History Main / StrictlyFormula

21st May '18 10:42:13 PM jtierney50
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* Similarly, the ''VideoGame/Fallout'' series follows a similar set of story beats: the hero - usually but not always a Vault Dweller - must leave their home which, through external circumstances, they cannot return to. They must travel through the Wasteland, recruiting companions along the way, to find what they're looking for: either something that will save their home or a lost family member, or both. They can help struggling towns, join themed factions, and complete a number of side quests. Along the way, a larger threat presents itself, and by the time the hero finds what they're looking for, it in some way has been rendered invalid by the larger conflict. Ultimately, the hero takes charge of whatever faction they choose and decide the conflict once and for all. Of all the games, only ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' strays from this, and even they keep the main beats (searching for an artifact, side quests, goofy side factions, larger conflict) but changes up the details.

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* Similarly, the ''VideoGame/Fallout'' ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series follows a similar set of story beats: the hero - usually but not always a Vault Dweller - must leave their home which, through external circumstances, they cannot return to. They must travel through the Wasteland, recruiting companions along the way, to find what they're looking for: either something that will save their home or a lost family member, or both. They can help struggling towns, join themed factions, and complete a number of side quests. Along the way, a larger threat presents itself, and by the time the hero finds what they're looking for, it in some way has been rendered invalid by the larger conflict. Ultimately, the hero takes charge of whatever faction they choose and decide the conflict once and for all. Of all the games, only ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' strays from this, and even they keep the main beats (searching for an artifact, side quests, goofy side factions, larger conflict) but changes up the details.
21st May '18 10:41:56 PM jtierney50
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* Similarly, the ''VideoGame/Fallout'' series follows a similar set of story beats: the hero - usually but not always a Vault Dweller - must leave their home which, through external circumstances, they cannot return to. They must travel through the Wasteland, recruiting companions along the way, to find what they're looking for: either something that will save their home or a lost family member, or both. They can help struggling towns, join themed factions, and complete a number of side quests. Along the way, a larger threat presents itself, and by the time the hero finds what they're looking for, it in some way has been rendered invalid by the larger conflict. Ultimately, the hero takes charge of whatever faction they choose and decide the conflict once and for all. Of all the games, only ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' strays from this, and even they keep the main beats (searching for an artifact, side quests, goofy side factions, larger conflict) but changes up the details.



* Ken Levine's three ''Shock'' games (''VideoGame/SystemShock2'', ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' and ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'') all follow the same general narrative structure (as described by Creator/BenCroshaw: "An oblivious man with a significant history arrives in a large residential environment in an unconventional location and must piece together a backstory involving a discovery that corrupted the people."). ''System Shock 2'' and ''[=BioShock=]'' even use the same mid-game twist (in which [[spoiler:MissionControl is revealed to be the game's actual villain]]). They are likewise [[ThematicSeries very similar in terms of gameplay]]: all three games are first-person shooters with prominent RPGElements, affording the player a creative and deep blend of gunplay and sci-fi superpowers.

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* Ken Levine's three ''Shock'' games (''VideoGame/SystemShock2'', ''VideoGame/BioShock1'' and ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'') all follow the same general narrative structure (as described by Creator/BenCroshaw: "An oblivious man with a significant history arrives in a large residential environment in an unconventional location and must piece together a backstory involving a discovery that corrupted the people."). ''System Shock 2'' and ''[=BioShock=]'' even use the same mid-game twist (in which [[spoiler:MissionControl is revealed to be the game's actual villain]]). They are likewise [[ThematicSeries very similar in terms of gameplay]]: all three games are first-person shooters with prominent RPGElements, affording the player a creative and deep blend of gunplay and sci-fi superpowers. ''Infinite'' recognizes the similarities in the game's final chapters: [[spoiler:There's always a man, there's always a city, there's always a lighthouse]].
21st May '18 10:32:34 PM jtierney50
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* An in-universe example in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegoMovie'' with the hit [=TV=] show "Where Are My Pants?", which consists entirely of a minifigure asking "Honey, where are my paaaaants?". It's the #1 show in Bricksburg (although, as far as we know, it's the ''only'' show).
21st May '18 10:32:34 PM jtierney50
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21st May '18 10:29:01 PM jtierney50
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* Four consecutive Disney films had a formula of their own: ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', ''Disney/BigHero6'' and ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' all ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic plot twisting [[TheReveal reveal]], which fans eventually began to expect. The latter three films added another aspect to the formula by having an unsavory character, always played by Creator/AlanTudyk, serve as [[RedHerring a decoy villain]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity. The first film to mess with this trend was ''Disney/{{Moana}}'', which had a different kind of villain twist: [[spoiler:the Big Bad (established as such early on rather than being revealed at the last minute) turns out to be the BigGood, corrupted into a monster for want of the very Macguffin Moana is trying to replace.]]

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* Four consecutive Disney films had a formula of their own: ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', ''Disney/BigHero6'' and ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' all ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic plot twisting [[TheReveal reveal]], which fans eventually began to expect. The latter three films added another aspect to the formula by having an unsavory character, always played by Creator/AlanTudyk, serve as [[RedHerring a decoy villain]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity. The first film to mess with this trend was ''Disney/{{Moana}}'', which had a different kind of villain twist: [[spoiler:the Big Bad (established as such early on rather than being revealed at the last minute) turns out to be the BigGood, corrupted into a monster for want of the very Macguffin Moana is trying to replace.]] [[ComicallyMissingThePoint And Alan Tudyk played not the decoy villain, but a chicken.]]]]
15th May '18 3:24:04 PM infernape612
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* Creator/BioWare's {{RPG}}s from ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' onward have mostly identical structures.
** Semi-TutorialLevel, [[CallToAdventure event that sets up initial quest]], initial quest [[PyrrhicVictory succeeds at high cost]], status quo is shaken up and [[OpeningTheSandbox leads to new, more open area with more sidequests]], the PlayerCharacter attains full status in whatever HeroesRUs [[PurelyAestheticGender s/he]] enlisted in (Jedi, Spirit Monk, Specter, Grey Warden) and gets [[GottaCatchThemAll larger task to gather]] [[MacGuffin four clues/allies]]. Each part of TheQuest involves a separate zone with multiple stages that can be [[StoryBranching solved in different ways]], with numerous {{Side Quest}}s in each area. Progress in each area will be completely useless towards completing the others, except in terms of equipment and party members recruited there to aid you in combat. A fifth area will open up after three of them are complete, you may or may not be [[PlotTunnel forced to complete it immediately]]. Once all five are done, the plot will continue in a linear fashion to the final area, [[PointOfNoReturn generally with no sidequests]], culminating in a cinematic conclusion. Deviations from the formula include:
** ''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'' was varied in that the middle section where you gather clues/allies was more linear, with content all in one area instead of split up.
** ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' replaced the Four {{MacGuffin}}s with Ten[=/=][[{{DLC}} Twelve]] [[PlayerParty Squadmates]], which made sections shorter but more diverse. [[EvenBetterSequel This was very well received.]]
** ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' intentionally averted the formula, instead opting for a DashedPlotLine with a ThreeActStructure. [[BrokenBase This was... not very well received]] (among other things).



* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' has a few plot templates that it tends to revisit. You can make a workable ''Final Fantasy'' plot outline out of mixing and matching them:
** Four warriors rise up to bring light to the Crystals that keep the forces of nature working (''I'', ''III'', ''IV'', ''V'', ''IX'', ''The 4 Warriors of Light'');
** A band of unlikely heroes must come together and fight against TheEmpire, only the Empire ends up being a minor threat compared to the godlike force of nature that has it in its thrall (''II'', ''VI'', ''VII'', ''VIII'', ''XII'', ''XIII''. ''X'' is an inversion, where the godlike force is the first opponent but it turns out TheEmpire is the true enemy.);
** Halfway through the game the world gets destroyed or damaged, putting us in a changed world map. YouCantThwartStageOne and so the rest of the game will be spent killing the BigBad before he finishes what he is trying to do (''V'', ''VI'', ''VIII''. ''VII'' touched on this mildly);
** An OmnicidalManiac villain. In ''FF'' using the crystals it will represent the element of Void between Light and Darkness. In others it will either be a god, or be attempting to become a god.
** There are three women in the party - [[TheThreeFacesOfEve a noble, strong-hearted princess-type, a streetwise, clever flirt, and a precocious childish girl]] (''II'', ''V'', ''VI'', ''VII'', ''VIII'', ''IX'', ''X'', ''XII''. ''IV'' has a sexy girl (Rydia) who is childlike in personality, and the child (Porom) acts confident and mature; ''XIII'' has a sexy girl and a childish girl but the third girl is part of the archetype below instead; ''XV'' gives these roles to male characters;);
** The hero is a pretty swordsman who is probably more thoughtful and introspective than the typical RPG protagonist (even ''FF'''s biggest IdiotHero, Bartz from ''V'', has a sad backstory that stops him in his tracks at times). If it's a PS1 game he will also be a bit humorously adolescent as a personality quirk, and if Creator/TetsuyaNomura designed him he will probably be a PerpetualFrowner with a DefrostingIceKing arc (Tidus of ''X'' is the one exception);
** The setting is a mixture of historical stuff and sci-fi-influenced MagicFromTechnology, if not pure modern-day-but-with-{{Magitek}};
** Eidolons/Summons/Espers may offer support to the heroes on their journey or manipulate events behind the scenes;
** A man named Cid will appear and help the party get access to an airship;
** While facing the final boss, who will probably be a FauxSymbolism angelic image, the heroes' friends all over the world and in the afterlife will pray for the heroes, sending them the strength to deal with it (most early ones).
* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' plots can basically be described as follows: TheGoodPrince's country is invaded by TheEmpire. YouKilledMyFather! The prince goes on a quest to gather allies and reclaim his throne, coming into conflict with a TinTyrant and an EvilSorcerer. He eventually gets his hands on the InfinityPlusOneSword and skewers the DiscOneFinalBoss, at which point the EldritchAbomination GreaterScopeVillain will rear its ugly head. The prince kills that and lives HappilyEverAfter, the end. While there have been variations on the formula over the years, the only true exceptions are ''VideoGame/FireEmblemThracia776'' (a midquel where you control an underdog who spends half of the story just ''running'' from the empire) and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates: Conquest'' (where you are actually ''on the empire's side'').
* Many ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' platform games (among them ''Kirby's Adventure'', ''Kirby's Return to Dream Land'', and ''Kirby Triple Deluxe'') follow a distinct formula. Popstar, or occasionally a series of other planets, is endangered or inconvenienced in some way and Kirby heads off to stop it. The first world is always a grassland world, and island and snow worlds are also commonly seen. Levels are usually connected via a HubLevel. In most cases, the world names are alliterative and spell out a plot-relevant acronym (V-I-B-G-Y-O-R, C-R-O-W-N-E-D, F-L-O-W-E-R, etc.) After defeating what appears to be the final boss, the plot begins to thicken and it turns out that Kirby's attempts to fix things have actually made them significantly worse. The player then faces the real final boss (with the title of their battle music always referencing the aforementioned acronym), sometimes after an UnexpectedShmupLevel, and the day is saved and everyone goes home.



* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'': The original games rigidly struck to the ExcusePlot of "Mad scientist is making trouble, go stop him!" with very few exceptions or different villains, and even the handful of new villains in spinoff like TailsAdventures tended to be [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one note bad guys]] who would [[MonsterOfTheWeek vanish after their debut.]] The main series tried to shake things up around VideoGame/SonicAdventure by shifting to a [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt grand scale conflict]] inflicted by a new, slightly more shaded, but monstrous AntiVillain, complete with a climatic showdown with the enemy in an eleventh hour superpowerful form--but unfortunately this (especially the former and latter) ended up becoming an overused series formula as well. Currently, the series has fallen back on the more straightforward formula of the original games, while sandwiching in some new minor villains along the way.

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* ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog'': ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'': The original games rigidly struck to the ExcusePlot of "Mad scientist is making trouble, go stop him!" with very few exceptions or different villains, and even the handful of new villains in spinoff like TailsAdventures ''VideoGame/TailsAdventure'' tended to be [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one note bad guys]] who would [[MonsterOfTheWeek vanish after their debut.]] The main series tried to shake things up around VideoGame/SonicAdventure ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure'' by shifting to a [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt grand scale conflict]] inflicted by a new, slightly more shaded, but monstrous AntiVillain, complete with a climatic showdown with the enemy in an eleventh hour superpowerful form--but unfortunately this (especially the former and latter) ended up becoming an overused series formula as well. Currently, the series has fallen back on the more straightforward formula of the original games, while sandwiching in some new minor villains along the way.



* Creator/BioWare's {{RPG}}s from ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' onward have mostly identical structures.
** Semi-TutorialLevel, [[CallToAdventure event that sets up initial quest]], initial quest [[PyrrhicVictory succeeds at high cost]], status quo is shaken up and [[OpeningTheSandbox leads to new, more open area with more sidequests]], the PlayerCharacter attains full status in whatever HeroesRUs [[PurelyAestheticGender s/he]] enlisted in (Jedi, Spirit Monk, Specter, Grey Warden) and gets [[GottaCatchThemAll larger task to gather]] [[MacGuffin four clues/allies]]. Each part of TheQuest involves a separate zone with multiple stages that can be [[StoryBranching solved in different ways]], with numerous {{Side Quest}}s in each area. Progress in each area will be completely useless towards completing the others, except in terms of equipment and party members recruited there to aid you in combat. A fifth area will open up after three of them are complete, you may or may not be [[PlotTunnel forced to complete it immediately]]. Once all five are done, the plot will continue in a linear fashion to the final area, [[PointOfNoReturn generally with no sidequests]], culminating in a cinematic conclusion. Deviations from the formula include:
** ''VideoGame/JadeEmpire'' was varied in that the middle section where you gather clues/allies was more linear, with content all in one area instead of split up.
** ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'' replaced the Four {{MacGuffin}}s with Ten[=/=][[{{DLC}} Twelve]] [[PlayerParty Squadmates]], which made sections shorter but more diverse. [[EvenBetterSequel This was very well received.]]
** ''VideoGame/DragonAgeII'' intentionally averted the formula, instead opting for a DashedPlotLine with a ThreeActStructure. [[BrokenBase This was... not very well received]] (among other things).
* Many ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' platform games (among them ''Kirby's Adventure'', ''Kirby's Return to Dream Land'', and ''Kirby Triple Deluxe'') follow a distinct formula. Popstar, or occasionally a series of other planets, is endangered or inconvenienced in some way and Kirby heads off to stop it. The first world is always a grassland world, and island and snow worlds are also commonly seen. Levels are usually connected via a HubLevel. In most cases, the world names are alliterative and spell out a plot-relevant acronym (V-I-B-G-Y-O-R, C-R-O-W-N-E-D, F-L-O-W-E-R, etc.) After defeating what appears to be the final boss, the plot begins to thicken and it turns out that Kirby's attempts to fix things have actually made them significantly worse. The player then faces the real final boss (with the title of their battle music always referencing the aforementioned acronym), sometimes after an UnexpectedShmupLevel, and the day is saved and everyone goes home.
* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' has a few plot templates that it tends to revisit. You can make a workable ''Final Fantasy'' plot outline out of mixing and matching them:
** Four warriors rise up to bring light to the Crystals that keep the forces of nature working (''I'', ''III'', ''IV'', ''V'', ''IX'', ''The 4 Warriors of Light'');
** A band of unlikely heroes must come together and fight against TheEmpire, only the Empire ends up being a minor threat than the godlike force of nature that has it in its thrall (''II'', ''VI'', ''VII'', ''VIII'', ''XII'', ''XIII''. ''X'' is an inversion, where the godlike force is the first opponent but it turns out TheEmpire is the true enemy.);
** Halfway through the game the world gets destroyed or damaged, putting us in a changed world map. YouCantThwartStageOne and so the rest of the game will be spent killing the BigBad before he finishes what he is trying to do (''V'', ''VI'', ''VIII''. ''VII'' touched on this mildly);
** An OmnicidalManiac villain. In ''FF'' using the crystals it will represent the element of Void between Light and Darkness. In others it will either be a god, or be attempting to become a god.
** There are three women in the party - [[TheThreeFacesOfEve a noble, strong-hearted princess-type, a streetwise, clever flirt, and a precocious childish girl]] (''II'', ''V'', ''VI'', ''VII'', ''VIII'', ''IX'', ''X'', ''XII''. ''IV'' has a sexy girl (Rydia) who is childlike in personality, and the child (Porom) acts confident and mature; ''XIII'' has a sexy girl and a childish girl but the third girl is part of the archetype below instead; ''XV'' gives these roles to male characters;);
** The hero is a pretty swordsman who is probably more thoughtful and introspective than the typical RPG protagonist (even ''FF'''s biggest IdiotHero, Bartz from ''V'', has a sad backstory that stops him in his tracks at times). If it's a PS1 game he will also be a bit humorously adolescent as a personality quirk, and if Creator/TetsuyaNomura designed him he will probably be a PerpetualFrowner with a DefrostingIceKing arc (Tidus of ''X'' is the one exception);
** The setting is a mixture of historical stuff and sci-fi-influenced MagicFromTechnology, if not pure modern-day-but-with-{{Magitek}};
** Eidolons/Summons/Espers may offer support to the heroes on their journey or manipulate events behind the scenes;
** A man named Cid will appear and help the party get access to an airship;
** While facing the final boss, who will probably be a FauxSymbolism angelic image, the heroes' friends all over the world and in the afterlife will pray for the heroes, sending them the strength to deal with it (most early ones).
12th May '18 9:54:47 AM Dghcrh
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Added DiffLines:

* In season 1 of ''WesternAnimation/Hero108'', a typical episode follows this pattern: a new animal species therorize the humans, Commander [=ApeTrully=] attempts to make peace with the animal king by offering them a gift of gold, the animals usually refuse the gift and [[DistressedDude capture him]] and he calls for First Squad with his device. First Squad arrive on the location where he's captured on their turtle tanks and there they fight off the animals and then either: they refuse to give up and a contest takes place, in which the animals show their abilities and at least one member of First Squad must defeat them or First Squad help them with a certain problem or make them realise something. At the end, the animal king joins Big Green and often gets a certain job in the base. There are quite a few episodes which deviate a bit from the formula and season 2 [[AvertedTrope stops following it completely]].
11th May '18 4:54:41 AM AmuckCricetine
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##'''The Beginning''': To musical accompaniment related to the era, the VictimOfTheWeek is shown in his/her time period doing whatever he/she does for a living, then cut to the corpse. Flash to present, where Rush & co. get their first lead on the case (either through previously-buried evidence, or a relative of the deceased with new information.) Cue OneWomanWail and credits.
##'''The Middle''': The detectives interrogate a chain of suspects, [[AllInARow each one revealing another plot development in the flashback]]. Almost every flashback is preceded by accusing the person of the murder, who then denies it, briefly flashes to their younger self, and reveals another side of the story. They return to the precinct at least once to study evidence, and multiple times for good ole PerpSweating. The last 20 minutes proceed to deconstruct the suspects' original motives until the person they return to with 5-7 minutes left, who confesses (with this flashback recreating the murder scene.)
##'''The End''': As another piece of [[NothingButHits time-period-appropriate music plays]], the killer is marched through the precinct, usually seen by another character. Vignettes are shown of the key players of the case going on with their lives in the present, in both their "past" and "present" appearances. A cardboard box marked "Case Closed" is filed in the evidence room. Someone who was really close to the victim sees an apparition of him or her, who turns and slowly fades away. The detectives resolve their romantic tension. Roll end credits.

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##'''The ** '''The Beginning''': To musical accompaniment related to the era, the VictimOfTheWeek is shown in his/her time period doing whatever he/she does for a living, then cut to the corpse. Flash to present, where Rush & co. get their first lead on the case (either through previously-buried evidence, or a relative of the deceased with new information.) Cue OneWomanWail and credits.
##'''The ** '''The Middle''': The detectives interrogate a chain of suspects, [[AllInARow each one revealing another plot development in the flashback]]. Almost every flashback is preceded by accusing the person of the murder, who then denies it, briefly flashes to their younger self, and reveals another side of the story. They return to the precinct at least once to study evidence, and multiple times for good ole PerpSweating. The last 20 minutes proceed to deconstruct the suspects' original motives until the person they return to with 5-7 minutes left, who confesses (with this flashback recreating the murder scene.)
##'''The ** '''The End''': As another piece of [[NothingButHits time-period-appropriate music plays]], the killer is marched through the precinct, usually seen by another character. Vignettes are shown of the key players of the case going on with their lives in the present, in both their "past" and "present" appearances. A cardboard box marked "Case Closed" is filed in the evidence room. Someone who was really close to the victim sees an apparition of him or her, who turns and slowly fades away. The detectives resolve their romantic tension. Roll end credits.



## The first 20 minutes would see the murderer setting up an elaborate plot to kill their victim
## Columbo would turn up at the crime scene looking incredibly dishelved
## After a brief investigation of the crime scene, Columbo would interview the murderer, generally with the excuse that he was 'just tidying up loose ends'. The conversation would meander, with the Lieutenant seeming to concentrate on anything but the murder, often with rambling stories about his wife or other members of his family. He would then leave, only to casually drop in a line which revealed he'd spotted a crack in the murderer's plan.
## The murderer would try and continue with his life, only to be continually haunted by Columbo who would turn up in the most unlikeliest locations, continually pestering the murderer.
## The episode would end either with a) Columbo finding the conclusive piece of evidence and presenting it to the suspect or b) Columbo getting the murderer to incriminate themselves.

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## ** The first 20 minutes would see the murderer setting up an elaborate plot to kill their victim
## ** Columbo would turn up at the crime scene looking incredibly dishelved
## ** After a brief investigation of the crime scene, Columbo would interview the murderer, generally with the excuse that he was 'just tidying up loose ends'. The conversation would meander, with the Lieutenant seeming to concentrate on anything but the murder, often with rambling stories about his wife or other members of his family. He would then leave, only to casually drop in a line which revealed he'd spotted a crack in the murderer's plan.
## ** The murderer would try and continue with his life, only to be continually haunted by Columbo who would turn up in the most unlikeliest locations, continually pestering the murderer.
## ** The episode would end either with a) Columbo finding the conclusive piece of evidence and presenting it to the suspect or b) Columbo getting the murderer to incriminate themselves.



** Terry Nation's Dalek stories became notorious for having the same virtually identical plot about the human resistance taking on the Daleks and winning. When Creator/PhilipHinchcliffe pointed out to him that the Dalek episode Nation had written for the new Doctor was exactly the same as several of the old ones ("we like it, but we like it so much we think we've already bought it multiple times before") Terry Nation completely broke all of the rules when he wrote "Genesis of the Daleks", the best story of his career and one of the best ''Doctor Who'' stories ever. Unfortunately, the addition of Davros just meant Dalek stories from that point on were a ''different'' identical plotline which now had Davros getting backstabbed by his own Daleks at the end.
** Season 5. Six out of seven stories in the season are virtually identical "[[TheSiege base under siege]]" plots and five out of seven feature a recurring monster. The [[BreatherEpisode one non-siege, non-recurring-enemy plot]], "Enemy of the World", was considered by the 80s fandom as being a bizarre OutOfGenreExperience in this context and panned, though after its rediscovery it was [[VindicatedByHistory re-evaluated as one of Troughton's best]]. All of the stories in this season are considered decent, most fans will have at least one story in this season they consider a classic, and many fans - particularly the [=BNFs=] of the 80s - praise the show for settling down into a routine of solid horror stories here; but many others mourn the loss of ''Doctor Who'''s trademark GenreRoulette in favour of a routine of going to a base on [PLANET] to fight [MONSTER] along with with a band of [3-6] people, one of whom is the commander, and some of whom are working with the monsters and are the real threat. Season 6, while the quality is more patchy (it contains hated stories like "The Dominators" and "The Space Pirates") does at least change up the formula with a SpaceWestern, a psychedelic MindScrew, AnachronismStew, SpyFiction, AlienInvasion, an early Creator/RobertHolmes story incorporating some of his {{Creator Thumbprint}}s, a WhamEpisode...

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** Terry Nation's Creator/TerryNation's Dalek stories became notorious for having the same virtually identical plot about the human resistance taking on the Daleks and winning. When Creator/PhilipHinchcliffe pointed out to him that the Dalek episode Nation had written for the new Doctor was exactly the same as several of the old ones ("we like it, but we like it so much we think we've already bought it multiple times before") Terry Nation completely broke all of the rules when he wrote "Genesis "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks Genesis of the Daleks", Daleks]]", the best story of his career and one of the best ''Doctor Who'' stories ever. Unfortunately, the addition of Davros just meant Dalek stories from that point on were a ''different'' identical plotline which now had Davros getting backstabbed by his own Daleks at the end.
** Season 5. Six out of seven stories in the season are virtually identical "[[TheSiege base under siege]]" plots and five out of seven feature a recurring monster. The [[BreatherEpisode one non-siege, non-recurring-enemy plot]], "Enemy "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS54TheEnemyOfTheWorld The Enemy of the World", World]]", was considered by the 80s fandom as being a bizarre OutOfGenreExperience in this context and panned, though after its rediscovery it was [[VindicatedByHistory re-evaluated as one of Troughton's best]]. All of the stories in this season are considered decent, most fans will have at least one story in this season they consider a classic, and many fans - particularly the [=BNFs=] of the 80s - praise the show for settling down into a routine of solid horror stories here; but many others mourn the loss of ''Doctor Who'''s trademark GenreRoulette in favour of a routine of going to a base on [PLANET] to fight [MONSTER] along with with a band of [3-6] people, one of whom is the commander, and some of whom are working with the monsters and are the real threat. Season 6, while the quality is more patchy (it contains hated stories like "The Dominators" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators The Dominators]]" and "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E6TheSpacePirates The Space Pirates") Pirates]]") does at least change up the formula with a SpaceWestern, a psychedelic MindScrew, AnachronismStew, SpyFiction, AlienInvasion, an early Creator/RobertHolmes story incorporating some of his {{Creator Thumbprint}}s, a WhamEpisode...



##The killer is known, and how the crime was committed is known. The episode is spent trying to find evidence to arrest that person.
##Monk knows who the killer is, and knows what the motive is, but the killer has a seemingly air-tight alibi. The episode is spent trying to break that alibi and find out how the killer did it.
##In a number of episodes, the plot involves trying to find out the killer, how the murder was done, and why.
##In some episodes, the killer's M.O. is known, but not who did it or why.

to:

##The ** The killer is known, and how the crime was committed is known. The episode is spent trying to find evidence to arrest that person.
##Monk ** Monk knows who the killer is, and knows what the motive is, but the killer has a seemingly air-tight alibi. The episode is spent trying to break that alibi and find out how the killer did it.
##In ** In a number of episodes, the plot involves trying to find out the killer, how the murder was done, and why.
##In ** In some episodes, the killer's M.O. is known, but not who did it or why.



* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has a habit of recycling old character traits and mixing/overlapping them into new crewmen. For instance, each show has featured or at least attempted a do-over of Spock & Bones. Each show features a wet ensign (Chekhov, Wesley, Nog, Kim, Mayweather) who is supposedly representative of Earth's finest. Each show features the Klingons, or some thinly-disguised variant thereof. Each show tended to revolve around a [[TheBartender bartender]] after the success of Whoopi Goldberg's Guinan (famously, the ''Enterprise'' series finale [[OutOfFocus sidelined the regular castmates]] in favor of "Chef"). It is also common for ''Trek'' series to feature one (or more) character who feels trapped between two cultures.''Voyager'' had the others well-beaten in this respect: It had the Half-Klingon hybrid B'Elanna Torres, the ostracized Native American Chakotay, the former Borg drone Seven of Nine, and the Emergency Medical Hologram.

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has a habit of recycling old character traits and mixing/overlapping them into new crewmen. For instance, each show has featured or at least attempted a do-over of Spock & Bones. Each show features a wet ensign (Chekhov, Wesley, Nog, Kim, Mayweather) who is supposedly representative of Earth's finest. Each show features the Klingons, or some thinly-disguised variant thereof. Each show tended to revolve around a [[TheBartender bartender]] after the success of Whoopi Goldberg's Creator/WhoopiGoldberg's Guinan (famously, the ''Enterprise'' series finale [[OutOfFocus sidelined the regular castmates]] in favor of "Chef"). It is also common for ''Trek'' series to feature one (or more) character who feels trapped between two cultures.''Voyager'' had the others well-beaten in this respect: It had the Half-Klingon hybrid B'Elanna Torres, the ostracized Native American Chakotay, the former Borg drone Seven of Nine, and the Emergency Medical Hologram.



*** Website/SFDebris noted that episodes centred around Torres boiled down to one of three plots - she's pissed off, she's broken something and has to fix it, or she wants to screw someone.



## A case where either the lawyer the player controls being new, [[LaserGuidedAmnesia gaining amnesia]] or otherwise rusty who covers a case of utmost importance that leads to a plot point that will become very important later on. Justified in that this is the obligatory Tutorial Mode.
## Two cases that are almost always unrelated to said plotpoints from the first case the player has to solve, one of which involves defending/prosecuting someone famous or is otherwise very high profile.
## Another case that either related to the regulars or the player, will almost always throw back to the plot point in the aforementioned first case and usually has something to do with some kind of dilemma the regular in question has, solving it by the end.
## Charley the plant. Or (step)ladders.
## Sometimes a bonus case that either further relates to, or shoots a throwback of, the aforementioned plot point.
## Sometimes having one of the regulars be accused of some kind of crime the player will have to defend them for or prosecute against [[spoiler: with an exception or so that the regular had ''really'' did it]], which may overlap with points 1-3.
## At least one villain of the final case is ''always'' pure evil.

to:

## ** A case where either the lawyer the player controls being new, [[LaserGuidedAmnesia gaining amnesia]] or otherwise rusty who covers a case of utmost importance that leads to a plot point that will become very important later on. Justified in that this is the obligatory Tutorial Mode.
## ** Two cases that are almost always unrelated to said plotpoints from the first case the player has to solve, one of which involves defending/prosecuting someone famous or is otherwise very high profile.
## ** Another case that either related to the regulars or the player, will almost always throw back to the plot point in the aforementioned first case and usually has something to do with some kind of dilemma the regular in question has, solving it by the end.
## ** Charley the plant. Or (step)ladders.
## ** Sometimes a bonus case that either further relates to, or shoots a throwback of, the aforementioned plot point.
## ** Sometimes having one of the regulars be accused of some kind of crime the player will have to defend them for or prosecute against [[spoiler: with an exception or so that the regular had ''really'' did it]], which may overlap with points 1-3.
## ** At least one villain of the final case is ''always'' pure evil.



## Some kid/environmentalist/native is doing something good.
## The Rogue's Gallery villain of the day shows up, saying politically and environmentally incorrect things while destroying the environment/eroding moral values/polluting.
## Cut to Hope Island/the Geocruiser[[note]] This plane that the Planeteers used[[/note]] where the Planeteers are going to wherever the plot happens to be. Odds are good that one of the Planeteers will know/be related/is fascinated by the subject of said kid/environmentalist/native in point one. Gaia calls and says that ecovillain of the week is doing bad stuff.
## They get there. [[TokenWhite Wheeler]] [[ButtMonkey makes an observation about the situation,]] [[TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong which is inevitably wrong.]] The other team members (and sometimes Gaia) have to correct his stupid, ignorant ways.
## The Planeteers try talking it out with the locals. With the exception of the kid/environmentalist/native mentioned earlier, everyone is for the ecovillain's plan, as it seems to be good for the time being because it draws in tourism/stimulates the economy/the natural thing that the planeteers are trying to save is annoying.
## The kid/environmentalist/native is now an ally of the kids and they try to talk to the ecovillain to make him stop. He/she tries to kill the heroes.
## The Planeteers get captured, Wheeler's fire ring does nothing. Someone comes along and saves them as the Ecovillain revs up their doomsday/mining/invention.
## They summon Captain Planet. He flies in and is almost immediately incapacitated by [[WeaksauceWeakness the pollutant of the day.]] The Planeteers and the ally of the episode help wash him off. Captain Planet saves the day while making incredibly bad jokes.
## Everyone learns a lesson about (INSERT MORAL OR ENVIRONMENTAL LESSON HERE.) These people never have a problem again.
## [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle Planeteer Alert!]]
## End credits, theme song.

to:

## ** Some kid/environmentalist/native is doing something good.
## ** The Rogue's Gallery villain of the day shows up, saying politically and environmentally incorrect things while destroying the environment/eroding moral values/polluting.
## ** Cut to Hope Island/the Geocruiser[[note]] This plane that the Planeteers used[[/note]] where the Planeteers are going to wherever the plot happens to be. Odds are good that one of the Planeteers will know/be related/is fascinated by the subject of said kid/environmentalist/native in point one. Gaia calls and says that ecovillain of the week is doing bad stuff.
## ** They get there. [[TokenWhite Wheeler]] [[ButtMonkey makes an observation about the situation,]] [[TheComplainerIsAlwaysWrong which is inevitably wrong.]] The other team members (and sometimes Gaia) have to correct his stupid, ignorant ways.
## ** The Planeteers try talking it out with the locals. With the exception of the kid/environmentalist/native mentioned earlier, everyone is for the ecovillain's plan, as it seems to be good for the time being because it draws in tourism/stimulates the economy/the natural thing that the planeteers are trying to save is annoying.
## ** The kid/environmentalist/native is now an ally of the kids and they try to talk to the ecovillain to make him stop. He/she tries to kill the heroes.
## ** The Planeteers get captured, Wheeler's fire ring does nothing. Someone comes along and saves them as the Ecovillain revs up their doomsday/mining/invention.
## ** They summon Captain Planet. He flies in and is almost immediately incapacitated by [[WeaksauceWeakness the pollutant of the day.]] The Planeteers and the ally of the episode help wash him off. Captain Planet saves the day while making incredibly bad jokes.
## ** Everyone learns a lesson about (INSERT MORAL OR ENVIRONMENTAL LESSON HERE.) These people never have a problem again.
## ** [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle Planeteer Alert!]]
## ** End credits, theme song.



## Five seconds of an invisible Casper riding a bike, playing with a yoyo, etc., he fades in.
## Casper's lonely, so he tries to befriend people, who run off screaming "A GHOST!".
## Casper meets a small child or animal, often helping them out of a jam.
## Casper and the friend play. Sometimes the friend discovers Casper's a ghost and runs off afraid, leaving Casper unhappy.
## A large baddie threatens the little friend, so Casper appears, demanding, "You leave my friend alone!"; so the baddie runs off in fear. All ends well.

to:

## ** Five seconds of an invisible Casper riding a bike, playing with a yoyo, etc., he fades in.
## ** Casper's lonely, so he tries to befriend people, who run off screaming "A GHOST!".
## ** Casper meets a small child or animal, often helping them out of a jam.
## ** Casper and the friend play. Sometimes the friend discovers Casper's a ghost and runs off afraid, leaving Casper unhappy.
## ** A large baddie threatens the little friend, so Casper appears, demanding, "You leave my friend alone!"; so the baddie runs off in fear. All ends well.



** The creators have a lot of material to work off of with their characters, so what usually happens is that a member of the Simpsons family (usually Bart or Homer) purposefully or inadvertently destroy the life of a secondary character and are then driven by guilt to help them, though it isn't always the fault of the family. Sometimes the character will even end up staying at the Simpsons' home until their life is put back in order. Some examples include: "Krusty Gets Busted", "When Flanders Failed", "Like Father, Like Clown", "Bart the Lover", "The Otto Show", "Brother Can you Spare Two Dimes?", "Krusty Gets Kancelled", "Homer and Apu", and "Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song". And that is just from the first five seasons, as it gets more prevalent in later seasons, to the point where it is the basis for TheMovie.

to:

** The creators have a lot of material to work off of with their characters, so what usually happens is that a member of the Simpsons family (usually Bart or Homer) purposefully or inadvertently destroy the life of a secondary character and are then driven by guilt to help them, though it isn't always the fault of the family. Sometimes the character will even end up staying at the Simpsons' home until their life is put back in order. Some examples include: "Krusty "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS1E12KrustyGetsBusted Krusty Gets Busted", "When Busted]]", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS3E3WhenFlandersFailed When Flanders Failed", "Like Failed]]", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS3E6LikeFatherLikeClown Like Father, Like Clown", "Bart Clown]]", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS3E16BartTheLover Bart the Lover", "The Lover]]", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS3E22TheOttoShow The Otto Show", "Brother Show]]", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS3E24BrotherCanYouSpareTwoDimes Brother, Can you You Spare Two Dimes?", "Krusty Dimes?]]", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS4E22KrustyGetsKancelled Krusty Gets Kancelled", "Homer Kancelled]]", "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS5E13HomerAndApu Homer and Apu", Apu]]", and "Sweet "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS5E19SweetSeymourSkinnersBaadasssssSong Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song".Song]]". And that is just from the first five seasons, as it gets more prevalent in later seasons, to the point where it is the basis for TheMovie.



* Most ''WesternAnimation/TotalDrama'' episodes start with some sort of conflict between two or more campers, a challenge which plays off that conflict (which takes up most of the episode), and an elimination ceremony that will resolve it unless the conflict is over several episodes (except for when they didn't do an elimination). It makes it extremely difficult to vary the amount of screentime, leading to EnsembleDarkHorse and SpotlightStealingSquad for multiple characters.

to:

* Most ''WesternAnimation/TotalDrama'' episodes start with some sort of conflict between two or more campers, a challenge which plays off that conflict (which takes up most of the episode), and an elimination ceremony that will resolve it unless the conflict is over several episodes (except for when they didn't do an elimination). It makes it extremely difficult to vary the amount of screentime, leading to EnsembleDarkHorse EnsembleDarkhorse and SpotlightStealingSquad for multiple characters.
6th May '18 10:44:32 AM NotGonnaDoALot4
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* ''WestermAmimation/MiraculousLadybug'': A civilian feels they have been wronged (often by Chloe), and they get akumatized. Marinette and Cat Noir transform into their superhero personas, fight the villain, Ladybug conjures up her lucky Charm, defeats the villain and uses a WorldHealingWave to fix all the collateral damage. Repeat for the next episode.

to:

* ''WestermAmimation/MiraculousLadybug'': ''WesternAnimation/MiraculousLadybug'': A civilian feels they have been wronged (often by Chloe), and they get akumatized. Marinette and Cat Noir Adrien transform into their superhero personas, fight the villain, Ladybug conjures up her lucky Charm, defeats the villain and uses a WorldHealingWave to fix all the collateral damage. Repeat for the next episode.
28th Apr '18 9:34:53 AM Tavernier
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** Ash spent 20 years traveling in a very strict pattern. He will be accompanied by one (1) elder boy, usually a Gym Leader, and one (1) girl of similar age, either a Gym Leader or the female protagonist from the region's respective games (if either partner has a little sibling, they may be included). Ash will be traveling the region in search of eight (8) gym badges and will take part in one (1) League tournament, which he will lose. The girl of the group, if she is a female protagonist, will be engaged in her own competitions, usually Pokemon pageantry of some kind, culminating in a finale competition which she will also lose.

to:

** Ash spent 20 years traveling in a very strict pattern. He will would be accompanied by one (1) elder boy, usually elder and a Gym Leader, and one (1) girl of similar age, either a Gym Leader or the female protagonist from the region's respective games (if either partner has a little sibling, they may be included). Ash will be traveling would travel the region in search of eight (8) gym badges and will take part in one (1) League tournament, which he will would lose. The girl of the group, if she is a female protagonist, will would be engaged in her own competitions, usually Pokemon pageantry of some kind, culminating in a finale competition final competition, which she will would also lose.
This list shows the last 10 events of 506. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.StrictlyFormula