History Main / SuddenSequelHeelSyndrome

19th Aug '17 7:11:42 PM Jormungar
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** Illidan is a notorious example, to the point where Blizzard has vowed to one day bring him back and redeem him to make up for it. They even admitted that they only made him a villain so the expansion would have a popular character to confront and get loot from.
*** In ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'' Illidan was a complex AntiHero who used any means necessary to save his people, but despite fears from those around him, never succumbed to the corruption of the dark powers he was toying with. This finally came to light when his brother attempted to stop him from destroying Northrend, only to find out after disrupting the spell that Illidan was only trying to destroy the Frozen Throne and the Lich King. After saving their mutual love, Illidan saw the error of his ways and they parted on good terms. In ''Burning Crusade'', with the [[HandWave flimsy explanation]] that he went crazy after losing to Arthas, Illidan is suddenly a CardCarryingVillain who is even known to sabotage his own goals if it means he [[ForTheEvulz gets to do something evil]]. This culminates in his death, where you are assisted by a character who is arguably an inversion of this trope. Maiev had dogged Illidan before as an insanely zealous InspectorJavert who went [[MoralEventHorizon too far]] into KnightTemplar territory, but is treated like a mostly heroic paragon of justice here.
** Sylvanas wasn't exactly the most shining example of heroism, but her character in ''Frozen Throne'' revolved around how horrible a fate undeath was. Arthas raised her as a banshee while defending her homeland just so he could force her to massacre the very people she died defending. Even when she regained her mind and body, she still saw undeath as a fate worse than death that no one deserved, and wanted nothing more than to get revenge on Arthas and stop the Scourge once and for all before finally dying and being able to rest. Come ''World of Warcraft'', Sylvanas is creating plagues that are explicitly worse than the ones the Scourge employed, and she suddenly likes talking about how she wants to kill the living and proliferate her undead "race". After Arthas is finally killed, she becomes the exact thing she hated in Arthas: using the Val'kyr to raise Lordaeron farmers and Galen Trollbane specifically to fight and kill their own families, with not the briefest hint of irony or justification for the blatant hypocrisy. She makes the Forsaken nation into a fascist dictatorship with a cult of personality and a heavy dose of hypocritical nationalism as justification. In her short story, ''Edge of Night'', she also claimed that she doesn't actually care to die for her people at all, and only sees the Forsaken as fodder to keep herself from dying and meeting the hell that awaits her in the afterlife.
** Kael'thas is another example. In ''Frozen Throne'' the blood elves were the epitome of the concept that [[DarkIsNotEvil a scary name does not mean evil]]. Kael'thas was arguably one of the most heroic characters in the campaign. He fought for a place for his people after the destruction of their homeland, he assisted the night elves, who his people were exiled from long ago, his actions even saving their leader, Tyrande, and he contributed as the sane man and moral center to Illidan's morally ambiguous outcasts. In ''Burning Crusade'', he's eventually revealed to be TheMole in Illidan's army for the Burning Legion, and is even implied to be the true reason for many of Illidan's most evil tactical decisions, in a way that couldn't be further from his original characterization. Blizzard expressed regret at this change as well, but after almost immediately bringing him back from the dead as an even more desperate Legion pawn, figured they missed their chance to properly repair his character.
** Garrosh Hellscream is an oft-argued version of this trope. He goes from an ineffectual but lore-important side character in ''The Burning Crusade'', to a warmongering {{jerkass}} with a following in ''Wrath of the Lich King''. He appears to gain some character development in ''Cataclysm'' by executing an officer who killed children and showing that he [[EvenEvilHasStandards has standards]] when interacting with Sylvanas, but he goes full-villain in ''Mists of Pandaria'' and becomes a genocidal warlord who wants to subjugate the entire world, sees orcs as the MasterRace, uses {{Fantastic Nuke}}s at the drop of a hat, attacks his own allies the second they refuse to obey, and doesn't care about working for an [[EldritchAbomination Old God]] if it leads to victory.
** The orcish race and the Horde as a whole have been struggling with this trope in a more general sense. One of the major plot points of ''Warcraft III'' was that the orcs weren't AlwaysChaoticEvil, and Thrall was building a new Horde that was good. By the end of the game, he's succeeded, and the Horde, Alliance, and night elves save the world and celebrate together. Right off the bat in ''World of Warcraft'' however, you have the Horde getting the darker races like the Forsaken, who are openly doing horrible experiments on innocent civilians. In ''Wrath of the Lich King'', the Horde players help to create the new plague that is used to devastate both Horde and Alliance forces at the Wrath Gate, and while its use was the result of a coup, Sylvanas openly works on such projects and talks about killing all life. In ''Cataclysm'', while the exact start of the war is a bit ambiguous in canon, the Horde are the main aggressors, gleefully defiling sacred lands, massacring civilians, and generally keeping the Alliance on the defensive. This war culminates with Garrosh essentially dropping an atomic bomb on a city that once championed for peace. While the majority of the Horde ultimately rebels in ''Mists of Pandaria'', most of the damage had already been done by that point, and most of the rebelling happens as a result of Garrosh personally attacking or insulting his allies, not them being horrified by his atrocities and war crimes. While ''Warlords of Draenor'' ostensibly recovers from this, with Garrosh no longer leading the Horde, we get the unfortunate implication from the Iron Horde that the orcish race (and the Horde) are genocidal conquerors by default. Even the Frostwolf [=NPCs=] (the only good clan) threaten to kill Alliance characters (who their only experience with in this timeline is positive) for no apparent reason, and main timeline Horde questgivers are shown acting and talking like they're still under Garrosh.
** The Zandalari trolls were introduced as allies of Horde an Alliance alike, seeking to stop the return of Hakkar and record the history of the collapsing Drakkari troll empire. In ''Cataclysm'' they began inciting the Amani and Gurubashi to reclaim their empires due to growing fears about trolls being wiped out. ''Mists of Pandaria'' escalated this when the Zandalari willingly joined forces with [[LawfulEvil the Thunder King]]. Here their reason is finally explained: [[DrivenToVillainy The Cataclysm is causing their homeland to sink into the ocean; without a new homeland they'll be wiped out]].

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** Illidan is a notorious example, to the point where Blizzard has vowed to one day bring him back and redeem him to make up for it. They even admitted that they only made him a villain so the expansion would have a popular character to confront and get loot from.
***
from. In ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'' Illidan was a complex AntiHero who used any means necessary to save his people, but despite fears from those around him, him never succumbed to the corruption of the dark powers he was toying with. This finally came to light when his brother attempted to stop him from destroying Northrend, only to find out after disrupting the spell that Illidan was only trying to destroy the Frozen Throne and the Lich King. After saving their mutual love, Illidan saw the error of his ways and they parted on good terms. In ''Burning Crusade'', with the [[HandWave flimsy explanation]] that he went crazy after losing to Arthas, Illidan is suddenly a CardCarryingVillain who is even known to sabotage his own goals if it means he [[ForTheEvulz gets to do something evil]]. This culminates in his death, where you are assisted by a character who is arguably an inversion of this trope. Maiev had dogged Illidan before as an insanely zealous InspectorJavert who went [[MoralEventHorizon too far]] into KnightTemplar territory, but is treated like a mostly heroic paragon of justice here.
** Sylvanas wasn't exactly the most shining example of heroism, but her character in ''Frozen Throne'' revolved around how horrible a fate undeath was. Arthas raised her as a banshee while defending her homeland just so he could force her to massacre the very people she died defending. Even when she regained her mind and body, she still saw undeath as a fate worse than death that no one deserved, and wanted nothing more than to get revenge on Arthas and stop the Scourge once and for all before finally dying and being able to rest.
Come ''World of Warcraft'', Sylvanas is creating plagues that are explicitly worse than the ones the Scourge employed, and she suddenly likes talking about how she wants to kill the living and proliferate her undead "race". After Arthas is finally killed, she becomes the exact thing she hated in Arthas: using the Val'kyr to raise Lordaeron farmers and Galen Trollbane specifically to fight and kill their own families, with not the briefest hint of irony or justification for the blatant hypocrisy. She makes the Forsaken nation into a fascist dictatorship with a cult of personality and a heavy dose of hypocritical nationalism as justification. In her short story, ''Edge of Night'', she also claimed that she doesn't actually care to die for her people at all, and only sees the Forsaken as fodder to keep herself from dying and meeting the hell that awaits her in the afterlife.
** Kael'thas is another example. In ''Frozen Throne'' the blood elves were the epitome of the concept that [[DarkIsNotEvil a scary name does not mean evil]]. Kael'thas was arguably one of the most heroic characters in the campaign. He fought for a place for his people after the destruction of their homeland, he assisted the night elves, who his people were exiled from long ago, his actions even saving their leader, Tyrande, and he contributed as the sane man and moral center to Illidan's morally ambiguous outcasts. In ''Burning Crusade'', he's eventually revealed to be TheMole in Illidan's army for
the Burning Legion, Crusade expansion, he's been "driven mad" and is even implied turned to be the true reason for many of Illidan's most evil tactical decisions, in a way that couldn't be further from his original characterization. with no adequately satisfying explanation.
**
Blizzard also expressed regret at this change as well, over Kael'thas's characterization, but after almost immediately bringing him back from the dead as an even more desperate Legion pawn, figured they missed their chance to properly repair his character.
** Garrosh Hellscream is an oft-argued version of this trope. He goes from an ineffectual but lore-important side character in ''The Burning Crusade'', to a warmongering {{jerkass}} with a following in ''Wrath of the Lich King''. He appears to gain some character development in ''Cataclysm'' by executing an officer who killed children and showing that he [[EvenEvilHasStandards has standards]] when interacting with Sylvanas, but he goes full-villain in ''Mists of Pandaria'' and becomes a genocidal warlord who wants to subjugate the entire world, sees orcs as the MasterRace, uses {{Fantastic Nuke}}s at the drop of a hat, attacks his own allies the second they refuse to obey, and doesn't care about working for an [[EldritchAbomination Old God]] if it leads to victory.
** The orcish race and the Horde as a whole have been struggling with this trope in a more general sense. One of the major plot points of ''Warcraft III'' was that the orcs weren't AlwaysChaoticEvil, and Thrall was building a new Horde that was good. By the end of the game, he's succeeded, and the Horde, Alliance, and night elves save the world and celebrate together. Right off the bat in ''World of Warcraft'' however, you have the Horde getting the darker races like the Forsaken, who are openly doing horrible experiments on innocent civilians. In ''Wrath of the Lich King'', the Horde players help to create the new plague that is used to devastate both Horde and Alliance forces at the Wrath Gate, and while its use was the result of a coup, Sylvanas openly works on such projects and talks about killing all life. In ''Cataclysm'', while the exact start of the war is a bit ambiguous in canon, the Horde are the main aggressors, gleefully defiling sacred lands, massacring civilians, and generally keeping the Alliance on the defensive. This war culminates with Garrosh essentially dropping an atomic bomb on a city that once championed for peace. While the majority of the Horde ultimately rebels in ''Mists of Pandaria'', most of the damage had already been done by that point, and most of the rebelling happens as a result of Garrosh personally attacking or insulting his allies, not them being horrified by his atrocities and war crimes. While ''Warlords of Draenor'' ostensibly recovers from this, with Garrosh no longer leading the Horde, we get the unfortunate implication from the Iron Horde that the orcish race (and the Horde) are genocidal conquerors by default. Even the Frostwolf [=NPCs=] (the only good clan) threaten to kill Alliance characters (who their only experience with in this timeline is positive) for no apparent reason, and main timeline Horde questgivers are shown acting and talking like they're still under Garrosh.
** The Zandalari trolls were introduced as allies of Horde an Alliance alike, seeking to stop the return of Hakkar and record the history of the collapsing Drakkari troll empire. In ''Cataclysm'' they began inciting the Amani and Gurubashi to reclaim their empires due to growing fears about trolls being wiped out. ''Mists of Pandaria'' escalated this when the Zandalari willingly joined forces with [[LawfulEvil the Thunder King]]. Here their reason is finally explained: [[DrivenToVillainy The Cataclysm is causing their homeland to sink into the ocean; without a new homeland they'll be wiped out]].
character.


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** The Zandalari trolls were introduced as allies of Horde an Alliance alike, seeking to stop the return of Hakkar and record the history of the collapsing Drakkari troll empire. In ''Cataclysm'' they began inciting the Amani and Gurubashi to reclaim their empires due to growing fears about trolls being wiped out. ''Mists of Pandaria'' escalated this when the Zandalari willingly joined forces with [[LawfulEvil the Thunder King]]. Here their reason is finally explained: [[DrivenToVillainy The Cataclysm is causing their homeland to sink into the ocean; without a new homeland they'll be wiped out]].
19th Aug '17 7:03:20 PM Jormungar
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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has gone ''hard'' on various characters from the [[VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} previous games]] or the [[Franchise/WarcraftExpandedUniverse expanded universe]] in order to turn them into bosses which may be killed for loot. "Going mad," is apparently an occupational hazard for lore characters, as it's the most common excuse used to turn them into raid bosses. This list includes Illidan Stormrage, Kael'Thas Sunstrider, Malygos, Fandral Staghelm, and Archbishop Benedictus.

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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has gone ''hard'' on various characters from the [[VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} previous games]] or the [[Franchise/WarcraftExpandedUniverse expanded universe]] in order to turn them into bosses which may be killed for loot. "Going mad," is apparently an occupational hazard for lore characters, as it's the most common excuse used to turn them into raid bosses. This list includes Illidan Stormrage, Kael'Thas Sunstrider, Malygos, Norzdormu, Fandral Staghelm, and Archbishop Benedictus.
19th Aug '17 7:01:57 PM Jormungar
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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has gone ''hard'' on various characters from the [[VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} previous games]] or the [[Franchise/WarcraftExpandedUniverse expanded universe]] in order to turn them into bosses which may be killed for loot.

to:

* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has gone ''hard'' on various characters from the [[VideoGame/{{Warcraft}} previous games]] or the [[Franchise/WarcraftExpandedUniverse expanded universe]] in order to turn them into bosses which may be killed for loot. "Going mad," is apparently an occupational hazard for lore characters, as it's the most common excuse used to turn them into raid bosses. This list includes Illidan Stormrage, Kael'Thas Sunstrider, Malygos, Fandral Staghelm, and Archbishop Benedictus.
18th Aug '17 7:47:53 AM BeerBaron
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* Throughout ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series, Hermaeus Mora, the [[OurGodsAreDifferent Daedric Prince]] of [[KeeperOfForbiddenKnowledge Knowledge]], was always a neutral entity, even if he could be a bit ruthless in achieving his goals. In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'''s ''Dragonborn'' DLC, however, he [[spoiler:[[TheChessmaster orchestrates everything that happens]], putting millions of innocent lives at risk, just to obtain the "secrets" of the [[NobleSavage Skaal]].]]
2nd Jul '17 5:55:43 PM MajinAkuma
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* ''Anime/YuGiOh'' Season 4 turned Mai Valentine, the gang's CoolBigSis, into an angst-ridden member of a villainous biker gang. It turns out she was tricked into HeelFaceBrainwashing by the arc's BigBad, Dartz.

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* ''Anime/YuGiOh'' Season 4 turned Mai Valentine, Kujaku, the gang's CoolBigSis, into an angst-ridden member of a villainous biker gang. It turns out she was tricked into HeelFaceBrainwashing by the arc's BigBad, Dartz.



* Happens to [[spoiler: Gennai]] in ''Anime/DigimonAdventureTri'', who was originally TheMentor for the kids. Here, he's one of the bad guys.

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* Happens to [[spoiler: Gennai]] [[spoiler:Gennai]] in ''Anime/DigimonAdventureTri'', who was originally TheMentor for the kids. Here, he's one of the bad guys.
2nd Jun '17 10:04:30 AM AlienPatch
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* In ComicBook/WorldWarHulk we learn that Miek, who was a friend and ally of Hulk in ''ComicBook/PlanetHulk'', was the one who let the explosion destroy Sakaar just so he would reach [[UnstoppableRage the WorldBreaker stage.]]
16th May '17 10:23:36 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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SuperTrope of RogueProtagonist, FallenHero, and TheParagonAlwaysRebels. See also RonTheDeathEater for fanfiction, and AdaptationalVillainy.

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SuperTrope of RogueProtagonist, FallenHero, and TheParagonAlwaysRebels. See also RonTheDeathEater for fanfiction, and AdaptationalVillainy.
AdaptationalVillainy. Contrast ProtagonistJourneyToVillain, which is all about showing their slide to villainy onscreen.
4th May '17 2:29:54 PM MathematicalVoid
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** Inverted with [[VideoGame/YoshisIsland Raphael the Raven]], who debuted as a boss, only to suddenly be one of Yoshi's friends in ''VideoGame/TetrisAttack'' and an ally in ''VideoGame/PaperMario64''.
25th Mar '17 11:34:59 AM erforce
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* ''FinalFantasyX2'' inverts it. Tromell Guado was TheDragon to Seymour, actively sending people out to kill the protagonists after discovering they murdered Seymour, along with destroying the evidence that Seymour killed his own father. In the two year TimeSkip the entire Guado race suffered a collective MyGodWhatHaveIDone - and were exiled to the Macalania Woods. One sidequest is preventing the Ronso from slaughtering the tribe. If the player does things correctly [[spoiler: Tromell will become the new leader of the Guado and direct them towards a brighter future]].

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* ''FinalFantasyX2'' ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX2'' inverts it. Tromell Guado was TheDragon to Seymour, actively sending people out to kill the protagonists after discovering they murdered Seymour, along with destroying the evidence that Seymour killed his own father. In the two year TimeSkip the entire Guado race suffered a collective MyGodWhatHaveIDone - and were exiled to the Macalania Woods. One sidequest is preventing the Ronso from slaughtering the tribe. If the player does things correctly [[spoiler: Tromell will become the new leader of the Guado and direct them towards a brighter future]].



* In the ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' video game series, the game Wing Commander III: Heart of the Tiger had [[spoiler:Col. Ralgha nar "Hobbes" Hhallas who was throughout game 2 a ProudWarriorRaceGuy who was disgusted with his race's lack of honor suddenly do a FaceHeelTurn in which he turns out to have been a sleeper agent hiding behind a fabricated personality]].
** Likewise, the BigBad of Wing Commander IV: The Price of Freedom [[spoiler: turns out to be Admiral Tolwyn, who lost his direction in life and ultimately went rather nuts once he no longer had a war to fight. Although he was something of a jerk towards your maverick ace character throughout the series, he was also mostly the main BigGood.]]

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* In the ''VideoGame/WingCommander'' video game series, the game Wing Commander III: Heart of the Tiger had [[spoiler:Col. Ralgha nar "Hobbes" Hhallas who was throughout game 2 ''2'' a ProudWarriorRaceGuy who was disgusted with his race's lack of honor suddenly do a FaceHeelTurn in which he turns out to have been a sleeper agent hiding behind a fabricated personality]].
** Likewise, the BigBad of Wing ''Wing Commander IV: The Price of Freedom Freedom'' [[spoiler: turns out to be Admiral Tolwyn, who lost his direction in life and ultimately went rather nuts once he no longer had a war to fight. Although he was something of a jerk towards your maverick ace character throughout the series, he was also mostly the main BigGood.]]



*** In ''Warcraft III'' Illidan was a complex AntiHero who used any means necessary to save his people, but despite fears from those around him, never succumbed to the corruption of the dark powers he was toying with. This finally came to light when his brother attempted to stop him from destroying Northrend, only to find out after disrupting the spell that Illidan was only trying to destroy the Frozen Throne and the Lich King. After saving their mutual love, Illidan saw the error of his ways and they parted on good terms. In ''Burning Crusade'', with the [[HandWave flimsy explanation]] that he went crazy after losing to Arthas, Illidan is suddenly a CardCarryingVillain who is even known to sabotage his own goals if it means he [[ForTheEvulz gets to do something evil]]. This culminates in his death, where you are assisted by a character who is arguably an inversion of this trope. Maiev had dogged Illidan before as an insanely zealous InspectorJavert who went [[MoralEventHorizon too far]] into KnightTemplar territory, but is treated like a mostly heroic paragon of justice here.

to:

*** In ''Warcraft III'' ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'' Illidan was a complex AntiHero who used any means necessary to save his people, but despite fears from those around him, never succumbed to the corruption of the dark powers he was toying with. This finally came to light when his brother attempted to stop him from destroying Northrend, only to find out after disrupting the spell that Illidan was only trying to destroy the Frozen Throne and the Lich King. After saving their mutual love, Illidan saw the error of his ways and they parted on good terms. In ''Burning Crusade'', with the [[HandWave flimsy explanation]] that he went crazy after losing to Arthas, Illidan is suddenly a CardCarryingVillain who is even known to sabotage his own goals if it means he [[ForTheEvulz gets to do something evil]]. This culminates in his death, where you are assisted by a character who is arguably an inversion of this trope. Maiev had dogged Illidan before as an insanely zealous InspectorJavert who went [[MoralEventHorizon too far]] into KnightTemplar territory, but is treated like a mostly heroic paragon of justice here.
24th Feb '17 3:24:38 PM contrafanxxx
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* Happens to [[spoiler: Gennai]] in ''Anime/DigimonAdventureTri'', who was originally TheMentor for the kids. Here, he's one of the bad guys.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SuddenSequelHeelSyndrome