History Main / SuetifulAllAlong

16th Apr '17 5:56:08 AM Vampireandthen
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* Prue from ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' fits this trope to a T. She often made a ton of rash decisions and often jeopardised her own sisters' safety for the sake of vanquishing demon or saving a random innocent. One aggravating season 3 episode saw her set a trap with a circle of crystals that would set off an electric charge when anyone walked through it. Cole did and was nearly killed. Phoebe made a justifiable argument, calling Prue out on the fact that she'd nearly killed a district attorney but Cole was actually a demon [[DebateAndSwitch so Prue was right all along.]]

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* Prue from ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' fits this trope to a T. She often made a ton of rash decisions and often jeopardised her own sisters' safety for the sake of vanquishing demon or saving a random innocent. One aggravating season 3 episode saw her set a trap with a circle of crystals that would set off an electric charge when anyone walked through it. Cole did and was nearly killed. Phoebe made a justifiable argument, calling Prue out on the fact that she'd nearly killed a district attorney but Cole was actually a demon [[DebateAndSwitch so Prue was right all along.]]]] Also, see that 'r' in her name? Put it between the 'u' and 'e', and see what you get. We'll wait.
14th Mar '17 9:03:04 AM lampshadeortriangle
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Added DiffLines:


Has nothing to do with suet.
28th Feb '17 12:36:39 PM FilthyPeasant
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In the most blatant cases a writer will try to disguise a character's Sue-ness by claiming that she's "not beautiful" before launching into a description of a goddess just without using the word 'beautiful', or by sprinkling her with physical traits such as thinness or a "wide mouth" that ''have'' been considered imperfections in the past but are rather more fashionable today. In fantasy or sci-fi examples, an author will sometimes invent a culture where some trait the audience is likely to consider attractive or neutral is regarded as horribly ugly, bad luck, etcetera. The most common of these tend to be a certain eye or hair color, or perhaps something like PointyEars indicating partially elven ancestry in a culture [[FantasticRacism prejudiced against elves]]. But looks aren't the half of it. It is other qualities--abilities, personality (or lack of) and the way that not just the story, but the WORLD revolves around a character, even though it logically wouldn't--that make a character SuetifulAllAlong. In addition, he or she never wants for attractive admirers.

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In the most blatant cases a writer will try to disguise a character's Sue-ness by claiming that she's "not beautiful" before launching into a description of a goddess just without using the word 'beautiful', or by sprinkling her with physical traits such as thinness or a "wide mouth" that ''have'' been considered imperfections in the past but are rather more fashionable today. In fantasy or sci-fi examples, an author will sometimes invent a culture where some trait the audience is likely to consider attractive or neutral is regarded as horribly ugly, bad luck, etcetera.et cetera. The most common of these tend to be a certain eye or hair color, or perhaps something like PointyEars indicating partially elven ancestry in a culture [[FantasticRacism prejudiced against elves]]. But looks aren't the half of it. It is other qualities--abilities, personality (or lack of) and the way that not just the story, but the WORLD revolves around a character, even though it logically wouldn't--that make a character SuetifulAllAlong. In addition, he or she never wants for attractive admirers.
14th Feb '17 11:27:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* [[Creator/JessicaAlba Max]] of ''DarkAngel'' is not only the only one of the [[SuperSoldier transgenics]] to have had a mother who loved her, the one [[ColonelBadass Lydecker]] [[{{squick}} based off of his dead wife]]... Was anyone surprised in the second season when it turned out she was the ChosenOne destined to save humanity?

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* [[Creator/JessicaAlba Max]] Max of ''DarkAngel'' ''Series/DarkAngel'' is not only the only one of the [[SuperSoldier transgenics]] to have had a mother who loved her, the one [[ColonelBadass Lydecker]] [[{{squick}} based off of his dead wife]]... Was anyone surprised in the second season when it turned out she was the ChosenOne destined to save humanity?
8th Feb '17 11:07:36 PM Anddrix
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* Kirito from ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'' is a perfect example of this. While not being particularly special in real life, he is one of the 1,000 beta testers of Sword Art Online, and he is able to face any challenge with ease, Brutal and powerful in combat to the point [[CommonMarySueTraits where he disguises his power in fear of being persecuted, he is also seen as attractive by both males and females in the series,]] while lamenting upon his status as a [[IneffectualLoner "Beater"]]. He possesses amazing power in every game he gets dragged into, and he is calm and collected in every situation, even when he finds out that [[spoiler: ''Sword Art Online'' is lethal, and kills the players IRL if they die in-game]]. His closest female companion and love interest, [[spoiler: Asuna]] is powerful, but she does not [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter actually contribute to the plot]] other than to be an amazing cook, failing her as an [[FauxActiongirl Action girl]].

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* Kirito from ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'' is a perfect example of this. While not being particularly special in real life, he is one of the 1,000 beta testers of Sword Art Online, and he is able to face any challenge with ease, Brutal and powerful in combat to the point [[CommonMarySueTraits where he disguises his power in fear of being persecuted, he is also seen as attractive by both males and females in the series,]] series, while lamenting upon his status as a [[IneffectualLoner "Beater"]]. He possesses amazing power in every game he gets dragged into, and he is calm and collected in every situation, even when he finds out that [[spoiler: ''Sword Art Online'' is lethal, and kills the players IRL if they die in-game]]. His closest female companion and love interest, [[spoiler: Asuna]] is powerful, but she does not [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter actually contribute to the plot]] other than to be an amazing cook, failing her as an [[FauxActiongirl Action girl]].
22nd Jan '17 7:31:30 PM Ebrbfureh
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* Before the third book, Literature/HarryPotter was almost the poster boy for this trope. Sometimes acting rashly and with limited understanding of the consequences of his actions, which is hardly a real flaw in the eyes of the readers, since he does it out of idealism. There is no end to how the other characters will praise his unlimited potential and heroic destiny. The few boys who oppose him are carefully designed to serve as an emphasis of Harry's status as a cinderella-knight in the making. The series then starts to rapidly deconstruct this trope. Harry's flaws start to show themselves in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban book 3]], when, while hunting for Sirius [[spoiler: he almost kills Sirius, even though it turns out he was innocent the entire time, and his parents' real betrayer was Wormtail]]. The real kicker, [[spoiler: Wormtail gets away because of Harry insisting that Lupin and Sirius don't kill him. This indirectly leads to many more people dying in the series]]. In Book 4, Harry's wide-eyed optimism to try and TakeAThirdOption in the Triwizard Tournament [[spoiler: by sharing the win with Cedric Diggory ends up springing a trap meant for him on both of them and leads to Cedric dying almost instantly]]. By [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix book 5]], Harry's heroism (which has always, always been in direct violation of rules and rationality) [[spoiler: sets him up for a BatmanGambit which kills Sirius and severely injures and almost kills several of his friends]].
** To put it very simply, the traits of Harry's that initially marked him as a MartyStu — his heroism, his willingness to take action, his idealism — ultimately become his flaws — unwillingness to ShootTheDog when it's needed, inability to stand back when he must, and a childish worldview that makes him blind to the harsh realities of a world torn by war and hatred. [[spoiler: Which is why [[AnyoneCanDie the last few books are pretty brutal]].]] Even the fact that he is at first presented to the reader as TheChosenOne is eventually revealed to be largely a matter of [[spoiler: Voldemort having decided to kill him instead of Neville Longbottom. Right around this point is when Neville has gone from being a simple loser to a more rounded out character, and by the end of the series he's even able to do things that Harry can't]].
* Scarlett O'Hara of ''Literature/GoneWithTheWind'' is introduced as "not beautiful" (but with flashing green eyes and magnolia skin), and she's self-centered, mercenary and amoral. But she's so extraordinarily successful, so resilient, so significant in the lives of everyone around her and so magnetic to men that it's hard not to see her as a wish-fulfillment figure — rather like a female Film/JamesBond. Then again, [[spoiler: by the end of the story most of these people actually hate her for those very reasons]].

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* Before the third book, Literature/HarryPotter was almost the poster boy for this trope. Sometimes acting rashly and with limited understanding of the consequences of his actions, which is hardly a real flaw in the eyes of the readers, since he does it out of idealism. There is no end to how the other characters will praise his unlimited potential and heroic destiny. The few boys who oppose him are carefully designed to serve as an emphasis of Harry's status as a cinderella-knight Cinderella-knight in the making. The series then starts to rapidly deconstruct this trope. Harry's flaws start to show themselves in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban book 3]], when, while hunting for Sirius [[spoiler: he almost kills Sirius, even though it turns out he was innocent the entire time, and his parents' real betrayer was Wormtail]]. The real kicker, [[spoiler: Wormtail gets away because of Harry insisting that Lupin and Sirius don't kill him. This indirectly leads to many more people dying in the series]]. In Book 4, Harry's wide-eyed optimism to try and TakeAThirdOption in the Triwizard Tournament [[spoiler: by sharing the win with Cedric Diggory ends up springing a trap meant for him on both of them and leads to Cedric dying almost instantly]]. By [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix book 5]], Harry's heroism (which has always, always been in direct violation of rules and rationality) [[spoiler: sets him up for a BatmanGambit which kills Sirius and severely injures and almost kills several of his friends]].
** To put it very simply, the traits of Harry's that initially marked him as a MartyStu — his MartyStu—his heroism, his willingness to take action, his idealism — ultimately idealism—ultimately become his flaws — unwillingness flaws—unwillingness to ShootTheDog when it's needed, inability to stand back when he must, and a childish worldview that makes him blind to the harsh realities of a world torn by war and hatred. [[spoiler: Which is why [[AnyoneCanDie the last few books are pretty brutal]].]] Even the fact that he is at first presented to the reader as TheChosenOne is eventually revealed to be largely a matter of [[spoiler: Voldemort having decided to kill him instead of Neville Longbottom. Right around this point is when Neville has gone from being a simple loser to a more rounded out character, and by the end of the series he's even able to do things that Harry can't]].
* Scarlett O'Hara of ''Literature/GoneWithTheWind'' is introduced as "not beautiful" (but with flashing green eyes and magnolia skin), and she's self-centered, mercenary and amoral. But she's so extraordinarily successful, so resilient, so significant in the lives of everyone around her and so magnetic to men that it's hard not to see her as a wish-fulfillment figure — rather figure—rather like a female Film/JamesBond. Then again, [[spoiler: by the end of the story most of these people actually hate her for those very reasons]].



* Actually subverted in ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'', where the author is able to show that Dagny's features (thin, [[ShesGotLegs leggy]], cheekbones) are beautiful — and that the reason people dislike her is her [[IceQueen cold and abrasive personality.]] The people who do come to find her sexy are those who share her ConvenientlyCommonKink of "making a profit from running my business."

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* Actually subverted in ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'', where the author is able to show that Dagny's features (thin, [[ShesGotLegs leggy]], cheekbones) are beautiful — and beautiful—and that the reason people dislike her is her [[IceQueen cold and abrasive personality.]] The people who do come to find her sexy are those who share her ConvenientlyCommonKink of "making a profit from running my business."



** The key word in her introductory description is "interesting"; she doesn't believe herself to be pretty, and she isn't, by usual standards. She's not rosy or cheery, she's bony, with plain coloration, and rather quiet and pale. Adults find her a trifle unsettling. However, the narrative points out that she is unaware that there is something else about her that compels people to attend to her — not beauty, but not ugliness, either.
* At the beginning of the first ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' book, Bella Swan goes on at length on how plain-looking, unremarkable, and clumsy she is. The first sign that Sueness is lurking around the corner is her name, which means "beautiful swan". The second sign is her attracting no less than three male admirers at her new school, despite claiming to be a nobody in her former hometown. The rest of the series consists of Bella being in a LoveTriangle with Edward the 100-year-old teenage vampire and Jacob the werewolf. Edward is part of a wealthy family of TheBeautifulElite who just so happen to be [[FriendlyNeighborhoodVampire the vampires with a hint of standards]], [[RelationshipSue and his absolute perfection and beauty are constantly described]]. Jacob is a six-foot plus boy who looks about eight years older than his seventeen years, with "inky" black hair, rippling muscles, superhuman strength, a posse of nearly equally hawt Quiluete beefcake, and a [[CoolBike motorcycle]]. Oh, and both take on an obsessive need to meet all of Bella's emotional and physical needs. [[spoiler: She gets her HappilyEverAfter with Edward by becoming a vampire, which coincidentally makes her stunningly beautiful and graceful in the process.]] Note that these are two more boys vying for her love, totaling five altogether. The only flaw remaining for Bella is her boring narrative voice, and that's unfortunately not one that the in-story characters can see. Only that turns out to be what makes her special to Edward — that he can't read her thoughts. [[SarcasmMode God, her life SUCKS]].

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** The key word in her introductory description is "interesting"; she doesn't believe herself to be pretty, and she isn't, by usual standards. She's not rosy or cheery, she's bony, with plain coloration, and rather quiet and pale. Adults find her a trifle unsettling. However, the narrative points out that she is unaware that there is something else about her that compels people to attend to her — not her—not beauty, but not ugliness, either.
* At the beginning of the first ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' book, Bella Swan goes on at length on how plain-looking, unremarkable, and clumsy she is. The first sign that Sueness is lurking around the corner is her name, which means "beautiful swan". The second sign is her attracting no less than three male admirers at her new school, despite claiming to be a nobody in her former hometown. The rest of the series consists of Bella being in a LoveTriangle with Edward the 100-year-old teenage vampire and Jacob the werewolf. Edward is part of a wealthy family of TheBeautifulElite who just so happen to be [[FriendlyNeighborhoodVampire the vampires with a hint of standards]], [[RelationshipSue and his absolute perfection and beauty are constantly described]]. Jacob is a six-foot plus boy who looks about eight years older than his seventeen years, with "inky" black hair, rippling muscles, superhuman strength, a posse of nearly equally hawt Quiluete Quileute beefcake, and a [[CoolBike motorcycle]]. Oh, and both take on an obsessive need to meet all of Bella's emotional and physical needs. [[spoiler: She gets her HappilyEverAfter with Edward by becoming a vampire, which coincidentally makes her stunningly beautiful and graceful in the process.]] Note that these are two more boys vying for her love, totaling five altogether. The only flaw remaining for Bella is her boring narrative voice, and that's unfortunately not one that the in-story characters can see. Only that turns out to be what makes her special to Edward — that Edward—that he can't read her thoughts. [[SarcasmMode God, her life SUCKS]].



** Bella's first description of herself in Chapter 1 of the first book is an example of this. Bella does her best to give the impression that she's ordinary in appareance — while using very flattering terms to describe herself ("ivory-skinned," "slender" and having a clear complexion) AND to establish that instead of being a typical ex-resident of Phoenix, Arizona ("tan, sporty, blond"), she's unique (a pale, un-athletic brunette).

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** Bella's first description of herself in Chapter 1 of the first book is an example of this. Bella does her best to give the impression that she's ordinary in appareance — while appearance—while using very flattering terms to describe herself ("ivory-skinned," "slender" and having a clear complexion) AND to establish that instead of being a typical ex-resident of Phoenix, Arizona ("tan, sporty, blond"), she's unique (a pale, un-athletic brunette).



** Bella Swan's narrative is generally apathetic and dry, yet she instantly befriends the entire school despite her obvious lack of effort, and she maintains these friendships despite the fact that she sits with the social elites — the vampires that are generally disliked by her acquaintances and classmates. She is also generally seen as innocent, and is only disliked by the beautiful, jealous, and blonde. She also [[spoiler: unlocks magical, never-seen abilities that protect her from every other vampiric power in existence, including mind reading, future seeing, and pain inflicting abilities of much older and stronger vampires BEFORE she is bitten by Edward Cullen]].

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** Bella Swan's narrative is generally apathetic and dry, yet she instantly befriends the entire school despite her obvious lack of effort, and she maintains these friendships despite the fact that she sits with the social elites — the elites—the vampires that are generally disliked by her acquaintances and classmates. She is also generally seen as innocent, and is only disliked by the beautiful, jealous, and blonde. She also [[spoiler: unlocks magical, never-seen abilities that protect her from every other vampiric power in existence, including mind reading, future seeing, and pain inflicting abilities of much older and stronger vampires BEFORE she is bitten by Edward Cullen]].



* ''Literature/CrimeAndPunishment'': most (if not all) female characters are introduced as strikingly beautiful, but filthy, but sickly, but actually quite homely, and really not pretty at all, but very desirable, and so determined and strong, one might even say — beautiful.

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* ''Literature/CrimeAndPunishment'': most (if not all) female characters are introduced as strikingly beautiful, but filthy, but sickly, but actually quite homely, and really not pretty at all, but very desirable, and so determined and strong, one might even say — beautiful.say—beautiful.



* Anastasia Steele from ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' is often complaining about how plain-looking she is next to her gorgeous best friend Kate while everyone tell her she's beautiful and at least three guys are fond of her. In ''Meet Fifty Shades'', an outtake which retells the first two chapters of ''Fifty Shades of Grey'' from Christian Grey's point of view, Grey describes Ana as having "guileless, powder-blue" eyes and "a small, sweet face that is blushing now, an innocent pale rose." So it's not just other people telling her that she's gorgeous. The audience is informed outright that Ana is strikingly beautiful...enough to startle and attract a jaded billionaire. By ''Fifty Shades Freed'', Ana has begun to believe that she's desirable — but only because of Christian's influence.

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* Anastasia Steele from ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' is often complaining about how plain-looking she is next to her gorgeous best friend Kate while everyone tell her she's beautiful and at least three guys are fond of her. In ''Meet Fifty Shades'', an outtake which retells the first two chapters of ''Fifty Shades of Grey'' from Christian Grey's point of view, Grey describes Ana as having "guileless, powder-blue" eyes and "a small, sweet face that is blushing now, an innocent pale rose." So it's not just other people telling her that she's gorgeous. The audience is informed outright that Ana is strikingly beautiful...enough to startle and attract a jaded billionaire. By ''Fifty Shades Freed'', Ana has begun to believe that she's desirable — but desirable—but only because of Christian's influence.



* Literature/AnneOfGreenGables is an example of the "not conventionally pretty" type whose looks are used as a litmus test for the person judging them — narrow-minded people think she's plain (which is often PlayedForLaughs) and more sensitive people think she's attractive. Her very introduction contrasts what an "ordinary" and an "extraordinary" observer would see in her appearance. She starts off as a prepubescent, skinny, freckled [[GreenEyedRedhead redhead with greenish-gray eyes]] (both considered negative traits at the time), but as she grows up she develops an elegant figure, her freckles disappear, her hair darkens (unsympathetic people continue to call it red, while her friends agree that it's auburn), and her eyes settle on gray, making her the period equivalent of the [[SheIsAllGrownUp hottie who used to be a nerd in school]]. After these developments we're given frequent and deliberate reminders that she doesn't resemble the curvy, vivacious standard of the period ''and'' that she is nonetheless pretty to people with real taste. Even [[GossipyHens Mrs. Lynde]], who represents conventionality in every way, has to admit she has a certain something:

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* Literature/AnneOfGreenGables is an example of the "not conventionally pretty" type whose looks are used as a litmus test for the person judging them — narrow-minded them—narrow-minded people think she's plain (which is often PlayedForLaughs) and more sensitive people think she's attractive. Her very introduction contrasts what an "ordinary" and an "extraordinary" observer would see in her appearance. She starts off as a prepubescent, skinny, freckled [[GreenEyedRedhead redhead with greenish-gray eyes]] (both considered negative traits at the time), but as she grows up she develops an elegant figure, her freckles disappear, her hair darkens (unsympathetic people continue to call it red, while her friends agree that it's auburn), and her eyes settle on gray, making her the period equivalent of the [[SheIsAllGrownUp hottie who used to be a nerd in school]]. After these developments we're given frequent and deliberate reminders that she doesn't resemble the curvy, vivacious standard of the period ''and'' that she is nonetheless pretty to people with real taste. Even [[GossipyHens Mrs. Lynde]], who represents conventionality in every way, has to admit she has a certain something:
22nd Jan '17 7:21:09 PM Ebrbfureh
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In the most blatant cases a writer will try to disguise a character's Sue-ness by claiming that she's "not beautiful" before launching into a description of a goddess just without using the word 'beautiful', or by sprinkling her with physical traits such as thinness or a "wide mouth" that ''have'' been considered imperfections in the past but are rather more fashionable today. In fantasy or sci-fi examples, an author will sometimes invent a culture where some trait the audience is likely to consider attractive or neutral is regarded as horribly ugly, bad luck, etcetera. The most common of these tend to be a certain eye or hair color, or perhaps something like PointyEars indicating partially elven ancestry in a culture [[FantasticRacism prejudiced against elves]]. But looks aren't the half of it. It is other qualities - abilities, personality (or lack of) and the way that not just the story, but the WORLD revolves around a character, even though it logically wouldn't - that make a character SuetifulAllAlong. In addition, he or she never wants for attractive admirers.

to:

In the most blatant cases a writer will try to disguise a character's Sue-ness by claiming that she's "not beautiful" before launching into a description of a goddess just without using the word 'beautiful', or by sprinkling her with physical traits such as thinness or a "wide mouth" that ''have'' been considered imperfections in the past but are rather more fashionable today. In fantasy or sci-fi examples, an author will sometimes invent a culture where some trait the audience is likely to consider attractive or neutral is regarded as horribly ugly, bad luck, etcetera. The most common of these tend to be a certain eye or hair color, or perhaps something like PointyEars indicating partially elven ancestry in a culture [[FantasticRacism prejudiced against elves]]. But looks aren't the half of it. It is other qualities - abilities, qualities--abilities, personality (or lack of) and the way that not just the story, but the WORLD revolves around a character, even though it logically wouldn't - that wouldn't--that make a character SuetifulAllAlong. In addition, he or she never wants for attractive admirers.



* [[LightIsNotGood Light]] [[BrokenAce Yagami]] of ''Manga/DeathNote'', though the viewer might not notice, ''does'' score a 45 (that's really high) on the [[http://www.springhole.net/writing/marysue.htm Mary Sue Litmus Test]] - being extremely attractive, intelligent, righteous and powerful will do that. However, he is ultimately a deconstruction more than a MartyStu; his [[ManipulativeBastard charming personality]], [[IntelligenceEqualsIsolation innate intelligence]], [[BlackAndWhiteInsanity sense of justice]], and [[ArtifactOfDeath supernatural powers]] are precisely the things that contribute to [[spoiler: his downfall]]. Also, you know, the whole VillainProtagonist / SerialKiller thing.

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* [[LightIsNotGood Light]] [[BrokenAce Yagami]] of ''Manga/DeathNote'', though the viewer might not notice, ''does'' score a 45 (that's really high) on the [[http://www.springhole.net/writing/marysue.htm Mary Sue Litmus Test]] - being Test]]--being extremely attractive, intelligent, righteous and powerful will do that. However, he is ultimately a deconstruction more than a MartyStu; his [[ManipulativeBastard charming personality]], [[IntelligenceEqualsIsolation innate intelligence]], [[BlackAndWhiteInsanity sense of justice]], and [[ArtifactOfDeath supernatural powers]] are precisely the things that contribute to [[spoiler: his downfall]]. Also, you know, the whole VillainProtagonist / SerialKiller thing.



** It should be noted that the character who usually brings up how short and ugly and abrasive he is is Wolverine himself, so this may not be truly an example - other characters might bring that stuff up too, but usually only in anger or just to joke around with him. In the main, it more like Wolverine has something of an inferiority complex.

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** It should be noted that the character who usually brings up how short and ugly and abrasive he is is Wolverine himself, so this may not be truly an example - other example--other characters might bring that stuff up too, but usually only in anger or just to joke around with him. In the main, it more like Wolverine has something of an inferiority complex.



* La'Ana Shaddem from the Star Wars fanfiction [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/7086034/1/bA_b_bBroken_b_bCircle_b A Broken Circle]]. The author starts by describing her "forest-green eyes" that occasionally have "flecks of gold", and has "short, curly, ebony black hair". Almost every chapter in the story describes her in the most exquisite terms possible, then hastily adds that she "couldn't win a beauty contest- she was far too thin and small". Despite this constant reminder, ''every single male'' in the story mentions her attractiveness. La'Ana thinks...

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* La'Ana Shaddem from the Star Wars fanfiction [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/7086034/1/bA_b_bBroken_b_bCircle_b A Broken Circle]]. The author starts by describing her "forest-green eyes" that occasionally have "flecks of gold", and has "short, curly, ebony black hair". Almost every chapter in the story describes her in the most exquisite terms possible, then hastily adds that she "couldn't win a beauty contest- she contest--she was far too thin and small". Despite this constant reminder, ''every single male'' in the story mentions her attractiveness. La'Ana thinks...



* Peter Petrelli from ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is constantly made to carry the IdiotBall, since he's so supremely powerful that [[IdiotPlot if he just acted sensibly]], it would be all but impossible for the writers to create any drama for him. However, no one ever seems to hold his plentiful mistakes against him or suggest that the world might not need quite so much rescuing if Peter could just get his act together for once. The worst he's been accused of (and invariably by a villain - any HeelFaceTurn seems to be automatically followed by a sudden appreciation of Peter's awesomeness) is being ''too self-sacrificing and idealistic''.

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* Peter Petrelli from ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is constantly made to carry the IdiotBall, since he's so supremely powerful that [[IdiotPlot if he just acted sensibly]], it would be all but impossible for the writers to create any drama for him. However, no one ever seems to hold his plentiful mistakes against him or suggest that the world might not need quite so much rescuing if Peter could just get his act together for once. The worst he's been accused of (and invariably by a villain - any villain--any HeelFaceTurn seems to be automatically followed by a sudden appreciation of Peter's awesomeness) is being ''too self-sacrificing and idealistic''.



* Chuck from ''Series/PushingDaisies'' is definitely this. The main protagonist Ned is defined by his adoration for Chuck after he brings her back in the first episode. She also can do NO wrong, as evidenced by the many times she defies common sense and Ned's directions and yet is always immediately forgiven (for a perfect example see "The Legend of Merle [=McQuoddy=]"). And many times, through some convoluted series of events, her behavior that at the time was ignorant and risky actually ends up being ''beneficial'' in the end, just to prove how awesome she is. The rest of the cast are also completely defined by her existence and love her despite the trouble she causes them. Admittedly, it can be argued that it's because of the complications she brings to the group that she so seems to affect their lives - however closer scrutiny simply shows that Chuck can do no wrong and is the most completely lovable beautiful person that ever lived (twice).

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* Chuck from ''Series/PushingDaisies'' is definitely this. The main protagonist Ned is defined by his adoration for Chuck after he brings her back in the first episode. She also can do NO wrong, as evidenced by the many times she defies common sense and Ned's directions and yet is always immediately forgiven (for a perfect example see "The Legend of Merle [=McQuoddy=]"). And many times, through some convoluted series of events, her behavior that at the time was ignorant and risky actually ends up being ''beneficial'' in the end, just to prove how awesome she is. The rest of the cast are also completely defined by her existence and love her despite the trouble she causes them. Admittedly, it can be argued that it's because of the complications she brings to the group that she so seems to affect their lives - however lives--however, closer scrutiny simply shows that Chuck can do no wrong and is the most completely lovable beautiful person that ever lived (twice).



* Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin was the ultimate JerkSue during his time in WWE, getting away with beating up all kinds of people just because he didn't like them or [[ComedicSociopathy to get a cheap laugh]]. Nobody booes Stone Cold. In fact, no matter what the Rattlesnake does, it is guaranteed to get fans cheering for him.

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* Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin was the ultimate JerkSue during his time in WWE, getting away with beating up all kinds of people just because he didn't like them or [[ComedicSociopathy to get a cheap laugh]]. Nobody booes boos Stone Cold. In fact, no matter what the Rattlesnake does, it is guaranteed to get fans cheering for him.



* Makoto Yosue of ''Webcomic/RedString'' is supposedly insecure, has cold and distant parents, and has trouble with girls because he's too feminine and too self-sacrificing. In the real world, Makoto is drop-dead gorgeous, is fabulously rich, is constantly either in a relationship or having girls begging to date him, and is always winning people over to his side without actually doing anything to earn their constant praise. Oh yea, and he's ''never'' shown to actually make anything close to a sacrifice for another person - despite even the author claiming this is his character flaw, Makoto is never depicted in a situation where he holds back on his own personal needs or happiness for the sake of another person. He is shown to actively cheat on his engagement to Miharu's cousin Karen because he fell in love at first sight with Miharu's photograph. In spite of Miharu telling him to leave her alone, he is constantly forcing himself on her until events that have nothing to do with him actually ''winning her over'' essentially award her to him. Everyone in the story, including people who should hate him, constantly [[CharacterShilling tell Miharu what a great person he is]] or encourage him further. While he theoretically was trying to help Miharu with Kazuo after their break up, even he admitted (though only to himself) that in reality he wasn't with her to help them out, he was with her to pick her up on the rebound. The closest he ever got was [[spoiler: at the end of the comic, quitting his job because his relationship with Miharu was causing her problems... except that he states plainly in front of Miharu and her parents that he's quitting his job ''explicitly to continue dating her.'' So he just quit his job to date his girlfriend full time, which is actually ''more'' advantageous to him.]] And those supposedly uncaring and emotionally distant parents of his? He calls them up off-panel and they apparently, with no complaints, go along with his plan and apparently financially support him to make it viable. In fact, despite the story trying to tell us how sad Makoto was growing up with them, the only times we see them they are constantly doting on him. And that engagement he's in with Karen? Oh, they set it up because they knew Makoto had a dream to be a sushi chef and expressed trouble with girls. So they offered a marriage arrangement to the heiress of a sushi restaurant to help him solve both problems - and he happily accepted!

to:

* Makoto Yosue of ''Webcomic/RedString'' is supposedly insecure, has cold and distant parents, and has trouble with girls because he's too feminine and too self-sacrificing. In the real world, Makoto is drop-dead gorgeous, is fabulously rich, is constantly either in a relationship or having girls begging to date him, and is always winning people over to his side without actually doing anything to earn their constant praise. Oh yea, and he's ''never'' shown to actually make anything close to a sacrifice for another person - despite person--despite even the author claiming this is his character flaw, Makoto is never depicted in a situation where he holds back on his own personal needs or happiness for the sake of another person. He is shown to actively cheat on his engagement to Miharu's cousin Karen because he fell in love at first sight with Miharu's photograph. In spite of Miharu telling him to leave her alone, he is constantly forcing himself on her until events that have nothing to do with him actually ''winning her over'' essentially award her to him. Everyone in the story, including people who should hate him, constantly [[CharacterShilling tell Miharu what a great person he is]] or encourage him further. While he theoretically was trying to help Miharu with Kazuo after their break up, even he admitted (though only to himself) that in reality he wasn't with her to help them out, he was with her to pick her up on the rebound. The closest he ever got was [[spoiler: at the end of the comic, quitting his job because his relationship with Miharu was causing her problems... except that he states plainly in front of Miharu and her parents that he's quitting his job ''explicitly to continue dating her.'' So he just quit his job to date his girlfriend full time, which is actually ''more'' advantageous to him.]] And those supposedly uncaring and emotionally distant parents of his? He calls them up off-panel and they apparently, with no complaints, go along with his plan and apparently financially support him to make it viable. In fact, despite the story trying to tell us how sad Makoto was growing up with them, the only times we see them they are constantly doting on him. And that engagement he's in with Karen? Oh, they set it up because they knew Makoto had a dream to be a sushi chef and expressed trouble with girls. So they offered a marriage arrangement to the heiress of a sushi restaurant to help him solve both problems - and problems--and he happily accepted!



* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Deliberately invoked and played with as the show drew its inspiration from popular live action like ''Series/{{Alias}}'' and ''[[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Buffy the Vampire Slayer]]'' (with a little bit of ''Film/AustinPowers'') and is meant to be a parody of those shows combined. However, in the first season Kim can literally "do anything" and looks good while doing it without breaking a sweat. "I can do anything" is a self-admitted braggy motto. Kim can't cook, can't sing high notes, can't drive (immediately - this one makes less sense, as she's been driving bikes and aircraft already), can't [[DudeWheresMyRespect sit at the Senior table]], [[ChronicHeroSyndrome can't say "no" to someone in need]], [[SociallyAwkwardHero can't say anything]] [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld to her crush]], can't resist a challenge. Ron [[{{lampshades}} points this out]] when Kim fails the driving test.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'': Deliberately invoked and played with as the show drew its inspiration from popular live action like ''Series/{{Alias}}'' and ''[[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Buffy the Vampire Slayer]]'' (with a little bit of ''Film/AustinPowers'') and is meant to be a parody of those shows combined. However, in the first season Kim can literally "do anything" and looks good while doing it without breaking a sweat. "I can do anything" is a self-admitted braggy motto. Kim can't cook, can't sing high notes, can't drive (immediately - this (immediately--this one makes less sense, as she's been driving bikes and aircraft already), can't [[DudeWheresMyRespect sit at the Senior table]], [[ChronicHeroSyndrome can't say "no" to someone in need]], [[SociallyAwkwardHero can't say anything]] [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld to her crush]], can't resist a challenge. Ron [[{{lampshades}} points this out]] when Kim fails the driving test.
15th Jan '17 2:32:52 PM DustSnitch
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** A lot of this [[DependingOnTheWriter depends on the creators]], though, for instance in his own title Wolverine is said to have become ProgressivelyPrettier and taller (this is often blamed on Mark Millar). On the other hand, it was averted in ''ComicBook/SecretWars'' (though still distinctly BadAss, he spent a good bit of the story being a drunken pain in the ass, with realistic reactions from the other heroes).

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** A lot of this [[DependingOnTheWriter depends on the creators]], though, for instance in his own title Wolverine is said to have become ProgressivelyPrettier and taller (this is often blamed on Mark Millar). On the other hand, it was averted in ''ComicBook/SecretWars'' (though still distinctly BadAss, badass, he spent a good bit of the story being a drunken pain in the ass, with realistic reactions from the other heroes).



* Similar to the Wolverine example, [[Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick Riddick's]] MartyStu qualities really show themselves as his role expands from ''Film/PitchBlack'' to ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick''. In the first film he is an, [[BadAss admittedly cool]], dark horse character who presents a dilemma to the other survivors: he's [[MagicalEye perfectly equipped]] to help save everyone, but he also might be an untrustworthy and unrepentant sociopath who'd cut your throat for looking at him funny. In the second film he's a legendary figure, talked about constantly. A fearless, nigh-unstoppable killing machine, soon to be LastOfHisKind and known in advance to be pivotal to ''saving the universe'', circumstances allow little mystery as to which way he is going to jump. In person, if you aren't trying to lock him up or otherwise disturb his loner existence, he's generally urbane, funny, even charming. The closest the film gets to his reputed evil is merely the oft stated disregard he has for the well being of anyone but himself.

to:

* Similar to the Wolverine example, [[Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick Riddick's]] MartyStu qualities really show themselves as his role expands from ''Film/PitchBlack'' to ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick''. In the first film he is an, [[BadAss admittedly cool]], cool, dark horse character who presents a dilemma to the other survivors: he's [[MagicalEye perfectly equipped]] to help save everyone, but he also might be an untrustworthy and unrepentant sociopath who'd cut your throat for looking at him funny. In the second film he's a legendary figure, talked about constantly. A fearless, nigh-unstoppable killing machine, soon to be LastOfHisKind and known in advance to be pivotal to ''saving the universe'', circumstances allow little mystery as to which way he is going to jump. In person, if you aren't trying to lock him up or otherwise disturb his loner existence, he's generally urbane, funny, even charming. The closest the film gets to his reputed evil is merely the oft stated disregard he has for the well being of anyone but himself.
28th Nov '16 3:08:43 PM Morgenthaler
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[[folder:Film]]
* Iris of ''Literature/ConfessionsOfAnUglyStepsister'', despite being one of the stepsisters, is actually rather pretty. It's not true in the book, though, so it may just be AdaptationalAttractiveness.
** At least in the book she doesn't really qualify because the world does not revolve around her, and she doesn't seem to be any better off than any of the other characters.
* Similar to the Wolverine example, [[Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick Riddick's]] MartyStu qualities really show themselves as his role expands from ''Film/PitchBlack'' to ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick''. In the first film he is an, [[BadAss admittedly cool]], dark horse character who presents a dilemma to the other survivors: he's [[MagicalEye perfectly equipped]] to help save everyone, but he also might be an untrustworthy and unrepentant sociopath who'd cut your throat for looking at him funny. In the second film he's a legendary figure, talked about constantly. A fearless, nigh-unstoppable killing machine, soon to be LastOfHisKind and known in advance to be pivotal to ''saving the universe'', circumstances allow little mystery as to which way he is going to jump. In person, if you aren't trying to lock him up or otherwise disturb his loner existence, he's generally urbane, funny, even charming. The closest the film gets to his reputed evil is merely the oft stated disregard he has for the well being of anyone but himself.

to:

[[folder:Film]]
* Iris of ''Literature/ConfessionsOfAnUglyStepsister'', despite being one of the stepsisters, is actually rather pretty. It's not true in the book, though, so it may just be AdaptationalAttractiveness.
** At least in the book she doesn't really qualify because the world does not revolve around her, and she doesn't seem to be any better off than any of the other characters.
* Similar to the Wolverine example, [[Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick Riddick's]] MartyStu qualities really show themselves as his role expands from ''Film/PitchBlack'' to ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick''. In the first film he is an, [[BadAss admittedly cool]], dark horse character who presents a dilemma to the other survivors: he's [[MagicalEye perfectly equipped]] to help save everyone, but he also might be an untrustworthy and unrepentant sociopath who'd cut your throat for looking at him funny. In the second film he's a legendary figure, talked about constantly. A fearless, nigh-unstoppable killing machine, soon to be LastOfHisKind and known in advance to be pivotal to ''saving the universe'', circumstances allow little mystery as to which way he is going to jump. In person, if you aren't trying to lock him up or otherwise disturb his loner existence, he's generally urbane, funny, even charming. The closest the film gets to his reputed evil is merely the oft stated disregard he has for the well being of anyone but himself.
[[folder:Films -- Animated]]


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* Iris of ''Literature/ConfessionsOfAnUglyStepsister'', despite being one of the stepsisters, is actually rather pretty. It's not true in the book, though, so it may just be AdaptationalAttractiveness.
** At least in the book she doesn't really qualify because the world does not revolve around her, and she doesn't seem to be any better off than any of the other characters.
* Similar to the Wolverine example, [[Franchise/TheChroniclesOfRiddick Riddick's]] MartyStu qualities really show themselves as his role expands from ''Film/PitchBlack'' to ''Film/TheChroniclesOfRiddick''. In the first film he is an, [[BadAss admittedly cool]], dark horse character who presents a dilemma to the other survivors: he's [[MagicalEye perfectly equipped]] to help save everyone, but he also might be an untrustworthy and unrepentant sociopath who'd cut your throat for looking at him funny. In the second film he's a legendary figure, talked about constantly. A fearless, nigh-unstoppable killing machine, soon to be LastOfHisKind and known in advance to be pivotal to ''saving the universe'', circumstances allow little mystery as to which way he is going to jump. In person, if you aren't trying to lock him up or otherwise disturb his loner existence, he's generally urbane, funny, even charming. The closest the film gets to his reputed evil is merely the oft stated disregard he has for the well being of anyone but himself.
[[/folder]]
28th Nov '16 3:07:39 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/{{Doctor Who}}'': The Doctor! Though he is usually excused by both writers and fans on account of 1) being a {{Badass}}, 2) this being his show, 3) [[WhatTheHellHero occasionally being called out on his more darker actions]], and 4) [[CharacterDevelopment the various flaws and growth the character experiences over and over again]] thanks to [[TheNthDoctor regeneration]].

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* ''Series/{{Doctor Who}}'': The Doctor! Though he is usually excused by both writers and fans on account of 1) being a {{Badass}}, badass, 2) this being his show, 3) [[WhatTheHellHero occasionally being called out on his more darker actions]], and 4) [[CharacterDevelopment the various flaws and growth the character experiences over and over again]] thanks to [[TheNthDoctor regeneration]].
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