History Main / SubcultureOfTheWeek

5th Jun '16 3:41:03 PM nombretomado
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* One ''PushingDaisies'' episode focuses on a murder at a rent-a-friend agency. The actual customers are portrayed sympathetically, but Ned eventually decries the whole enterprise as useless, because while the patrons may enjoy it for a time, "deep down they never stop thinking of themselves as weirdos who need to be fixed".

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* One ''PushingDaisies'' ''Series/PushingDaisies'' episode focuses on a murder at a rent-a-friend agency. The actual customers are portrayed sympathetically, but Ned eventually decries the whole enterprise as useless, because while the patrons may enjoy it for a time, "deep down they never stop thinking of themselves as weirdos who need to be fixed".
18th May '16 3:11:05 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/CSINewYork''

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* ''Series/CSINewYork''''Series/{{CSINY}}''



** Yet another episode involved the owners of [[TheDollEpisode adult dolls]] (although it turned out that the doll ownership was irrelevant to the murder). Basically, ''CSINewYork'', like all of the shows in the CSIVerse, is pretty much in love with this trope.

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** Yet another episode involved the owners of [[TheDollEpisode adult dolls]] (although it turned out that the doll ownership was irrelevant to the murder). Basically, ''CSINewYork'', ''CSI: NY'', like all of the shows in the CSIVerse, is pretty much in love with this trope.
20th Apr '16 6:34:36 AM Morgenthaler
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[[folder:Literature]]
* In the Lee Goldberg novel ''Mr. Monk in Outer Space'', an investigation takes him into a convention of fans of the show "After Earth", who among other things, bicker about whether they should be called "Earthers" or "Earthies" --- an obvious Trekkies {{expy}}. Even Monk finds them bizarre and scary. (Or should one say, especially Monk.) Particularly after finding out that his brother is the leading authority on the show's fictional "Dratch" language. (Named after series staff member Daniel Dratch.)
[[/folder]]



** In the Lee Goldberg novel ''Mr. Monk in Outer Space'', an investigation takes him into a convention of fans of the show "After Earth", who among other things, bicker about whether they should be called "Earthers" or "Earthies" --- an obvious Trekkies {{expy}}. Even Monk finds them bizarre and scary. (Or should one say, especially Monk.) Particularly after finding out that his brother is the leading authority on the show's fictional "Dratch" language. (Named after series staff member Daniel Dratch.)
20th Apr '16 6:33:43 AM Morgenthaler
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[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]



* Toyed with in the ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}'' episode, "Where No Fan Has Gone Before"; the antagonist Melllvar is an obsessive Trekkie, and the episode goes on to explain that in the past, Trekkies became their own religion and started a devastating war that forced the show itself to be banned.



* Frequently on ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'', Bobby would get involved with a strange new crowd, much to Hank's dismay. Even when the group is harmless and Bobby picks up a constructive hobby, Hank will still stop at nothing to pull his son out of it in favor of something "normal."
** One of many examples is the episode where Bobby falls in with a group of CollectibleCardGame players who are also seemly [=NeoPagans=] due of thier group name "The Coven of Artemis" and style are so happens they were purple robes. It casts both subcultures in a negative light, and portrays them as one and the same.
* Later episodes of ''TheSimpsons'' have been using this trope heavily, featuring subcultures and lifestyles that have gained prominence in the few years leading up to the episode, in an attempt to [[WereStillRelevantDammit keep the show relevant]].


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[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
* Toyed with in the ''{{WesternAnimation/Futurama}}'' episode, "Where No Fan Has Gone Before"; the antagonist Melllvar is an obsessive Trekkie, and the episode goes on to explain that in the past, Trekkies became their own religion and started a devastating war that forced the show itself to be banned.
* Frequently on ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'', Bobby would get involved with a strange new crowd, much to Hank's dismay. Even when the group is harmless and Bobby picks up a constructive hobby, Hank will still stop at nothing to pull his son out of it in favor of something "normal."
** One of many examples is the episode where Bobby falls in with a group of CollectibleCardGame players who are also seemly [=NeoPagans=] due of thier group name "The Coven of Artemis" and style are so happens they were purple robes. It casts both subcultures in a negative light, and portrays them as one and the same.
* Later episodes of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' have been using this trope heavily, featuring subcultures and lifestyles that have gained prominence in the few years leading up to the episode, in an attempt to [[WereStillRelevantDammit keep the show relevant]].
[[/folder]]
3rd Apr '16 6:25:51 AM Snaketooth
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** The problem's this can cause mean that most long lasting Assassins Society's, such as [[OopNorth Durham University's]], have good relationships with the local police - normally informing before any game begins. The kill methods are also restricted to obviously unreal weapons (paper knives are fine, but not a larp sword).
4th Mar '16 10:13:38 PM MsChibi
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See TheQuincyPunk. Compare MistakenForSubculture.

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See TheQuincyPunk.TheQuincyPunk, SmallReferencePools, PublicMediumIgnorance, DropInCharacter, and the GhettoIndex. Compare MistakenForSubculture.
4th Feb '16 12:58:43 AM Naram-Sin
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** The imfamous episode "Fur and Loathing", set at a furry convention began it all. The portrayal of furries caused considerable controversy in that fandom. The episode was even a {{Jump The Shark}} moment for some, who saw it as the start of a freak-a-week format.

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** The imfamous infamous episode "Fur and Loathing", set at a furry convention began it all. The portrayal of furries caused considerable controversy in that fandom. The episode was even a {{Jump The Shark}} moment for some, who saw it as the start of a freak-a-week format.


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** "Unleashed" dealt with [[note]]some silly over-exaggeration of[[/note]] HumanPet role play [[note]]that was however completely devoid of nudity[[/note]].
15th Sep '15 4:20:16 PM MagBas
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** There was also a RippedFromTheHeadlines episode inspired by Gamergate called "Intimidation Game" which quickly attracted attention for its {{Narm}} and UnfortunateImplications. As with countless examples on this page, it depicted gamers as a whole as insane freaks unable to tell the difference between video games and real life, and Gamergate as an ISIS-esque group who routinely kidnap, torture and rape women.

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** There was also a RippedFromTheHeadlines episode inspired by Gamergate called "Intimidation Game" which quickly attracted attention for its {{Narm}} and UnfortunateImplications.Game". As with countless examples on this page, it depicted gamers as a whole as insane freaks unable to tell the difference between video games and real life, and Gamergate as an ISIS-esque group who routinely kidnap, torture and rape women.
12th Sep '15 10:26:29 PM nombretomado
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* In ''[[NipTuck Nip/Tuck]]'' the client/patient of the week was often part of some strange subculture.

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* In ''[[NipTuck Nip/Tuck]]'' ''Series/NipTuck'' the client/patient of the week was often part of some strange subculture.
30th Aug '15 7:26:29 AM DesertDragon
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The subculture in question is most often presented in a horrifically stereotyped manner. They aren't just [[AcceptableTargets average people with non-mainstream interests]]. Rather, they are [[StrawLoser total creeps with no social skills unrelated to their subculture]], which dominates every aspect of their lives. For example, if it's sexual, they'll wear fetish gear to the supermarket and make inappropriate come-ons to the main character. If it's gamers ({{video|Games}} or {{tabletop|Games}}), they'll play to the point of addiction, [[BasementDweller live with their parents]] well into their 30's, possibly [[MurderSimulators imitate the violence they commit in the game]], and are probably [[NerdsAreVirgins virgins]]. If it's UsefulNotes/{{NeoPagan|ism}}s, they'll wear ridiculous Goth or New Age clothing and talk about casting spells and "cursing" people they don't like. To ''real'' people within these subcultures, the misconceptions and poor research on these shows can be either a source of SnarkBait or a FandomBerserkButton.

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The subculture in question is most often presented in a horrifically stereotyped manner.as one cheap stereotype after another. They aren't just [[AcceptableTargets average people with non-mainstream interests]]. Rather, they are [[StrawLoser total creeps with no social skills unrelated to their subculture]], which dominates every aspect of their lives. For example, if it's sexual, they'll wear fetish gear to the supermarket and make inappropriate come-ons to the main character. If it's gamers ({{video|Games}} or {{tabletop|Games}}), they'll play to the point of addiction, [[BasementDweller live with their parents]] well into their 30's, possibly [[MurderSimulators imitate the violence they commit in the game]], and are probably [[NerdsAreVirgins virgins]]. If it's UsefulNotes/{{NeoPagan|ism}}s, they'll wear ridiculous Goth or New Age clothing and talk about casting spells and "cursing" people they don't like. To ''real'' people within these subcultures, the misconceptions and poor research on these shows can be either a source of SnarkBait or a FandomBerserkButton.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SubcultureOfTheWeek