be herself... however what the story shows us is something completely different. Amu's 'cool girl' act prompts her entire class, and by extension her entire school to fawn and gush about how awesome she is... and when she [[NeverLiveItDown confesses her love to Tadase]], courtesy of Ran, you'd expect her to be mercilessly teased about it, right? Nope. Her classmates still gush over her! Then she gets accepted into an [[AbsurdlyPowerfulStudentCouncil absurdly powerful student council]] which has its own building and a tea room, and becomes chummy with the most popular kids in school. She is also shown to have a total of FIVE guardian characters and no less than EIGHT transformations, [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules when it is explicitly stated that one can only have two characters at most,]] and gains [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands said transformations at an absurdly fast rate.]] She has a total of [[DudeMagnet four boys in love with her]] (one of which is an [[PaedoHunt eighteen year old man]]) despite being eleven years old! She also spouts pseudo-philosophical/pretentious quotes in an attempt to sound 'mature'. Oh, and she also has [[ImpossiblyCoolClothes impossibly cool clothes]].

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* Amu Hinamori from Manga/ShugoChara ''Manga/ShugoChara'' is presented as a shy and awkward girl who puts on a 'cool girl' facade because she's not brave enough to be herself... however herself…however what the story shows us is something completely different. Amu's 'cool girl' act prompts her entire class, and by extension her entire school to fawn and gush about how awesome she is... and when she [[NeverLiveItDown confesses her love to Tadase]], courtesy of Ran, you'd expect her to be mercilessly teased about it, right? Nope. Her classmates still gush over her! Then she gets accepted into an [[AbsurdlyPowerfulStudentCouncil absurdly powerful student council]] which has its own building and a tea room, and becomes chummy with the most popular kids in school. She is also shown to have a total of FIVE guardian characters and no less than EIGHT transformations, [[MyRulesAreNotYourRules when it is explicitly stated that one can only have two characters at most,]] and gains [[NewPowersAsThePlotDemands said transformations at an absurdly fast rate.]] She has a total of [[DudeMagnet four boys in love with her]] (one of which is an [[PaedoHunt eighteen year old man]]) despite being eleven years old! She also spouts pseudo-philosophical/pretentious quotes in an attempt to sound 'mature'. Oh, and she also has [[ImpossiblyCoolClothes impossibly cool clothes]].
6th Aug '16 5:33:39 PM SomeoneElse17
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* Before the third book, Literature/HarryPotter was almost the poster boy for this trope. Sometimes acting rashly and with limited understanding of the consequences of his actions, which is hardly a real flaw in the eyes of the readers, since he does it out of idealism. There is no end to how the other characters will praise his unlimited potential and heroic destiny. The few boys who oppose him are carefully designed to serve as an emphasis of Harry's status as a cinderella-knight in the making. The series then starts to rapidly deconstruct this trope. Harry's flaws start to show themselves in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban book 3]], when, while hunting for Sirius [[spoiler: he almost kills Sirius, even though it turns out he was innocent the entire time, and his parents' real betrayer was Wormtail.]] The real kicker, [[spoiler: Wormtail gets away because of Harry insisting that Lupin and Sirius don't kill him. This indirectly leads to many more people dying in the series.]] In Book 4, Harry's wide-eyed optimism to try and TakeAThirdOption in the Triwizard Tournament [[spoiler: by sharing the win with Cedric Diggory ends up springing a trap meant for him on both of them and leads to Cedric dying almost instantly.]] By [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix book 5]], Harry's heroism (which has always, always been in direct violation of rules and rationality) [[spoiler: sets him up for a BatmanGambit which kills Sirius and severely injures and almost kills several of his friends.]]
** To put it very simply, the traits of Harry's that initially marked him as a MartyStu - his heroism, his willingness to take action, his idealism - ultimately become his flaws - unwillingness to ShootTheDog when it's needed, inability to stand back when he must, and a childish worldview that makes him blind to the harsh realities of a world torn by war and hatred. [[spoiler: Which is why [[AnyoneCanDie the last few books are pretty brutal]]]]. Even the fact that he is at first presented to the reader as TheChosenOne is eventually revealed to be largely a matter of [[spoiler: Voldemort having decided to kill him instead of Neville Longbottom. Right around this point is when Neville has gone from being a simple loser to a more rounded out character, and by the end of the series he's even able to do things that Harry can't]].
* Scarlett O'Hara of ''GoneWithTheWind'' is introduced as "not beautiful" (but with flashing green eyes and magnolia skin), and she's self-centered, mercenary and amoral. But she's so extraordinarily successful, so resilient, so significant in the lives of everyone around her and so magnetic to men that it's hard not to see her as a wish-fulfillment figure - rather like a female Film/JamesBond. Then again, [[spoiler: by the end of the story most of these people actually hate her for those very reasons.]]

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* Before the third book, Literature/HarryPotter was almost the poster boy for this trope. Sometimes acting rashly and with limited understanding of the consequences of his actions, which is hardly a real flaw in the eyes of the readers, since he does it out of idealism. There is no end to how the other characters will praise his unlimited potential and heroic destiny. The few boys who oppose him are carefully designed to serve as an emphasis of Harry's status as a cinderella-knight in the making. The series then starts to rapidly deconstruct this trope. Harry's flaws start to show themselves in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban book 3]], when, while hunting for Sirius [[spoiler: he almost kills Sirius, even though it turns out he was innocent the entire time, and his parents' real betrayer was Wormtail.]] Wormtail]]. The real kicker, [[spoiler: Wormtail gets away because of Harry insisting that Lupin and Sirius don't kill him. This indirectly leads to many more people dying in the series.]] series]]. In Book 4, Harry's wide-eyed optimism to try and TakeAThirdOption in the Triwizard Tournament [[spoiler: by sharing the win with Cedric Diggory ends up springing a trap meant for him on both of them and leads to Cedric dying almost instantly.]] instantly]]. By [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix book 5]], Harry's heroism (which has always, always been in direct violation of rules and rationality) [[spoiler: sets him up for a BatmanGambit which kills Sirius and severely injures and almost kills several of his friends.]]
friends]].
** To put it very simply, the traits of Harry's that initially marked him as a MartyStu - — his heroism, his willingness to take action, his idealism - — ultimately become his flaws - — unwillingness to ShootTheDog when it's needed, inability to stand back when he must, and a childish worldview that makes him blind to the harsh realities of a world torn by war and hatred. [[spoiler: Which is why [[AnyoneCanDie the last few books are pretty brutal]]]]. brutal]].]] Even the fact that he is at first presented to the reader as TheChosenOne is eventually revealed to be largely a matter of [[spoiler: Voldemort having decided to kill him instead of Neville Longbottom. Right around this point is when Neville has gone from being a simple loser to a more rounded out character, and by the end of the series he's even able to do things that Harry can't]].
* Scarlett O'Hara of ''GoneWithTheWind'' ''Literature/GoneWithTheWind'' is introduced as "not beautiful" (but with flashing green eyes and magnolia skin), and she's self-centered, mercenary and amoral. But she's so extraordinarily successful, so resilient, so significant in the lives of everyone around her and so magnetic to men that it's hard not to see her as a wish-fulfillment figure - — rather like a female Film/JamesBond. Then again, [[spoiler: by the end of the story most of these people actually hate her for those very reasons.]]reasons]].



* Actually subverted in ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'', where the author is able to show that Dagny's features (thin, [[ShesGotLegs leggy]], cheekbones) are beautiful--and that the reason people dislike her is her [[IceQueen cold and abrasive personality.]] The people who do come to find her sexy are those who share her ConvenientlyCommonKink of "making a profit from running my business."

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* Actually subverted in ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'', where the author is able to show that Dagny's features (thin, [[ShesGotLegs leggy]], cheekbones) are beautiful--and beautiful — and that the reason people dislike her is her [[IceQueen cold and abrasive personality.]] The people who do come to find her sexy are those who share her ConvenientlyCommonKink of "making a profit from running my business."



** The key word in her introductory description is "interesting"; she doesn't believe herself to be pretty, and she isn't, by usual standards. She's not rosy or cheery, she's bony, with plain coloration, and rather quiet and pale. Adults find her a trifle unsettling. However, the narrative points out that she is unaware that there is something else about her that compels people to attend to her -- not beauty, but not ugliness, either.
* At the beginning of the first ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' book, Bella Swan goes on at length on how plain-looking, unremarkable, and clumsy she is. The first sign that Sueness is lurking around the corner is her name, which means "beautiful swan". The second sign is her attracting no less than three male admirers at her new school, despite claiming to be a nobody in her former hometown. The rest of the series consists of Bella being in a LoveTriangle with Edward the vampire [[RelationshipSue whose absolute perfection and beauty are constantly described]] and Jacob the werewolf, and [[spoiler: getting her HappilyEverAfter with Edward by becoming a vampire, which coincidentally makes her stunningly beautiful and graceful in the process.]] Note that these are two more boys vying for her love, totaling five altogether. The only flaw remaining for Bella is her boring narrative voice, and that's unfortunately not one that the in-story characters can see. Only that turns out to be what makes her special to Edward -- that he can't read her thoughts.
** Let us not fail to mention that the werewolf in question is a six-foot plus boy who looks about eight years older than his seventeen years, with "inky" black hair, rippling muscles, superhuman strength, a posse of nearly equally hawt Quiluete beefcake, a motorcycle and an obsessive need to meet all of Bella's emotional and physical needs. [[SarcasmMode God, her life SUCKS]].

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** The key word in her introductory description is "interesting"; she doesn't believe herself to be pretty, and she isn't, by usual standards. She's not rosy or cheery, she's bony, with plain coloration, and rather quiet and pale. Adults find her a trifle unsettling. However, the narrative points out that she is unaware that there is something else about her that compels people to attend to her -- — not beauty, but not ugliness, either.
* At the beginning of the first ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' book, Bella Swan goes on at length on how plain-looking, unremarkable, and clumsy she is. The first sign that Sueness is lurking around the corner is her name, which means "beautiful swan". The second sign is her attracting no less than three male admirers at her new school, despite claiming to be a nobody in her former hometown. The rest of the series consists of Bella being in a LoveTriangle with Edward the 100-year-old teenage vampire and Jacob the werewolf. Edward is part of a wealthy family of TheBeautifulElite who just so happen to be [[FriendlyNeighborhoodVampire the vampires with a hint of standards]], [[RelationshipSue whose and his absolute perfection and beauty are constantly described]] and described]]. Jacob the werewolf, is a six-foot plus boy who looks about eight years older than his seventeen years, with "inky" black hair, rippling muscles, superhuman strength, a posse of nearly equally hawt Quiluete beefcake, and a [[CoolBike motorcycle]]. Oh, and both take on an obsessive need to meet all of Bella's emotional and physical needs. [[spoiler: getting She gets her HappilyEverAfter with Edward by becoming a vampire, which coincidentally makes her stunningly beautiful and graceful in the process.]] Note that these are two more boys vying for her love, totaling five altogether. The only flaw remaining for Bella is her boring narrative voice, and that's unfortunately not one that the in-story characters can see. Only that turns out to be what makes her special to Edward -- — that he can't read her thoughts.
** Let us not fail to mention that the werewolf in question is a six-foot plus boy who looks about eight years older than his seventeen years, with "inky" black hair, rippling muscles, superhuman strength, a posse of nearly equally hawt Quiluete beefcake, a motorcycle and an obsessive need to meet all of Bella's emotional and physical needs.
thoughts. [[SarcasmMode God, her life SUCKS]].



** Bella's first description of herself in Chapter 1 of the first book is an example of this. Bella does her best to give the impression that she's ordinary in appareance--while using very flattering terms to describe herself ("ivory-skinned," "slender" and having a clear complexion) AND to establish that instead of being a typical ex-resident of Phoenix, Arizona ("tan, sporty, blond"), she's unique (a pale, un-athletic brunette).

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** Bella's first description of herself in Chapter 1 of the first book is an example of this. Bella does her best to give the impression that she's ordinary in appareance--while appareance — while using very flattering terms to describe herself ("ivory-skinned," "slender" and having a clear complexion) AND to establish that instead of being a typical ex-resident of Phoenix, Arizona ("tan, sporty, blond"), she's unique (a pale, un-athletic brunette).



** Bella Swan's narrative is generally apathetic and dry, yet she instantly befriends the entire school despite her obvious lack of effort, and she maintains these friendships despite the fact that she sits with the social elites -- the vampires that are generally disliked by her acquaintances and classmates. She is also generally seen as innocent, and is only disliked by the beautiful, jealous, and blonde. She also [[spoiler: unlocks magical, never-seen abilities that protect her from every other vampiric power in existence, including mind reading, future seeing, and pain inflicting abilities of much older and stronger vampires BEFORE she is bitten by Edward Cullen]].

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** Bella Swan's narrative is generally apathetic and dry, yet she instantly befriends the entire school despite her obvious lack of effort, and she maintains these friendships despite the fact that she sits with the social elites -- — the vampires that are generally disliked by her acquaintances and classmates. She is also generally seen as innocent, and is only disliked by the beautiful, jealous, and blonde. She also [[spoiler: unlocks magical, never-seen abilities that protect her from every other vampiric power in existence, including mind reading, future seeing, and pain inflicting abilities of much older and stronger vampires BEFORE she is bitten by Edward Cullen]].



* In "Being of the Field" by Traci Harding, the author mentions repeatedly that the main character Taren is supposed to be shunned by society as a loony madwoman. But from the first moment the story begins, praise is lavished on her nonstop by every other character in the book, everyone comes to her for advice, and everyone clamours to be her friend and/or romantic partner. A shocking case of Sue.
** This is only 'cause the other main characters are also seen as a bunch of weirdos by the rest of society, too.
** Also, the main plot point in the series is that the entire cast of main characters are reincarnated versions of people who have been friends/family/lovers since the beginning of time- you can't really apply the normal rules of suedom.
* ''Literature/CrimeAndPunishment'': most (if not all) female characters are introduced as strikingly beautiful, but filthy, but sickly, but actually quite homely, and really not pretty at all, but very desirable, and so determined and strong, one might even say - beautiful.

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* In "Being ''Being of the Field" Field'' by Traci Harding, the author mentions repeatedly that the main character Taren is supposed to be shunned by society as a loony madwoman. But from However, by virtue of the main plot she's only one out of an ''entire main cast'' of reincarnated social outcasts who've all been close with each other since the beginning of time, so this is ''completely'' downplayed in importance. From the first moment the story begins, praise is lavished on her nonstop by every other character in the book, everyone comes to her for advice, and everyone clamours clamors to be her friend and/or romantic partner. A Limited to the main characters' community, it's a shocking case of Sue.
** This is only 'cause the other main characters are also seen as a bunch of weirdos by the rest of society, too.
** Also, the main plot point in the series is that the entire cast of main characters are reincarnated versions of people who have been friends/family/lovers since the beginning of time- you can't really apply the normal rules of suedom.
* ''Literature/CrimeAndPunishment'': most (if not all) female characters are introduced as strikingly beautiful, but filthy, but sickly, but actually quite homely, and really not pretty at all, but very desirable, and so determined and strong, one might even say - — beautiful.



* September, the protagonist of ''[[Literature/TheGirlWhoCircumnavigatedFairylandInAShipOfHerOwnMaking The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making]]'', has a formulaic background and nothing really endearing about her, and yet everyone loves her, the only people who don't are the villains, and she's so utterly selfless and brave that she does absolutely everything that no one else would dare to do (to the point of stepping up to save a child ''when the child's own mother wouldn't''). The problem is, to make sure there's enough brave and selfless stuff for her to do, the author has to make it so that no one else in the book does anything for themselves, even when there's no real reason why they can't. After the dozenth time someone calls her amazing and wonderful, you start to suspect the only reason she's described as such is because no one else in Fairyland is capable of solving their own problems.
* Anastasia Steele from ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' is often complaining about how plain-looking she is next to her gorgeous best friend Kate while everyone tell her she's beautiful and at least three guys are fond of her. In ''Meet Fifty Shades'', an outtake which retells the first two chapters of ''Fifty Shades of Grey'' from Christian Grey's point of view, Grey describes Ana as having "guileless, powder-blue" eyes and "a small, sweet face that is blushing now, an innocent pale rose." So it's not just other people telling her that she's gorgeous. The audience is informed outright that Ana is strikingly beautiful...enough to startle and attract a jaded billionaire. By ''Fifty Shades Freed'', Ana has begun to believe that she's desirable--but only because of Christian's influence.

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* September, the protagonist of ''[[Literature/TheGirlWhoCircumnavigatedFairylandInAShipOfHerOwnMaking The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making]]'', ''Literature/TheGirlWhoCircumnavigatedFairylandInAShipOfHerOwnMaking'', has a formulaic background and nothing really endearing about her, and yet everyone loves her, the only people who don't are the villains, and she's so utterly selfless and brave that she does absolutely everything that no one else would dare to do (to the point of stepping up to save a child ''when the child's own mother wouldn't''). The problem is, to make sure there's enough brave and selfless stuff for her to do, the author has to make it so that no one else in the book does anything for themselves, even when there's no real reason why they can't. After the dozenth time someone calls her amazing and wonderful, you start to suspect the only reason she's described as such is because no one else in Fairyland is capable of solving their own problems.
* Anastasia Steele from ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' is often complaining about how plain-looking she is next to her gorgeous best friend Kate while everyone tell her she's beautiful and at least three guys are fond of her. In ''Meet Fifty Shades'', an outtake which retells the first two chapters of ''Fifty Shades of Grey'' from Christian Grey's point of view, Grey describes Ana as having "guileless, powder-blue" eyes and "a small, sweet face that is blushing now, an innocent pale rose." So it's not just other people telling her that she's gorgeous. The audience is informed outright that Ana is strikingly beautiful...enough to startle and attract a jaded billionaire. By ''Fifty Shades Freed'', Ana has begun to believe that she's desirable--but desirable — but only because of Christian's influence.



* Mia from ''Literature/ThePrincessDiaries'' views and describes herself as rather plain and awkward looking with wide mouth and unmanageable hair, while other characters see her as quite conventionally beautiful: tall, thin and blonde. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], considering she's a very self-aware teenager at the start of the story and actually grows to be more confident and comfortable with herself over the series run. [[SheIsAllGrownUp Puberty and taking more interest in fashion]] have something to do with it as well.

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* Mia from ''Literature/ThePrincessDiaries'' views and describes herself as rather plain and awkward looking with wide mouth and unmanageable hair, while other characters see her as quite conventionally beautiful: tall, thin and blonde. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], {{Justified|Trope}}, considering she's a very self-aware teenager at the start of the story and actually grows to be more confident and comfortable with herself over the series run. [[SheIsAllGrownUp Puberty and taking more interest in fashion]] have something to do with it as well.



* In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' novel ''Mosaic'', about the origins of Capt. Janeway written by Voyager creator Jeri Taylor herself, young Janeway constantly frets about how everyone else seems to have better hair, but she has no trouble landing a few men, including the young William Riker. But unlike other [[MarySue Mary Sues]], she is portrayed as having a few actual flaws, like being shallow, reckless, argumentative, and insensitive to others (her breakup with her first boyfriend was the result of her dragging him along on a dangerous underwater diving trip). Of course, ''none'' of these flaws are supposedly present in the grown-up Kathryn Janeway...
* Literature/AnneOfGreenGables is an example of the "not conventionally pretty" type whose looks are used as a litmus test for the person judging them -- narrow-minded people think she's plain (which is often PlayedForLaughs) and more sensitive people think she's attractive. Her very introduction contrasts what an "ordinary" and an "extraordinary" observer would see in her appearance. She starts off as a prepubescent, skinny, freckled [[GreenEyedRedhead redhead with greenish-gray eyes]] (both considered negative traits at the time), but as she grows up she develops an elegant figure, her freckles disappear, her hair darkens (unsympathetic people continue to call it red, while her friends agree that it's auburn), and her eyes settle on gray, making her the period equivalent of the [[SheIsAllGrownUp hottie who used to be a nerd in school]]. After these developments we're given frequent and deliberate reminders that she doesn't resemble the curvy, vivacious standard of the period ''and'' that she is nonetheless pretty to people with real taste. Even [[GossipyHens Mrs. Lynde]], who represents conventionality in every way, has to admit she has a certain something:

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* In the ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' novel ''Mosaic'', about the origins of Capt. Janeway written by Voyager ''Voyager'' creator Jeri Taylor herself, young Janeway constantly frets about how everyone else seems to have better hair, but she has no trouble landing a few men, including the young William Riker. But unlike other [[MarySue Mary Sues]], {{Mary Sue}}s, she is portrayed as having a few actual flaws, like being shallow, reckless, argumentative, and insensitive to others (her breakup with her first boyfriend was the result of her dragging him along on a dangerous underwater diving trip). Of course, ''none'' of these flaws are supposedly present in the grown-up Kathryn Janeway...
* Literature/AnneOfGreenGables is an example of the "not conventionally pretty" type whose looks are used as a litmus test for the person judging them -- — narrow-minded people think she's plain (which is often PlayedForLaughs) and more sensitive people think she's attractive. Her very introduction contrasts what an "ordinary" and an "extraordinary" observer would see in her appearance. She starts off as a prepubescent, skinny, freckled [[GreenEyedRedhead redhead with greenish-gray eyes]] (both considered negative traits at the time), but as she grows up she develops an elegant figure, her freckles disappear, her hair darkens (unsympathetic people continue to call it red, while her friends agree that it's auburn), and her eyes settle on gray, making her the period equivalent of the [[SheIsAllGrownUp hottie who used to be a nerd in school]]. After these developments we're given frequent and deliberate reminders that she doesn't resemble the curvy, vivacious standard of the period ''and'' that she is nonetheless pretty to people with real taste. Even [[GossipyHens Mrs. Lynde]], who represents conventionality in every way, has to admit she has a certain something:
30th Jul '16 6:05:05 PM nombretomado
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-->-- "Fangs of Endearment: A Vampire Novel" by '''DaveBarry'''

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-->-- "Fangs of Endearment: A Vampire Novel" by '''DaveBarry'''
'''Creator/DaveBarry'''
30th Jul '16 8:55:24 AM Anddrix
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** Clara Oswald started as a mundane teacher who happened to share the appearance with two other girls in different time periods. Over the course of her run, she slowly became the Doctor's DistaffCounterpart and was ultimately revealed to be the one behind all his victories. In "Listen", she meets the Doctor as a kid and inspires him courage. In her final episode, [[spoiler:she's is implied to be the "hybrid" the Doctor was fleeing when he left Gallifrey and then she leaves him with her own TARDIS and companion]]. Unsurprisingly just like Rose and River, she's a BaseBreaker.

to:

** Clara Oswald started as a mundane teacher who happened to share the appearance with two other girls in different time periods. Over the course of her run, she slowly became the Doctor's DistaffCounterpart and was ultimately revealed to be the one behind all his victories. In "Listen", she meets the Doctor as a kid and inspires him courage. In her final episode, [[spoiler:she's is implied to be the "hybrid" the Doctor was fleeing when he left Gallifrey and then she leaves him with her own TARDIS and companion]]. Unsurprisingly just like Rose and River, she's a BaseBreaker.
5th Jun '16 3:42:17 PM nombretomado
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** Clara Oswald started as a mundane teacher who happened to share the appearance with two other girls in different time periods. Over the course of her run, she slowly became the Doctor's DistaffCounterpart and was ultimately revealed to be the one behind all his victories. In "Listen", she meets the Doctor as a kid and inspires him courage. In her final episode, [[spoiler:she's is implied to be the "hybrid" the Doctor was fleeing when he left Gallifrey and then she leaves him with her own TARDIS and companion]]. Unsurpisingly just like Rose and River, she's a BaseBreaker.

to:

** Clara Oswald started as a mundane teacher who happened to share the appearance with two other girls in different time periods. Over the course of her run, she slowly became the Doctor's DistaffCounterpart and was ultimately revealed to be the one behind all his victories. In "Listen", she meets the Doctor as a kid and inspires him courage. In her final episode, [[spoiler:she's is implied to be the "hybrid" the Doctor was fleeing when he left Gallifrey and then she leaves him with her own TARDIS and companion]]. Unsurpisingly Unsurprisingly just like Rose and River, she's a BaseBreaker.



* Chuck from ''PushingDaisies'' is definitely this. The main protagonist Ned is defined by his adoration for Chuck after he brings her back in the first episode. She also can do NO wrong, as evidenced by the many times she defies common sense and Ned's directions and yet is always immediately forgiven (for a perfect example see "The Legend of Merle [=McQuoddy=]"). And many times, through some convoluted series of events, her behavior that at the time was ignorant and risky actually ends up being ''beneficial'' in the end, just to prove how awesome she is. The rest of the cast are also completely defined by her existence and love her despite the trouble she causes them. Admittedly, it can be argued that it's because of the complications she brings to the group that she so seems to affect their lives - however closer scrutiny simply shows that Chuck can do no wrong and is the most completely lovable beautiful person that ever lived (twice).

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* Chuck from ''PushingDaisies'' ''Series/PushingDaisies'' is definitely this. The main protagonist Ned is defined by his adoration for Chuck after he brings her back in the first episode. She also can do NO wrong, as evidenced by the many times she defies common sense and Ned's directions and yet is always immediately forgiven (for a perfect example see "The Legend of Merle [=McQuoddy=]"). And many times, through some convoluted series of events, her behavior that at the time was ignorant and risky actually ends up being ''beneficial'' in the end, just to prove how awesome she is. The rest of the cast are also completely defined by her existence and love her despite the trouble she causes them. Admittedly, it can be argued that it's because of the complications she brings to the group that she so seems to affect their lives - however closer scrutiny simply shows that Chuck can do no wrong and is the most completely lovable beautiful person that ever lived (twice).
4th Jun '16 1:09:00 PM Morgenthaler
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* Robert Langdon from ''[[TheDaVinciCode Angels and Demons]]'' is described this way at the opening of one of the books. "He was not classically handsome" followed shortly by "tall", "dark hair", "piercing eyes", "voice was like chocolate for the ears" and "swims thirty laps of the pool every day". [[spoiler: And he gets the stunningly hot love interest at the end of it.]]

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* Robert Langdon from ''[[TheDaVinciCode Angels and Demons]]'' ''Literature/AngelsAndDemons'' is described this way at the opening of one of the books. "He was not classically handsome" followed shortly by "tall", "dark hair", "piercing eyes", "voice was like chocolate for the ears" and "swims thirty laps of the pool every day". [[spoiler: And he gets the stunningly hot love interest at the end of it.]]



* Ayla of the ''EarthsChildren'' series is the epitome of this trope. Ayla believes she is ugly [[JustifiedTrope because]] she [[RaisedByNatives grew up among Neanderthals]], whose beauty standards are different. However, she's described in ways that would look pretty to a modern reader, and once she meets other modern humans they find her not just normal-looking but a stunning beauty. Beside looks, most of her other "[[InformedFlaw flaws]]" are things only the Neanderthals disapprove of.

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* Ayla of the ''EarthsChildren'' ''Literature/EarthsChildren'' series is the epitome of this trope. Ayla believes she is ugly [[JustifiedTrope because]] she [[RaisedByNatives grew up among Neanderthals]], whose beauty standards are different. However, she's described in ways that would look pretty to a modern reader, and once she meets other modern humans they find her not just normal-looking but a stunning beauty. Beside looks, most of her other "[[InformedFlaw flaws]]" are things only the Neanderthals disapprove of.
8th May '16 6:05:57 AM captainpat
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** However, she does possess one, [[BuxomIsBetter or, rather, two,]] very...prominent features which are never out of favour.

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** However, she does possess one, [[BuxomIsBetter or, rather, two,]] two, very...prominent features which are never out of favour.
29th Apr '16 3:46:29 PM Silverblade2
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Added DiffLines:

** Clara Oswald started as a mundane teacher who happened to share the appearance with two other girls in different time periods. Over the course of her run, she slowly became the Doctor's DistaffCounterpart and was ultimately revealed to be the one behind all his victories. In "Listen", she meets the Doctor as a kid and inspires him courage. In her final episode, [[spoiler:she's is implied to be the "hybrid" the Doctor was fleeing when he left Gallifrey and then she leaves him with her own TARDIS and companion]]. Unsurpisingly just like Rose and River, she's a BaseBreaker.
11th Mar '16 11:00:51 PM MsChibi
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Will often appear hand-in-hand with HollywoodHomely in visual media. Also consider AntiSue, a more deliberate attempt to avoid making a character into a MarySue.

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Will often appear hand-in-hand with HollywoodHomely in visual media. Also consider AntiSue, a more deliberate attempt to avoid making a character into a MarySue. See also CanonSue.
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