History Main / StrictlyFormula

16th Oct '17 5:27:15 PM StardustSoldier
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* Creator/JodiPicoult: All her books have the same (general) formula: People (usually centering on the woman) living a normal life (in some New England town), something big happens/happened to them (i.e. husband is cheating, child is arrested) and there ends up being a court case either involving family members (i.e a family member committed a crime) or involving family members suing each other. Usually the court case involves children or teens. Expect one child to be severely ill and wiser than their years. The parents will/already did forget about the other child, if there is one. It is often a TearJerker, but is successful because of that (the judge/jury feels sorry for the defendant). Usually there is a ShockingSwerve near the end. Glaring examples include ''MySistersKeeper'' and ''Literature/HandleWithCare'', the latter of which has been criticized for being nearly identical to ''My Sister's Keeper''. Most of Picoult's books written before ''My Sister's Keeper'' actually are more fluid with the formula, with ''Harvesting the Heart'' not following it at all.

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* Creator/JodiPicoult: All her Her books tend to have the same (general) formula: People (usually centering on the woman) living a normal life (in some New England town), something big happens/happened to them (i.e. husband is cheating, child is arrested) and there ends up being a court case either involving family members (i.e a family member committed a crime) or involving family members suing each other. Usually the court case involves children or teens. Expect one child to be severely ill and wiser than their years. The parents will/already did forget about the other child, if there is one. It is often a TearJerker, but is successful because of that (the judge/jury feels sorry for the defendant). Usually there is a ShockingSwerve near the end. Glaring examples include ''MySistersKeeper'' and ''Literature/HandleWithCare'', the latter of which has been criticized for being nearly identical to ''My Sister's Keeper''. Most of Picoult's books written before ''My Sister's Keeper'' actually are more fluid with the formula, with ''Harvesting the Heart'' not following it at all.
15th Oct '17 6:44:38 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Four more recent consecutive Disney films had a formula of their own: ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', ''Disney/BigHero6'' and ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' all ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic plot twisting [[TheReveal reveal]], which fans eventually began to expect. The latter three films added another aspect to the formula by having an unsavory character, always played by Creator/AlanTudyk, serve as [[RedHerring a decoy villain]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity. The first film to break this trend was ''Disney/{{Moana}}'', which had did not have such a villain. Instead, Te Ka's status as the antagonist is made clear at the beginning of the story.

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* Four more recent consecutive Disney films had a formula of their own: ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', ''Disney/BigHero6'' and ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' all ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic plot twisting [[TheReveal reveal]], which fans eventually began to expect. The latter three films added another aspect to the formula by having an unsavory character, always played by Creator/AlanTudyk, serve as [[RedHerring a decoy villain]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity. The first film to break this trend was ''Disney/{{Moana}}'', which had did not have such a villain. Instead, Te Ka's status as the antagonist is made clear at the beginning of the story.
15th Oct '17 6:21:46 PM ElSquibbonator
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* Four consecutive Disney films had a formula of their own: ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', ''Disney/BigHero6'' and ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' all ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic plot twisting [[TheReveal reveal]], which fans eventually began to expect. The latter three films added another aspect to the formula by having an unsavory character, always played by Creator/AlanTudyk, serve as [[RedHerring a decoy villain]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity.

to:

* Four more recent consecutive Disney films had a formula of their own: ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', ''Disney/BigHero6'' and ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' all ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic plot twisting [[TheReveal reveal]], which fans eventually began to expect. The latter three films added another aspect to the formula by having an unsavory character, always played by Creator/AlanTudyk, serve as [[RedHerring a decoy villain]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity. The first film to break this trend was ''Disney/{{Moana}}'', which had did not have such a villain. Instead, Te Ka's status as the antagonist is made clear at the beginning of the story.
15th Oct '17 6:12:47 PM ElSquibbonator
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** Almost every episode follows this formula: Ash and friends meet the person of the week and/or the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]]. This person/Pokémon will have a problem. [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] will plot to steal Pikachu and/or the Pokémon of the week and are defeated in short order, with the problem of the week solved either by Team Rocket's defeat or [[DeusExMachina some unrelated event]]. If the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]] does not have a trainer, sometimes Ash or one of his friends will catch it. The only exceptions to this formula are Gym battles, character development episodes, or plot points from the games, but even these tend to have their own formulas.

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** Almost For a long time, almost every episode follows followed this formula: Ash and friends meet the person of the week and/or the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]]. This person/Pokémon will have a problem. [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] will plot to steal Pikachu and/or the Pokémon of the week and are defeated in short order, with the problem of the week solved either by Team Rocket's defeat or [[DeusExMachina some unrelated event]]. If the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]] does not have a trainer, sometimes Ash or one of his friends will catch it. The only exceptions to this formula are Gym battles, character development episodes, or plot points from the games, but even these tend to have their own formulas.



** As with the games it was based on, the formula further changed with the ''Sun and Moon'' series (2016-), where the adventure-style layout was instead changed to a school-based SliceOfLife show. Characters of the week are few and far in between, with most interactions being between the main cast and their Pokémon. In contrast to previous seasons, which had 3-4 main characters, there are now 6 main characters, and 1 extra Pokémon sidekick. Pokémon of the week are often implemented into the show more naturally, rather than being overexposed and being made the focus of the whole episode. In contrast to previous seasons, events from previous episodes are often regularly brought back and mentioned, adding more continuity. Team Rocket, while now humorous again, have become surprisingly competent and do not appear in every single episode.
** [[NonSerialMovie The movies]] follow such a rigid formula that you'd swear that they only have two or three plots they recycle every year: Ash and friends will enter a location with a completely different appearance from the region they're supposed to be in, possibly come across the newest Mythical Pokémon/a Pokémon from the next generation of games, then come into conflict with an antagonist; either a [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one-dimensional]] [[HumansAreBastards bastard human]] who wants to use the title Pokémon for his (and yes, it's almost always a man) own evil ends, or a big, scary and evil-looking Pokémon with sinister/disasterous goals. If the antagonist is a human, expect them to be irredeemable jackasses through and through, but if it's a Pokémon, 90% of the time they're NotEvilJustMisunderstood, and the other 10% perform a HeelFaceTurn. Oftentimes, the world will be at stake, a large-scale battle happens, a DisneyDeath or two will occur, Team Rocket [[MandatoryLine show up and do absolutely nothing significant]], and a SuperMode or two will be shown off (the portrayal of which may or may not directly contradict how they work in the games). To top it off, despite all that happens across the movie, its events will rarely, if ever, actually be referenced in the actual show.

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** As with the games it was based on, the formula further changed with the The ''Sun and Moon'' series (2016-), where the adventure-style layout was instead changed to a school-based SliceOfLife show.show, threw the old formula completely out the window. Characters of the week are few and far in between, with most interactions being between the main cast and their Pokémon. In contrast to previous seasons, which had 3-4 main characters, there are now 6 main characters, and 1 extra Pokémon sidekick. Pokémon of the week are often implemented into the show more naturally, rather than being overexposed and being made the focus of the whole episode. In contrast to previous seasons, events from previous episodes are often regularly brought back and mentioned, adding more continuity. Team Rocket, while now humorous again, have become surprisingly competent and do not appear in every single episode.
** [[NonSerialMovie The movies]] follow such a rigid formula that you'd swear that they only have two or three plots they recycle every year: Ash and friends will enter a location with a completely different appearance from the region they're supposed to be in, possibly come across the newest Mythical Pokémon/a Pokémon from the next generation of games, then come into conflict with an antagonist; either a [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one-dimensional]] [[HumansAreBastards bastard human]] who wants to use the title Pokémon for his (and yes, it's almost always a man) own evil ends, or a big, scary and evil-looking Pokémon with sinister/disasterous goals. If the antagonist is a human, expect them to be irredeemable jackasses through and through, but if it's a Pokémon, 90% of the time they're NotEvilJustMisunderstood, and the other 10% perform a HeelFaceTurn. Oftentimes, the world will be at stake, a large-scale battle happens, a DisneyDeath or two will occur, Team Rocket [[MandatoryLine show up and do absolutely nothing significant]], and a SuperMode or two will be shown off (the portrayal of which may or may not directly contradict how they work in the games). To top it off, despite all that happens across the movie, its events will rarely, if ever, actually be referenced in the actual show.
*** As with the most recent season of the anime, the 20th movie, ''Anime/PokemonIChooseYou'', avoids this formula. It has no true villain (the closest thing being Ash's JerkAss rival, Cross), Team Rocket doesn't appear, the fate of the world is never at stake, and it takes place in an alternate timeline from the main series. There ''is'' a DisneyDeath, though.
12th Oct '17 2:08:56 PM MBG
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Added DiffLines:

* Along with borrowing heavily from the series, the ''Manga/DragonBallZ'' {{Non Serial Movie}}s had a very distinct formula that they rarely broke from: the Z-Warriors are living their lives normally, the villain is introduced and does some damage, alongside various [[QuirkyMinibossSquad side villains]], the heroes attempt to defeat the villain right away but are repulsed, the side villains and the non-central Z-fighters duke it out, the main character (Goku, and very occasionally Gohan) fights evenly with the main villain for a while, the main villain [[OneWingedAngel reveals his true power]] and inflicts a CurbStompBattle onto everyone, and then Goku [[AssPull pulls out a technique]] that defeats the villain.
10th Oct '17 3:07:58 PM Malady
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* On ''WildAnimalBabyExplorers'', the Explorers are outside doing something when one of them wonders something related to animals. They decide to go exploring and sing the song "''Let's explore, more and more / There's so much to do and see! (Wild Animal Baby!) / Let's explore, there's fun galore / In making new discoveries.''" They begin exploring and at some point meet up with Miss Sally, their mentor, who has useful info for them. Sometime during the exploration, Sammy the skunk hides and they have to find him. Eventually, the exploration comes to an end and they say "Out and about, over and out!" They then talk about what their favorite thing they saw was on the exploration and then one of them prompts the others to imitate something they saw one of the animals they explored doing. As they do this, recap footage begins playing of animals explored in the episode as a BraggingThemeTune of sorts plays, talking about their exploration and how they're "the greatest bunch in history." After a brief coda, the episode ends.

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* On ''WildAnimalBabyExplorers'', ''WesternAnimation/WildAnimalBabyExplorers'', the Explorers are outside doing something when one of them wonders something related to animals. They decide to go exploring and sing the song "''Let's explore, more and more / There's so much to do and see! (Wild Animal Baby!) / Let's explore, there's fun galore / In making new discoveries.''" They begin exploring and at some point meet up with Miss Sally, their mentor, who has useful info for them. Sometime during the exploration, Sammy the skunk hides and they have to find him. Eventually, the exploration comes to an end and they say "Out and about, over and out!" They then talk about what their favorite thing they saw was on the exploration and then one of them prompts the others to imitate something they saw one of the animals they explored doing. As they do this, recap footage begins playing of animals explored in the episode as a BraggingThemeTune of sorts plays, talking about their exploration and how they're "the greatest bunch in history." After a brief coda, the episode ends.
7th Oct '17 2:01:56 PM TheWarioBros
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** Most {{GameMod}}s of ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'' work like thus: You've got eight worlds, with the Koopalings in world 1-7 and Bowser in world 8 (which have the same themes as most actual Mario games). Then once you beat Bowser, a plot twist happens and you end up in an extra world or two with super hard levels with either a space or crossover theme. Examples include ''VideoGame/BrutalMario'', ''VideoGame/ASuperMarioThing'', ''VideoGame/TheSecondRealityProject'' (both 1 and 2), ''VIP'' 1-5 and damn every other hack in history.
3rd Oct '17 2:33:16 PM DisneyFan94
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* During the 1990s, [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] had a very successful run from 1989 till 1994, but after that they were often accused of enforcing this trope. {{Rebellious princess}}es who want to marry for love, heroines [[IWantSong looking for something beyond what they know]], [[BumblingDad bumbling]] or [[FantasyForbiddingFather fantasy-forbidding fathers]], [[DisneyVillainDeath bad guys falling off great heights]]. ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' especially was accused of adhering to Disney formula, which admittedly is not entirely untrue. Ironically though, the problem seems to have been that all these movies came out in succession, as every single movie of the Disney Renaissance has been VindicatedByHistory and is now well-loved (some more than others: ''Pocahontas'' is still not thought of as a great movie, and ''Disney/TheRescuersDownUnder'' has gained a cult following but isn't anywhere near mainstream).

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* During the 1990s, [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] had a very successful run from 1989 till 1994, [[Disney/TheLittleMermaid 1989]] [[Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast up]] [[Disney/{{Aladdin}} until]] [[Disney/TheLionKing 1994]], but after that they were often accused of enforcing this trope. {{Rebellious princess}}es who want to marry for love, heroines [[IWantSong looking for something beyond what they know]], [[BumblingDad bumbling]] or [[FantasyForbiddingFather fantasy-forbidding fathers]], [[DisneyVillainDeath bad guys falling off great heights]]. ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' especially was accused of adhering to Disney formula, which admittedly is not entirely untrue. Ironically though, the problem seems to have been that all these movies came out in succession, as every single movie of the Disney Renaissance has been VindicatedByHistory and is now well-loved (some more than others: ''Pocahontas'' is still not thought of as a great movie, and ''Disney/TheRescuersDownUnder'' has gained a cult following but isn't anywhere near mainstream).
2nd Oct '17 8:13:15 PM infernape612
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** 1st murder: [[spoiler:Someone who is believed to be important and have a PlotArmor gets killed, like Sayaka, who was played as the {{Deuteragonist}} and LoveInterest and in the second Togami, who was a survivor from the previous game, or so the fans were led to believe. Also, in the third game, Rantaro who is played up as a suspicious person and has unknown talent in a similar way to past survivors such as Kyoko and Hajime and Kaede who turns out to be a DecoyProtagonist.]]
** 2nd murder: [[spoiler: A murder occurs because someone flew off the handle, sometimes because of their past (Mondo/Chihiro, Peko/Mahiru, Tojo/Ryouma). Usually tragic. The killers tends to have connections with a criminal gang]]
** 3rd murder: [[spoiler:Two victims are found, and the killer tends to be the least sympathtic killer. Celeste was this in the first, Mikan in the second, and Korekiyo was this in the third]]
** 4th murder: [[spoiler: BigGuyFatalitySyndrome is in full effect (Sakura, Nidai, Gonta). The trial ends in a TearJerker and the death was committed for a noble cause (end the internal conflict of the group, get the group out of the funhouse, saving Oma's life)]].
** The final death is always the most brutal and gruesome one,in the first, [[spoiler:Mukuro was impaled several times all over her body by spears and then her corpse was burned]], in the second, [[spoiler:Nagito was maimed by himself, which included stab his thighs several times, cut off a part of the skin in his arm and stab his other hand, just so he can be poisoned and then impaled in the gut by a spear, and ultimately, Ruruka, who was maimed, stabbed, gagged with her own candy and impaled through the chest with a knife]]. In the third, [[spoiler: Kokichi Oma was crushed to death through a hydraulic press.]] The trial ends in the execution for a character among the main group [[spoiler: ([[TheHero Makoto]] (though he survives), [[{{Deuteragonist}} Chiaki]], [[TheHeart Kaito]])]] and the last victim is always an antagonistic character [[spoiler: (Mukuro, Nagito, Oma)]]

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** 1st murder: [[spoiler:Someone who is believed to be important and have a PlotArmor gets killed, like killed. The first game has Sayaka, who was played as the {{Deuteragonist}} and LoveInterest and in LoveInterest; the second has Togami, who was a survivor from the previous game, or so the fans were led to believe. Also, in believe; the third game, Rantaro game has Rantaro, who is played up as a suspicious person and has an unknown talent in a similar way to past survivors such as Kyoko and Hajime and Kaede Hajime. The third game also has Kaede, who turns out to be the first murderer and a DecoyProtagonist.]]
** 2nd murder: [[spoiler: A murder occurs because someone flew off the handle, sometimes because of their past (Mondo/Chihiro, Peko/Mahiru, Tojo/Ryouma).Hirumi/Ryouma). Usually tragic. The killers tends to have connections with a criminal gang]]
gang.]]
** 3rd murder: [[spoiler:Two victims are found, and the killer tends to be the least sympathtic sympathetic killer. Celeste was is this in the first, Mikan in the second, and Korekiyo was this in the third]]
third.]]
** 4th murder: [[spoiler: BigGuyFatalitySyndrome is in full effect (Sakura, Nidai, Gonta). The trial ends in a TearJerker and the death was committed for a noble cause (end the internal conflict of the group, get the group out of the funhouse, saving Oma's life)]].
save Kokichi's life and protect everyone from the truth about the outside world)]].
** The final death is always the most brutal and gruesome one,in one. In the first, [[spoiler:Mukuro was is impaled several times all over her body by spears and then her corpse was burned]], in is blown up]]. In the second, [[spoiler:Nagito was maimed by maims himself, which included stab includes stabbing his thighs several times, cut cutting off a part of the skin in his arm and stab stabbing his other hand, just so he can be poisoned and then impaled in the gut by a spear, and ultimately, Ruruka, who was maimed, stabbed, gagged with her own candy and impaled through the chest with a knife]]. spear. In the third, [[spoiler: Kokichi Oma was is crushed to death through with a hydraulic press.]] The trial ends in the execution for of a character among the main group [[spoiler: ([[TheHero Makoto]] (though he survives), [[{{Deuteragonist}} Chiaki]], [[TheHeart Kaito]])]] and the last victim is always an antagonistic character [[spoiler: (Mukuro, ([[spoiler:Mukuro, Nagito, Oma)]] Kokichi]]).
28th Sep '17 11:33:09 PM Vir
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** Harry is working on a low-key wizarding (that is, consulting) job or personal business when two problems develop more or less simultaneously: a police investigation with a supernatural side and a client hiring him for his magical expertise. The two cases almost always turn out to be connected. He butts heads with the police frequently even if he's working on something with their blessing, because they don't know or don't like how the magical world works and [[PoorCommunicationKills he can't tell them]]. He also butts heads with and insults local crime lord Johnny Marcone, but they're never actually enemies. He [[JamesBondage is tied up]] and/or gets his ass kicked several times by {{Mook}}s as he's hunting down his two cases. He will do something [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome awesome]] to save a woman. By the time he and his [[TrueCompanions allies in this story]] finally find the BigBad, he is [[YouCanBarelyStand already in bad shape]] but wins by throwing a SpannerInTheWorks.

to:

** Harry is working on a low-key wizarding (that is, consulting) job or personal business when two problems develop more or less simultaneously: a police investigation with a supernatural side and a client hiring him for his magical expertise. The two cases almost always turn out to be connected. He butts heads with the police frequently even if he's working on something with their blessing, because they don't know or don't like how the magical world works and [[PoorCommunicationKills he can't tell them]]. He also butts heads with and insults local crime lord Johnny Marcone, but they're never actually enemies. He [[JamesBondage is tied up]] and/or gets his ass kicked several times by {{Mook}}s as he's hunting down his two cases. He will do something [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome awesome]] to save a woman. By the time he and his [[TrueCompanions allies in this story]] finally find the BigBad, he is [[YouCanBarelyStand already in bad shape]] but wins by throwing a SpannerInTheWorks.



* Creator/PGWodehouse tends to be fairly formulaic in overall plot. Though given that several lines in the formula are evidently "Insert creative and unique CrowningMomentOfFunny here", who cares?

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* Creator/PGWodehouse tends to be fairly formulaic in overall plot. Though given that several lines in the formula are evidently "Insert creative and unique CrowningMomentOfFunny SugarWiki/{{Funny Moment|s}} here", who cares?



* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'': Start with an [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome epic title theme]], then let the player [[CharacterCustomization customize]] the FeaturelessProtagonist, whose only backstory is [[YouAllMeetInACell being a convict]]. At the end of the TutorialLevel, the prisoner is released into the WideOpenSandbox with a [[TheQuest quest]] to SaveTheWorld and/or to prevent TheEmpire from crumbling. No matter how grand the task, TakeYourTime is the policy, and every WeirdTradeUnion in the sandbox provides a SidequestSidestory at least as long as the main quest. At the end of the latter, the ex-convict receives [[RedBaron a fancy title]] and conspicuously disappears from the series. Put a snappy one-word subtitle referencing [[ThePlace the primary location of the game]] on it and you are done.[[note]]''Daggerfall'' does deviate a bit in a few ways, however. You're an Imperial Agent and friend of the Emperor, rather than a prisoner at the beginning. In addition, there are some parts of the main quest that are timed and that you can't TakeYourTime with at all.[[/note]]

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'': Start with an [[CrowningMusicOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic epic title theme]], then let the player [[CharacterCustomization customize]] the FeaturelessProtagonist, whose only backstory is [[YouAllMeetInACell being a convict]]. At the end of the TutorialLevel, the prisoner is released into the WideOpenSandbox with a [[TheQuest quest]] to SaveTheWorld and/or to prevent TheEmpire from crumbling. No matter how grand the task, TakeYourTime is the policy, and every WeirdTradeUnion in the sandbox provides a SidequestSidestory at least as long as the main quest. At the end of the latter, the ex-convict receives [[RedBaron a fancy title]] and conspicuously disappears from the series. Put a snappy one-word subtitle referencing [[ThePlace the primary location of the game]] on it and you are done.[[note]]''Daggerfall'' does deviate a bit in a few ways, however. You're an Imperial Agent and friend of the Emperor, rather than a prisoner at the beginning. In addition, there are some parts of the main quest that are timed and that you can't TakeYourTime with at all.[[/note]]



* ''Franchise/ProfessorLayton'''s formula is as follows: Layton gets a letter telling him to go to a certain town, town has [[TownWithADarkSecret secret]] of some sort, EvilTowerOfOminousness is present, Layton unmasks [[LatexPerfection disguised villain]], town secret is revealed (it's always completely insane), Layton does something [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome really fucking badass]], other villain is thwarted (usually this villain is sympathetic in some way), player is left crying for [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming one reason]] or [[TearJerker another]], then one last puzzle. Not always in this order, so the degree to which it's ''strictly'' formula is debatable. There are three minigames, you unlock extra content for these minigames by solving specific puzzles, beating these minigames 100% unlocks a trio of [[BrutalBonusLevel bonus puzzles]] each.
* Ken Levine's three ''Shock'' games (''VideoGame/SystemShock2'', ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' and ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'') all follow the same general narrative structure (as described by Creator/BenCroshaw: "An oblivious man with a significant history arrives in a large residential environment in an unconventional location and must piece together a backstory involving a discovery that corrupted the people."). ''System Shock 2'' and ''[=BioShock=]'' even use the same mid-game twist (in which [[spoiler:MissionControl is revealed to be the game's actual villain]]). They are likewise [[ThematicSeries very similar in terms of gameplay]]: all three games are first-person shooters with prominent RPGElements, affording the player a creative and deep blend of gunplay and sci-fi superpowers.
* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'': The original games rigidly struck to the ExcusePlot of "Mad scientist is making trouble, go stop him!" with very few exceptions or different villains, and even the handful of new villains in spinoff like TailsAdventures tended to be [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one note bad guys]] who would [[VillainOfTheWeek vanish after their debut.]] The main series tried to shake things up around VideoGame/SonicAdventure by shifting to a [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt grand scale conflict]] inflicted by a new, slightly more shaded, but monstrous AntiVillain, complete with a climatic showdown with the enemy in an eleventh hour superpowerful form--but unfortunately this (especially the former and latter) ended up becoming an overused series formula as well. Currently, the series has fallen back on the more straightforward formula of the original games, while sandwiching in some new minor villains along the way.

to:

* ''Franchise/ProfessorLayton'''s formula is as follows: Layton gets a letter telling him to go to a certain town, town has [[TownWithADarkSecret secret]] of some sort, EvilTowerOfOminousness is present, Layton unmasks [[LatexPerfection disguised villain]], town secret is revealed (it's always completely insane), Layton does something [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome really fucking badass]], other villain is thwarted (usually this villain is sympathetic in some way), player is left crying for [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments one reason]] or [[TearJerker another]], then one last puzzle. Not always in this order, so the degree to which it's ''strictly'' formula is debatable. There are three minigames, you unlock extra content for these minigames by solving specific puzzles, beating these minigames 100% unlocks a trio of [[BrutalBonusLevel bonus puzzles]] each.
* Ken Levine's three ''Shock'' games (''VideoGame/SystemShock2'', ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' and ''VideoGame/BioshockInfinite'') ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'') all follow the same general narrative structure (as described by Creator/BenCroshaw: "An oblivious man with a significant history arrives in a large residential environment in an unconventional location and must piece together a backstory involving a discovery that corrupted the people."). ''System Shock 2'' and ''[=BioShock=]'' even use the same mid-game twist (in which [[spoiler:MissionControl is revealed to be the game's actual villain]]). They are likewise [[ThematicSeries very similar in terms of gameplay]]: all three games are first-person shooters with prominent RPGElements, affording the player a creative and deep blend of gunplay and sci-fi superpowers.
* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'': The original games rigidly struck to the ExcusePlot of "Mad scientist is making trouble, go stop him!" with very few exceptions or different villains, and even the handful of new villains in spinoff like TailsAdventures tended to be [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one note bad guys]] who would [[VillainOfTheWeek [[MonsterOfTheWeek vanish after their debut.]] The main series tried to shake things up around VideoGame/SonicAdventure by shifting to a [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt grand scale conflict]] inflicted by a new, slightly more shaded, but monstrous AntiVillain, complete with a climatic showdown with the enemy in an eleventh hour superpowerful form--but unfortunately this (especially the former and latter) ended up becoming an overused series formula as well. Currently, the series has fallen back on the more straightforward formula of the original games, while sandwiching in some new minor villains along the way.
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