History Main / StrictlyFormula

23rd Apr '16 5:12:19 PM MyFinalEdits
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** There's a current trend that they don't seem interested in shaking off any time soon: [[Disney/WreckItRalph their]] [[Disney/{{Frozen}} past]] [[Disney/BigHero6 four]] [[Disney/{{Zootopia}} films]] have ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic {{plot twist}}ing [[TheReveal reveal]]. Even more formulaic is that the last three of those have also featured unsavory characters who serve as [[RedHerring decoy villains]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity, and all of the decoy villains have been voiced by Creator/AlanTudyk, who played the first of the secret villains.
* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has also been accused of enforcing this trope in most of their CGI-animated movies during the 2000s: in the beginning, the main character is an outcast (or at the very least is "different"). Throughout the film he becomes a better person. In the end, he saves the day and everyone accepts him for who he is. Add bonus points for pop culture references, fart jokes, gratuitous {{Celebrity Voice Actor}}s, and the occasional DreamWorksFace, and you're good to go.
** While Dreamworks themselves have gotten over this formula, it's been adopted by every ''other'' CGI animation studio, while Dreamworks has joined Disney and Pixar in the ranks of companies that know there's more to an animated film than that.

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** There's a current trend that they don't seem interested in shaking off any time soon: [[Disney/WreckItRalph their]] [[Disney/{{Frozen}} past]] [[Disney/BigHero6 four]] [[Disney/{{Zootopia}} films]] * Later Disney films have adopted a different formula: ''Disney/WreckItRalph'', ''Disney/{{Frozen}}'', ''Disney/BigHero6'' and ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' have all ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic {{plot twist}}ing [[TheReveal reveal]]. Even more formulaic is that the last three of those have also featured unsavory characters who serve as [[RedHerring decoy villains]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity, and all of the decoy villains have been voiced by Creator/AlanTudyk, who played the first of the secret villains.
* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has also been accused of enforcing this trope in most of their CGI-animated movies during the 2000s: in the beginning, the main character is an outcast (or at the very least is "different"). Throughout the film he becomes a better person. In the end, he saves the day and everyone accepts him for who he is. Add bonus points for pop culture references, fart jokes, gratuitous {{Celebrity Voice Actor}}s, and the occasional DreamWorksFace, and you're good to go.
** While Dreamworks themselves have gotten over this formula,
go. They later outgrew it, but it's since been adopted by every ''other'' CGI animation studio, while Dreamworks has joined Disney and Pixar in the ranks of companies that know there's more to an animated film than that.
23rd Apr '16 8:30:59 AM trulymadmoves
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* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has also been accused of enforcing this trope in most of their CGI-animated movies during the 2000s: in the beginning, the main character is an outcast (or at the very least is "different"). Throughout the film he becomes a better person. In the end, he saves the day and everyone accepts him for who he is. Add bonus points for pop culture references, fart jokes and the occasional DreamWorksFace, and you're good to go.

to:

* Creator/DreamWorksAnimation has also been accused of enforcing this trope in most of their CGI-animated movies during the 2000s: in the beginning, the main character is an outcast (or at the very least is "different"). Throughout the film he becomes a better person. In the end, he saves the day and everyone accepts him for who he is. Add bonus points for pop culture references, fart jokes jokes, gratuitous {{Celebrity Voice Actor}}s, and the occasional DreamWorksFace, and you're good to go.go.
** While Dreamworks themselves have gotten over this formula, it's been adopted by every ''other'' CGI animation studio, while Dreamworks has joined Disney and Pixar in the ranks of companies that know there's more to an animated film than that.
18th Apr '16 11:41:57 PM erforce
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* Franchise/IndianaJones films: It starts in the middle of a quest that ties into the film's main adventure, which revolves around finding a supernatural {{MacGuffin}}. Along the way Indy picks up a girl and has at least one comical sidekick, gets grossed out by creepy creatures, and kills the worst of the henchmen. He gets the {{MacGuffin}} and the BigBad gets it too. The {{MacGuffin}} eventually shows its true power, the BigBad is killed by their own greed, Indy gets a heartwarming ending, and the {{MacGuffin}} is once again lost. According to film critic Leonard Maltin, the formula had already gotten old by the time they got to the third installment.

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* Franchise/IndianaJones films: It starts in the middle of a quest that ties into the film's main adventure, which revolves around finding a supernatural {{MacGuffin}}. Along the way Indy picks up a girl and has at least one comical sidekick, gets grossed out by creepy creatures, and kills the worst of the henchmen. He gets the {{MacGuffin}} and the BigBad gets it too. The {{MacGuffin}} eventually shows its true power, the BigBad is killed by their own greed, Indy gets a heartwarming ending, and the {{MacGuffin}} is once again lost. According to film critic Leonard Maltin, Creator/LeonardMaltin, the formula had already gotten old by the time they got to the [[Film/IndianaJonesAndTheLastCrusade third installment.installment]].



* Perhaps in an effort to WinBackTheCrowd (who’ve [[ThePhantomMenace been]] [[Film/AttackOfTheClones burned]] [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith before]]), ''Film/StarWarsTheForceAwakens'' follows the ''exact'' pattern of the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' AKA ''Film/ANewHope'', right down to the droid carrying precious cargo and the spherical superweapon. Creator/GeorgeLucas himself tried to do something similar in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'', with female royalty being in danger and the gifted boy from Tatooine blowing up a big round thing at the end.

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* Perhaps in an effort to WinBackTheCrowd (who’ve [[ThePhantomMenace [[Film/ThePhantomMenace been]] [[Film/AttackOfTheClones burned]] [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith before]]), ''Film/StarWarsTheForceAwakens'' follows the ''exact'' pattern of the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' AKA ''Film/ANewHope'', right down to the droid carrying precious cargo and the spherical superweapon. Creator/GeorgeLucas himself tried to do something similar in ''Film/ThePhantomMenace'', with female royalty being in danger and the gifted boy from Tatooine blowing up a big round thing at the end.
18th Apr '16 10:57:03 PM Kid
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** Aonuma and Miyamoto went out of their way to change up the Zelda formula for ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword''. Not only is [[DungeonTown the rest of the overworld dungeon-like]], most of the dungeons themselves sport the format of a more compact space, but a higher density in puzzles, enemies and obstacles. This is best appreciated with the first three dungeons, whose goal of completion isn't even on the Plot Coupons (you ''do'' collect some in the first two, but finding Zelda is the main focus). Also, half the boss fights take place outside the conventional dungeons - this includes [[spoiler:the airborne battle against a Bilocyte-controlled Levias, the finale against Ghirahim, the FinalBoss and all three]] battles with the Imprisoned. Also, the first fight with [[spoiler:Ghirahim]] breaks formula even further- you actually can't use the dungeon's item (the Beetle) to even inflict damage on this guy, let alone defeat him. Straight-up swordplay time!

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** Aonuma and Miyamoto went out of their way to change up the Zelda formula for ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword''. Not only is [[DungeonTown the rest of the overworld dungeon-like]], most of the dungeons themselves sport the format of a more compact space, but a higher density in puzzles, enemies and obstacles. This is best appreciated with the first three dungeons, whose goal of completion isn't even on the Plot Coupons (you ''do'' collect some in the first two, but finding Zelda is the main focus). Also, half the boss fights take place outside the conventional dungeons - this includes [[spoiler:the airborne battle against a Bilocyte-controlled Levias, the finale against Ghirahim, the FinalBoss and all three]] battles with the Imprisoned. Also, the first fight with [[spoiler:Ghirahim]] breaks formula even further- you further--you actually can't use the dungeon's item (the Beetle) to even inflict damage on this guy, let alone defeat him. Straight-up swordplay time!
15th Apr '16 1:14:23 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* Every single doujinshi released by the {{hentai}} circle ''Black Dog'' follows this formula: an unattractive middle-aged man rapes a young, nubile teenage girl [[RuleThirtyFour from a popular anime series]]. Despite them always getting it on in a public area, like a subway or a hot springs, [[ApatheticCitizens nobody ever bothers to try to stop him or call the police.]] On the last (or, if you're lucky, second-to-last) page, one of two things will happen: either a DeusExMachina will prevent the girl from being raped any longer (e.g., her father will walk in at ''just'' the right time), or the girl ''herself'' will beat the man up ([[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot making you wonder why she didn't do that before]]). Cue postscript; end book.[[note]] This mostly applies to his latter-day books; his earlier ''Anime/SailorMoon'' books had a much greater emphasis on plot before they became formulaic rape-fests.[[/note]]

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* Every single doujinshi released by the {{hentai}} circle ''Black Dog'' follows this formula: an unattractive middle-aged man rapes a young, nubile teenage girl [[RuleThirtyFour from a popular anime series]]. Despite them always getting it on in a public area, like a subway or a hot springs, [[ApatheticCitizens nobody ever bothers to try to stop him or call the police.]] On the last (or, if you're lucky, second-to-last) page, one of two things will happen: either a DeusExMachina will prevent the girl from being raped any longer (e.g., her father will walk in at ''just'' the right time), or the girl ''herself'' will beat the man up ([[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot making (making you wonder why she didn't do that before]]).before). Cue postscript; end book.[[note]] This mostly applies to his latter-day books; his earlier ''Anime/SailorMoon'' books had a much greater emphasis on plot before they became formulaic rape-fests.[[/note]]
6th Apr '16 1:16:12 PM trulymadmoves
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* During the 1990s, [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] had a very succesful run from 1989 till 1994, but after that they were often accused of enforcing this trope. {{Rebellious princess}}es who want to marry for love, heroines [[IWantSong looking for something beyond what they know]], [[BumblingDad bumbling]] or [[FantasyForbiddingFather fantasy-forbidding fathers]], [[DisneyVillainDeath bad guys falling off great heights]]. ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' especially was accused of adhering to Disney formula, which admittedly is not entirely untrue. Ironically though, the problem seems to have been that all these movies came out in succession, as every single movie of the Disney Renaissance has been VindicatedByHistory and is now well-loved (some more than others: ''Pocahontas'' is still not thought of as a great movie, and ''Disney/TheRescuersDownUnder'' has gained a cult following but isn't anywhere near mainstream).

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* During the 1990s, [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] had a very succesful successful run from 1989 till 1994, but after that they were often accused of enforcing this trope. {{Rebellious princess}}es who want to marry for love, heroines [[IWantSong looking for something beyond what they know]], [[BumblingDad bumbling]] or [[FantasyForbiddingFather fantasy-forbidding fathers]], [[DisneyVillainDeath bad guys falling off great heights]]. ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' especially was accused of adhering to Disney formula, which admittedly is not entirely untrue. Ironically though, the problem seems to have been that all these movies came out in succession, as every single movie of the Disney Renaissance has been VindicatedByHistory and is now well-loved (some more than others: ''Pocahontas'' is still not thought of as a great movie, and ''Disney/TheRescuersDownUnder'' has gained a cult following but isn't anywhere near mainstream).mainstream).
** There's a current trend that they don't seem interested in shaking off any time soon: [[Disney/WreckItRalph their]] [[Disney/{{Frozen}} past]] [[Disney/BigHero6 four]] [[Disney/{{Zootopia}} films]] have ditched the classic, ObviouslyEvil Disney villains in favor of keeping the identity of the BigBad as a climactic {{plot twist}}ing [[TheReveal reveal]]. Even more formulaic is that the last three of those have also featured unsavory characters who serve as [[RedHerring decoy villains]] to further obfuscate the BigBad's identity, and all of the decoy villains have been voiced by Creator/AlanTudyk, who played the first of the secret villains.
25th Mar '16 2:07:53 PM SpinAttaxx
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** Every episode follows this formula: Ash and friends meet the person of the week with the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]]. This person/Pokémon will have a problem. [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] will plot to steal Pikachu and/or the Pokémon of the week and are defeated in short order, with the problem of the week solved either by Team Rocket's defeat or [[DeusExMachina some unrelated event]]. If the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]] does not have a trainer, sometimes Ash or one of his friends will catch it. The only exceptions to this formula are Gym battles, character development episodes, or plot points from the games, but even these tend to have their own formulas.

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** Every episode follows this formula: Ash and friends meet the person of the week with and/or the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]]. This person/Pokémon will have a problem. [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] will plot to steal Pikachu and/or the Pokémon of the week and are defeated in short order, with the problem of the week solved either by Team Rocket's defeat or [[DeusExMachina some unrelated event]]. If the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]] does not have a trainer, sometimes Ash or one of his friends will catch it. The only exceptions to this formula are Gym battles, character development episodes, or plot points from the games, but even these tend to have their own formulas.



** [[NonSerialMovie The movies]] follow such a rigid formula that you'd swear that they only have two or three plots they recycle every year: Ash and friends will enter a location based off a European city, possibly come across the newest Mythical Pokémon/a Pokémon from the next generation of games, then come into conflict with an antagonist; either a [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one-dimensional]] [[HumansAreBastards bastard human]] who wants to use the title Pokémon for his (and yes, it's almost always a man) own evil ends, or a big, scary and evil-looking Pokémon with sinister/disasterous goals. If the antagonist is a human, expect them to be irredeemable jackasses through and through, but if it's a Pokémon, 90% of the time they're NotEvilJustMisunderstood, and the other 10% perform a HeelFaceTurn. Oftentimes, the world will be at stake, a large-scale battle happens, a DisneyDeath or two will occur and a SuperMode or two will be shown off (the portrayal of which may or may not directly contradict how they work in the games). To top it off, despite all that happens across the movie, its events will rarely, if ever, actually be referenced in the actual show.

to:

** [[NonSerialMovie The movies]] follow such a rigid formula that you'd swear that they only have two or three plots they recycle every year: Ash and friends will enter a location based off a European city, area, possibly come across the newest Mythical Pokémon/a Pokémon from the next generation of games, then come into conflict with an antagonist; either a [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one-dimensional]] [[HumansAreBastards bastard human]] who wants to use the title Pokémon for his (and yes, it's almost always a man) own evil ends, or a big, scary and evil-looking Pokémon with sinister/disasterous goals. If the antagonist is a human, expect them to be irredeemable jackasses through and through, but if it's a Pokémon, 90% of the time they're NotEvilJustMisunderstood, and the other 10% perform a HeelFaceTurn. Oftentimes, the world will be at stake, a large-scale battle happens, a DisneyDeath or two will occur occur, Team Rocket [[MandatoryLine show up and do absolutely nothing significant]], and a SuperMode or two will be shown off (the portrayal of which may or may not directly contradict how they work in the games). To top it off, despite all that happens across the movie, its events will rarely, if ever, actually be referenced in the actual show.
25th Mar '16 2:05:05 PM SpinAttaxx
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* Every episode of ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'': Meet person of the week with [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]]. This person/Pokémon will have a problem. [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] will plot to steal Pikachu and/or Pokémon of the week and are defeated in short order, with the problem of the week solved either by Team Rocket's defeat or [[DeusExMachina some unrelated event.]] If the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]] does not have a trainer, sometimes Ash will catch it. The only exceptions to this formula are Gym battles, character development episodes, or plot points from the games.
** The formula only changed with the ''Best Wishes'' series (2011-2013), where Team Rocket got a big boost in competence and much less screentime, the implication being they had their hands full with special directives or other serious business, leaving Ash and co. alone. They didn't show up once per episode, and they didn't have much bearing on Ash's side of the plot. The half-season of {{Filler}} before Pokémon X and Y came out turned them back to normal, though they still get a couple episodes of non-absence. Additionally, the Gen 5 arc also altered the "Ash catches five Pokémon in a region, releases or otherwise gives up one, and then catches another Pokémon to replace it" gimmick, where he instead had a team of eight (not counting Pikachu) with no releases, though out of those, four got shafted in terms of screen time to make room for the starters, [[RidiculouslyCuteCritter Scraggy]], and the MerchandiseDriven rejoining of [[NostalgiaFilter Charizard]].

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* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'':
**
Every episode of ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'': Meet follows this formula: Ash and friends meet the person of the week with the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]]. This person/Pokémon will have a problem. [[GoldfishPoopGang Team Rocket]] will plot to steal Pikachu and/or the Pokémon of the week and are defeated in short order, with the problem of the week solved either by Team Rocket's defeat or [[DeusExMachina some unrelated event.]] event]]. If the [[MonsterOfTheWeek Pokémon of the week]] does not have a trainer, sometimes Ash or one of his friends will catch it. The only exceptions to this formula are Gym battles, character development episodes, or plot points from the games.games, but even these tend to have their own formulas.
** *** The formula only changed with the ''Best Wishes'' series (2011-2013), where Team Rocket got a big boost in competence and much less screentime, the implication being they had their hands full with special directives or other serious business, leaving Ash and co. alone. They didn't show up once per episode, and they didn't have much bearing on Ash's side of the plot. The half-season of {{Filler}} before Pokémon X and Y came out turned them back to normal, though they still get a couple episodes of non-absence. Additionally, the Gen 5 arc also altered the "Ash catches five Pokémon in a region, releases or otherwise gives up one, and then catches another Pokémon to replace it" gimmick, where he instead had a team of eight (not counting Pikachu) with no releases, though out of those, four got shafted in terms of screen time to make room for the starters, [[RidiculouslyCuteCritter Scraggy]], and the MerchandiseDriven rejoining of [[NostalgiaFilter Charizard]].Charizard]].
** [[NonSerialMovie The movies]] follow such a rigid formula that you'd swear that they only have two or three plots they recycle every year: Ash and friends will enter a location based off a European city, possibly come across the newest Mythical Pokémon/a Pokémon from the next generation of games, then come into conflict with an antagonist; either a [[GenericDoomsdayVillain one-dimensional]] [[HumansAreBastards bastard human]] who wants to use the title Pokémon for his (and yes, it's almost always a man) own evil ends, or a big, scary and evil-looking Pokémon with sinister/disasterous goals. If the antagonist is a human, expect them to be irredeemable jackasses through and through, but if it's a Pokémon, 90% of the time they're NotEvilJustMisunderstood, and the other 10% perform a HeelFaceTurn. Oftentimes, the world will be at stake, a large-scale battle happens, a DisneyDeath or two will occur and a SuperMode or two will be shown off (the portrayal of which may or may not directly contradict how they work in the games). To top it off, despite all that happens across the movie, its events will rarely, if ever, actually be referenced in the actual show.
21st Mar '16 7:44:26 PM butterflygrrl
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* In most [[DatingSim games about]] characters' [[RomanceGame relationships]] and [[HGame adult games]], the main character will get a (reverse) harem of three or more people. A while after the main character chooses one love interest, the story will wind down. If it's presented as a VisualNovel, then it will often be a slice of life story. If it's presented as a SimulationGame, then it will often have an ordinary setting and mundane themes. In order to distinguish run-of-the-mill content from exceptional content, one should look for quality writing, visuals, music, and gameplay (where applicable).
10th Mar '16 11:38:54 PM Gravityman
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* Wrestling/DragonGate is known for actively promoting division in the ranks of its roster. Unfortunately, because GoodIsDumb, the common formula is that TheBadGuyWins over the baby {{face}} {{power stable}}s only for further division in the victorious group via {{heel face turn}}s.[[/folder]]

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* Wrestling/DragonGate is known for actively promoting division in the ranks of its roster. Unfortunately, because GoodIsDumb, the common formula is that TheBadGuyWins over the baby {{face}} {{power stable}}s only for further division in the victorious group via {{heel face turn}}s.turn}}s.
* One of the central reasons why {{WWE}}'s Wrestling/TheAuthority angle is so unpopular is the feeling that they induce this on every show they take a prominent role on, which has been almost all of them since they formed in 2013. Almost every episode begins with a member of the Authority, or occasionally the face they're feuding with, cutting a promo, which will usually be interrupted by their enemy, usually setting up both the episode's main event, and the next match. Then the show ends with the main event, which will almost always end with the Authority heel either scoring a cheap victory or a disqualification/no-contest when a different heel interferes. Even in the occasional event that the face actually wins, the episode will almost always end with the Authority beating down the faces and standing tall.
[[/folder]]


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* {{Creepypasta}} tend to be fairly similar to each other, largely due to FollowTheLeader being in play. This is especially notable in the case of the Video Game creepypasta genre, which copy so heavily from the most famous stories that they are all nearly the same. Expect to see the story begin with the main character buying a beat-up old copy of an old game they played as a kid while experiencing a bout of nostalgia, then find that the content on this particular copy is unusually dark or violent. Expect to see bodies of water replaced with blood by default and for the main character to assume everything is a glitch at first, only to realize everything is caused instead by some kind of supernatural force. These stories ended up being so similar to each other that several creepypasta-hosting sites outright disallow them.
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