History Main / SuddenlySexuality

6th Feb '17 7:10:18 AM Doug86
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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', companion Captain Mike Yates started out flirting with Jo Grant and calling a pretty female Chinese soldier a 'dolly', and later ended up flirting with the Brigadier and implicitly seducing Global Chemicals' tea boy - although BBC rules at the time prevented any explicit mention of same-sex attraction, so it was kept to innuendo. The DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse finally confirmed him to be bisexual, decades later.

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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', companion Captain Mike Yates started out flirting with Jo Grant and calling a pretty female Chinese soldier a 'dolly', and later ended up flirting with the Brigadier and implicitly seducing Global Chemicals' tea boy - although BBC rules at the time prevented any explicit mention of same-sex attraction, so it was kept to innuendo. The DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse finally confirmed him to be bisexual, decades later.
5th Feb '17 9:04:00 AM ironballs16
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* Mr./Ms. Garrison on ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is the embodiment of this trope, starting out as a [[TransparentCloset closeted homosexual]], [[FlamboyantGay token homosexual]], heterosexual woman (after her [[GenderBender sex change]]), a lesbian, and finally a man again (his current sexuality hasn't been confirmed yet, but the gay men of the town gathered for a meeting in "The F Word" and Garrison wasn't among them, so it is assumed he is a straight man). This is even {{lampshade|Hanging}}d when she tells her class about her sudden change to lesbianism, after she comes right out and says she's gay, and Stan asks, "Again?" Chef probably put it best a long time ago: "There's a huge difference between gay people, and Mr. Garrison" since he's also had sex with animals and tried to rape children.

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* Mr./Ms. Garrison on ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is the embodiment of this trope, starting out as a [[TransparentCloset closeted homosexual]], [[FlamboyantGay token homosexual]], heterosexual woman (after her [[GenderBender sex change]]), a lesbian, and finally a man again (his current sexuality hasn't been confirmed yet, but the gay men of the town gathered for a meeting in "The F Word" and Garrison wasn't among them, so it is assumed he is a straight man). This is even {{lampshade|Hanging}}d when she tells her class about her sudden change to lesbianism, after she comes right out and says she's gay, and Stan asks, "Again?" Chef probably put it best a long time ago: "There's a huge difference between gay people, [[DepravedBisexual and Mr. Garrison" Garrison]]" since he's also had sex with animals and tried to rape children.
13th Jan '17 8:15:01 PM IcarusPhoenix
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This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's ''entirely'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very jarring. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, gay people do indeed sometimes attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out, but when handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.

to:

This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's ''entirely'' actually [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very many viewers find it jarring. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, many gay people do indeed sometimes attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out, but when handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.



''Technically'' speaking, if no information as to a given character's sexuality has been demonstrated before in a work, either due to that character not getting a lot of screen time or the work simply not focusing on romantic relationships, then ''any'' declaration of sexual or romantic feelings would count as this trope.

to:

''Technically'' Technically speaking, if no information as to a given character's sexuality has been demonstrated before in a work, either due to that character not getting a lot of screen time or the work simply not focusing on romantic relationships, then ''any'' declaration of sexual or romantic feelings would count as this trope.
10th Jan '17 6:51:36 PM nombretomado
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* ''LoadingReadyRun'' parodies this in "[[http://loadingreadyrun.com/videos/view/50/The-Worst-Homosexual The Worst Homosexual]]", in which womanizer Morgan suddenly declares that he's gay, because, "the only way I could be this much of a mad, pimping playa is if I was covering for something". He spends the remainder of the episode trying to be gay, but fails miserably.

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* ''LoadingReadyRun'' ''WebVideo/LoadingReadyRun'' parodies this in "[[http://loadingreadyrun.com/videos/view/50/The-Worst-Homosexual The Worst Homosexual]]", in which womanizer Morgan suddenly declares that he's gay, because, "the only way I could be this much of a mad, pimping playa is if I was covering for something". He spends the remainder of the episode trying to be gay, but fails miserably.
8th Jan '17 9:42:35 PM mlsmithca
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This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's entirely [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very jarring to most straight audience members. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, many gay people do indeed attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out (if anything, it's unrealistic to make all LGBT characters out from the beginning). When handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.

{{YMMV}}, as fans who dislike the development tend to have more negative opinions of how it was handled. Additionally, your milage may vary in cases where some fans saw it as sudden, but others perceived some degree of HomoeroticSubtext leading up to it. For these reasons, any time a character comes out (and it's not more or less immediately after the character was first introduced), some fans will inevitably deride it as a "retcon" that came "from out of nowhere."

Sometimes employed purely as a rebuttal to the assumption that all undeclared characters in fiction must, by default, be heterosexual. Technically speaking, if no information as to a given character's sexuality has been demonstrated before in a work (either due to that character not getting a lot of screen time, or the work simply not focusing on romantic relationships) then ''any'' declaration of sexual or romantic feelings should count as this trope. In practice, however, there is a double standard where the trope is only noted for non-heterosexual orientations.

to:

This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's entirely ''entirely'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very jarring to most straight audience members. jarring. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, many gay people do indeed sometimes attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out (if anything, it's unrealistic to make all LGBT characters out from the beginning). When out, but when handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.

{{YMMV}}, as fans who dislike the development tend to have more negative opinions of how it was handled. Additionally, your milage may vary in cases where some fans saw it as sudden, but others perceived some degree of HomoeroticSubtext leading up to it. For these reasons, any time a character comes out (and it's not more or less immediately after the character was first introduced), some fans will inevitably deride it as a "retcon" that came "from out of nowhere."

Sometimes employed purely as a rebuttal an answer to the assumption that all undeclared characters in fiction must, by default, be heterosexual. Technically heterosexual.

''Technically''
speaking, if no information as to a given character's sexuality has been demonstrated before in a work (either work, either due to that character not getting a lot of screen time, time or the work simply not focusing on romantic relationships) relationships, then ''any'' declaration of sexual or romantic feelings should would count as this trope. In practice, however, there is a double standard where the trope is only noted for non-heterosexual orientations.
trope.
8th Jan '17 1:43:12 PM IcarusPhoenix
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This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's entirely [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very jarring to most straight audience members. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, gay people do indeed sometimes attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out. When handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.

{{YMMV}}, as fans who dislike the development tend to have more negative opinions of how it was handled. Additionally, your milage may vary in cases where some fans saw it as sudden, but others perceived some degree of HomoeroticSubtext leading up to it.

to:

This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's entirely [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very jarring to most straight audience members. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, many gay people do indeed sometimes attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out.out (if anything, it's unrealistic to make all LGBT characters out from the beginning). When handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.

{{YMMV}}, as fans who dislike the development tend to have more negative opinions of how it was handled. Additionally, your milage may vary in cases where some fans saw it as sudden, but others perceived some degree of HomoeroticSubtext leading up to it.
it. For these reasons, any time a character comes out (and it's not more or less immediately after the character was first introduced), some fans will inevitably deride it as a "retcon" that came "from out of nowhere."
8th Jan '17 1:26:59 PM IcarusPhoenix
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[[YMMV Your milage may vary]], as fans who dislike the development tend to have more negative opinions of how it was handled. Additionally, your milage may vary in cases where some fans saw it as sudden, but others perceived some degree of HomoeroticSubtext leading up to it.

to:

[[YMMV Your milage may vary]], {{YMMV}}, as fans who dislike the development tend to have more negative opinions of how it was handled. Additionally, your milage may vary in cases where some fans saw it as sudden, but others perceived some degree of HomoeroticSubtext leading up to it.
8th Jan '17 1:26:35 PM IcarusPhoenix
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This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's ''entirely'' [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very jarring. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, gay people do indeed sometimes attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out, but when handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.

Sometimes employed purely as an answer to the assumption that all undeclared characters in fiction must, by default, be heterosexual.

to:

This can be because the author changed his mind about a character, is catering to FanWank, or is simply providing {{Fanservice}}. In any of these instances, it's usually frowned upon. Not that it's ''entirely'' entirely [[RealityIsUnrealistic unrealistic]], but it's very jarring. jarring to most straight audience members. When handled well, it can be TruthInTelevision, given that in real life, gay people do indeed sometimes attempt to appear heterosexual before coming out, but when out. When handled poorly, it can instead come across as a sloppy or cynical {{Retcon}}.

[[YMMV Your milage may vary]], as fans who dislike the development tend to have more negative opinions of how it was handled. Additionally, your milage may vary in cases where some fans saw it as sudden, but others perceived some degree of HomoeroticSubtext leading up to it.

Sometimes employed purely as an answer a rebuttal to the assumption that all undeclared characters in fiction must, by default, be heterosexual.
heterosexual. Technically speaking, if no information as to a given character's sexuality has been demonstrated before in a work (either due to that character not getting a lot of screen time, or the work simply not focusing on romantic relationships) then ''any'' declaration of sexual or romantic feelings should count as this trope. In practice, however, there is a double standard where the trope is only noted for non-heterosexual orientations.



''Technically'' speaking, if no information as to a given character's sexuality has been demonstrated before in a work, either due to that character not getting a lot of screen time or the work simply not focusing on romantic relationships, then ''any'' declaration of sexual or romantic feelings would count as this trope.
25th Nov '16 1:18:54 PM Morgenthaler
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* Defied by GregRucka, when people accused him for "Making [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries Renée Montoya]] gay" in ComicBook/GothamCentral.

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* Defied by GregRucka, Creator/GregRucka, when people accused him for "Making [[WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries Renée Montoya]] gay" in ComicBook/GothamCentral.
18th Nov '16 7:19:09 AM DaibhidC
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* The canonity is questionable, but a ''Star Trek: Waypoints'' comic gives a retrospective of Yeoman Thompson's life before she was [[Recap/StarTrekS2E22ByAnyOtherName transformed into a chalky dodecahedron and crushed]]. She's shown as being married to an alien woman.

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* The canonity is questionable, but a ''Star ''[[Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse Star Trek: Waypoints'' Waypoints]]'' comic gives a retrospective of Yeoman Thompson's life before she was [[Recap/StarTrekS2E22ByAnyOtherName transformed into a chalky dodecahedron and crushed]]. She's shown as being married to an alien woman.
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